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International Space Station (ISS) => ISS Section => Topic started by: jacqmans on 09/29/2017 02:07 pm

Title: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 09/29/2017 02:07 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 09/29/2017 03:42 pm
Tikhonov is among the names. So maybe he will fly on Soyuz MS-10 (and not a second US astronaut).
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 10/17/2017 10:40 pm
Quote
Alexander Gerst ‏Verified account @Astro_Alex 26m26 minutes ago

My crew mate @Astro_Jeanette getting ready for her space suit checkout in the vacuum chamber today #Exp57

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/920412325701709824 (https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/920412325701709824)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 11/09/2017 07:18 pm
Quote
Alexander Gerst‏ @Astro_Alex

Nothing like sitting in your own #spaceship for the very first time. Today @Astro_Jeanette, Sergey and I had our first fitcheck at the Energia factory in Moscow. Love the “new-spacecraft-smell” #Soyuz-MS09


https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/928555572970041344
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: bolun on 11/09/2017 08:01 pm
Horizons logo

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is returning to the International Space Station next year and today he revealed his mission name and logo: Horizons.

Alexander is the first of ESA’s class of 2009 astronauts who will be sent into space for a second time, launching on Soyuz MS-09 together with NASA astronaut Jeanette Epps and Russian spacecraft commander Sergei Prokopyev in May 2018. His first mission, Blue Dot, in 2014, lasted from May to November 2014.

The logo was designed to be timeless and shows a face gazing into the horizon above a blue band that symbolises the atmosphere, but also the Blue Dot mission. The new mission goes beyond Blue Dot and extends into infinity symbolised by the white arc. To the right of the mission name is a stylised International Space Station.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/05/Horizons_logo

Image credit: ESA/Steinbeis Beratungszentrum/Hochschule Darmstadt
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 11/11/2017 10:09 pm
https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/928723766896742400
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 11/15/2017 05:46 pm
Quote
Human Spaceflight @esaspaceflight

[email protected]_Alex spacesuit portrait for his mission to @Space_Station next year. Credits @NASA_Johnson
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Poole Amateur on 01/19/2018 02:09 pm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42747272

Jeannette Epps removed from the crew...

Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Steve G on 01/19/2018 09:45 pm
Though we don't know the circumstances, and I won't speculate, that must be devastating for Jeannette to be cycled out after all the time she had trained for the mission. Hope she catches another flight soon.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 01/20/2018 08:33 am
Though we don't know the circumstances, and I won't speculate, that must be devastating for Jeannette to be cycled out after all the time she had trained for the mission. Hope she catches another flight soon.

This sounds to me very much like what happened when Karen Nyberg was replaced on STS-132 due to a "temporary medical condition". She eventually got to fly again on Expedition 36/37, so I wouldn't worry too much.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Riley1066 on 01/22/2018 05:20 pm
Uh oh:

https://www.theroot.com/why-was-nasa-astronaut-jeanette-epps-removed-from-inter-1822295566

And NASA can't respond to it to refute it because of the shutdown.

I don't believe what he alleges is true at all, but it doesn't help that NASA can't make any public statements about such an incendiary accusation.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SWGlassPit on 01/22/2018 07:08 pm
I'm not sure NASA would even respond to it if they weren't shut down, other than to say, more or less, "we do not discuss personnel matters."
Title: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Star One on 01/22/2018 08:34 pm
NASA has now responded to some degree in this article .

Quote
NASA likewise declined to comment about Henry Epps's post but provided a statement saying, “Diversity and inclusion are integral to mission success at NASA and we have a diverse astronaut corps reflective of that approach.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/01/22/nasa-pulled-this-astronaut-from-a-space-station-crew-her-brother-blames-racism/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Sam Ho on 01/22/2018 08:53 pm
NASA has now responded to some degree in this article.

Quote
NASA likewise declined to comment about Henry Epps's post but provided a statement saying, “Diversity and inclusion are integral to mission success at NASA and we have a diverse astronaut corps reflective of that approach.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/01/22/nasa-pulled-this-astronaut-from-a-space-station-crew-her-brother-blames-racism/
There is a quote from Dr. Epps in that article that does rule out medical or family reasons.
Quote
Epps said that she did not have a medical condition or family problem that would have prevented her from participating in the mission and that her overseas training in Russia and Kazakhstan had been successful.

Also, there was earlier discussion of this in the Flight Crew Assignments thread.
Are there any information about a crew change on Soyuz MS-09?
According to the pictures and the text in this pages http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=4060 and http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=4064 it looks like Serena Auñón-Chancellor is the third member of this crew instead of Jeanette Epps.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Moonbase_Alphan on 01/23/2018 09:36 pm
Updated 57 patch

(https://s18.postimg.cc/9osgkmgtl/iss057-s-001s-update.jpg)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 02/01/2018 08:00 pm
Quote
https://twitter.com/AstroSerena/status/959161288881508352

Getting ready for Expedtion 57! Our crew after an afternoon of emergency simulations @Astro_Alex @AstroHague @spacetihon

Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Targeteer on 02/08/2018 10:21 pm
February 08, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-026
NASA Hosts News Conference, Interviews with Crew Launching to Space Station in June
 
NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, along with Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will participate in a news conference at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The news conference will air live on NASA Television and stream on the agency’s website.

Following the news conference, interview opportunities are available with all crew members, in person or by phone.

The trio is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in June and will be part of Expeditions 56 and 57. This will be the first trip to the space station for Auñón-Chancellor and Prokopyev, and the second for Gerst.

Media who would like to participate in person or reserve an interview opportunity must contact Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12. Because the deadline for international media accreditation has passed, only U.S. media will receive credentials to participate in person. Media who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom no later than 1:45 p.m. Feb. 14. Those following the briefing on social media may submit questions via Twitter using #askNASA.

During her upcoming mission aboard the orbiting laboratory, Auñón-Chancellor and her crewmates will facilitate more than 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth. The experiments yield benefits for all of humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space.

Originally from Fort Collins, Colorado, Auñón-Chancellor earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C, and a doctorate in medicine from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston’s McGovern Medical School. She was selected as an astronaut by NASA in 2009, after coming to NASA in 2006 as a flight surgeon.

Follow Auñón-Chancellor on social media at:

www.twitter.com/AstroSerena
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 02/14/2018 10:15 pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbxm2Hv0iuw

Quote
NASA Hosts News Conference with Crew Launching to Space Station in June

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, along with Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, participated in a news conference Feb. 14, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The trio is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in June and will be part of Expeditions 56 and 57. This will be the first trip to the space station for Auñón-Chancellor and Prokopyev, and the second for Gerst.

Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 02/15/2018 11:05 am
http://www.americaspace.com/2018/02/14/former-bomber-commander-second-european-iss-skipper-and-cuban-american-flight-surgeon-prepare-for-june-launch-to-space-station/

Quote
   
Former Bomber Commander, Second European ISS Skipper and Cuban-American Flight Surgeon Prepare for June Launch to Space Station
By Ben Evans
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 02/15/2018 08:41 pm
Quote
Alexander Gerst @Astro_Alex

Sergey und @AstroSerena üben schonmal, mich bei Bedarf vor die Tür zu schicken (erinnert mich an meine Schulzeit;) —
Sergey and @AstroSerena practicing to send me out to open space for a while.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/964251139658145792
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 02/15/2018 08:55 pm
Quote
Alexander Gerst @Astro_Alex
Wenn man als Astronaut seinen Missionsnamen auf einem Kuchen lesen kann, ist das ein recht gutes Zeichen. —
If as a astronaut you can read your mission name on a cake, that’s typically a good sign.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/964252175181299712
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rik ISS-fan on 04/19/2018 06:51 pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m894z2hDNH0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m894z2hDNH0)
It's German and English mixed through each other. (European style  ;))
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Moonbase_Alphan on 05/01/2018 01:17 am
Updated version
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 05/07/2018 08:08 am
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEuOQnllj5s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEuOQnllj5s)

Quote
Published on 7 May 2018 ‘Horizons’ is the name of ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst’s second mission to the International Space Station.
The mission name evokes exploring our Universe, looking far beyond our planet and broadening our knowledge. Alexander would also like to make people realise that there is always a chance to go beyond their personal horizons.
Alexander will be launched on 6 June with US astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev from the Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan in the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft.
Alexander will take over command of the International Space Station for the second half of his mission. Alexander Gerst is the 11th German citizen to fly into space.
The astronaut is now in the last stages of training for his challenging spaceflight. The science programme is packed with European research: more than 50 experiments will deliver benefits to people back on Earth and prepare for future space exploration.
Credits: ESA
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 05/09/2018 07:19 am
https://twitter.com/LiNa8294/status/994056373116817408
Quote
The official portrait of the Expedition 57 crewmembers @AstroSerena, Aleksey Ovchinin, @Astro_Alex, @AstroHague & Sergei Prokopev.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 05/09/2018 08:00 am
The hi res version is at https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/41940798812/in/dateposted/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 06/04/2018 06:22 pm
from: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html

Quote
June 18, Monday
2 p.m. – ISS Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference with Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin (All Channels)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 06/19/2018 06:40 pm
Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference - June 18, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg-OeaG0i5w
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 06/23/2018 10:42 pm
https://twitter.com/AFSpace/status/1010160703393673218

Quote
[email protected] discussed his upcoming trip to the @Space_Station during a news conference at the @NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston on June 18. Read more about the press conference and his upcoming mission here: https://go.usa.gov/xQhu9

http://www.afspc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1555806/hague-ovchinin-talk-iss-mission-during-presser/

Quote
Hague, Ovchinin talk ISS mission during presser

By Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann, Air Forces Cyber Public Affairs / Published June 20, 2018

Surrounded by media representatives and audience members, Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, discussed their upcoming trip to space during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. The two will journey to the International Space Station on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

 JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas --

Surrounded by media representatives and audience members, Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, discussed their upcoming trip to space during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018.

The two will journey to the International Space Station on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Their six-month mission serves one purpose.

“We are up there … to do science,” said Hague in a Twitter-Chat hosted after the news conference. “Some of that I am simply performing, and some of that I am the test subject. But we are up there to ask questions and collect data so the scientists on the ground can answer those questions.”

Those questions, in the form of more than 300 experiments, are aimed at advancing science to benefit future deep-space travel.

“Some experiments will look at us and how we survive on orbit; what happens when you put a human up there for that long,” said Hague.

“Space is the only place we can perform research where people have long-term exposure to microgravity,” he continued. “We can see what happens when you take gravity out of the equation. There are things we’re trying to discover about how the body responds.”

The U.S. and Russian space travelers will join the rest of their Expedition 57 crew, already on the ISS. The first three crewmembers left earth June 6, 2018, aboard the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft, and arrived at the station June 8, 2018.

The team began training together more than a year ago.

“We trained a lot in Russia on the Russian segment of the International Space Station,” said Ovchinin. “We’ve also trained here in Houston on the U.S. segment of the station. But the biggest part of our training was on the Russian Soyuz vehicle in Russia.”

Additionally, Hague has trained nearly 150 hours in preparation for a possible space walk.

“The space walk that’s currently planned will help us improve the station’s capabilities,” said Hague. “We’ve been training a long time for it, and I’d love to put the training to some use.”

Hague, from Hoxie, Kansas, is the first astronaut from NASA’s 2013 astronaut class to fly to space. He is one of four active duty Air Force astronauts, beginning his training for space in 2013.  He earned a Master of Science degree in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000 and taught astronautics at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 2006-2009.

“It’s exciting. You work your whole life for something and when it’s there it’s hard to believe,” said Hague. “I just feel really lucky to be doing what I’m doing and to have the opportunity that I have.”

Hague credits his success to his family.  His parents, Don and Bev Hague, live in Gering, Nebraska.

“My biggest source of inspiration in pursuing this dream has been my parents,” said Hague. “They taught me the value of education and hard work, and gave me constant love and support that let me know I could be successful.

 Hague is married to Lt. Col. Catie Hague, who is also an Air Force officer. They have two sons. 

“My wife and boys are the motivation that keeps me going,” he added. “They make the hard seem less hard. This is all thanks to them.”

Hague and Ovchinin will return to earth April 15, 2019, as part of Expedition 58. Watch their live launch Oct. 11 on https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive.


Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, discusses his upcoming trip to the International Space Station, during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. Hague and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, and Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, discuss their upcoming trip to the International Space Station, during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. The two will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)


Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut (second from left), poses with Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets after a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018, to discuss his upcoming trip to the International Space Station. Hague and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

Quote
Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint Jacques helps Astronaut Col. Tyler N. "Nick" Hague prepare to be lowered into a pool with a mockup of the International Space Station (ISS) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training at the Johnson Space Flight Center's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) in Houston, Tex., Apr. 27, 2017. During training at NBL, Hague wears a spacesuit to simulate the near weightless environment he will encounter while performing EVAs, or spacewalks, while serving as a flight engineer on Expedition 54/55 aboard ISS in 2018-2019.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 07/13/2018 01:56 pm
Expedition 57 crew poster (06/14/2018 - Final Draft 5 version):
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 07/15/2018 08:50 am
ISS Expedition 57 Final version:
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 08/24/2018 03:24 pm
The CPC. ISS-57/58 crew successfully passed the manual docking and re-docking exam

The Cosmonaut Training Center named after Yu. A. Gagarin has a unique simulator complex that allows cosmonauts and astronauts to be trained in the management of a manned transport vehicle at each stage of the flight, simulate abnormal and emergency situations in order to work out their parrying actions. On one of these specialized simulators Don-Soyuz today passed the exam for manual berthing and reconnecting of the TPK Soyuz MS, the ISS-57/58 crew, which includes Cosmonaut Roskosmos Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Heig.
 
In the exam ticket - traditionally four modes. The first - redocking - is performed without any abnormal situations, since the mode itself immediately assumes manual control of the ship. Today, the crew pulled out a ticket with the option of re-docking, which is planned during the expedition to the International Space Station - from the MIM-2 module to the service module's service bay.
 
When the second mode was implemented, the mooring began with an abnormal situation in the on-board computer system, which the crew members quickly identified and switched to manual control in the analog circuit, docking was done in the shade. The complexity of the regime is that the crew must parry the separation, which is performed automatically after the failure of the computer system. For successful docking in the shade, the crew should approach the station at a distance of less than 80 meters - the range at which the ISS will be visible by the light of the ship's headlamp.
 
The third regime began with an automatic flight, then, after the instructor introduced an emergency situation - a collision accident - the crew switched to manual control in a discrete circuit. Alexey Ovchinin and Nick Haig responded quickly to an abnormal situation, confidently performed the flight manually and docked to the given node.
 
The fourth is a safety mode with a high speed of the ship and the introduction of such an abnormal situation as the failure of the on-board computer system. In this case, the crew's task is to switch to manual control in the analog circuit and ensure safe flight of the station, mooring and docking.
 
As a result of the examination, the commission noted the responsiveness of the astronaut and astronaut's response to the emerged contingencies, the competent execution of all modes in accordance with on-board documentation and the coordinated work of the commander and flight engineer who deservedly received excellent marks.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/03/2018 07:05 am
Press release, 2 October 2018

Alexander Gerst assumes command of the ISS - On 3 October 2018, the German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility of the International Space Station

Alexander Gerst will undoubtedly never forget 3 October 2018 – on the 'Day of German Unity', the 42-year old geophysicist and astronaut will be the first German and second European to become Commander of the International Space Station (ISS). The ceremony
aboard the ISS will last from 04:10 to 16:30 CEST and be broadcast live on the Internet by NASA and ESA. NASA astronaut, Andrew 'Drew' Feustel, Commander of the current 'Expedition 56' crew will then officially hand over the 'top position' on the Space
Station to Alexander Gerst. The German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility for both the Expedition 57 crew and all modules of the Space Station, that is, the US, Russian, Japanese and European parts, until the end of his mission and return
to Earth – which will probably take place on 13 December.

"The transfer of overall responsibility for the crew and the ISS space station to the German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is an enormous vote of confidence in the partnership between Europe and the other ISS nations, in particular the two founding
nations – the United States and Russia," says Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Executive Board.

"Germany is the strongest European partner of the ISS; we are the European leader in the use of the space station with about 40 percent." Passing on command to Alexander Gerst is therefore also a special recognition of the achievements in his two previous
ISS missions – 'Blue Dot' in 2014 and 'horizons' this year," adds Walther Pelzer, DLR Executive Board member responsible for the Space Administration and for the German contributions to the 'horizons' mission and ESA.

Gerst's crew will continue to be NASA astronaut Serena Aunon-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopjev – with whom @Astro_Alex set off to the ISS for his 'horizons' mission on 6 June 2018. From mid-October, they will be joined by NASA astronaut
Nick Hague and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, who will take off for the space station in a Russian Soyuz capsule on 11 October.

Compared to an astronaut's 'normal' everyday life as a mission specialist, for example in the role of a flight engineer or scientist, being captain of the entire spaceship means "maintaining an overview especially in critical situations and making
informed decisions," explains Volker Schmid, 'horizons' Mission Manager and Head of the ISS Division at the DLR Space Administration in Bonn. Experience of procedures on board the ISS is just as important as being accepted by the crew. "The Captain
must be a team player more so than anyone else, while earning the respect and confidence to assume responsibility for the entire crew and ship, even in a crisis," says Schmid. The Commander also works extremely closely with the Flight Director and
mission team on the ground to ensure a successful overall mission. Alexander Gerst is also responsible for safety, the health of the crew and the protection of the ISS modules. In an emergency, he will be the one who makes decisions regarding rescue
measures, including aborting the mission or returning to Earth prematurely.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rik ISS-fan on 10/03/2018 10:20 pm
After the change off command ceremony, the ISS operations discussion moves to this topic right.
Thus I've moved part of a post to this topic.

Most likely the ISPR rack transfers for HTV-7 have been completed yesterday when the 3th RSR was placed inside HTV-7. Now comes the commissioning activities for the new racks. AFAIK this work is already in progress for the Basic Express Racks (ER-9B & ER-10B) and LSR (ACLS).

After the ISPR rack transfers and the activation of the Basic Express Racks. I expect a lot of experiment locker relocations. My expectation is that the Nanoracks lockers will be transferd from ER-4 (JPM F6) to ER-10B (JPM A5). I also expect that both TangoLabs will be relocated to a BER.
The Rodent Habitat Lockers and DEXA will most likely be transferred from ER-1 or ER-2 (LAB Overhead 1&2) to ER-4. This will happen after LSG (Live Science Glovebox) installation and commissioning. This will create a very nice Rodent research facility comprised of ER-4, LSG and MELFI.
Most likely several new research equipment lockers will arrive on coming commercial resupply missions. So the HTV-7 might lead to a increase in the scientific utilization of the ISS, because more experiments can be hosted at the same time.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 10/04/2018 12:46 pm
ISS config., after Soyuz MS-08 departure and before Soyuz MS-10 arrival...
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/04/2018 03:36 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/03/2018

54S Undocking:  The ISS crew has sleep shifted to accommodate 54S undock/landing tomorrow at 02:56/06:45 CT respectively.  The crew is scheduled to wake up at 4:30 pm tonight to complete final undock preparations.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  The crew began a 48hr BEST experiment 3 copy-DNA (cDNA) session.  The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Functional Immune: The crew will perform saliva and blood collection activities as part of the Functional Immune experiment.  Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD)-10: The crew performed part 2 of 2 of the J-SSOD installation onto the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP).  This is being performed in preparation for the J-SSOD-10 deploys this Saturday, GMT 279.  The J-SSOD is a unique satellite launcher, handled by the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), which provides containment and deployment mechanisms for several individual small satellites. Once the J-SSOD is installed on the MPEP by crewmembers, it is passed through the JEM airlock for retrieval, positioning and deployment by the JEMRMS.

Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS):  The crew removed the MATISS Sample Holder S/N5 and prepared it for return to the ground. The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space for possible application in future spacecraft. MATISS is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions.

Express Rack (ER)9B and 10B Umbilical Mate:  The crew mated the umbilical for ER9 at COL1F2 and installed an AC Inverter onto the rack.  The crew also mated the umbilical for the ER-10B at JPM1A5 and install an AC Inverter onto the rack.

Public Affairs Office (PAO) Event:  Expedition 56 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst participated in a live event with The International Astronautical Congress in Bremen, Germany.  An audience of about 5000 people participated in the event.  Topics discussed included space safety, daily life on the ISS and progress of the current mission.

Change of Command Ceremony:  The Change of Command Ceremony with Expedition 56 Commander Drew Feustel handing off station command to Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst was held earlier today.  Gerst is the second European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut to serve as the ISS Commander (CDR).

HTV Cargo Operations: Today the crew continued with HTV7 Cargo Ops by completing loading the HTV Port 2 rack with trash and Starboard 2 rack unpack. The crew has been given flexibility on which JSBs can be loaded to increase efficiency. The crew has completed a total of 15 hours of HTV cargo transfer, ground specialist estimate the crew will require another 6 hours to complete HTV cargo transfer.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 10/06/2018 04:40 pm
https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1048592410194919424
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/10/2018 02:37 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/04/2018
 


54S Undock and Landing: The 54 Soyuz vehicle undocked successfully from the Mini Research Module (MRM)-2 Zenith Docking Port at 2:56 AM CT this morning. Following the completion of a fly-around maneuver, during which the crew took photos of ISS in celebration of its 20th Anniversary on-orbit, 54S completed a nominal de-orbit burn, separation of modules, and descent; the Soyuz vehicle landed in Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan at approximately 6:44 AM CT bringing Drew Feustel, Ricky Arnold, and Oleg Artemyev safely home to Earth.

Functional Immune: The crew completed the Functional Immune Health Assessment Questionnaire. Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Meteor:  Today the crew successfully recovered the Meteor laptop and checked the camera settings.  The next target of opportunity for the investigation is the Draconids meteor shower with a peak of 08-Oct-2018, but significant meteor flux occurring as early as 06-Oct.  The Draconids shower occurs when the Earth passes through the dust debris left by comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Pressure Management Device (PMD) Unpack and Deploy: PMD is a new device that allows for the depressurization and repressurization of vestibules without venting the air overboard. Scheduled for its first use this Friday, the crew unpacked PMD today and pre-deployed the unit in preparation for use during the upcoming Lab/Node 2 Fine Vestibule Leak Check; successful operation of PMD will help conserve ISS resources when both berthing visiting vehicles and conducting vestibules leak checks.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/10/2018 02:37 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/05/2018
 


Life Support Rack (LSR): The crew reviewed the LSR big picture words in preparation for the upcoming installation. Once the installation and checkout are complete, LSR will be capable of providing oxygen generation, carbon dioxide removal, and water generation. Life Support Rack (LSR) is a Technology Demonstrator for Closed Loop Air Revitalization. LSR captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR technologies were selected for integration into a single system, not requiring buffer tanks or compressors. It is intended to operate for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions and is sized to support a crew of three.

Lighting Effects:  The crew performed the Lighting Effects sleep logging activity. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Fine Leak Checks and Pressure Management Device (PMD):  Fine leak checks were successfully performed for the Node1/Lab and Node2/Lab vestibules today. The Crew was isolated aft of the Lab for approximately 6 hours while Lab hatches were closed. PMD was utilized successfully in support of the Node2/Lab portion of the leak checks. PMD helps conserve ISS resources and Crew time for depressurizing and pressurizing vestibule operations.

Treadmill (T2) Accelerometer R&R:  Today, the crew successfully replaced the Accelerometer within T2. In addition, they took advantage of the access and greased the forward right axle today. Once the replacement was complete, the crew and ground successfully performed a checkout of T2. The Accelerometer had been failed since April 12, 2018. Ground teams utilize accelerometer data to characterize the health of the T2 Vibration Isolation System (VIS).
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/10/2018 02:38 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/08/2018
 


Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer 10 (J-SSOD#10):  On Saturday, Robotics Controllers in Tsukuba, Japan maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to the small satellite deploy position and deployed the Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Demonstration (JSSOD)-10 satellites.  The crew supported the activity by taking photographs of the three small satellites as they were deployed.   

Lighting Effects: The crew conducted a Visual Performance Test for the Lighting Effects investigation today. They stowed the hardware in COL1F4, set the light to the correct mode, turned all other light sources in the Crew Quarters off, and performed a Numerical Verification Test, followed by a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Biochemical Profile: A crewmember collected Flight Day 120 blood and urine samples for the Biochemical Profile and Repository investigations today. The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutrons (RADI-N2): Today the eight detectors were retrieved from the Russian crew and deployed in the NOD3F3 Rack Front area. This Canadian Space Agency investigation measures neutron radiation levels in the ISS.  These bubble detectors are designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST): Crew removed Flow Cell from the Biomolecule Sequencer and stowed the hardware. The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Life Support Rack (LSR) Outfitting: The Crew removed the restraining launch locks from the LSR today. LSR is a Technology Demonstrator for Closed Loop Air Revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR will operate for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions.

Basic Express Rack 9 (ER-9B) Outfitting and Activation:  The Crew manually adjusted the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) flow rate to the newly installed rack within the Columbus module.  In addition, they worked with the ground teams and successfully performed the initial activation and checkout of the rack.

IVA Procedure Review:  Serena reviewed an EVA System Briefing Package in support of the Battery EVAs planned for October 19 and 25.  The package contained reminders, emergency briefing, helpful tips, and procedures used by the IV Crewmember during EVAs.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 10/10/2018 03:04 pm
https://twitter.com/JAXA_Kiboriyo/status/1049934355034828802
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SciNews on 10/10/2018 05:43 pm
Expedition 57 got a good view of hurricane Michael
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0MxaQTYPDw
S. Auñón-Chancellor posted this picture
https://twitter.com/AstroSerena/status/1050073203182329856
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/11/2018 08:27 am
Hurricane Michael was captured from the International Space Station on Oct. 10 after the storm made landfall as a category 4 hurricane over the Florida panhandle. The National Hurricane Center reported maximum sustained winds near 145 mph with the potential to bring dangerous storm surge and heavy rains to the Florida panhandle area.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: rdale on 10/11/2018 08:06 pm
Good comments from the crew regarding today's emergency landing - plus EVA tool config scheduled for tomorrow was removed from the schedule...
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/12/2018 09:44 am

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/09/2018
 


Lighting Effects: A Crewmember provided a sleep log entry upon waking. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG): Low Temp Protein Crystal Growth samples were prepared and inserted into the Glacier facility. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to produce high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD): The J-SSOD #10 launch hardware was removed from the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform in preparation of the Loop Heat Pipe Radiator installation. J-SSOD provides a novel and safe small satellite launching capability from the ISS.

Demonstration of Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR) System: The Crew installed the LHPR System and the External Ethernet Extender onto the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform inside the JEM Airlock for future deployment. LHPR is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS): The Crew checked the camera alignment and focus by viewing the latest BCAT images on a laptop. BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles. Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics: Crew reconfigured the FIR LMM Biophysics facility and installed the Biophysics Plate 2 into the LMM Petri Base Auxiliary Fluids Container. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work. Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. The Effect of Macromolecular Transport on Microgravity Protein Crystallization (LMM Biophysics 4) studies why this is the case, examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Human Resources Facility (HRF) 1: Crew unstowed a Z-Book to be used as HRF Portable Computer 1 and connected it Express Rack 3. The new Z-book laptops will be used for upcoming NeuroMapping sessions. HRF-1 provides an on-orbit laboratory that enables scientists conducting human life science research to evaluate the physiological, behavioral, and chemical changes induced by space flight. Research performed using HRF-1 provides data to help scientists understand how the human body adapts to long-duration spaceflight.

Basic Express Rack 10 (ER-10B): Express Rack 10B was activated by the ISS Crew for the first time today. The new rack arrived on HTV-7 and was previously installed by the Crew. Today’s activities included initiating the Manual Flow Control Valve that will affect the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL)flow into the Rack. In addition, they worked with the ground teams and successfully performed the initial activation and checkout of the rack. EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) Racks are multipurpose payload rack systems that store and support research aboard the ISS. The EXPRESS Racks support science experiments in any discipline by providing structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water, and other items needed to operate science experiments in space.

VHF-1 Emergency Comm Checks: The Crew configured USOS and ROS Audio Subsystems to support successful VHF-1 comm checks with Houston, Huntsville, Tsukuba, and Moscow via the Wallops Flight Facility. VHF-1 provides an emergency back up for ISS to ground communications and is verified using each of the three U.S. ground sites at least once per year.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/12/2018 09:44 am

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/10/2018
 


Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Anomaly: Shortly after Crew wake, the Crew reported all lights were off on the WHC Control Panel and the associated power switch was in the off/tripped position. Attempts to reactivate WHC were not successful. The crew then performed troubleshooting steps in order to isolate the problem to the WHC Pump Separator. The Pump Separator was successfully replaced with an onboard spare. WHC is now operating nominally.

Lighting Effects: A crewmember recorded Light Meter readings for an empty crew quarter compartment. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): Crew replaced the Gas Bottle for ELF as ground teams discovered that the previous bottle is currently depleted. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Actiwatch Spectrum: The Actiwatch Spectrum hardware was setup for checkout and then stowed by the ISS crew. The Actiwatch Spectrum is a waterproof, nonintrusive, sleep-wake monitor worn on the wrist of a crewmember. The device contains an accelerometer for measuring motion and color sensitive photodiodes (a photodetector capable of converting light into voltage) for monitoring ambient lighting. Together, these capabilities enable the Actiwatch Spectrum to be used to analyze circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, and activity.

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) / Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-FIELD) Flames: The crew replaced the Manifold 4 bottle and the ground will be downlinking files from ACME test points and monitoring the bottle pressure. For E-Field Flames an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, which are naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for great simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less polluting and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Life Support Rack (LSR): The crew prepared the O2 generator, performed the Red Helium Camera setup, and performed a meter reading. LSR is a Technology Demonstrator for Closed Loop Air Revitalization. LSR captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the International Space Station to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions.

Aerosol Samplers: All Sampler drawers were closed and stowed. The Samplers have individual drawer-like surfaces covered with sticky carbon tape that will capture aerosols in the ISS air. Aerosols are small particles suspended in the air. In the Earth’s atmosphere they include soot, dust, pollen and a wide range of other natural and human-made materials. Because smoke and dust do not move in microgravity the way they do on Earth, aerosols in the ISS air pose hazards for crewmembers. The Aerosol Samplers investigation collects airborne particles in the ISS cabin air and returns them to Earth so scientists can study the particles with powerful microscopes.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SciNews on 10/12/2018 12:01 pm
Spacewalk to inspect hole in Soyuz spacecraft’s hull cancelled over aborted rocket launch
Quote
A spacewalk to inspect a hole in the manned Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft’s hull scheduled for mid-November has been cancelled due to the abortive launch of the Soyuz-FG carrier rocket, Roscosmos Executive Director for Manned Programs Sergei Krikalyov said on Friday.
"The spacewalk was planned for mid-November. Alexei Ovchinin and Sergei Prokopyev were expected to make the spacewalk together. There will be no spacewalk on November 15. We will see, if we manage to make the shift intervals long enough, we will try to make this spacewalk with one of the next crews. The flight program will now be on hold and revised," Krikalyov said.
http://tass.com/science/1025708
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/13/2018 08:19 am
October 12, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-150

Missouri, Colorado Students to Speak with Astronaut on Space Station

Elementary school students from Missouri and Colorado will talk live with an astronaut on the International Space Station next week. Both Earth-to-space calls will air live on NASA television and the agency’s website.

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor will answer questions posed by 4th grade students from Katie Harper Wright Elementary School in St. Louis at 1:15 p.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 15. The downlink is in association with the National Park Service’s recognition of both the 50th anniversary of the National Trails System and NASA’s 60th anniversary.

A National Park Service mascot, Seaman Jr., a plush toy replica of the original Newfoundland dog, Seaman made its way to the International Space Station. Seaman explored the trail with his owner, Capt. Meriwether Lewis and colleague 2nd Lt. William Clarkon their Corps of Discovery Expedition across the Louisiana Purchase from 1804 to 1806. From the space station’s unparalleled perspective of Earth, Seaman Jr. tracked the 3,700 mile Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Seaman Jr.’s travels abroad the station will debut during the downlink.

The event will be held the Gateway Arch National Park at 11 North 4th St, St. Louis. Media interested in covering should contact Erin Hilligoss-Volkmann at [email protected] 314-655-1615.

Auñón-Chancellor also will answer questions from Frontier Academy and Dos Rios Elementary School students at noon on Thursday, Oct. 18 in Evans, Colorado. The downlink will be hosted by High Plains Library District based in Greeley, Colorado, in collaboration with the Space Science Institute and its National Center for Interactive Learning. Students will participate in hands-on science and engineering activities surrounding the downlink, and the event will be streamed live to other public libraries and schools across the country.

The event will be held at Riverside Library and Cultural Center at 3700 Golden St, Evans. Media interested in covering should contact Kelli Johnson at [email protected] 970-506-8560.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Follow Seaman Jr’s blog at:

https://www.nps.gov/lecl/planyourvisit/seaman-jr-lewis-and-clark-pups.htm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2018 02:19 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/11/2018
 


56 Soyuz (56S) Anomaly: 56S launched today at 3:40 AM CDT.  At 3:42 AM CDT the Soyuz crew reported that a booster failure had occurred.  Per standard response to a booster abort in this timeframe, the descent module separated and performed a ballistic descent and landing near Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan.  At 4:20 AM CDT, Russian Search and Rescue forces arrived at the landing location after which the crew was safely extracted and transported to Dzhezkazgan via helicopter. They were subsequently transported via fixed wing aircraft to Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

Team Task Switching (TTS): The crew completed a TTS survey today. When crewmembers are required to switch their attention between tasks frequently, performance on each of the tasks can be negatively affected.  The objective of the TTS investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crewmembers have difficulty in switching tasks and determine the impacts of these switches to both reduce any negative consequences and improve individual and team motivation and effectiveness.

Food Acceptability: The crew completed the Food Acceptability questionnaires today. This investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Myotones: The crew gathered Myotones Hardware in preparation of upcoming operations. The investigation observes the biochemical properties of muscles during long-term exposure to the spaceflight environment. Results from this investigation are expected to provide insight into principles of human resting muscle tone which could lead to the development of new strategies for alternative treatments for rehabilitation both on Earth and for future space missions.

Basic Express Rack #10B Locker remove: Lockers were removed from the newly installed Basic Express Rack (BER) #10B and stowed in new locations. EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) Racks are multipurpose payload rack systems that store and support research aboard the ISS. The EXPRESS Racks support science experiments in any discipline by providing structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water, and other items needed to operate science experiments in space.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7 Cargo Transfer: The crew continued HTV-7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately 15 hours remain to complete transfer.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2018 02:21 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/12/2018
 


56 Soyuz (56S) Anomaly Follow Up:   Following yesterday’s launch anomaly, the 56S crew returned to Moscow after medical evaluations in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.  Roscosmos has created an investigative commission to look into the booster anomaly. In addition, Energia has formed a commission to find ways to improve performance and reliability of the Soyuz launch escape system.  ISS Increment Teams are actively replanning activities as a result of the launch anomaly.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7 Cargo Transfer:  The crew continued HTV-7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately 10 hours remain to complete transfer.

Myotones Measurements:  A crewmember performed skin marking and measurements with the Myotones Device. Data was then transferred to the laptop. Myotones investigation observes the biochemical properties of muscles during long-term exposure to the spaceflight environment. Results from this investigation are expected to provide insight into principles of human resting muscle tone, which could lead to the development of new strategies for alternative treatments for rehabilitation both on Earth and for future space missions.

Sextant Navigation:  The Crew performed the sixth Sextant Navigation session using the Star, planet and Moon Limb sighting. .  The primary science objective of sighting using the method of lunar distances was fully accomplished. This session also served to rehearse the technique that will be used for Orion lunar navigation. Astronauts onboard the ISS test a hand-held sextant that is intended for use on future Orion exploration missions. The results from this investigation can aid in the development of emergency navigation methods for future manned spacecraft. Historically, Gemini missions in 1965-66 were the first to exercise sextant sightings from a spacecraft. A sextant was built into Apollo vehicles as a navigation backup in case of lost communications.

Basic Express Rack #10B Locker remove:  Lockers were removed from the newly installed Basic Express Rack 10B and stowed in new locations. EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) Racks are multipurpose payload rack systems that store and support research aboard the ISS. The EXPRESS Racks support science experiments in any discipline by providing structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water, and other items needed to operate science experiments in space.

Time Perception in Microgravity: Time Perception in Microgravity: The crew performed a Time perception session. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks.  Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

NanoRacks Platform 3 Relocate: The NanoRacks Platform 3 was relocated from Express Rack 4 to Express Rack 10B. NanoRacks Platforms is a multipurpose research facility on board the ISS. NanoRacks Platforms supports NanoRacks Modules in the CubeSat form factor by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2018 05:42 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2018 05:43 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/17/2018 11:53 am

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/15/2018
 


Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS): Over the Weekend, the crew checked the camera alignment and focus settings by viewing the latest BCAT images on a laptop. BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles. Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration

Loop Heat Pipe Radiator LHPR): ISS crew reconfigured the cable connection for the JEM Ethernet Extender in preparation for the Loop Heat Pipe Radiator. The LHPR is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Life Support Rack (LSR): ISS crew continued configuration for the Life Support rack by installing the CO2 absorbers and setup of the Air Water Management System. LSR is a European Space Agency technology demonstrator for closed loop air revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions

Zero-g Battery Testing: A crewmember completed testing of a sample alkaline batteries. All batteries passed and were restowed for return. Over many years, some crewmembers have reported that batteries on orbit do not last as long as they do on the ground. In the Zero-g Battery Testing experiment, an ISS crew member installs several sets of batteries into a standard camera flash, identifies batteries that fail to work, and returns them to the ground for analysis. If battery life is, in fact, shorter in space, this knowledge could lead to development of better batteries for use in space and on the ground.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7 Cargo Transfer: The crew continued HTV-7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately ~7 hours remain to complete transfer of identified items.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/17/2018 12:02 pm
Soyuz MS-10 launch

Photos: Alexander Gerst
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/17/2018 12:03 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 10/17/2018 07:33 pm
Quote
The official insignia of the three-member Expedition 57 crew

iss057-s-001b (Oct. 16, 2018) --- The official insignia of the three-member Expedition 57 crew.

Quote
iss057-s-002b (Nov. 8, 2017) --- Official crew portrait of Expedition 57 crew members (from left) Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/18/2018 11:09 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/16/2018
 
Cold Atom Lab (CAL):  A Crewmember attached the Helium monitor to the front of the CAL hardware to collect readings. The CAL produces clouds of atoms that are chilled to about one ten billionth of a degree above absolute zero — much colder than the average temperature of deep space. At these low temperatures, atoms have almost no motion, allowing scientists to study fundamental behaviors and quantum characteristics that are difficult or impossible to probe at higher temperatures. In microgravity, researchers may be able to achieve even colder temperatures than what is possible on the ground, and observe these cold atom clouds for longer periods of time.

Lighting Effects:  Crew performed a numerical and color discrimination visual test at a designated location. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutrons (RADI-N2): Today the eight detectors were retrieved from NOD3F3 rack front area location and handed back to the Russian crew for data extraction and download. This Canadian Space Agency investigation measures neutron radiation levels in the ISS.  These bubble detectors are designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1: A crewmember used pipettes to mix varying viscosity solutions into the crystallization plates. BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS.  Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)7 Cargo Transfer:  The crew continued HTV7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately ~4 hours remain to complete transfer of identified items.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging:  Today the crew initiated a charging Auto cycle of two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB) with data logging. Over the course of three days, the Auto cycle will capture battery health data and help ground experts understand the charge and discharge capacities of these new and improved LLBs. The data will also be used to compare charging system performance between the on-orbit and ground based systems.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/18/2018 11:10 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/19/2018 08:06 am
ss057e050440 (Oct. 13, 2018) --- Two Russian spacecraft, the Soyuz MS-09 crew ship (foreground) and the Progress 70 resupply ship, are pictured docked to the International Space Station as the orbital complex orbited nearly 257 miles above Ukraine.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/19/2018 02:03 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/17/2018

Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS):  The crew checked the camera alignment and focus by viewing the latest BCAT images on a laptop. BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles. Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1:  Crew performed viscosity solutions into Crystallization plates mixing. Plate samples were stowed in the SABL unit. BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG):  Ice packs were placed into the Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST)-2 unit in preparation for LT PCG4 samples that will eventually be transferred to the HTV Small Return Capsule (HSRC). The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to produce high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pre-Treat Tank Remove and Replace (R&R):  Today the crew R&R’d the Pre-Treat Tank as part of nominal WHC preventative maintenance. During the activity, the crew discovered pretreat liquid that had leaked into the containment hose connected to the vent caps on the new tank. The leaking tank was bagged and stowed and an alternate tank was subsequently used to complete the R&R.  Each tank contains five liters of pre-treat solution, a mix of acid, chromium oxide, and water, used for toilet flushing and required for nominal WHC operation.

LAB 1 Port 1 (LAB1P1) Pivot Fitting Swap:  During installation of the Life Support Rack (LSR) on October 1, the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) pivot brackets were removed from LAB1P1 and replaced with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries [IHI] style pivot brackets. However, when the crew attempted to re-reinstall an area smoke detector, a 1 cm interference between the smoke detector mounting plate and the new IHI pivot bracket was reported. Today, the crew removed the IHI pivot bracket and replaced it with outside-style ARIS pivot fittings. This eliminated interference between the pivot fitting and the smoke detector bracket.

System Operations Data File (SODF) Warning Book Updates:  The crew printed and incorporated updates to Warning procedure books today. The changes are required in support of Life Support Rack activation, expected early November.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Quarterly Maintenance:  The crew completed ARED quarterly maintenance, which includes steps to inspect the x-rotation dashpots, cycle the main arm through the full range of motion and grease ARED Vibration Isolation System (VIS) rails and rollers.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/19/2018 02:03 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/18/2018

Food Acceptability: An ISS crewmember performed the Questionnaire. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR): The ISS crew swapped out CIR Manifold #4 (1-letre) Bottles. One bottle contains 100% C2H4 and the other contains 40% CH4. The CIR includes an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel and oxidizer control, and five different cameras for performing combustion experiments in microgravity.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Tether Slosh: Crew performed test runs of the SPHERES Tether Slosh test points. SPHERES Tether Slosh combines fluid dynamics equipment with robotic capabilities aboard the ISS to investigate automated strategies for steering passive cargo that contain fluids. In space, the fluid fuels used by spacecraft can slosh around in unpredictable ways making space maneuvers difficult. This investigation uses two SPHERES robots tethered to a fluid-filled container covered in sensors to test strategies for safely steering spacecraft such as dead satellites that might still have fuel in the tank
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/19/2018 02:06 pm
Liquid and Flame Science Work amid Japanese, Russian Maintenance

Mark Garcia Posted on October 18, 2018

Two Expedition 57 astronauts are working to understand what happens to fluids being transported by spacecraft today. Another crew member also worked on combustion science gear as well as Japanese and Russian systems.

Fluid physics and combustion research on the International Space Station helps scientists understand how well-known phenomena on Earth behaves in microgravity. For instance, fluids sloshing around inside fuel tanks can impact how a spaceship steers in space. The way flames burn and create soot in space can also create safety issues for crews.

Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) explored how fluids affect spacecraft maneuvers today. The duo set up a pair of tiny mobile satellites known as SPHERES for the test inside Japan’s Kibo lab module. The SPHERES Tether Slosh experiment is observing what happens when the satellites tow a liquid-filled tank versus a solid mass body with a Kevlar tether.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack in the afternoon and replaced manifold bottles that contain gases for flame experiments. The flight engineer also packed items for disposal on a Japanese cargo ship and checked on Russian ventilation and air conditioning systems.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: rdale on 10/19/2018 11:10 pm
Can someone translate the fire mask issues into English? http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-10-19-Fri-1445_trim.mp3
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Life_Support_32 on 10/20/2018 10:28 am
Can someone translate the fire mask issues into English? http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-10-19-Fri-1445_trim.mp3
There are cartridges that are attached to emergency masks that scrub out constituents from fire. One of the ground ones from the same lot failed testing, so they are now no-go for use in a fire.

Crew will now have to use oxygen masks for fire response, which is normally less desirable because you are introducing oxygen near where the fire is. Crew will need training on this new philosophy including how to safely re-activate and use the hardline O2 system.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/22/2018 04:44 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/19/2018

Plant Habitat:  Plant Habitat activities were performed today to measure chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of growing plants and provided photos to the ground. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the ISS. The space environment is stressful for all living organisms. Understanding how plants respond will help crews on future missions successfully grow plants for food and oxygen generation. The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between plants grown in space and on Earth.  This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

Life Support Rack (LSR):  Power and data umbilical cables, as well as fluid and waste gas umbilicals were mated in preparation for LSR activation in November.  LSR is a European Space Agency technology demonstrator for closed loop air revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions

NanoRacks Platform:  Platforms 1 and 2 were relocated from Express Rack 4 to the new Express Rack 10B. Cables were re-mated and the Platforms were powered up. NanoRacks Platforms is a multipurpose research facility on board the ISS. NanoRacks Platforms supports NanoRacks Modules in the CubeSat form factor by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.

POSSUM (Payload On-orbit Still Shorts for Utilization and Maintenance) Payload Photo:  The crew took high quality still photos of ISS rack locations in the USOS Lab, Columbus, and JEM modules for use on the ground to train astronauts with ISS topography. The POSSUM photo project is a training tool that has the ISS crew take onboard photographs of completed Express rack and experiment installations. These photos are sent to the ground and printed into actual life size marquees that are used for ISS astronaut training and familiarization.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging:  Today the crew terminated an Autocycle for two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB) and initiated the Autocycle on two additional batteries. Today’s initiated Autocycle will be terminated on October 23, leaving all 4 LLBs in a nominal, discharged state. Over the course of three days, the auto cycle will capture battery health data and help ground experts understand the charge and discharge capacities of these new and improved LLBs. The data will also be used to compare charging system performance between the on-orbit and ground based systems.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/22/2018 08:00 pm
Genetics, Vision and Earth Studies Aboard Station Today

Mark Garcia Posted on October 22, 2018

Three Expedition 57 crew members are orbiting Earth today researching RNA sequencing and eye health aboard the International Space Station. The trio from the U.S., Germany and Russia also replaced combustion research hardware and activated Earth observation gear.

Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor from NASA is helping scientists identify microbes and understand how their genetics change in space. She extracted and processed microbial samples today from swabbed station surfaces for later genetic sequencing using specialized hardware. Results will also help researchers observe how life adapts to the weightlessness of microgravity.

Auñón-Chancellor then observed and photographed samples for a protein crystal study to help doctors improve the development of disease-treating drugs. She then joined Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) for eye scans with an ultrasound device to learn how long-term missions affect vision.

Gerst started his day in the U.S. Destiny lab module replacing hardware inside the Combustion Integrated Rack that enables gas and flame studies. He later wrapped up the workday photographing how quartz and clay particles sediment in space.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked inside the Unity module setting up Earth photography gear for the long-running EarthKAM experiment. The study enables school students to remotely operate the station digital camera to photograph and download imagery of Earth landmarks such as coastlines and mountains.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/23/2018 04:26 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/22/2018

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  The ISS crew began a BEST experiment 1 session.  The goal of experiment 1 is to identify bacteria directly from ISS surfaces through the swabbing and subsequent extraction of DNA from the swab using miniPCR.  The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1:  In today’s phase 2 final operations session, the crew removed the BioServe Protein Crystallography samples from SABL, then observed and photographed the sample wells using the microscope.  Well-defined crystals were present in many of the observed wells.  BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form, and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) / Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) / Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-FIELD) Flames Hardware Replacement:  Today the crew removed the negative power supply and installed the positive power supply in support of the continuing E-Field Flames part 2 investigation.  For E-Field Flames an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, which are naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for great simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less polluting and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR):  The checkout of the external LHPR investigation was initiated via ground commanding this morning.  The LHPR, is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKam) Set Up: The crew set up the EarthKAM hardware in Node in preparation for the start of Mission 64.  As of today, over 19,000 students from 34 countries have signed up to participate.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) Radio Frequency (RF) Demonstration:  Ground Teams are implementing their fourth and final on-orbit C2V2 demonstration while flying over the Electronic System Test Laboratory (ESTL). These demonstrations are intended to verify end-to-end functionality of all C2V2 capabilities following the Revision 2 (R2) Software transition, which occurred this past March.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/23/2018 07:41 pm
Station Preps for Japan, US Ship Operations Next Month

Mark Garcia Posted on October 23, 2018

The International Space Station is getting ready for Japanese and U.S. cargo ship operations next month. In the meantime, the three residents onboard the orbital lab today configured science hardware and checked out safety gear.

Serena Auñón-Chancellor from NASA worked in the Japanese Kibo laboratory today replacing gear inside a Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR). The MSPR provides a workspace that supplies power and video enabling research into a variety of smaller experiments. She spent the majority of the day working on video cable connections and swapping out a computer in the MSPR.

She and Commander Commander Alexander Gerst started Tuesday practicing wearing and using breathing gear connected to an oxygen port in the event of a space emergency. Gerst then helped out with the MSPR work before the duo moved on to packing Japan’s HTV-7 resupply ship.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked out on a treadmill today to help Russian scientists understand how the human body is impacted by exercise in microgravity. He then spent the afternoon on computer and life support maintenance.

The packed HTV-7 is due to be removed from the Harmony module with the Canadarm2 and released back into Earth orbit in November. Its release will cap a 47 day stay at the station but the vehicle has one more mission before its fiery destruction over the Pacific Ocean. The HTV-7 will release a small reentry capsule for recovery in the Pacific Ocean by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The recovery mission is a test of the Japanese space agency’s ability to retrieve experiment samples safely and quickly from the station.

An American cargo ship is due to replenish the Expedition 57 crew a few days after the HTV-7 leaves. Northrup Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter will take a three-day trip in space before it is captured with the Canadarm2 and berthed to the Unity module. Cygnus will stay attached to the station for 86 days of cargo operations.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/24/2018 02:27 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/23/2018

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC / DC Converter Unit (DCU) Replacement Part 1:  The crew replaced MSPR DCU with and upgraded DCU2. The still functional older unit will be kept onboard as a spare. The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. It has two workspaces and a work table that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM):  Mission 64 is continuing nominally.  As of today, the number participating has increased to just over 20,000 students from 35 countries.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Wireless Communication and Positioning Experiment (WICO):  The crew copied WICO data from the SD Card to a Station Support Computer (SSC) for subsequent downlink.  WICO demonstrates a wireless network for the efficient readout of sensors, as well as the localization of moving objects within the Columbus module. The experiment is based on the impulse radio – ultra-wideband (IR-UWB), which extends the capabilities of a recently performed Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) demonstration using Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) bands at 2.45 GHz. The evaluation of WICO helps to analyze potential uses of WSN for unmanned and manned spaceflight missions, and to derive obstacles and limitations for the operations under very specific conditions due to the complex electromagnetic environment.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)7 Cargo Transfer:  The crew continued HTV7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately 1 hour remains to complete transfer.

Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA) Hardline O2 Demonstration:  Today, the crew practiced demonstrating the connection of a PBA via an extension hose to a low pressure O2 port and donning the mask. This training serves as a refresher on the usage of PBA hardware and hardline O2 in response to a U.S. Segment Fire.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging:  Today the crew terminated an Autocycle session, which was initiated this past Friday for two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB). Today’s activity leaves the LLBs in a nominal, discharged state. Over the course of three days, the auto cycle captures battery health data and helps ground experts understand the charge and discharge capacities of these new and improved LLBs. The data will also be used to compare charging system performance between the on-orbit and ground based systems.

Port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (PSARJ) Current Draw:  The port SARJ drive current has shown an increasing trend for the past several days, although it is still well below maximum limits. The current draw for String 2 Drive Lock Assembly (DLA) for the PSARJ is generally ~0.15 amps and increases to ~0.17 amps during high negative solar beta. Solar beta peaked at -62 degrees on October 21 and is decreasing in magnitude. Currently the solar beta angle is at -58 degrees and the PSARJ current draw is ~0.3 amps. The DLA trip point is 1.3 amps. There is no on orbit action required at this time. However, ground teams are studying the signature and may recommend a DLA string swap if the current does not drop when the solar beta decreases. The PSARJ was lubricated in 2011 and the lubricant is expected to last at least 15 years.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/25/2018 02:34 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/24/2018
 


Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) / Light Microscopy Module (LMM) / Biophysics-4:  Following an overall successful conclusion of the Biophysics-4 experiment run, the Biophysics-4 plate was removed from the LMM and stowed.  The Biophysics-4 experiment contained proteins with both a fast and slow evolutionary period, which were observed by the ground teams.  Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work. Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. The Effect of Macromolecular Transport on Microgravity Protein Crystallization (LMM Biophysics 4) studies why this is the case, examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Meteor Troubleshooting:  As a continuation of the Meteor troubleshooting, the crew opened the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), replaced the faulty inverter, and configured the diffraction grating to support operations.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC/DC converter unit 2 (DCU2) and Video Compression And Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) R&R:  Today the crew performed the MSPR DCU2 Cable connection and Closeout. They also replaced the MSPR VRU with an upgraded VRU2 unit.  The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. The MSPR has two workspaces and a work table that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM) Set Up: Today the 50mm camera lens was exchanged for an 85mm camera lens for the on-going EarthKAM mission 64.  EarthKAM is expected to continue this mission through Tuesday, October 30.  As of today, over 20,000 students from 37 countries are participating and 2,069 images have been downlinked.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Crew Quarters (CQ) Clean:  A USOS crewmember cleaned the Deck CQ today.  During this activity, the crew cleaned behind panels, intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors as required.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/25/2018 04:32 pm
Plant Science and Solar Array Photos as Station Nears Milestone

Mark Garcia Posted on October 25, 2018

Botany science and solar array photography were on the Expedition 57 crew’s schedule today including ongoing maintenance of the orbital lab. The research and photo surveys help scientists and engineers understand how life and International Space Station systems adapt to microgravity.

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor is helping NASA and its international partners understand how plants grow in microgravity to promote humans living longer and farther in space. She set up the Veggie plant growth facility today to grow a variety of edible plants such as kale and lettuce inside Europe’s Columbus lab module. Botanists are also exploring how cultivating plants to provide a fresh food supply affects crew morale.

Commander Alexander Gerst started his day familiarizing himself with the botany experiment. The German astronaut from of ESA (European Space Agency) then worked throughout the day photo-documenting the station’s port side solar arrays. The photos will be downloaded so ground specialists can inspect the condition of the arrays for damage sites.

On the Russian side of the space lab, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev checked on power supply systems inside the Zarya cargo module before moving on to science and life support work. Zarya was the first station module launched into space and will reach its 20th anniversary on Nov. 20.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/26/2018 02:07 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/25/2018

Veg-03G:  Today, the crew installed a Root Mat and Plant Pillows, then powered up Veg-03G and set light intervals.  They then filled the Plant Pillows and Root Mat with water in order to initiate the Veg-03G experiment.  This is the first day of a 28 day growth cycle for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03G testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as test crops, benefitting future long-duration space missions which will require crew members to grow their own food.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM):  EarthKAM mission 64 is continuing nominally.  As of this report, 242 schools representing 20,445 students and 37 countries have signed up to request images.  17,360 image requests have been submitted, 3,437 images have been downlinked, and 2,879 images have been posted to the web.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC/DC Converter Unit 2 (DCU2):  The ground has detected an issue with the assembly of DCU2 on MSPR2.  The checkout scheduled for tomorrow, October 26, will be cancelled and the ground teams are considering a forward plan.  The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM equipped with two workspaces and a worktable that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization, including science and educational missions.

Crew Quarters (CQ) Clean:  A USOS crewmember cleaned the Overhead CQ today. During this activity, the crew cleaned behind panels, intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors as required.

Port Solar Array Imagery:  The crew obtained photographs of all four Port Solar Array mast structures and blankets.  These images will provide data that can be compared to baseline imagery to obtain a better understanding of the current physical condition of the arrays and the potential rates that structural degradation of the mast occurs due to Micro Meteor Orbital Debris (MMOD) damage.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)7 Cargo Transfer:  Today, the crew completed loading of all currently available cargo items. Any remaining trash to be loaded will consist of common trash and KTOs which will be loaded as they become available.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/26/2018 08:06 pm
Spacesuits and High-Temp, Fire Science Focus of Crew Today

Mark Garcia Posted on October 26, 2018

U.S. spacesuits and hot, fiery research kept the Expedition 57 crew busy Friday. The three-member crew from around the world also continued the ongoing upkeep of the International Space Station’s systems.

A pair of spacesuits inside the Quest airlock had their cooling loops scrubbed today by station Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency). The suit maintenance comes ahead of a pair of spacewalks being planned to connect new lithium-ion batteries on the space station’s port truss structure.

Fellow flight engineers Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked on advanced science hardware. The two devices, the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), enable the safe research of high temperatures, flames and gases.

Auñón-Chancellor cleaned up the ELF inside the Kibo lab module after removing samples exposed to extremely high temperatures. Scientists are observing how microgravity affects the thermophysical properties of a variety materials at different temperatures.

Prokopyev worked in the Destiny lab module replacing fuel bottles for experiments inside the CIR researching how fuels and flames burn in space. Results may guide the development of rocket engines and fire safety aboard spacecraft.

Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/27/2018 12:24 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/29/2018 01:49 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/26/2018

Echo External Hard Disk Connection: The crew connected the Echo External Hard Disk and USB Cable to SSC 11 in preparation for a file update and subsequent Echo software update.  The purpose of the investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system equipped with motorized probes that are controlled by ground controllers. Additionally, this investigation serves to perform the commissioning of the Echo instrument which is planned for use during future Vascular Echo experiment.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): The crew extracted the sample cartridge from the ELF, removed the lost sample from ELF cartridge chamber, and reassembled the ELF. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM): EarthKAM mission 64 is continuing nominally.  A total of 21,753 students from 38 countries are now signed up and 4,984 images have been downlinked.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Wireless Communication and Positioning Experiment (Wireless Compose or WiCo): The crew reconfigured the WiCo Motes (sensor packages) to energy harvesting mode.  One of the three objectives of the WiCo experiment is to demonstrate energy harvesting as a viable method to achieve a maintenance-free sensing system for ISS and future scenarios.  WiCo demonstrates a wireless network for the efficient readout of sensors, as well as the localization of moving objects within the Columbus module of the ISS. The experiment is based on the impulse radio – ultra-wideband (IR-UWB), which extends the capabilities of a recently performed wireless sensor network (WSN) demonstration using Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) bands at 2.45 GHz. The evaluation of Wireless Compose helps to analyze potential uses of WSN for unmanned and manned spaceflight missions, and to derive obstacles and limitations for the operations under very specific conditions due to the complex electromagnetic environment.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Operations: The crew completed a half dump and fill on EMUs 3004 and 3006 followed by scrubbing and iodination of the suits.

Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Flow Measurement Survey: Using the Velocicalc tool, the crew took measurements of selected USOS ventilation inlets and outlets as part of system health monitoring. These readings are taken approximately every 4 months.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: eeergo on 10/29/2018 02:14 pm

New flyaround high-resolution pictures from MS-08's departure in Roskosmos' Flickr:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/roscosmos/45616596621/in/album-72157699714664812/

Note BEAM in what I believe is the first wide context picture since its installation, the antenna of the recently installed Icarus experiment on Zvezda, or NICER in its unstowed position.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: wjbarnett on 10/29/2018 02:47 pm
New desktop background!!
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/29/2018 07:07 pm
Crew Studies How Space Impacts Brain and Perception

Mark Garcia Posted on October 29, 2018

A pair of Expedition 57 astronauts spent the day exploring how humans think and work while living long-term in space. A cosmonaut also tested a pair of tiny, free-floating satellites operating inside the International Space Station.

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor is helping doctors on the ground understand if an astronaut’s brain structure and mental abilities change in space. She took part in a behavioral assessment test today that involves the mental imaging of rotating objects, target accuracy during motion or stillness and concentrating on two tasks at the same time. The NeuroMapping experiment, which has been ongoing since 2014, is exploring an astronaut’s neuro-cognitive abilities before, during and after a spaceflight.

Scientists are also learning how an astronaut’s nervous system may be impacted by different gravitational environments such as the moon, asteroids or planets. The GRIP study from ESA (European Space Agency) is exploring how space residents interact with objects by monitoring their grip and load forces.

Commander Alexander Gerst from Germany strapped himself into a specialized seat in the Columbus lab module for the GRIP study today. He performed several motions in the seat while gripping a device collecting data measuring cognition, grip force and movement kinematics.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev set up the bowling ball-sized SPHERES satellites for a test run inside Japan’s Kibo lab module. The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) are used for a variety of experiments including autonomous formation-flying, shipping liquids such as fuels and introducing students to spacecraft navigation techniques.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 10/30/2018 01:51 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/29/2018

Actiwatch Spectrum:  Following the discovery of some bad data from a previous Actiwatch spectrum data collection, this activity set up the nine remaining Actiwatch spectrum units to verify they are producing good data. The Actiwatch Spectrum is a waterproof, nonintrusive, sleep-wake monitor worn on a crewmember’s wrist. The device contains an accelerometer for measuring motion and color sensitive photodiodes (a photodetector capable of converting light into voltage) for monitoring ambient lighting. Together, these capabilities enable the Actiwatch Spectrum to analyze circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, and activity.

Grip Seated Science Session:  The crew completed the Grip seated session which is the first of three Grip activities for the week.  Pending verification of the downlinked data, the ground reported the session went well.  ESA’s Grip investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects.  Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments, support design and control of haptic interfaces to be used in challenging environments such as space, and provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases (Neuromapping):  The crew performed a NeuroMapping Experiment Neurocognitive Test which includes testing in both “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it takes for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation includes use of structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics Unit Test:  As part of the 2018 High School Tournament, the crew performed a unit test today.  The unit test occurs prior to the actual competition and allows the ground to verify various aspects of the competition are working as intended.  When the actual completion is performed in January, the High School Tournament teams will be tasked with dodging virtual space debris in low Earth orbit to retrieve a damaged SPHERES satellite.  The SPHERES-Zero-Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Nitrogen (N2) Transfer Initiation: The crew reconfigured the ISS N2 System and initiated the N2 transfer from the NORS tank to the ISS High Pressure Gas Tank. This NORS N2 tank will be left installed until the N2 is depleted, which is expected in approximately one month.

Lab Waste Water Bus Reconfiguration: Today, the crew attempted to reconfigure the waster bus for the upcoming commissioning and use of the newly installed Life Support Rack (LSR).  The crew noticed when demating the Node 1 to LAB waste water line that the male side of the Quick Disconnects (QD) poppet was off nominal and still depressed. The crew took photos for ground assessment and remated the connector.  LSR commissioning is currently scheduled for November 6.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 10/31/2018 10:41 am
Happy Halloween
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 10/31/2018 10:45 am
And a second photo from Alex Gerst
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/31/2018 01:37 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/30/2018
 


Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS):  Today, the crew transferred images to the Station Support Computer (SSC), replaced the SB-800 Flash batteries, verified the camera alignment and focus are still intact, and re-set the intervalometer.  BCAT-CS continues to produce interesting data resulting in an extension past the original 2-4 week run duration.  BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles. Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

Echo Setup and Stow:  The crew retrieved the Echo hardware and deployed it in the Columbus module so the ground could perform maintenance activities. The purpose of the Echo investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system, equipped with motorized probes controlled by flight controllers on the ground. Additionally, this investigation serves to perform the commissioning of the Echo instrument, which is planned to be used for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Vascular Echo experiment in the future.

GRIP Seated Science Session:  The crew completed the GRIP seated session, which is second of three GRIP activities for the week.  European Space Agency (ESA)’s GRIP investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects.  Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments. Data from the GRIP experiment may also support design and control of haptic interfaces used in challenging environments such as space, as well as provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Vegetable Production System (Veggie):  Today, the crew increased the fan speed to the high setting for Veggie. This was performed to help lower the higher than expected moisture levels in the plant pillow wicks. Veggie is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.  The VEG-03G experiment is currently running in the Veggie facility.

Life Science Glovebox (LSG) Outfitting:  Today, the crew successfully integrated the LSG Core Facility (CF), which arrived on HTV7, with the Avionics Package (AP), which arrived on SpX-15.  Afterwards, the crew installed the hardware into the Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR). Tomorrow, the crew will complete the on-orbit configuration of LSG with commissioning planned for November 12th. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its large enclosed volume of around 450 Liters, almost twice the size of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), two crew members can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Lab Waste Water Bus Reconfiguration:  As a follow up to yesterday’s attempt to reconfigure the water bus for the newly installed Life Support Rack (LSR), ground teams reviewed photos of the o-rings and the poppet on the male side of the Quick Disconnect (QD) and determined it was nominal. Today, the crew successfully completed the Lab Waste Water Bus reconfiguration.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: theonlyspace on 10/31/2018 03:18 pm
When the new crew goes up in late November or  early December on Soyuz MS 11 to join the three crew Exp 57  will they be considered Exp 57 or 58? Then in April when the new 3 crew joins them will it still be Exp 58 or 59? The numbering of the crews have gotten messed up with Soyuz MS 1O failure.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 10/31/2018 03:42 pm
It will be Exp. 58 when the MS-09 leaves on Dec. 20
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/01/2018 06:32 pm
An amazing view of SPDM "Dextre" today !  8)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/02/2018 08:30 am

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/31/2018
 


Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Manifold Bottle Replacement: In support of part 2 of the CIR / Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) / Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-FIELD) Flames operations, the crew removed the 30% ethylene, 70% nitrogen fuel bottle and replaced it with a 100% methane fuel bottle today.  For E-Field Flames, an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less pollution and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) Sample Holder Insertion: The crew performed an ELF sample holder insertion. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts are measurable and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.  ELF typically processes oxide samples, but is also capable of processing semiconductors, alloys, and metals.

Grip Supine Science Session: The crew was scheduled to perform the third part of Grip science tasks (third out of three this week) in the supine position. However, the session was only partially completed. Data is being downlinked and the ground team is discussing further action. ESA’s Grip investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects. Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments. Data from the GRIP experiment may also support design and control of haptic interfaces used in challenging environments such as space, as well as provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Life Science Glovebox (LSG) Final Integration and Closeout: Today the crew removed the front launch panel and work volume launch locks and deployed the LSG work volume.  After removing door pip pins and the cable harness block, they installed the fan electronics box.  When connecting the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) lines, JAXA noted a drop in accumulator quantity and asked the crew to disconnect the lines.  LSG lines were flown wet so the drop was unexpected.  The accumulator quantity continued to decrease slightly following the demate of the lines and then stabilized, which is thought to be due to the gas trap removing air from the system.  Teams are standing down on operations for today while they discuss the forward plan.  Commissioning is planned for November 12th.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/03/2018 02:38 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/01/2018

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Burst Disc Removal: The crew removed the burst discs from the argon and checked gas manifolds in the CIR Gas Chromatography (GC) system.  These burst discs are considered redundant with the pressure relief valves in the system and issues with the helium burst disc have occurred in the past.  Following this activity, the valves for all three gas bottles were opened.  The GC will be used with the future Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiment (ACME) investigation entitled Burning Rate Emulator (BRE), which focuses on spacecraft fire prevention.

Gravitational References for Sensimotor Performance:  Reaching and Grasping (GRASP): The crew performed three versions of the GRASP seated position science session.  GRASP is intended to provide insight into how the central nervous system integrates information from different sensory modalities, encoded in different reference frames, to coordinate movements of the hand with objects in the environment.  Performed on the ISS, in conjunction with a series of experiments performed on the ground, GRASP explores the interaction among all of the various sensory cues.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) Crew Conference and Procedure Review: The crew participated in a crew conference and procedure review in preparation for the HTV-7 release next week.  The HTV-7 HSRC will return the JAXA Low Temp Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG4) samples to the ground.  HSRC demonstrates re-entry and retrieval techniques to return experimental samples from ISS research back to Earth. HSRC has navigation, guidance, and control systems, including a Reaction Control System (RCS), and can conduct controlled re-entry to a target point on Earth, while keeping an environment of less than 4G for return.

Veg-03G Plant Thinning and Pillow Prime: The crew thinned the plants as needed so that only one plant per pillow remains.  Multiple seeds are germinated in each plan pillow and this activity removes the smallest plants.  The ground and crew noted some of the plants were too small to thin today and these will be thinned at a later time. The crew also performed the pillow prime, which involves the addition of 15ml of water to each plant pillow to support continued growth.  Veg-03G is currently in a 28 day growth cycle which began on October 25 for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Emergency Procedure Update: Today, the crew updated the hard copy Fire Emergency Book with changes to account for which breathing mask to prepare and don per established criteria.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: rdale on 11/03/2018 10:16 pm
Ed Sheeran stopped by the space station before a concert in Houston tonight...

http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-11-03-Sat-1600_trim.mp3
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/05/2018 08:05 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/02/2018

Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-7 (ACE-T7) Sample Configuration:  The crew configured LMM (Light Microscopy Module) for the ACE-T-7 science run.  The ACE-T-7 module was processed prior to this increment, and this run will allow investigators to observe the structures following longer-term evolution.  The experiment involves the design and assembly of complex three-dimensional structures from small particles suspended within a fluid medium. These “self-assembled colloidal structures” are vital to the design of advanced optical materials and active devices. In the microgravity environment, insight is provided into the relation between particle shape and interparticle interactions on assembly structure and dynamics.

Gravitational References for Sensimotor Performance: Reaching and Grasping (GRASP):  The crew successfully performed three versions of the GRASP quasi free-floating science session.  GRASP is intended to provide insight into how the central nervous system integrates information from different sensory modalities, encoded in different reference frames, to coordinate movements of the hand with objects in the environment.  Performed on the ISS, in conjunction with a series of experiments performed on the ground, GRASP explores the interaction between all of the various sensory cues.

Plant Hab-01 Science Carrier 2 Harvest:  The crew performed the harvest on the science carrier 2 plants.  Growth of the plants was initiated on September 18 and similar to the plants grown in science carrier 1, the plants grew more slowly than expected.  Although there was no real issue with the slower growth, only one of the two plant harvests was performed as a result.  The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between various Arabidopsis plant lines grown in space and on Earth. This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

Plasma Kristal-4 Experiment campaign 5:  The crew performed the familiarization session in preparation for the science run next week.  PK-4 is a scientific payload for performing research in the field of ‘Complex Plasmas’: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  On Thursday evening, Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Body to perform a survey of the SPDM Latching End Effector (LEE) snare cables using an External High Definition Camera. They then maneuvered SSRMS and SPDM to approach and stow SPDM on the Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2).
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/05/2018 08:08 pm
New Crops Planted Aboard the International Space Station

James Cawley Posted on November 5, 2018

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor planted two new crops in a special garden aboard the International Space Station on Thursday, Oct. 25. If all goes well, the ‘Red Russian’ kale and ‘Dragoon’ lettuce, will be ready to enjoy in time for Thanksgiving.

The lettuce seeds arrived at the station in “plant pillows,” which are needed because of the way water moves in microgravity. Auñón-Chancellor placed the plant pillows atop a root mat, which she primed with water. She installed them in the station’s Veggie plant growth system, and completed her sowing by adding water to the growth chamber’s reservoir.

These plants are part of experiment Veg-03 G – NASA has been successfully growing veggies aboard station since 2014. The latest experiment will provide astronauts with vitamins C, K and potassium, not to mention a welcome addition to their turkey day table 250 miles above Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2018/11/05/new-crops-planted-aboard-the-international-space-station/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/05/2018 08:09 pm
Astronauts Prepare for Japanese Cargo Ship Departure

Mark Garcia Posted on November 5, 2018

A pair of Expedition 57 astronauts trained for the release of a Japanese resupply ship Wednesday after a 41-day mission at the International Space Station. Japan’s seventh cargo ship, H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7), has one more mission though after it departs the orbital lab.

If all goes as planned, astronaut Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release the HTV-7, also called the Kounotori, Wednesday at 11:50 a.m. EST. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will back up Gerst in the cupola monitoring the vehicle and its telemetry as it slowly backs away from the space station. The two astronauts reviewed departure procedures and practiced robotics controls on a computer today. NASA TV will broadcast live the space freighter’s departure beginning at 11:30 a.m.

Kounotori was captured Sept. 27 and delivered external station batteries and hardware to be configured during a pair of upcoming spacewalks. The resupply ship also replenished the station with advanced science experiments and equipment to benefit humans on Earth and in space.

However, it has one more payload to deliver for splashdown on Earth before the vehicle burns up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean. The HTV-7 will release a small reentry capsule packed with test cargo for retrieval by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The splashdown mission is a test of JAXA’s ability to return small payloads from space for quick delivery to researchers on Earth.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev worked on science and maintenance tasks throughout Monday in the orbital lab’s Russian segment. He started out researching how the space environment and solar radiation affects plasma-dust crystals. Prokopyev finished up his day photographing the condition of the Zvezda service module interior panels before disposing of obsolete hardware in the Progress 70 resupply ship.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/05/astronauts-prepare-for-japanese-cargo-ship-departure/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/06/2018 06:40 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/05/2018

Plant Habitat: Today, the crew wrapped plant samples into foil packs and placed them into Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-3 and the Plant Habitat facility was cleaned. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility conducting plant bioscience research on the ISS. The space environment is stressful for all living organisms. Understanding how plants respond will help crews on future missions successfully grow plants for food and oxygen generation. The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between plants grown in space and on Earth.  This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC): The crew completed Part 1 of the HTV Capsule Assembly including the assembly of the Cylindrical Support Cone Section, Capsule Plate Section and the acceleration/pressure data logger which was taped to the sample box lid. The HSRC is designed to return relatively small payloads to the ground.  The HSRC is 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return.

Plasma Kristall (PK)-4: The crew performed video setup and checkout, connected Gas Supply hoses (Argon and Neon) and verified valve functionality. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas” which are low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles – so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

H-II Transfer Vehicle 7 (HTV7) Departure Preparation:  The crew reviewed HTV-7 departure materials including HTV Rendezvous Review and HTV Departure Review. They also completed Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) Release Session. Additionally, the crew removed the smoke detector from the vehicle prior to departure. HTV-7 is scheduled to unberth from the ISS on Wednesday, November 7.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/06/2018 06:42 pm
Astronauts Ready Japanese Ship as Cosmonaut Works Russian Space Science

Mark Garcia Posted on November 6, 2018

Japan’s seventh resupply ship to the International Space Station is packed and readied for departure Wednesday morning. However, the Japanese cargo ship, H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7), has one more delivery mission before it burns up safely over the Pacific Ocean.

Station skipper Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release the HTV-7 at 11:50 a.m. EST Wednesday. It will spend about an hour maneuvering safely away from the station on a trajectory to begin its next mission. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will monitor the vehicle until it reaches a point about 200 meters from the space station. NASA TV begins its live coverage of the departure Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.

The HTV-7 will fire its deorbit engines Saturday for a fiery but safe ending to its mission after 41 days attached to the station’s Harmony module. Before the HTV-7 self-destructs in Earth’s atmosphere it will release a small reentry capsule loaded with test cargo for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean near the Japanese islands. The capsule will be retrieved by personnel from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency to test the space partner’s ability to safely return precious space cargo for analysis on Earth.

As the two Expedition 57 astronauts packed the cargo ship, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev continued his space physics research, photo inspections and inventory updates. The cosmonaut explored how microgravity and the Sun impact plasma-dust crystals. Prokopyev also photographed the condition of the station’s Russian segment then updated the station’s inventory system.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/06/astronauts-ready-japanese-ship-as-cosmonaut-works-russian-space-science/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: rdale on 11/06/2018 09:05 pm
Expedition 57 took part in Expedition 56's plaque hanging at the end of the day...

http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-11-06-Tue-1530_trim.mp3
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/07/2018 05:44 pm
ISS configuration after HTV-7 departure.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/08/2018 04:21 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/06/2018

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (JAXA LT PCG): The crew retrieved JAXA LT PCG samples from the General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER)1 unit and stowed them in the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Capsule Carrier. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to produce high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC): The crew completed Parts 2 and 3 of the HTV Capsule Assembly. They also completed final closeout of the Capsule Support Plate on the HTV-7 bulkhead prior to vestibule demating. The HSRC is designed to return relatively small payloads to the ground. The HSRC is 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return. Splashdown is scheduled to occur at 4:06 pm (CT) on Saturday, November 10.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew initiated the second of four PK-4 experiment runs with the start of Particle Trapping via the European Physiology Module (EPM) laptop commanding using Neon Gas. This will allow clouds of particles to be captured inside the PK-4 chamber. Between the two scripts, it is desired to perform four successful trappings. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas” which are low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles – so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

HTV7 Departure Preparations:  The crew completed loading ~74 Cargo Transfer Bag Equivalent (CTBEs) of trash into the HTV vehicle. The crew configured the vestibule for demate by removing Air Revitalization System (ARS) jumper, Intermodular Ventilation (IMV) supply jumper, 1553/ENET A and B jumper, and disconnecting the Node 2 HTV channel 2 power jumper. They also installed the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs). HTV-7 is scheduled to unberth tomorrow, November 7.

Life Support Rack (LSR) Ground Initial Activation and Checkout:  The ground began LSR activation and checkout, which will continue throughout the next several days. LSR is an ESA technology demonstrator for closed loop air revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/08/2018 04:23 am
Astronauts Release Japanese Spaceship

Mark Garcia Posted on November 7, 2018

Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), with back-up support from NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, used the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to release a Japanese cargo spacecraft at 11:51 a.m. EST. At the time of release, the space station was flying 254 miles over the northern Pacific Ocean. Earlier, ground controllers used the robotic arm to unberth the cargo craft.

After release, a new, small reentry capsule will be deployed from the unpiloted H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Designed by JAXA and assembled by the station crew, the conically shaped capsule measures 2 feet in height and 2.7 feet in width. The project is a technology demonstration designed to test JAXA’s ability to return small payloads from the station for expedited delivery to researchers.

HTV-7 will be a safe distance away from the space station after the last of several deorbit maneuvers. The return capsule will be ejected from a hatchway after the deorbit burn. The experimental capsule will perform a parachute-assisted splashdown off the coast of Japan, where a JAXA ship will be standing by for its recovery.

The HTV-7 spacecraft is scheduled to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up harmlessly over the South Pacific Ocean Nov. 10.

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/07/astronauts-release-japanese-spaceship/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/08/2018 04:50 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/07/2018

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7 Departure:  This morning, the crew finished closing out the Node 2 vestibule by demating all umbilicals and depressurizing the vestibule between HTV-7 and Node 2 in preparation for the unberth. Commands were sent to the release Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) bolts prior to unberth.  Robotic Flight Controllers then maneuvered HTV-7 to the release position utilizing the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).  HTV-7 was subsequently released by the crew at 10:51 CT. Just after the HTV deorbit burn occurs on Saturday November 10, the HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) will deploy from HTV with an intended splashdown southwest of Japan occurring at 4:06PM CT. The HSRC with JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG) samples inside will then be retrieved and returned to Japan. The HSRC measures 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return.

Veggie:  The crew placed markings on the watering syringes in preparation for future plant watering. Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  BEST experiment operations part 3 were completed today to demonstrate direct ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequencing with the MinION miniature deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencer using the sample kit retrieved from MELFI 1. The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Plasma Kristall-4:  The crew performed particle trapping activities using the Argon Gas line. Experiment was initiated via the European Physiology Module (EPM) laptop. Plasma Krystall-4 (PK-4) is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS in the Hot Backup Configuration and unberthed HTV-7 from the Node 2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).  They then maneuvered HTV-7 to the release. After HTV-7 departure, Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to a park position, de-configured the MSS from Hot Backup and supported a video survey of the Node 2 Nadir ACBM.  Once the survey was complete, the MSS was powered down.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/08/2018 07:43 pm
U.S., Russian Spaceships Line Up for Launch After Japanese Vessel Departs

Mark Garcia Posted on November 8, 2018

The Expedition 57 crew said farewell to a Japanese resupply ship Wednesday and is getting ready to welcome U.S. and Russian space freighters in less than two weeks. The trio first practiced International Space Station emergency procedures today then went on to space research and robotics training.

The U.S. company Northrop Grumman is getting its 10th Cygnus cargo craft packed and ready for launch atop an Antares rocket Nov. 15 at 4:49 a.m. EST. Russia will launch its 71st station resupply mission aboard a Progress spaceship the next day at 1:14 p.m.

Both resupply ships are due to arrive at the station Sunday Nov. 18 just 10 hours apart. The Cygnus will get there first following its head start. Commander Alexander Gerst assisted by Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will capture the American vessel with the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 4:35 a.m. A few hours later, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will monitor the approach and automated docking of the Russian Progress 71 cargo craft to the Zvezda service module at 2:30 p.m.

All three crew members called down to mission controls centers in Houston and Moscow for a coordinated emergency drill today. The orbital residents practiced communication and decision-making skills while maneuvering along evacuation paths and locating safety gear.

Afterward, Gerst and Serena partnered up and reviewed next Sunday’s Cygnus approach and rendezvous procedures. Gerst will command the Canadarm2 to reach out and grapple Cygnus as Serena monitors the spaceship’s telemetry and data.

Prokopyev continued his science and maintenance duties in the orbital lab’s Russian segment. The cosmonaut explored the physics of plasma-dust crystals then conducted an eye exam in conjunction with doctors on Earth. Prokopyev also photographed the inside of the Zvezda and stowed radiation detectors.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/08/u-s-russian-spaceships-line-up-for-launch-after-japanese-vessel-departs/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/09/2018 09:01 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/08/2018

Meteor: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop and completed a software anti-virus update. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew exchanged the hard drive containing Run #2 data and inserted a new hard drive for Run #3. The crew then reconfigured the gas chamber from Neon to Argon gas usage. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Onboard Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Simulation:  The full crew participated in a simulation to practice emergency responses based on information provided by simulator displays. They translated through ISS to appropriate response locations and practiced procedure execution and decision making based on cues from the simulator. Following the training, they conducted a review session with Houston and Moscow Control Centers.

Northrop Grumman-10 (NG-10) Cygnus Rendezvous On-board Training (OBT):  The crew reviewed the NG-10 mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures, and interfaces necessary for monitoring and commanding to the Cygnus vehicle.  NG-10 is scheduled to arrive at the ISS on November 18.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/09/2018 09:07 pm
Crew Ends Week Researching Space Physics, Biology and Time

Catherine Williams Posted on November 9, 2018

A crew of three from around the world are heading into the weekend aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 57 trio from the United States, Russia and Germany studied a variety of space phenomena today including physics, biology and time perception.
Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor joined Commander Alexander Gerst for eye checks first thing Friday morning. The duo then split up for a science-filled day and preparations for the next U.S. cargo mission.

Serena spent most of the day in the Japanese Kibo lab module mixing protein crystal samples and stowing them in an incubator for later analysis. She moved on to a little space gardening for the VEG-03 study before stowing gear that sequences ribonucleic acid, or RNA, from unknown microbes living in the station.

Serena also found time to set up a command panel for communications with a Cygnus cargo craft when it arrives to resupply the station Nov. 18. The resupply ship from U.S. company Northrop Grumman is being packed and readied for launch atop an Antares rocket Nov. 15 at 4:49 a.m. EST. from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Gerst spent over an hour in the European Columbus lab module today researching how astronauts perceive time in space including its physical and mental impacts. The German astronaut from ESA (European Space Agency) also configured a specialized microscope for more protein crystal observations.

Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev from Roscosmos continued his week-long research exploring complex plasmas, or ionized gases produced by high temperatures. The Russian experiment may benefit space physics research and improve spacecraft designs. The cosmonaut also swapped fuel bottles inside the Combustion Integrated Rack to maintain ongoing flame and gas research aboard the station.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/09/crew-ends-week-researching-space-physics-biology-and-time/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/13/2018 10:22 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/09/2018

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew exchanged the data hard drive and then setup Particle Trapping for Run #4. The Chamber was then cleaned and the video monitor was setup to document the de-installation of the hardware. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1: The crew used pipettes to mix varying viscosity solutions into the crystallization plates. BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Time Perception in Microgravity: A crewmember performed the Time Perception experiment that utilized a head mounted display and headphones. A laptop program induces visual and audio stimuli to measure a subject’s response to spatial and time perception in a microgravity environment. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics: The crew reconfigured the LMM from ACE-T7 science to Biophysics-06 experiment science configuration. The crew cleaned up oil on ACE (Advanced Colloids Experiment) Module inside the LMM AFC, removed the ACE Module and LMM Control Base, configured LMM objective lenses, and installed the LMM Petri Base inside the LMM AFC. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work.  Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. LMM Biophysics 4 examines the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPs) Inspection: Today the crew inspected the Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBAs), as well as the Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs). They ensured each item was in a useable configuration and fully functional. This routine inspection is scheduled every 45 days.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Detent Plate Adjust with Rope Check: Today the crew adjusted the ARED Detent Plates with ground team support to restore full functionality. The activity incorporated steps to assess the possibility of friction from the Cable Arm Ropes preventing successful two-point Detent Ball and Plate engagement.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Checkout: Today, the crew worked with ground teams in order to successfully activate and checkout the C2V2 system in support of the Northrop Grumman-10 (NG-10) mission, which will utilize the C2V2 system during approach and capture. The test verified command capability from MCC-D (Dulles) and from on board via the Portable Computer System (PCS).  NG-10 is scheduled to launch on November 15, 2018.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/13/2018 10:23 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/12/2018

H-II Transfer Vehicle 7 (HTV7) Status:  HTV7 performed a nominal deorbit, on Saturday November 10, concluding a very successful mission.  Final telemetry from HTV7 was received at 21:41 GMT (03:41 PM CT) at an altitude of ~104 km.  A nominal separation of the HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) was conducted during this timeframe. The HSRC with JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG) and Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) samples inside the capsule were subsequently retrieved from the expected splashdown zone and are returning to Japan. The HSRC measures 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30 liters of pressurized volume for sample return.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4):  Over the weekend, a crewmember changed the configuration of the PK-4 chamber gas valve to the Neon setting.  A hard drive change out was also completed and hard drives s/n 035 and 036 were packed. Plasma Krystall-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Veggie:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

US Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Resize:  Today the crew resized EMUs 3003 and 3008 in preparation for upcoming EVAs. Each EMU contains exchangeable components allowing each astronaut to adjust EMU fit to their individual preference. EMU 3003 was resized for David Saint-Jacques and EMU 3008 was resized for Anne McClain. Both of these crewmembers are expected to arrive to the ISS via Soyuz 57S on December 3, 2018.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Cable Replacement:  Today the crew performed routine maintenance in order to replace the ARED Cable Arm Ropes.  Once replaced, they applied proper tension and inspected the cable-pulley system bearings.  This maintenance is performed approximately every 146 days.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/13/2018 10:25 pm
U.S., Russian Rockets Preparing to Resupply Station This Weekend

Mark Garcia Posted on November 13, 2018

A U.S. rocket stands at its launch pad at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia counting down to a Thursday morning launch. On the other side of the world in Kazakhstan, a Russian rocket is being processed for its launch Friday afternoon. Both spaceships are hauling several tons of food, fuel, supplies and new science to resupply the Expedition 57 crew aboard the International Space Station.

First, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter is set to blastoff atop the Antares rocket Thursday at 4:49 a.m. EST from Virginia’s Atlantic coast. Next, Russia will roll out its Progress 71 (71P) cargo craft for a launch Friday at 1:14 p.m. from the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

Cygnus will then lead the 71P on a dual journey to the orbital laboratory where the two spaceships will arrive on Sunday just hours apart. Cygnus will get there first when Commander Alexander Gerst assisted by Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor captures the private cargo carrier at 4:35 a.m. with the Canadarm2 robotic arm. After some rest, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will monitor the automated docking of the 71P to the Zvezda service module’s rear port at 2:30 p.m.

Gerst and Serena trained today for the robotic capture of Cygnus on Sunday reviewing approach and rendezvous procedures. Gerst first started his day reviewing details about a new free-flying robotic assistant that uses artificial intelligence before moving on to protein crystal research. Serena worked on the Life Sciences Glovebox then moved on to orbital plumbing tasks.

The duo also joined Prokopyev for ongoing eye checks in conjunction with doctors on the ground. Prokopyev primarily worked in the Russian segment throughout Tuesday on life support maintenance and science experiments.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/13/u-s-russian-rockets-preparing-to-resupply-station-this-weekend/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/14/2018 06:29 am
November 13, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-172

New York Students to Speak with Astronaut Aboard Space Station

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, currently orbiting Earth as part of the International Space Station’s Expedition 57 crew,will answer questions from students at New York’s University Prep Charter High School at 11:05 a.m. EST Friday, Nov. 16. The Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA television and the agency’s website.

The school’s 400-member student body is expected to attend the event and use Auñón-Chancellor’s responses to guide students in an interdisciplinary project investigating how to colonize Mars.

The event, in association with Teach for America, will be held in the auditorium at University Prep Charter High School, 600 St. Ann’s Ave., the Bronx. Media interested in covering should contact Nick Schifano at [email protected] 201-961-4903.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/14/2018 08:42 am
Right now, inside Zvezda module, Sergey Prokopyev performs training on TORU, in preparation for the arrival of Progress MS-10, Sunday 18...
(talking a lot about Fly Around…)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/14/2018 09:57 am
TORU training always in progress, practicing final approach and docking training, now….
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/14/2018 02:22 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/13/2018

MObile companion (Cimon):  A crewmember reviewed a summary for this week’s operations and also retrieved and charged the two Cimon batteries.  Cimon is a technology demonstration project and an observational study that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics:  A crewmember removed Plate 1 Biophysics sample from the Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-1 and installed it into the LMM in preparation for Biophysics-06 experiment. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work.  Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. LMM Biophysics 4 examines the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG):  Today the crew removed the Gas Trap Fill Fixture from the Node-1 location in preparation for attachment to the LSG Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) return line planned for tomorrow. Tomorrow’s activity will start the removal of any trapped air in the system. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus On-board Training:  Today, the crew performed a Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. NG-10 is currently on track to launch on Novemeber15 and berth to ISS on November 18.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Yesterday evening, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and performed Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latch End Effector (LEE) checkouts on both strings. Brakes and joints diagnostics were also performed on both strings. All of the NG-10 pre-launch MSS checkouts were successful. They then maneuvered SSRMS to the Offset Grapple start positon where the LEE snare cables survey was performed to find that the snares were in a good configuration. MSS is now in position for the crew practice session scheduled for November 15, 2018.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R):  The crew removed and replaced the WHC Urine Receptacle and Insert Filter. After replacement, a functionality test of the WHC was performed and the WHC was declared operational.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/14/2018 04:49 pm
Dual Cargo Missions Set for Friday Launch and Sunday Delivery

Mark Garcia Posted on November 14, 2018

Dismal weather on Virginia’s Atlantic coast has pushed back the launch of a U.S. cargo craft to the International Space Station one day to Friday. Russia’s resupply ship is still on track for its launch to the orbital lab from Kazakhstan less than nine hours later on the same day.

Mission managers from NASA and Northrop Grumman are now targeting the Cygnus space freighter’s launch on Friday at 4:23 a.m. EST from Pad-0A at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Cygnus sits atop an Antares rocket packed with over 7,400 pounds of crew supplies, science experiments, spacesuit gear, station hardware and computer resources.

Cygnus will separate from the Antares rocket when it reaches orbit nine minutes after launch and begin a two-day journey to the station’s Unity module. Its cymbal-shaped UltraFlex solar arrays will then unfurl to power the vehicle during its flight. Expedition 57 astronauts Alexander Gerst and Serena Auñón-Chancellor will be in the cupola to greet Cygnus Sunday and capture the private cargo carrier with the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 4:35 a.m.

Russia rolled out its Progress 71 (71P) resupply ship today at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan where it stands at the launch pad for final processing. The 71st flight of a Progress cargo craft to the orbital laboratory is scheduled for launch Friday at 1:14 p.m. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will be monitoring the arrival of 71P when it automatically docks to the rear port of the Zvezda service module Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

Gerst and Prokopyev started Wednesday morning training for the arrival of 71P. The pair practiced commanding and manually docking the vehicle on a computer in the unlikely event the Russian cargo craft is unable to dock on its own. Gerst then moved on to Cygnus capture training after lunchtime with Auñón-Chancellor following up before the end of the day. NASA TV will cover live the launch, capture and docking of both Cygnus and Progress on Friday and Sunday.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/14/dual-cargo-missions-set-for-friday-launch-and-sunday-...
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/15/2018 02:28 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/14/2018

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) Gas Trap Degassing IFM-return line:  A crewmember installed a gas trap into the return line of the LSG in preparation for removing trapped gas from system lines.  During the activity, ground teams observed a 93mL accumulator drop, which then leveled off.  The LSG was subsequently isolated by closing the Flow Control Valve (FCV) via ground command. Teams are reviewing the telemetry and are developing a forward plan. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1 Microscopy Ops:  A crewmember performed the final Microscopy operations Phase 2 by placing samples under the microscope for observation and providing photographic documentation.  BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Veggie:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Cimon (MObile companioN):  Sound and Camera Check:  The crew performed a Cimon microphone adjustment and camera view check with the ground in preparation for upcoming Cimon demonstrations. Both the sound and camera checks were deemed successful. The Pilot Study with the Crew Interactive MObile companioN (Cimon) is a technology demonstration project, and an observational study, that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Robotics On-Board Training (OBT):  Today the crew performed a self-study training session using the Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT). They exercised Cygnus approach and retreat monitoring, as well as capture, using a simulated Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Antares 230 Rocket is scheduled to launch from Wallops Flight Facility on November 16 at 09:27 GMT and Cygnus capture is planned for November 18 at 09:35 GMT.

TORU Training Session:  Alexander Gerst and Sergey Prokopev participated in a TORU training session today. During the session the crew practiced working through TORU procedures and expected docking data, prepared for TV coverage and photography, and practiced rendezvous and docking using an onboard simulator. TORU is a manual docking system for Soyuz and Progress spacecraft that serves as a backup to the automatic Kurs System. Today’s training was performed in preparation for Progress 71P docking scheduled for November 18.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/15/2018 04:38 pm
US Cargo Mission Slips a Day; Station Tests Free-Flying AI Assistant

Mark Garcia Posted on November 15, 2018

The launch of the Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman has slipped another day due to inclement weather at the Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Atlantic coast. Cygnus is now scheduled to launch atop the Antares rocket Saturday at 4:01 a.m. EST with a much improved weather forecast.

The U.S. resupply ship will deliver approximately 7,400 pounds of food, fuel and supplies to the station two days later. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to capture Cygnus Monday at 5:20 a.m. Commander Alexander Gerst will back her up and monitor telemetry from the vehicle during its approach and rendezvous.

The Progress 71 (71P) cargo craft from Russia is at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad in Kazakhstan ready to blast off Friday at 1:14 p.m. EST. Prokopyev will be monitoring the Russian resupply ship when it arrives Sunday for an automated docking to the rear port of the Zvezda service module at 2:30 p.m.

The International Space Station Program is testing the use of artificial intelligence today to contribute to mission success aboard the orbital laboratory. Meanwhile, the space residents from the U.S., Germany and Russia continued more human research and prepared for the upcoming U.S. and Russian space deliveries.

CIMON, or Crew Interactive MObile CompanioN, is a free-flying robotic assistant based on artificial intelligence currently being tested on the station. The astronaut support device from ESA (European Space Agency) was powered up and commissioned today by the station commander inside the Columbus lab module. The CIMON technology seeks to demonstrate astronaut-robot interaction by answering crew questions, assisting with science experiments and navigating autonomously in the lab.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev and fellow crewmates Gerst and Auñón-Chancellor started Thursday with ongoing eye checks. Gerst and Serena swapped roles as Crew Medical Officer scanning each other’s eyes including Prokopyev’s using an ultrasound device with guidance from a doctor on the ground. The data is downlinked to Earth real-time and helps scientists understand how microgravity affects astronaut vision as well as the components and shape of the eye.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/15/us-cargo-mission-slips-a-day-station-tests-free-flying-ai-assistant/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/15/2018 06:55 pm
Thursday, 11/15:: Cygnus Offset Grapple Practice.
Friday, 11/16: Cygnus ROBoT Training Session 2.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 11/16/2018 10:54 am
From Alex Gerst
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/16/2018 01:15 pm
Alexander Gerst interacts with technology demonstrator CIMON in the Columbus laboratory.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/16/2018 02:14 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/15/2018

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Robotics Onboard Training:  Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) in support of the crew’s Cygnus Offset Grapple practice.  During the Off Set Grapple activity, the crew used the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) as the target to practice grapple approaches, maneuvering the SSRMS over the pin, and practiced pulling the trigger when they are in the grapple envelope.  Due to weather concerns, NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket is now scheduled to launch on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT.  Cygnus capture is planned for Monday, November 19 at 4:20AM CT.

Crew Interactive MObile companioN (Cimon):  The crew performed a successful checkout of the new Cimon artificial Intelligence free-flyer. Cimon was able to demonstrate free flying and absolute navigation in the Columbus Module.  The Pilot Study with Cimon is a technology demonstration project and an observational study that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Questionnaire. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST):  The crew opened up FROST-1 and removed condensation and some corrosion that was identified during the last use of the facility.  The FROST is a Stirling cooler that is able to maintain temperatures under -70ºC.

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG):  As part of the continuing integration activity for the Life Science Glovebox, the crew connected the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) Supply Hose to the JPM1F5 Utility Interface Panel.  The Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Meteor:  The crew performed On-orbit training of the Meteor experiment by watching a video provided by the Meteor experiment team.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/16/2018 05:48 pm
Russia’s Cargo Craft Blasts Off to Station for Sunday Delivery

Mark Garcia Posted on November 16, 2018

Carrying almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the International Space Station crew, the unpiloted Russian Progress 71 cargo spacecraft launched at 1:14 p.m. EST (12:14 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, Baikonur) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

At the time of launch, the International Space Station was flying about 252 statute miles over southern Kazakhstan.

The resupply ship reached preliminary orbit and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned. The Russian cargo craft will make 34 orbits of Earth before docking to the orbiting laboratory at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18. NASA Television coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin at 1:45 p.m.

Progress 71 will remain docked at the station for more than four months before departing in March for its deorbit in Earth’s atmosphere.

Crew aboard the space station are scheduled to receive two cargo resupply missions in the coming days. Tomorrow, launch of Northrop Grumman’s Antares rocket with Cygnus cargo spacecraft bound for the International Space Station is targeted for 4:01 a.m. from Pad 0A of Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, located at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. NASA TV will provide launch broadcast coverage online beginning at 3:30 a.m. A Cygnus launch Saturday would result in capture and berthing on Monday, Nov. 19.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/16/russias-cargo-craft-blasts-off-to-station-for-sunday-delivery/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/17/2018 09:59 am
Press release, 16 November 2018

World premiere – Rendezvous between CIMON and Alexander Gerst on the International Space Station - International Space Station - Technology Experiment with Artificial Intelligence 'made in Germany'

On 15 November 2018 at 11:40 CET, the mission team in the Biotechnology Space Support Center (BIOTESC) at Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts watched with baited breath. After two-and-a-half years of highly intensive preparations, as well
as countless testing and training sessions with CIMO (Crew Interactive Mobile CompanioN) on Earth, you could hear a pin drop – there was an atmosphere of total concentration and thrilled anticipation. After a software upload to the International Space
Station, a software update for CIMON himself, an audio check and a test of the navigation camera, Alexander Gerst took a good look at his new robotic housemate and put him straight into operation. The world premiere lasted 90 minutes – the first 'rendezvous'
between the German ESA astronaut and his autonomous mobile robot assistant. 

Once Alexander Gerst had taken his manmade helper out of its box in the Columbus module of the ISS, the German astronaut woke him up with the words "Wake up, CIMON!" The answer came promptly: "What can I do for you?" After this initial banter, Gerst
allowed CIMON to float around freely – initially by remote control from Earth. The guidance, navigation and control system was thus activated.

Then came some autonomous navigation with multiple turns and movements in all directions. Once complete, CIMON was able to locate Gerst's face and make eye contact. To demonstrate its capabilities as an assistant, CIMON used its 'face' – a display
at the centre of the sphere – to show the instructions for a student experiment on crystallisation and also played a song. It then recorded a video and photo of Alexander Gerst using its integrated cameras. Afterwards, Alexander Gerst brought CIMON
back to its place in the Columbus module. "The voice communication worked perfectly and I am very relieved that the cooperation between CIMON and Alex ran so smoothly," says Gwendolyne Pascua, the BIOTESC project manager who spoke directly with Alexander
Gerst during the commissioning phase to guide him through the experiment.

"It is an incredible feeling and an absolute delight to witness how CIMON is seeing, hearing, understanding and speaking. For us, this first real deployment in space is part of history and is hopefully just the beginning of its usage on the ISS," says
Dr Christian Karrasch, CIMON project manager from the DLR Space Administration. "Interaction with artificial intelligence fascinates me. As a system, CIMON is unparalleled elsewhere in the world and was designed specifically for deployment on the ISS.
We are entering uncharted territory here and broadening technological horizons in Germany." 

"CIMON represents the embodiment of our vision," adds Till Eisenberg, project manager for CIMON at Airbus. "It is a huge step for human spaceflight and one that we are taking here as a team. In CIMON, we have laid the foundation for social assistance
systems that can work even under extreme conditions." 

CIMON used the Wi-Fi on the International Space Station for data transmission and established an Internet connection to the IBM Cloud via satellite link and ground stations. "When CIMON is asked a question or when it is addressed, the Watson AI first
converts the audio signal into text that can be understood or interpreted by the AI," says Matthias Biniok, IBM project manager, describing the processes taking place in CIMON's 'brain'. "IBM Watson is thus able to grasp the underlying intention, as
well as the context of the words. The result is a pinpoint response, which is then converted back into language and beamed up to the ISS. This process enables a natural, dynamic spoken dialogue."

Bernd Rattenbacher, team leader at the BIOTESC Biotechnology Space Support Center of the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, says: "The data connection to the Earth runs via satellite to NASA and to the Columbus Control Centre at the DLR
site in Oberpfaffenhofen. The signal travels from there to us, the CIMON ground station at BIOTESC in Lucerne, the Swiss User Support and Operations Center, which is connected to the IBM Cloud in Frankfurt by Internet. The runtime for the signal alone
via the satellites is 0.4 second in one direction. A large number of firewalls and VPN tunnels are enabled to ensure data security."

CIMON also has a scientific background. The consultants are Judith-Irina Buchheim and Professor Alexander Choukèr from the Department of Anaesthesiology at LMU Munich. "As an AI partner and companion, CIMON could support astronauts in their high workload
of experiments as well as maintenance and repair work, thus reducing their exposure to stress," Buchheim says.

CIMON – The idea

Developed and built in Germany, CIMON is a technology experiment to support astronauts and increase the efficiency of their work. CIMON is able to show and explain information, instructions for scientific experiments and repairs. The voice-controlled
access to documents and media is an advantage, as the astronauts can keep both hands free. It can also be used as a mobile camera to save astronaut crew time. CIMON could perform routine tasks, in particular, such as the documentation of experiments,
the search for objects and for taking inventory. CIMON is also able to see, hear, understand and speak. Its eyes are actually two cameras that it uses for facial recognition, as well as five other cameras for orientation and video documentation. Ultrasound
sensors measure distances to recognise potential collisions. Its ears consist of eight microphones to identify directions, and an additional directional microphone to improve voice comprehension. Its mouth is a loudspeaker used to speak or to play
music. At the heart of the AI for language understanding is the IBM Watson AI technology from the IBM Cloud. CIMON was not equipped with self-learning capabilities and requires active human instruction. The AI used for autonomous navigation was contributed
by Airbus and is designed for movement planning and object recognition. Twelve internal fans allow CIMON to move and rotate freely in all directions. This means it can turn toward the astronaut when addressed. It can also nod or shake its head and
follow through space either autonomously or on command. 

CIMON – The partners

The development and construction of the interactive astronaut assistant was commissioned by the Space Administration of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) and implemented
by Airbus in Friedrichshafen and Bremen. The Watson AI technology from the IBM Cloud is used for voice-controlled artificial intelligence. Scientists from the Medical Center of the University of Munich (LMU) helped develop and oversee the human aspects
of the assistance system. A roughly 50-strong project team from DLR, Airbus, IBM and LMU have been working on the implementation of CIMON since August 2016. CIMON has been on board the ISS since 2 July 2018. It is no coincidence that its name is reminiscent
of Simon Wright, the robot assistant – the ‘flying brain’ – from the science-fiction series 'Captain Future'.

Other partners are the European Space Agency (ESA) and BIOTESC at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts (Switzerland) for the operational preparation and implementation of the experiment in the infrastructure of the ISS, as well as the
Columbus Control Center at the DLR site in Oberpfaffenhofen for operational mission planning.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 11/17/2018 07:25 pm
Is there a resource online that shows where the station is now that ALSO shows any approaching (or departing) visiting vehicles?  All of the tracker sites I've found so far only show the ISS.  With Progress launching yesterday and Cygnus this morning, I'm looking for a map that shows where they are.  I'm hosting an outdoor event tonight and am hoping to spot the VV's (I already know the station itself won't be visible).

I imagine it's hard to create an accurate map of them since they are doing orbital correction burns pretty often during their respective two-day cruises.  So I don't expect it to be perfectly accurate, but do want to see if their location makes them visible.

Thanks!

EDIT a full day later:

Over in the NG-10 thread, someone posted this link:

https://www.n2yo.com/?s=25544|43702|43704

... which shows how to get multiple objects onto the N2YO map.  However you'll need the NORAD object IDs for the spacecraft you want to track, and obviously that takes some time (less than a day, in my meager experience) after launch to get posted.  But at least now I know the syntax for creating the multi-object map.

My outdoor event last night was great, by the way.  Using the ISS HDEV views (projected on a wall outside) we got to see a sunrise and a moonset.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/18/2018 06:59 pm
ISS Config., after Progress MS-10 arrival.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/18/2018 08:24 pm
Russian Cargo Craft Docks to Station and Delivers Goods

Mark Garcia Posted on November 18, 2018

Traveling about 252 miles over Algeria, the unpiloted Russian Progress 71 cargo ship docked at 2:28 p.m. EST to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module on the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

In addition to the arrival of Progress today, a Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft is on its way to the space station with about 7,400 pounds of cargo after launching at 4:01 a.m. Saturday from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

The Cygnus spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at the orbital laboratory Monday, Nov. 19. Expedition 57 astronauts Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA and Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will use the space station’s robotic arm to grapple Cygnus about 5:20 a.m. Watch installation coverage beginning at 4 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/18/russian-cargo-craft-docks-to-station-and-delivers-goods/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/19/2018 11:50 am
ISS Config., after Cygnus NG-10 arrival.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 11/19/2018 12:55 pm
NASA TV, November 20, Tuesday
10:55 a.m. – ISS Expedition 57 Facebook Live In-Flight Event for the 20th Anniversary of ISS with ISS Commander Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Flight Engineers Serena Aunon-Chancellor of NASA and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos (All Channels)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/19/2018 02:39 pm
U.S. Space Freighter Captured by NASA Astronaut

Mark Garcia Posted on November 19, 2018

At 5:28 a.m. EST, Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA used the International Space Station’s robotic Canadarm2 to grapple the Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft as Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), monitored Cygnus’ systems during its approach. Next, ground controllers will command the station’s arm to rotate and install Cygnus, dubbed the SS John Young, on the bottom of the station’s Unity module.

NASA Television coverage of installation will begin at 6:45 a.m., and installation of the Cygnus spacecraft to the space station is expected to be completed later this morning.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/19/u-s-space-freighter-captured-by-nasa-astronaut/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/19/2018 02:41 pm
Canadian Robotic Arm Installs U.S. Cygnus Cargo Ship to Station

Mark Garcia Posted on November 19, 2018

The Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo ship was bolted into place on the International Space Station’s Earth-facing port of the Unity module at 7:31 a.m. EST. The spacecraft will spend about three months attached to the space station before departing in February 2019. After it leaves the station, the uncrewed spacecraft will deploy several CubeSats before its fiery re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere as it disposes of several tons of trash.

The spacecraft’s arrival brings close to 7,400 pounds of research and supplies to space station. Highlights of NASA-sponsored research to advance exploration goals and enable future missions to the Moon and Mars include:

Sensory input in microgravity

Changes in sensory input in microgravity may be misinterpreted and cause a person to make errors in estimation of velocity, distance or orientation. VECTION examines this effect as well as whether people adapt to altered sensory input on long-duration missions and how that adaptation changes upon return to Earth. Using a virtual reality display, astronauts estimate the distance to an object, length of an object and orientation of their bodies in space. Tests are conducted before, during and after flight. The investigation is named for a visual illusion of self-movement, called vection, which occurs when an individual is still but sees the world moving past, according to principal investigator Laurence Harris. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) sponsors the investigation.

Solidifying cement in space

The MVP-Cell 05 investigation uses a centrifuge to provide a variable gravity environment to study the complex process of cement solidification, a step toward eventually making and using concrete on extraterrestrial bodies. These tests are a follow-on to the previous studies known as Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification (MICS), which studied cement solidification in microgravity.  Together, these tests will help engineers better understand the microstructure and material properties of cement, leading to design of safer, lightweight space habitats and improving cement processing techniques on Earth. This investigation is sponsored by NASA.

Investigations sponsored by the U.S. National Laboratory on the space station, which Congress designated in 2005 to maximize its use for improving quality of life on Earth, include:

From stardust to solar systems

Much of the universe was created when dust from star-based processes clumped into intermediate-sized particles and eventually became planets, moons and other objects. Many questions remain as to just how this worked, though. The EXCISS investigation seeks answers by simulating the high-energy, low gravity conditions that were present during formation of the early solar system. Scientists plan to zap a specially formulated dust with an electrical current, then study the shape and texture of pellets formed.

Principal investigator Tamara Koch explains that the dust is made up of particles of forsterite (Mg2SiO4), the main mineral in many meteorites and related to olivine, also known as the gemstone peridot. The particles are about the diameter of a human hair.

Growing crystals to fight Parkinson’s disease

The CASIS PCG-16 investigation grows large crystals of an important protein, Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, or LRRK2, in microgravity for analysis back on Earth. This protein is implicated in development of Parkinson’s disease, and improving our knowledge of its structure may help scientists better understand the pathology of the disease and develop therapies to treat it. Crystals of LRRK2 grown in gravity are too small and too compact to study, making microgravity an essential part of this research.

Better gas separation membranes

Membranes represent one of the most energy-efficient and cost-effective technologies for separating and removing carbon dioxide from waste gases, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. CEMSICA tests membranes made from particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) with pores 100 nanometers or smaller. Producing these membranes in microgravity may resolve some of the challenges of their manufacture on Earth and lead to development of lower-cost, more durable membranes that use less energy. The technology ultimately may help reduce the harmful effects of CO2 emissions on the planet.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/19/canadian-robotic-arm-installs-u-s-cygnus-cargo-ship-to-station/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/19/2018 04:36 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/16/2018

Progress (71P) Launch:  71P successfully launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome today at 12:14PM CT.  71P will be performing a 34 orbit rendezvous with ISS, which sets the stage for docking on Sunday at 1:29PM CT. 

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) Integration:  The crew performed tasks to install work volume filters, deploy the LSG Laptop, and made rack-to-rack connections to EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 4. The LSG was then successfully commissioned by ground teams. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Meteor:  The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Veggie-03:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary.  The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus On-board Training:  Today, the crew performed a second training session utilizing the Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT). ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket is on track to launch on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT.  Cygnus capture is planned for Monday, November 19 at 4:20AM CT.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/20/2018 08:42 pm
Crew Unpacking New U.S., Russian Cargo Ships on Station’s 20th Anniversary

Mark Garcia Posted on November 20, 2018

The International Space Station turned 20 years old today with the launch of the first element, the Zarya module, occurring on Nov. 20, 1998. The three-person Expedition 57 crew commemorated the beginning of the orbital lab’s construction during a Facebook Live event today and answered questions submitted via social media.

The crew also continues to unpack the newest U.S. and Russian cargo ships to visit the International Space Station today.

The Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman arrived Monday delivering almost 7,400 pounds of crew supplies and new science experiments. The Progress 71 (71P) resupply from Russia docked Sunday packed with almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies

Astronauts Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Alexander Gerst opened Cygnus’s hatch a few hours after it was captured and attached to the Unity module. Today they are installing new science freezers, transferring the new cargo and replenishing the orbital laboratory. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev opened the 71P hatch after its automated docking Sunday and began unloading the new gear.

In between all the cargo work today, the three-person crew had time to conduct science and maintain station systems.

Gerst photographed samples for a physics study that is observing how quartz/clay particles interact in microgravity. Results could benefit future planetary studies and the petroleum industry. Auñón-Chancellor measured light levels in the Columbus lab module for a study researching how new station lights impact crew wellness. Prokopyev worked primarily in the station’s Russian segment maintaining life support systems.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/20/crew-unpacking-new-u-s-russian-cargo-ships-on-stations-20th-anniversary/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/21/2018 03:48 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/21/2018 03:50 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/21/2018 03:52 pm
Alexander Gerst

Space Station history

I found a locker on the International Space Station that probably hasn't been opened for a while...
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/21/2018 03:59 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/19/2018

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10):  NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket successfully launched on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.  Once in orbit, Cygnus S.S. John Young performed a series of phasing burns over the course of two days to rendezvous with ISS. The crew successfully captured Cygnus with the Space Station Remote Manipulation System (SSRMS) today at 4:28AM CT. Once captured, they handed off control of the SSRMS to ground Robotics Controllers who then maneuvered the vehicle to the Node 1 nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) interface where it was securely bolted to the ISS. Once the CBM bolting operations were complete, the crew and ground teams worked together to perform Node 1 CBM vestibule pressurization followed by hatch opening and ingress at 11:17 AM CT. NG-10 brings ~3266 kg of cargo to ISS.

Progress (71P) Docking:  Following Friday’s launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, 71P successfully performed a 34 orbit rendezvous with ISS and automatically docked to the Service Module Aft docking port on Sunday, November 18 at 1:28PM CT. The hatch was subsequently opened later that same day. 71P brings ~1404 kg of cargo to ISS.

Probiotics: Today the crew collected samples in support of the ongoing Probiotics investigation.  Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts in a closed microgravity environment.  The results of this investigation may be used to support improvements in crew members’ intestinal microbiota and their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Veg-03: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility with the bellows up.  Per recent reports from the team, there are currently have 3 healthy plants and 3 delayed plants growing in the 6 plant pillows.  Veg-03G is currently in a 28 day growth cycle which began on October 25 for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/21/2018 04:37 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/20/2018

ISS 20th Anniversary:  The largest and most complex international construction project in space began in Kazakhstan 20 years ago today. Atop its Proton rocket, on November. 20, 1998, the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) lifted off its launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome. The launch of the first element of the ISS kicked off an incredible journey of orbital assembly, operations, and science. Today the ISS crew participated in a Public Affairs Event answering a sequence of questions from participants around the world on Facebook Live.

Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS):  Today the crew performed the final set of sample photos and stowed BCAT-CS experiment hardware.  The PI team was present to monitor the activities from the ground and was very happy with the results. Due to the very interesting data produced from BCAT-CS, the experiment was extended substantially past the original 2-4 week run duration to around 90 days in order to observe the continued evolution of the aggregates.  BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles.  Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

Multiple User System for Earth Sensing Facility (MUSES) server boot swap:  Due to degradation observed in boot drive 1, today the crew switched the MUSES server to use boot drive 2 instead.  The MUSES facility hosts earth-viewing instruments (Hosted Payloads), such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations. It hosts up to four instruments at the same time, and offers the ability to change, upgrade, and robotically service those instruments. It also provides a test bed for technology demonstration and technology maturation by providing long-term access to the space environment on the ISS.

Probiotics:  Today the crew collected samples and answered a questionnaire in support of the ongoing Probiotics investigation.  Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts in a closed microgravity environment.  The results of this investigation may be used to support improvements in crew members’ intestinal microbiota and their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Team Task Switching (TTS):  The crew completed a Team Task Switching Survey using the Data Collection Tool on a space station computer.  When crewmembers are required to switch their attention between tasks frequently, performance on each of the tasks can be negatively affected.  The objective of the TTS investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crewmembers have difficulty in switching tasks and determine the impacts of these switches, in order to both reduce any negative consequences and improve individual and team motivation and effectiveness

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations:  Following yesterday’s Cygnus hatch opening, the crew completed approximately 3 hours of cargo operations today.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/21/2018 04:40 pm
Three Humans Will Spend Thanksgiving 260 Miles Above Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on November 21, 2018

Three humans will spend Thanksgiving orbiting about 260 miles above Earth. Another three individuals are spending the holiday in Kazakhstan preparing to launch to the International Space Station on Dec. 3.

The Expedition 57 trio from the U.S., Russia and Germany will share a traditional Thanksgiving meal together with fresh ingredients delivered over the weekend on a pair of new cargo ships. Commander Alexander Gerst from ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will take the day off in space. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will work a normal day of Russian science and maintenance then join his crewmates for the holiday feast.

Gerst called down to European mission controllers today for a weekly tag up then answered a questionnaire about his experiences living in space. Afterward, he continued unpacking inventory from the new Cygnus cargo craft.

Auñón-Chancellor spent most of her day in Japan’s Kibo lab module working on life support gear. Toward the end of the day, she stowed research samples in a science freezer then debriefed ground controllers with Gerst about Cygnus cargo operations.

Prokopyev focused his attention on the Russian side of the orbital lab working on life support gear and unloading the new Progress 71 cargo craft.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 58 crew members from the U.S., Russia and Canada are in final training ahead of their six-and-a-half month mission on the orbital lab. Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko will lead the six-hour flight aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft flanked by NASA astronaut Anne McClain and Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques.

This will be Kononenko’s fourth mission to the space station and his second as station commander. McClain and Saint-Jacques are both beginning their first missions to space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/21/three-humans-will-spend-thanksgiving-260-miles-above-earth/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/26/2018 02:58 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/21/2018

Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR) removal: Following a successful completion of the LHPR experiment on GMT 320, today the crew removed it from the MPEP and stowed the hardware.  The Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) was then removed from the Japanese Experiment Module Air Lock (JEMAL) slide table and troubleshooting was performed on a limit switch in the Passive Capture Mechanism.  The LHPR, is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid (propylene in this case) to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Nanoracks (NR) Platform 1: The crew removed Modules -75 and -76 from Nanoracks Platform-1, took photos of modules -75, -76, and -77 all together, and then installed all three modules into Nanoracks Platform-1.  NR Module 75, known as Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project ARISE, is an experiment by University of Duisburg-Essen team on Planet Formation Due to Charge Induced Clustering.  NR Module 76 is the Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project Pump Application using Pulsed Electromagnets for Liquid relocation (PAPELL) experiment. NR Module 77 is the Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project Experimental Chondrule Formation at the ISS (EXCISS). Chondrules are small spherical objects that can be found in most of all meteorites with a texture that indicates they have crystallized from a melt.

Veg-03G plant check and watering: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility and individual plants with the bellows up.  The ground team reports the plants are doing well, including the plants that were initially growing more slowly than the others were.  The current plan is to harvest next week.  Veg-03G is currently in a ~ 28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

At Home in Space (AHIS): The crew completed a questionnaire in their morning (to prevent answers from being impacted by fatigue).  This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations:  The crew continued to perform early cargo unloading operations today. Ground Teams estimate ~6 hours remain for unloading critical items.  Once critical items have been unloaded from Cygnus, the hatch will be closed until after the SpX-16 Dragon mission.

Ku-Band High Rate Data Testing:  This evening, ground teams will configure the on-board video system to maximize Joint Space LAN (JSL) throughput in order to test increased Ku-Band return data rates. Upgrades to both the onboard systems and ground networks have been put in place to allow for Ku-Band return rates of up to 600 Mbps. This test will specifically increase the amount of source data provided from the on-board system in order to observe the system while fully utilizing the bandwidth.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/26/2018 02:58 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018

Food Acceptability Questionnaire: The crew performed the Food Acceptability questionnaire. Food Acceptability seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  The results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).

Veg-03G Plant Check:  Today the crew checked the VEG-03G experiment plants, took photos, and watered as necessary. The current plan is to harvest next week. The ground team noted they are seeing a slight phenotypical difference between the flight Dragoon lettuce and what they have grown on the ground.  Phenotype refers to traits expressed as a result of environmental factors. Veg-03G is currently in a ~28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued to perform early cargo unloading operations today. Ground Teams estimate 3.5 hours remain for unloading critical items.  Once critical items have been unloaded from Cygnus, the hatch will be closed until after the SpX-16 Dragon mission.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 11/26/2018 04:07 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018
<snip>
Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).
<snip>
Any specific reasons that 0.7g is of interest?
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: eeergo on 11/26/2018 04:53 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018
<snip>
Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).
<snip>
Any specific reasons that 0.7g is of interest?

Approximately the mid-point between Mars and Earth gravities, and continuing the Moon-Mars progression ratio:

0.7g ≈ 2 x g(Mars) ≈ 4 x g(Moon)

probably?
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/26/2018 06:07 pm
Human Research in Space; Next Crew Preps for Launch on Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on November 26, 2018

The Expedition 57 crew aboard the International Space Station conducted human research and space physics today while maintaining life support systems. The space trio also continued U.S. and Russian cargo operations as another crew on Earth prepared for its launch early next week.

Commander Alexander Gerst started his day with astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and scanned her eyes with an ultrasound device helping doctors understand how microgravity impacts vision. Gerst then observed protein crystals associated with Parkinson’s disease to help improve treatments on Earth. Auñón-Chancellor jotted down her space experiences for a psychological study then set up hardware for a semiconductor crystal experiment.

Gerst also gathered items to be packed inside the next SpaceX Dragon cargo vessel due to launch Dec. 4 and arrive at the station for capture Dec. 6. Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev transferred fluids for disposal aboard the Russian Progress 70 cargo craft which will depart from the Pirs docking compartment Jan. 25.

Back on Earth in Kazakhstan, three Expedition 58 crew members are in their final week of mission preparations before beginning a six-and-a-half-month mission aboard the orbital lab. Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques will join Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko for a six-hour ride aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft to the station. The new trio will launch Dec. 3 at 6:31 a.m. EST and dock to the Poisk module at 11:36 a.m. NASA TV will broadcast live the launch, docking and crew greeting.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/26/human-research-in-space-next-crew-preps-for-launch-on-earth/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/27/2018 10:50 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/27/2018 11:59 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/26/2018

At Home in Space (AHIS):  The crew completed an AHIS questionnaire this morning.  This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Crystallization of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (CASIS PCG 16):  The crew set up PCG-16 experiment hardware on the Maintenance Work Area and used a pipette to fill PCG Card Micro-G card wells. CASIS PCG 16 evaluates growth of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein crystals in microgravity. LRRK2 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, but crystals of the protein grown on Earth are too small and compact to study. Detailed analysis of larger, space-grown crystals can define the protein’s exact shape and morphology and help scientists better understand the disease’s pathology.

Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) Setup in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG):  Today the crew setup the SUBSA in the MSG. This will be used to support the design of Scalable Gas Separation Membranes via Synthesis Under Microgravity (Cemsica) investigation. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability. SUBSA offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C.

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Depressurization: This depressurization supports the NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) retrieval from the Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4 and relocation to the JEMAL which will occur tonight via ground commanding. NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

MATISS:  The crew removed the Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) Sample Holder Serial Number 6 and prepared it for return to the ground. The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space for possible application in future spacecraft. MATISS is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions.

Veg-03G Plant Check and Watering: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility and individual plants. The current plan is to harvest the plants later this week. Veg-03G is currently in a ~28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

SpaceX-16 (SpX-16) Dragon Pre-Pack:  In preparation for SpX-16 Dragon launch planned for December 4 and arrival to ISS on December 6, the crew started to pack items that will be returning to the ground.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/28/2018 12:02 am
Russian, U.S. Spaceships Get Ready for Launch Ahead of Spacewalk

Mark Garcia Posted on November 27, 2018

In a replay similar to the weekend before Thanksgiving, two rockets on the opposite sides of the world are poised to launch one day after another to replenish the International Space Station with a new crew and cargo.

Three new Expedition 58 crew members are preparing to blast off to the space station on a Russian Soyuz crew ship early next week. The following day, SpaceX will launch its Dragon cargo craft to the orbital lab atop a Falcon 9 rocket.

New astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques with veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko will take a six-hour ride to the station on Monday Dec. 3. The trio will lift off inside their Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft at 6:31 a.m. EST from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. About six hours later they will reach their new home in space and dock to the Poisk module beginning a six-and-a-half-month mission.

The SpaceX Dragon is targeted to begin its ascent to space from the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 4. Dragon will orbit Earth for two days loaded with new science before it is captured with the station’s Canadarm2 and installed to the Harmony module.

Back in space, three Expedition 57 crew members are getting ready for the arrival of both spacecraft while staying focused on microgravity science and spacewalk preparations.

Commander Alexander Gerst and Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor trained for next week’s Dragon rendezvous and capture on a computer today. The duo also continued working on more life science and physics research. Gerst once again studied how protein crystals impact Parkinson’s disease to possibly improve treatments on Earth. Serena researched how cement hardens in space and continued setting up hardware for a semiconductor crystal experiment.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev is configuring the station’s Russian segment for a spacewalk targeted for Dec. 11. He and Kononenko will inspect the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft docked to the Rassvet module before the Expedition 57 trio returns to Earth on Dec. 20.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/27/russian-u-s-spaceships-get-ready-for-launch-ahead-of-spacewalk/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/28/2018 02:49 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/27/2018

CASIS PCG-16 card fill: The crew continued the PCG Card Micro-G card fill that was not fully completed the previous day. This was performed using some of today’s microscope observation time due to the relatively short lifetime of the protein precipitant solution. Crystallization of LRRK2 Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (CASIS PCG 16) evaluates growth of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein crystals in microgravity. LRRK2 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, but crystals of the protein grown on Earth are too small and compact to study. Detailed analysis of larger, space-grown crystals can define the protein’s exact shape and morphology and help scientists better understand the disease’s pathology.

Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification (MICS) – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05) insert 2: The crew mixed the samples, inserted them into the MICS Module, then installed the MICS Module into the MVP Platform. This will start run 2 of 3 for the investigation. MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g). The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.

Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) setup in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) 2: The crew finished the installation of the SUBSA hardware in the MSG work volume, installed the calibration sample, and took 5 – 10 photos of hardware setup. This is being performed in support of the Cemsica investigation setup that was not fully completed yesterday. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability. SUBSA offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C.

The Effect of Long Duration Hypogravity on the Perception of Self-Motion (VECTION): The crew performed the setup of the reference length for use in future operations.  However, issues with the Zbook laptop prevented execution of the commissioning activities today for the VECTION experiment. The objective of the VECTION study is to determine to what extent an astronaut’s ability to visually interpret motion, orientation, and distance may be disrupted in a microgravity environment, and how it may adapt, and how it may be changed upon return to Earth. Multiple experimental time points inflight and upon return to Earth allows for the adaptation and recovery process to be investigated.

SpaceX 16 (SpX-16) Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): The crew reviewed Dragon Robotics procedures and participated in a conference with ground specialists in support of SpX-16 Dragon arrival. Using computer based training, the crew reviewed the Dragon mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures, and the crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding Dragon. SpX-16 Dragon launch is currently scheduled for December 4 with capture and berthing planned for December 6.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Monthly Inspection: The crew completed the monthly T2 inspection with no issues noted. This activity has the crew inspect all four Snubber Arms for signs of free play.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/28/2018 10:56 pm
Station Crews Ramping Up for Busy December

Mark Garcia Posted on November 28, 2018

December is shaping up to be a heavy traffic period at the International Space Station. Two crews will swap places before Christmas and a U.S. spaceship will deliver new supplies and science. A Russian spacewalk is also planned for a crew vehicle inspection.

The Expedition 57 crew onboard the station today continued preparing for the upcoming missions while researching space science. Commander Alexander Gerst cleaned cooling loops in U.S. spacesuits as Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev prepared the Soyuz MS-09 crew vessel for next month’s undocking. Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor worked on commercial science gear, semiconductor crystal observations and space gardening.

Monday and Tuesday are launch days for a new crew and a cargo delivery. Two new astronauts and a veteran cosmonaut are set to blast off first on Monday at 6:31 a.m. EST aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft. Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko flanked by new Expedition 58 Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques will dock to the station’s Poisk module just six hours and five minutes later.

The very next day, the SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply ship will launch on its 16th mission to the orbital laboratory with a variety of new science experiments at 1:38 p.m. Dragon will orbit Earth for two days before reaching a point about 10 meters from the station where it will be captured with the Canadarm2 robotic arm.

Following those two critical arrivals at the orbital laboratory, cosmonauts Prokopyev and Oleg Kononenko will exit the station for the third Russian spacewalk of the year on Dec. 11. The duo will wear their Orlan spacesuits for about six hours of inspection work on the Soyuz MS-09 crew craft docked to the Rassvet module.

After the vehicle inspection, the Soyuz MS-09 will return to Earth Dec. 20 bringing home the Expedition 57 crew after six and a half months in space. Auñón-Chancellor and Gerst will sit on either side of Soyuz Commander Prokopyev as he leads the trio to a parachuted landing in Kazakhstan at 12:03 a.m.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/28/station-crews-ramping-up-for-busy-december/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/29/2018 08:16 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/28/2018

Cemsica Sample Exchange:  Today the crew removed the calibration cartridge from the SUBSA facility and inserted the first Cemsica science cartridge for processing. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability. SUBSA offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C.

NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) Hardware Swap: The crew installed the new experiment plate and Hyperspectral Earth Imaging System Trial (HEIST) onto the NREP. Due to an unexpected L-bracket configuration on the HEIST hardware, it was mounted to an alternate location, but no science impacts are expected. HEIST is a compact hyperspectral sensor system for commercial Earth observation. Hyperspectral data from hundreds of narrow spectral bands result in extremely high spectral resolution and a contiguous reflectance spectrum of each pixel in the image, from visible light all the way through infrared. NanoRacks-ISS-HEIST offers a less expensive and smaller option for a commercial hyperspectral sensor deployed in space. The NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Veg-03G Harvest: The crew harvested the Dragoon lettuce and Red Russian Kale plants that have been growing since October 25. Part of the harvest was packed for return for ground analysis and the rest of the harvest was made available for crew consumption.  The crew also performed microbial sampling and cleaning/drying of the Veggie facility hardware. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) 3003 and 3008 H20 Recharge, Loop Scrub, and Iodination: In preparation for the potential of upcoming ExtraVehicular Activities (EVAs), the crew refilled both EMUs feedwater tanks. The crew then performed EMU water loop scrubs and then acquired and tested water samples for conductivity. EMU Loop Scrubs are required preventive maintenance needed to remove any chemical and biological contaminants from the EMU Transport Loop.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/29/2018 11:21 pm
Spacewalk Preps and Muscle Research Keep Crew Busy

Mark Garcia Posted on November 29, 2018

A Russian spacewalk is planned before three Expedition 57 crew members return to Earth aboard a Soyuz spacecraft just before Christmas. Meanwhile, in the middle of the spacewalk and departure preparations, the International Space Station residents today also explored how living in space impacts the human muscle system.

Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev will work outside the space station Dec. 11 to inspect the Soyuz MS-09 crew vessel. The Russian spacewalker will join veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko for a scheduled 6-hour inspection on the outside of the spaceship that will return the Expedition 57 crew home Dec. 19 U.S. time.

Prokopyev checked the Orlan spacesuits today that he and Kononenko will wear during the eighth spacewalk of the year. Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst and Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor assisted Prokopyev checking the Russian spacesuits for leaks.

Gerst and Auñón-Chancellor then moved on to a study that has been ongoing aboard the orbital lab since September of 2017 observing how muscles adapt to outer space. The duo set up the Columbus lab module for research operations and scanned their head and foot muscles with an ultrasound device. The data may help doctors improve fitness in space and develop treatments for muscle and aging problems on Earth.

Back on Earth, on opposite sides of the globe, a pair of rockets are getting ready to send a new crew and more science and supplies to the space station. Russia’s Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft will launch Kononenko and fellow crew members Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques from Kazakhstan to the station on Monday at 6:31 a.m. EST. The following day at 1:38 p.m. in Florida, the SpaceX Dragon will blast off to the station to deliver more than 5,600 pounds of cargo to resupply the station residents.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/29/spacewalk-preps-and-muscle-research-keep-crew-busy/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/30/2018 08:14 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 11/30/2018 02:03 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/29/2018

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Depressurization: The JEM Airlock was depressurized in preparation for the transfer of the NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) back to the Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4 location. The NREP was brought inside ISS earlier this week so the crew could exchange the sortie 3 payload for the sortie 4 payload. Each NREP sortie on the JEM Exposed Facility is approximately 6 months in duration. The NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Muscle Tone in Space (Myotones): A crewmember performed blood collection, skin marking, Myotones device measurements, and ultrasound measurements in support of the Myotones investigation.  The Myotones investigation observes the biochemical properties of muscles during long-term exposure to the spaceflight environment. Results from this investigation are expected to provide insight into principles of human resting muscle tone, which could lead to the development of new strategies for alternative treatments for rehabilitation both on Earth and for future space missions.

Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI2): Late in the day on Wednesday, MELFI2 stopped sending health and status and was not recoverable via a power cycle, and was subsequently powered down. Science samples were successfully transferred to another MELFI with no issues reported. During the initial troubleshooting today, MELFI2 powered back into a nominal state. The team will continue to monitor MELFI2 and it’s unlikely we’ll consider putting any science samples into this unit until sometime after SpaceX-16 arrival. MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at temperatures as low as -95°C throughout a mission. There are three MELFI units on ISS.

Sokol Suit Leak Checks:  In preparation for their return to earth on December 20, all three crew members donned their Russian Sokol launch and entry suits in order to perform standard leak checks.  All leak checks were completed successfully.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/03/2018 12:02 pm
https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/1069516642424635393
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/03/2018 01:42 pm
Some ROBO ops today, ahead of Soyuz MS-11 arrival (and Dragon SpX-16 launch tomorrow)...
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/03/2018 02:40 pm
New Crew Blasts Off Heading to Space Station Today

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2018

The Soyuz MS-11 launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 6:31 a.m. EST Monday, Dec. 3 (5:31 p.m. in Baikonur) and have safely reached orbit.  At the time of launch, the station was flying about 250 miles over central Kazakhstan southwest of the capital of Astana, 405 miles ahead of the Soyuz as it leaves the launch pad.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, and Oleg Konenenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos have begun their six-hour trip to the orbital laboratory where they will live and work for the next six-and-a-half months.

The arrival will briefly restore the station’s crew complement to six as they join Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who are scheduled to remain aboard the station until Dec. 20.

Just days after their arrival, the crew members will capture the SpaceX Dragon cargo resupply spacecraft set to launch Tuesday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and deliver more than 5,800 pounds of critical research and supplies.

At 9:30 a.m., NASA TV will broadcast from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida a briefing to highlight the science and research on board the Dragon.

Following the science briefing, NASA TV will then broadcast beginning at 11:15 a.m. the arrival of the agency’s first asteroid sample return mission as the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is set to rendezvous with asteroid Bennu.

Coverage of the Soyuz docking to the International Space Station will begin on NASA TV’s media channel and the agency’s website beginning at 11:45 a.m. and be broadcast on all channels following the conclusion of OSIRIS-REx coverage expected at 12:15 p.m., with the spacecraft docking expected at 12:36 p.m.

Coverage of the hatch opening between the Soyuz and the space station will begin at 1:45 p.m.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/03/new-crew-blasts-off-heading-to-space-station-today/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/03/2018 03:03 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/30/2018
 


Cemsica sample exchange: Today the crew removed the processed first Cemsica science cartridge from the SUBSA facility and inserted the second science cartridge.  Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability. SUBSA offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C.

Crystallization of LRRK2 Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (CASIS PCG-16) microscope observations: The crew performed microscope observation on the PCG-16 Card that was loaded earlier this week.  CASIS PCG-16 evaluates growth of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein crystals in microgravity. LRRK2 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, but crystals of the protein grown on Earth are too small and compact to study. Detailed analysis of larger, space-grown crystals can define the protein’s exact shape and morphology and help scientists better understand the disease’s pathology.

Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification (MICS) – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05) insert 2: The crew removed the sample modules from MVP and stowed them for return. This completed run 2 of 3 total for the investigation.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).  The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others.  It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.

NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) transfer to Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4: The NREP, loaded with the newly-installed sortie #4 science, was passed through the JEM airlock with the intent to be transferred to its external Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4 location.  However, during the extension of the slide table, an object was seen floating away.  The object is currently believed to be a missing tool that was used during the NREP operations inside the ISS pressurized volume.  The slide table with NREP was subsequently retracted back into the JEM airlock and transfer of the NREP to EFU 4 is on hold while the teams discuss a forward plan.  NREP sortie #4 consists of the Hyperspectral Earth Imaging System Trial (HEIST) investigation.  HEIST a compact hyperspectral sensor system for commercial Earth observation.  The NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

SpaceX-16 Dragon On-Board Training: The crew utilized the Robotic Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) to practice procedures that will be used to capture the SpX-16 Dragon next week.  The crew ran a couple of simulations, including 30-meter approach, Capture Point (CP)-hold and 2-meters, during this training session.

COTS UHF Communications Unit (CUCU) and the Crew Command Panel (CCP) Checkout:  Earlier today, ground teams successfully checked out the CUCU and CCP. The checkouts were nominal and the CUCU and CCP are ready to support the upcoming SpX-16 mission
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/03/2018 04:56 pm
Exp 58 Trio Docks to Station Six Hours After Launch Today

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2018

The Soyuz spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, and Oleg Konenenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos docked to the International Space Station at 12:33 p.m. EST while both spacecraft were flying about 251 miles over the Atlantic Ocean.

Aboard the space station, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos will welcome the new crew members when the hatches between the two spacecraft are opened following standard pressurization and leak checks.

Watch the hatch opening targeted for 2:35 p.m. and welcome ceremony to follow live on NASA TV and the agency’s website beginning at 1:45 p.m.

For continued coverage and more information about the mission, visit: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/. Get space station news, images and features via social media on Instagram at: @iss, ISS on Facebook, and on Twitter @Space_Station and @ISS_Research.\

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/03/exp-58-trio-docks-to-station-six-hours-after-launch-today/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/03/2018 04:59 pm
ISS Configuration after Soyuz MS-11 arrival.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/03/2018 08:02 pm
Expedition 57 Crew Aboard Station Expands to Six

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2018

NASA astronaut Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, and Oleg Konenenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos joined Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos aboard the International Space Station when the hatches between the Soyuz spacecraft and the orbiting laboratory officially opened at 2:37 p.m. EST.

The arrival briefly restores the station’s crew complement to six until Auñón-Chancellor, Gerst and Prokopyev return to Earth Dec. 20. Expedition 58 officially begins once the three departing spacefarers undock from the space station.

McClain, Saint-Jacques and Konenenko will spend more than six months conducting hundreds of science investigations in fields such as biology, Earth science, human research, physical sciences and technology development, providing the foundation for continuing human spaceflight beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars. Some of the investigations they will conduct are sponsored by the U.S. National Laboratory on the space station, which Congress designated in 2005 to maximize its use for improving quality of life on Earth. Highlights of upcoming investigations include experiments in forest observation, robotic refueling, and satellite deployment.

The crew is scheduled to be onboard during the first test flights of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, which will return human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil.

In March, the station will again return to a full complement of six crew members when they are joined for Expedition 59 by NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch and Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos.

This is the first spaceflight for both McClain and Saint-Jacques and the fourth trip to the space station for Kononenko.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/03/expedition-57-crew-aboard-station-expands-to-six/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2018 09:42 am
Expedition 57 is at full count now. Welcome to the International Space Station, Soyuz MS-11 crew! And congrats to all international partners for preserving continuous human presence on Earth's embassy in space, for more than 18 years now.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2018 02:14 pm

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/03/2018
 


57 Soyuz (57S) Launch and Docking: The 57S vehicle launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome this morning at 5:31 CT and completed a nominal docking to the ISS at 11:33 CT. The 57S crew, Oleg Kononenko, David Saint-Jacques, and Anne McClain, returned ISS to 6-crew operations after hatch opening at 13:38 CT. This afternoon, the entire ISS crew conducted a Safety Briefing to familiarize the new Soyuz crew with potential hazards and available safety measures on-board ISS; they reviewed the Emergency Equipment in 57S and practiced utilizing various emergency egress routes in the new station configuration.

Actiwatch Spectrum: Today the crew connected two Actiwatch Spectrum monitors to the Human Research Facility (HRF)1 rack for ground commanding and then stowed both monitors. Later, two crewmembers donned the Actiwatch Spectrum monitors. The Actiwatch Spectrum is a waterproof, nonintrusive, sleep-wake monitor worn on the wrist of a crewmember. The device contains an accelerometer for measuring motion and color sensitive photodiodes (a photodetector capable of converting light into voltage) for monitoring ambient lighting. Together, these capabilities enable the Actiwatch Spectrum to be used to analyze circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, and activity.

Design of Scalable Gas Separation Membranes via Synthesis Under Microgravity (Cemsica): Today the crew removed the processed second Cemsica science cartridge from the Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) facility and inserted the third science cartridge. Later, another swap was performed to insert the fourth sample. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Powerup : Today the Robotics ground controllers powered up the MSS and positioned the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) in preparation for the crew offset grapples practice. The crew practiced several times flying SSRMS into the grapple envelope of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) for training/familiarization in preparation of SpX-16 capture. After the crew completed their practice, ground controllers maneuvered SSRMS back at Rendezvous (RDV) Park, in position for the Dragon capture day December 6.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/04/2018 06:26 pm
Dragon Launch Slips One Day as New Crew Moves In

Mark Garcia Posted on December 4, 2018

The launch of the SpaceX Dragon cargo vessel slipped one day to Wednesday at 1:16 p.m. EST with meteorologists forecasting 90% favorable weather for launch. Meanwhile, the newest crew members aboard the International Space Station are getting used to their new home in space.

Dragon’s 16th mission to the orbital lab will deliver almost 5,700 pounds of science, crew supplies and hardware. The commercial space freighter is due to arrive at the station Saturday when astronauts Alexander Gerst and Serena Auñón-Chancellor will command the Canadarm2 to grapple Dragon around 6 a.m.

New station crew members Oleg Kononenko, Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques are in their second day aboard the station. The trio are familiarizing themselves with station systems and safety procedures today. They began their mission Monday when they launched aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft at 6:31 a.m. and docked just six hours and two minutes later to the Poisk module. The new crew will stay in space until June.

Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst is getting for his return to Earth on Dec. 20 and began packing his personal items today. He’ll wrap up his mission with Flight Engineers Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Sergey Prokopyev and land in Kazakhstan inside the Soyuz MS-09 crew ship after six-and-a-half months in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/04/dragon-launch-slips-one-day-as-new-crew-moves-in/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: anik on 12/04/2018 08:08 pm
Quote
NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) transfer to Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4: The NREP, loaded with the newly-installed sortie #4 science, was passed through the JEM airlock with the intent to be transferred to its external Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4 location.  However, during the extension of the slide table, an object was seen floating away.  The object is currently believed to be a missing tool that was used during the NREP operations inside the ISS pressurized volume.  The slide table with NREP was subsequently retracted back into the JEM airlock and transfer of the NREP to EFU 4 is on hold while the teams discuss a forward plan.  NREP sortie #4 consists of the Hyperspectral Earth Imaging System Trial (HEIST) investigation.  HEIST a compact hyperspectral sensor system for commercial Earth observation.  The NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space

https://tass.ru/kosmos/5871286
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/05/2018 07:54 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/04/2018

SpaceX (SpX)-16 Launch Status:  SpX-16 launch attempt was delayed from today’s opportunity due to a cargo issue. The next launch attempt is December 5 in order to accommodate replacement of late load cargo. Liftoff on December 5 is planned for 12:16 PM CT with rendezvous and capture planned for Saturday, December 8. Should SpX-16 still be on the pad after December 5, the next launch opportunity will be December 7.

Behavioral Core Measures:  Today crewmembers completed journal questionnaires for the Behavioral Core Measures study. Standardized Behavioral Measures for Detecting Behavioral Health Risks during Exploration Missions (Behavioral Core Measures) examines an integrated, standardized suite of measurements for its ability to rapidly and reliably assess the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders during long-duration spaceflight.

Standard Measures: Today crewmembers filled out questionnaires for the Standard Measures study. The aim is to ensure consistent capture of an optimized, minimal set of measures from crewmembers until the end of the ISS Program in order to characterize the adaptive responses to and risks of living in space.

VECTION (Effect of Long Duration Hypogravity on the Perception of Self-Motion): Today a crewmember performed Z-book configuration steps for the Vection software as well as verification of the Oculus Rift virtual Reality headset and trackball components. The objective of The Effect of Long Duration Hypogravity on the Perception of Self-Motion (VECTION) study is to determine to what extent an astronaut’s ability to visually interpret motion, orientation, and distance may be disrupted in a microgravity environment, and how it may adapt, and how it may be changed upon return to Earth. Multiple experimental time points inflight and upon return to Earth allows for the adaptation and recovery process to be investigated.

Solidification Using Baffles in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA): Today a crewmember stowed the SUBSA hardware. The objective of the SUBSA investigation is to advance understanding of the processes involved in semiconductor crystal growth. It offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C. Samples are contained in transparent quartz or ceramic ampoules with high definition video imaging available in real-time along with remote commanding of thermal control parameters.

Cemsica (Design of Scalable Gas Separation Membranes via Synthesis Under Microgravity): Today the crew removed the processed 4th Cemsica science cartridge from theSolidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) facility and stowed the sample for return. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability.

Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review:  With the arrival of 57S, all crewmembers participated in an Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review. Items of discussion included crew accountability, access to escape vehicles, and ISS Commander responsibilities. Due to the complex nature of emergencies in space, it is imperative each crewmember is fully familiar with the various emergency procedures and strategies in place.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Liquid Cooling Ventilation Garment (LVCG) Water Fill:  In preparation for potential ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), the crew filled two LCVGs with water utilizing EMU 3004 water tanks. In addition, they installed a Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly REBA onto EMU 3003.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: eeergo on 12/05/2018 11:13 pm
Cimon looks a little bit more useful than Robonaut  :o but there is clearly some polishing to do  ;D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE0LQ2y_-Pk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE0LQ2y_-Pk)

Slightly creepy at 5:20 D:
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 12/06/2018 06:29 am
We are still missing hi res versions of the updated patch and the updated crew portrait.
A small version of the patch with all six names could be seen at the end of the launch coverage. A very small crew portrait with all six crew members was shown at the video wall in Moscow while the docking coverage.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/06/2018 02:23 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/05/2018
 
SpaceX (SpX)-16 Launch: SpX-16 launched today from Kennedy Space Center at 12:16 PM CT. Its rendezvous with ISS and capture is planned for Saturday, December 8 at 5:00AM CT. SpX-16 Dragon is bringing over 2500 kg of pressurized and unpressurized cargo to ISS.

NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP): Today, the Ground Robotics Team utilized the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to relocate the NREP platform and installed it into the Japanese Module Exposed Facility #4 (EFU-4). The NREP is loaded with the newly installed sortie #4 science consisting of the Hyperspectral Earth Imaging System Trial (HEIST) investigation. HEIST a compact hyperspectral sensor system for commercial Earth observation. The NanoRacks External Platform is a compact research platform fitted for versatile use on the exterior of the ISS.

Behavioral Core Measures: Crewmembers completed journal questionnaires for the Behavioral Core Measures study. Standardized Behavioral Measures for Detecting Behavioral Health Risks during Exploration Missions (Behavioral Core Measures) examines an integrated, standardized suite of measurements for its ability to rapidly and reliably assess the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders during long-duration spaceflight.

Standard Measures: Crewmembers filled out questionnaires for the Standard Measures study. The aim is to ensure consistent capture of an optimized, minimal set of measures from crewmembers until the end of the ISS Program in order to characterize the adaptive responses to and risks of living in space.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) On-orbit Fitcheck Verification (OFV): Crewmembers David Saint-Jacques and Anne McClain took body measurements, resized, and donned their EMU suits (3003 and 3008) to ensure proper fit. Each EMU contains exchangeable components allowing each astronaut to adjust EMU fit to their individual preference.

Departure Preparation: In preparation for their return to earth on December 20, the 55S Crew gathered and packed crew provisions. The packed items will be returned by way of SpX-16 and Soyuz 55S.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Intra-Module Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning: As part of routine maintenance, the crew removed and cleaned the JEM IMV starboard aft fan and grille.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Hatch Closure: Following the unloading of all critical items from Cygnus over the past several weeks, today the hatch was closed and will remain in this configuration until after the SpX-16 Dragon mission.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/07/2018 03:34 am
Dragon and Spacewalk Preps as New Crew Adapts to Space

Mark Garcia Posted on December 6, 2018

A Dragon is chasing the International Space Station today to be gracefully captured by a robotic arm early Saturday. The expanded Expedition 57 crew prepared for Dragon’s arrival while conducting science, spacesuit checks and a variety of other station activities.

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft has been orbiting Earth for one day now carrying over 5,600 pounds of science, supplies and hardware for the crew. It is due to arrive Saturday around 6 a.m. when astronauts Alexander Gerst and Serena Auñón-Chancellor will command the Canadarm2 to grapple Dragon. The duo along with new Flight Engineer Anne McClain trained today for Dragon’s approach and rendezvous.

Gerst later worked on U.S. spacesuit maintenance cleaning their cooling loops. Serena worked on a cement study inside the orbital lab that could inform the construction of future lunar or Martian habitats.

McClain is getting used to her new home in space with fellow Flight Engineers Oleg Kononenko and David Saint-Jacques who have been onboard the station since Monday. This is Kononenko’s fourth stint at the station and he is unpacking the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft that launched him and his crew to space. McClain and Saint-Jacques are first-time space residents and they worked on a visual perception and orientation study today. The duo also packed up biology research gear that will be stowed in Dragon for return to Earth after it arrives on Saturday.

Kononenko also joined Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev to ready a pair of Russian Orlan spacesuits for a spacewalk on Dec. 11. The duo will inspect the Soyuz MS-09 crew ship that will return Prokopyev, Gerst and Serena back to Earth Dec. 19 U.S. time.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/06/dragon-and-spacewalk-preps-as-new-crew-adapts-to-space/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/07/2018 10:30 am
Mark Garcia Posted on December 6, 2018 ...Gerst later worked on U.S. spacesuit maintenance cleaning their cooling loops...https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/06/dragon-and-spacewalk-preps-as-new-crew-adapts-to-space/

(note the Canadian flag on the EMU, on the right …)
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Joachim on 12/07/2018 01:54 pm
About the 6-name-patch for Exp. 57 shown in the NASA coverage JSC PAO Rob Navias told me:
"We have confirmed that this patch did not come from NASA, is not official, and cannot be used for public dissemination."
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Artyom. on 12/07/2018 02:42 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 12/07/2018 03:30 pm
Here is a view from MCC-M with 6 crew portrait (unofficial one) from photo by EPA-EFE/YURI KOCHETKOV.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 12/07/2018 03:57 pm
https://twitter.com/AstroAnnimal/status/1071058561638252546
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 12/08/2018 12:53 pm
from NASA TV...Exp 57 6 crew portrait:
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/08/2018 02:54 pm
ISS config. after Dragon CRS-16 berthing.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/08/2018 03:15 pm
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/1071185144432734208
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: SMS on 12/09/2018 04:25 pm
https://twitter.com/AstroAnnimal/status/1071814045752279041
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2018 10:57 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: theonlyspace on 12/11/2018 12:40 pm
Today Tuesday, Dec. 11, 10 a.m. on NASA  TV  Live : Coverage of Russian spacewalk. Spacewalk at the International Space Station is scheduled to begin at 11:03 a.m. EST and will last around 6 hours.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: theonlyspace on 12/11/2018 12:51 pm
Can anyone help us please and get posted on here just the picture only of the Expedition 57   6 crew portrait (unofficial one) from photo by EPA-EFE/YURI KOCHETKOV.?
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/11/2018 11:07 pm
https://twitter.com/AstroAnnimal/status/1072502871952908294
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: MattBaker on 12/12/2018 01:18 am
Well, one of them sliced a spacecraft with a knife today, so...good for Santa's budget, I guess, spaceflight's expensive, especially from the North Pole, that plane change to the ISS and everything.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/12/2018 01:23 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/06/2018

Rodent Research-8 (RR-8): Today crewmembers stowed the two Rodent Research-7 Habitats and then installed Rodent Research-8 Habitats 1 and 3 in preparation for SpX-16 arrival. The RR-8 investigation utilizes mice flown aboard the ISS, and maintained on Earth, to investigate the physiology of aging in response to microgravity and the role of aging in the onset and progression of disease.

Marrow: A crewmember performed breath and ambient air sample collections. Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Effect of Long Duration Hypogravity on the Perception of Self-Motion (VECTION): Crewmembers deployed the VECTION hardware and performed experiment sessions. Data was downlinked to the ground. The objective of The Effect of Long Duration Hypogravity on the Perception of Self-Motion (VECTION) study is to determine to what extent an astronaut’s ability to visually interpret motion, orientation, and distance may be disrupted in a microgravity environment, and how it may adapt, and how it may be changed upon return to Earth. Multiple experimental time points inflight and upon return to Earth allows for the adaptation and recovery process to be investigated.

Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification (MVP Cell-05): Today a crewmember mixed control and experiment samples within the portable glove bag. Eight experiment samples were inserted into the MVP centrifuge facility to simulate 0.7-g’s. The four control samples were stowed for return. MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification. There have been a number of studies of the potential for making and using concrete on extraterrestrial bodies, but as of yet, no actual tests in a microgravity environment have been performed. Detailed microstructural evaluation of the samples represents the first step toward such implementation.

SpaceX (SpX)-16 Dragon On-Board Training: In preparation for this weekend’s capture of SpX-16 Dragon, the crew utilized the Robotic Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) to practice free drift timing, malfunction response, and nominal rate approaches. Dragon capture is planned for Saturday, December 8 at 5:00AM CT.

Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) 3003 and 3008 Loop Scrub, and Iodination: Following yesterday’s EMU On-orbit Fitcheck Verification (OFV), the crew performed EMU water loop scrubs and then acquired and tested water samples for conductivity. EMU Loop Scrubs are required preventive maintenance needed to remove any chemical and biological contaminants from the EMU transport loop.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Return Grille Cleaning: As part of routine maintenance, the crew removed return grille mesh covers and cleaned inside of the grilles within the JEM and Japanese Experiment Logistics Module-Pressurized Section (JLP).
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/12/2018 01:24 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/08/2018

SpaceX (SpX)-16 Mission:  At 6:21 AM CT, the ISS crew used the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to successfully capture the SpX-16 Dragon vehicle. Capture was delayed from its originally planned time of 5:00AM CT due to an issue with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) 41 Space to Ground Link Terminal (SGLT) at White Sands Test Facility, New Mexico.  Dragon capture was subsequently performed utilizing an alternate TDRS.  After capture, Ground Robotic Flight Controllers maneuvered the spacecraft to the pre-install position where they performed an inspection of the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM).  Dragon was then berthed to the Node2 Nadir port at ~9:36 AM CT.  The crew is scheduled to complete vestibule pressurization, leak checks, vestibule outfitting, and CBM Control Panel Assembly (CPA) rotation later this afternoon in support of tomorrow morning’s ingress.

Marrow:  Crewmembers performed a blood sample collection. Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Molecular Muscle: A crewmember performed preliminary checks on the Kubik incubator in preparation for Molecular Muscle experiment inserts. The Molecular Muscle investigation examines the molecular causes of muscle abnormalities during spaceflight in order to establish effective countermeasures.

Rodent Research-8 (RR-8): Today crewmembers participated in a conference to review animal transfer procedures. The RR-8 investigation utilizes mice flown aboard the ISS, and maintained on Earth, to investigate the physiology of aging in response to microgravity and the role of aging in the onset and progression of disease.

NanoRacks Module-9: Today a crewmember performed the on-board training for Module-9 operations. NanoRacks-NSL Satellites Ltd-Oil Bubbles is a student-designed investigation that explores whether microgravity affects this mixing phenomenon in space. Data from the investigation benefits materials research and future mixing methods in space.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/12/2018 01:25 am
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/10/2018

Molecular Muscle: Crewmembers performed sample inserts into the Kubik incubator facility, photography documentation, and a status check of the experiment run. The Molecular Muscle investigation examines the molecular causes of muscle abnormalities during spaceflight in order to establish effective countermeasures.

NanoRacks Module-9 (NSL Satellites Ltd-Oil Bubbles): A crewmember performed NanoRacks Module-9 operations Session-01, which involves opening the clamp on a sample tube and shaking to mix contents. NanoRacks-NSL Satellites Ltd-Oil Bubbles is a student-designed investigation that explores whether microgravity affects this mixing phenomenon in space. Data from the investigation benefits materials research and future mixing methods in space.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-4: A crewmember performed sample installation then removed the processed samples and stowed them into the Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-3) unit. The STaARS BioScience-4 investigation examines how oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) react to microgravity, specifically the rate at which the cells proliferate and differentiate in the microgravity environment. OPCs are precursors to a type of central nervous system cells and results may help to improve neural stem cell studies, including those on tissue regrowth and organ farming.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics: A crewmember installed the new LMM wide-field camera replacing the failed FIR/LMM camera. The Biophysics-04 plate was also removed and stowed. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work. Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. The Effect of Macromolecular Transport on Microgravity Protein Crystallization (LMM Biophysics) studies why this is the case, examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity

NanoRacks Module-74 (Hydrogel Formation and Drug Release in Microgravity Conditions): A crewmember activated NanoRacks Module-74. Microplates are inserted into the module and scans are initiated. Investigation of the Effects of Microgravity on Controlled Release of Antibiotics and Curing Mechanism of a Novel Wound Dressing (Hydrogel Formation and Drug Release in Microgravity Conditions) investigates formation and drug release from cross-linked or mixed hydrogels in microgravity.

TangoLab-1 & 2 (Space Tango MultiLab Locker): A crewmember installed sample cubes into TangoLab-1 and 2 and inserted one of the sample cubes into the General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator-3 (GLACIER-3). Space Tango MultiLab Locker is a reconfigurable general research facility designed for microgravity research, development, and pilot manufacturing aboard the ISS.

Rodent Research-8 (RR-8): Crewmembers transferred all animal subjects from the Dragon into habitats. The RR-8 investigation utilizes mice flown aboard the ISS, and maintained on Earth, to investigate the physiology of aging in response to microgravity and the role of aging in the onset and progression of disease.

NALCO Biofilms (Champion Studies on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion): A crewmember removed NALCO Biofilm Group Activated Packets (GAPs) from the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL).  Each GAP was activated by hand cracking the barrels to initiate mixture followed by vigorous shaking. The GAPs were then returned to the SABL. NALCO Biofilms (Champion Studies on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion) examines biofilms on Earth and in space and monitors the rate of corrosion caused by microorganisms, referred to as Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC).

SpaceX (SpX)-16 Cargo Operations:  Following the opening of the Dragon hatch on Sunday December 9, the crew started removing cargo from the spacecraft.  Approximately 17 hours of cargo operations remain to be completed.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: On Sunday, Robotic Flight Controllers commanded the Mobile Transporter (MT) to translate from Worksite 7 to 6 in order to support the berthed phase of the SpX-16 mission. Then, they powered up the MSS and commanded the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to release Dragon and maneuvered it to grapple the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). The Robotics team then positioned the SPDM over the Dragon trunk to perform a survey of the external payloads using the SPDM Body cameras.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/12/2018 01:28 am
Russian Spacewalkers Complete Crew Vehicle Inspection

Mark Garcia Posted on December 11, 2018

Expedition 57 Flight Engineers Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos completed a spacewalk lasting 7 hours and 45 minutes.

The two cosmonauts opened the hatch to the Pirs docking compartment to begin the spacewalk at 10:59 a.m. EST. They re-entered the airlock and closed the hatch at 6:44 p.m. EST.

During the spacewalk, the two examined the external hull of the Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft attached to the space station, took images, and applied a thermal blanket. They also retrieved science experiments from the Rassvet module before heading back inside.

It was the 213th spacewalk in support of International Space Station assembly, maintenance and upgrades, the fourth for Kononenko, and the second for Prokopyev.

Prokopyev, NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Alexander Gerst are scheduled to depart the station in the Soyuz MS-09 at 8:42 p.m. Dec. 19, returning home to Earth after a six-and-half-month mission.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/11/russian-spacewalkers-complete-crew-vehicle-inspection/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/12/2018 03:09 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/11/2018

Russian Segment ExtraVehicular Activity (RS EVA) 45A: Today, Kononenko and Prokopev exited Docking Compartment (DC)-1 at ~10:11 AM CT in order to execute RS EVA #45A. The following tasks were completed in 7 hours 46 minutes.

Inspection of Soyuz MS-09 БО (Orbital Module) exterior with MLI shield removal.
BCM (Behavioral Core Measures): Today crewmembers performed Behavioral Core measure sessions. Standardized Behavioral Core Measures for Detecting Behavioral Health Risks during Exploration Missions examines an integrated, standardized suite of measurements for its ability to rapidly and reliably assess the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders during long-duration spaceflight.

NanoRacks Module-9: A crewmember performed NanoRacks Module-9 operations Session-02 which involves opening the clamp on a sample tube and shaking to mix contents. ARCUS Protein – Making the Cut – in Space consists of students that use Precision BioSciences’ genome editing technology to test a synthetic enzyme in microgravity. Or Drinking Coffee in Space: The Impact of Microgravity on Streptococcus mutans on Susceptibility to Coffee (SmCoffee) is a student investigation that studies the effect of cavity-causing bacteria on teeth in a space environment.

APEX-05 (Advanced Plant Experiment): Today the APEX-05 Petri Plates were inserted into the Veggie-02 Facility. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space.

MVP Cell-05 (Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility) Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification: Today a crewmember removed the 4 modules from the MVP centrifuge and stowed for return. This is the third and last sample run completing MVP Cell-05 science operations. Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05) investigates the complex process of cement solidification. There have been a number of studies of the potential for making and using concrete on extraterrestrial bodies, but as of yet, no actual tests in a microgravity environment. Detailed microstructural evaluation of the samples represents the first step toward such implementation.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/13/2018 03:13 am
Well Rested Crew Moves To Human Research, Departure Preps After Spacewalk

Mark Garcia Posted on December 12, 2018

The Expedition 57 crew were allowed to catch a few extra hours of sleep today after a lengthy spacewalk Tuesday by the two cosmonauts on board. They then went to work on a variety of microgravity science and lab maintenance aboard the International Space Station.

Cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev performed routine maintenance on their Russian Orlan spacesuits after a seven-hour, 45-minute spacewalk to inspect the Soyuz MS-09 crew ship docked to the station. The duo took detailed photos and captured video of some of the sealant on the outer hull of the Habitation Module used in the repair of a hole discovered inside the vehicle in August.

The other four orbital residents also put in a good night’s sleep after supporting the eighth spacewalk at the station this year. The quartet moved headlong into human research and departure preps after waking up a few hours later than usual today.

Alexander Gerst and Serena Auñón-Chancellor drew their own blood samples today and processed them in the Human Research Facility’s centrifuge. The samples were then coagulated and stowed in a science freezer for later analysis. The Biochemical Profile is a long-running study on astronauts and is providing insight into the human body’s adaptation to living in space.

Gerst is also packing the Soyuz spacecraft that will take him, Auñón-Chancellor and Prokopyev back to Earth Dec. 19. This is the same spaceship that was inspected Tuesday by the two Russian spacewalkers.

The station’s newest astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques are still getting used to their new home in space. The pair also went about the day working on a variety of maintenance and research.  McClain strapped on an armband monitoring how her body adapts to orbiting Earth 16 times a day after setting up research hardware for two separate experiments. Saint-Jacques deployed over a dozen radiation monitors throughout the station today before some light plumbing work with Gerst in the orbital restroom.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/12/well-rested-crew-moves-to-human-research-departure-preps-after-spacewalk/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Artyom. on 12/13/2018 05:40 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/13/2018 11:39 am
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/13/2018 02:11 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/12/2018

STaARS BioScience-4 (Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems): Today a crewmember removed four Experiment containers from the STaARS facility and inserted them into Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-3) unit. The STaARS BioScience-4 investigation examines how oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) react to microgravity, specifically the rate at which the cells proliferate and differentiate in the microgravity environment.

Circadian Rhythms: A crewmember configured and donned the Circadian Rhythms hardware and initiated data collection. The hardware is to be worn for 3 days. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks.

SODI-DSC (Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient): Today a crewmember performed the SODI-DSC hardware setup in the MSG Work Volume. The Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient (SODI-DSC) experiment will study diffusion in six different liquids over time in the absence of convection induced by the gravity field.

MSFO-2 (Made In Space Fiber Optics 2): Today a crewmember installed the Made in Space Fiber Optics 2 hardware. The Optical Fiber Production in Microgravity (Made In Space Fiber Optics) investigation demonstrates the merits of manufacturing fiber optic filaments in microgravity. The fiber optic material chosen for this demonstration is ZBLAN.

Express Rack 9B Rack Power Switch Data Gathering: Today, the crew powered on Express Rack 9B in Columbus to gather data on an unusual data signature seen on previous activations. When the Express Rack 9B rack power switch is turned on, the data appears immediately on some ground displays, but data that follows an alternate path is delayed.  Today’s activity will collect data dumps to understand where the delay is occurring in the alternate data path.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/14/2018 04:42 am
Crew Prepares to Split Up While Researching Space Biology

Mark Garcia Posted on December 13, 2018

Half of the Expedition 57 crew is getting ready to depart International Space Station while the other half is getting used to life on orbit. Amidst those preparations, all six space residents are researching what microgravity does to their bodies while keeping the orbital lab in tip-top shape.

Commander Alexander Gerst continues unpacking the Space Dragon cargo craft today with its near 5,700 pounds of science, supplies and hardware. The German astronaut from ESA (European Space Agency) is also packing the Soyuz MS-09 crew ship that will take him and two crewmates home next week. He’ll parachute to a landing aboard the Soyuz in Kazakhstan Dec. 20 at 12:03 a.m. EST with fellow crew members Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Sergey Prokopyev after 197 days in space.

Auñón-Chancellor spent Thursday working with a variety of research gear supporting space biology. She processed research samples today in the NanoRacks Plate Reader that enables pharmaceutical and biotechnology science in space. She also stowed biological samples in a science freezer for a cellular adaptation study.

The newest trio aboard the station that arrived last week are hard at work today on human research and getting up to speed on station systems. Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques collected blood and urine samples to be analyzed for the Biochemical Profile space adaptation study. The duo also scheduled some time today to get used to life in space. Four-time station cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko joined Prokopyev for more spacesuit maintenance after Tuesday’s spacewalk.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/13/crew-prepares-to-split-up-while-researching-space-biology/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: bolun on 12/14/2018 02:30 pm
Catching a Dragon

ESA astronaut, Alexander Gerst shared this image on his social media channels saying "No matter how often we perform this manoeuvre, capturing a freely drifting spaceship with the International Space Station's robotic arm in full manual mode always gets an astronaut's pulse up."

https://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2018/12/Catching_a_Dragon

Image credit: ESA/NASA
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/14/2018 03:00 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/13/2018

ICE Cubes (International Commercial Experiment Cubes): A crewmember removed Experiment Cubes (Cube set #2) from the ICE Cubes facility and installed the new set of Cubes (Cube set #1) that were flown on SPX-16. The ICE Cubes Facility is a capable experiment platform that offers flexibility to host many different experiments for research, technology demonstration or educational objectives.

Micro-14: Today a crewmember performed Operations-1 activation of Micro-14 for three Group Activation Packs (GAP) by hand cranking and shaking the GAP modules prior to re-insertion back into SABL-1(Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory). The Micro-14 (Characterizing the Effects of Spaceflight on the Candida albicans Adaptation Responses) life science research mission will investigate and evaluate the responses of the Candida albicans microorganism to microgravity conditions and, in particular, to assess changes at the physiological, cellular, and molecular level and to characterize virulence factors.

STaARS BioScience-7 (Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems): Today a crewmember inserted six Biochip kits into the MELFI-2 (Minus Eighty-degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2). STaARS BioScience-7 uses tissue chips to investigate the relationship between aging of the immune system and its function. The study looks at the biology of aging from two perspectives; immune function in microgravity and recovery of the cells after return to a 1g environment. Aging is associated with dysregulation of the immune response, termed immunosenescence, a condition that also may be accelerated by prolonged exposure to microgravity.

STaARS BioScience-4 (Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems): Today a crewmember removed an additional Active EC (Experiment Container) from the STaARS facility and stowed it in MELFI-3 (Minus Eighty-degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS-3). This particular active EC was showing signs of degradation and the ground team requested that it be removed and stowed. The STaARS BioScience-4 investigation examines how oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) react to microgravity, specifically the rate at which the cells proliferate and differentiate in the microgravity environment.

SpaceX (SpX-16) Cargo Operations:  The crew continued to perform cargo unloading operations today. The crew has now completed all scheduled unpacking operations.  SpX-16 will remain berthed to ISS until January 13.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/17/2018 02:19 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/14/2018

Molecular Muscle: Crewmembers removed the Molecular Muscle samples from the Kubik-5 facility and inserted the samples into the MELFI-3 (Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS). Telemetry data for Kubik-05 was downloaded and both the primary and back up units were deinstalled and stowed. The Molecular Muscle investigation examines the molecular causes of muscle abnormalities during spaceflight in order to establish effective countermeasures.

Microbial Tracking (MT) 2: Today a crewmember performed an extensive sample collection of ISS air sample and surface areas for the MT-2 study which will be placed in cold stowage and returned on Soyuz-55. MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Micro-14: Today a crewmember removed the Micro-14 Group Activated Packets (GAPs 1,2,3) from the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL-1) and used a hand-crack to terminate  GAP-3. All three GAPs were then stowed into MELFI-3 (Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS). The Micro-14 (Characterizing the Effects of Spaceflight on the Candida albicans Adaptation Responses) life science research mission will investigate and evaluate the responses of the Candida albicans microorganism to microgravity conditions and, in particular, to assess changes at the physiological, cellular, and molecular level and to characterize virulence factors.

Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI): Ground operations used the ISS Remote Manipulator Arms (MSS and JEMRMS) to extract the GEDI hardware from the SPX-16 Dragon and install it onto the Japanese Exposed Module Facility (JEM EFU-4). Ground teams confirmed activation telemetry. The Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) provides high-quality laser ranging observations of the Earth’s forests and topography required to advance the understanding of important carbon and water cycling processes, biodiversity, and habitat.

Circadian Rhythms: Today a crewmember doffed the circadian Rhythms hardware and downlinked the telemetry data. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks.

On Board Training (OBT) Soyuz Descent Drill:  In preparation for their departure from the ISS on December 19, the 55S Crew completed a nominal descent and landing drill earlier this morning.  During this training, the crew was inside their Soyuz spacecraft reviewing and practicing undock and landing procedures.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 12/17/2018 05:12 pm
Cross-post re EP move:
The SSRMS has moved a large item in the last hours. What was it?
To answer my own question, it looks like the External Pallet from HTV-7. That creates the next question. What is the reason for this relocation?
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 12/18/2018 05:17 am
The JEM-RMS has removed SEDA-AP.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 12/18/2018 05:53 am
SEDA-AP now on the JEM-Logistic Module.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 12/18/2018 06:52 am
It looks like the same procedure as with HREP in July.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/18/2018 03:43 pm
SEDA-AP now on the JEM-Logistic Module.
Its prep for its upcoming jettison.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Olaf on 12/18/2018 05:39 pm
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2018/12/17/iss-daily-summary-report-12172018/
Quote
Two Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 12/18:
JEMRMS Ops to relocate SEDA-AP from EFU 11 to 13 in prep for Jettison December 21
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/18/2018 07:00 pm
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2018/12/17/iss-daily-summary-report-12172018/
Quote
Two Day Look Ahead:
Tuesday, 12/18:
JEMRMS Ops to relocate SEDA-AP from EFU 11 to 13 in prep for Jettison December 21
It is to be jettisoned because SEDA-AP mast failed to retract to its launch locks position for planned Dragon disposal.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/18/2018 07:03 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/17/2018

Airway Monitoring: Today the crew performed the setup activities for the upcoming Airway Monitoring US Lab (ambient) session. The Airway Monitoring investigation aims to determine in detail the pulmonary nitric oxide (NO) turnover in weightlessness and in combined weightless, hypobaric and hypoxic environments. The goal is also to determine the lung diffusion capacity for NO with dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere.  This investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This will help to identify health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, such as to the Moon and Mars, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding such conditions.

Functional Immune: HRF saliva collections were performed in support of the end-of-mission sample collection. Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Nanoracks Module 74:  Today a crewmember placed the 6 microplates into Plate Reader-2 for scanning, and then stowed them back into Module-74. The Module-74 experiment investigates the Effects of Microgravity on Controlled Release of Antibiotics and Curing Mechanism of a Novel Wound Dressing (Hydrogel Formation and Drug Release in Microgravity Conditions) and studies the formation and drug release from cross-linked or mixed hydrogels in microgravity.

Crystallization of LRRK2 Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (CASIS PCG-16) microscope observations: The crew performed a microscope observation on the PCG-16 Card that was loaded three weeks ago. CASIS PCG-16 evaluates growth of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein crystals in microgravity. LRRK2 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, but crystals of the protein grown on Earth are too small and compact to study. Detailed analysis of larger, space-grown crystals can define the protein’s exact shape and morphology and help scientists better understand the disease’s pathology.

Rodent Research-8 (RR-8): The crew performed a Habitat restock for units 1-4 and a cleaning of the animal access unit. During the Habitat restock activities, mold was observed on 2 of the food bars. One of these bars was trashed. The small spots of mold on the other food bar were scraped off prior to installation. The RR-8 investigation utilizes mice flown aboard the ISS, and maintained on Earth, to investigate the physiology of aging in response to microgravity and the role of aging in the onset and progression of disease.  The mice on-board ISS consist of 40 total mice divided into 2 age groups.

SpaceX-16 Cargo Operations: The crew completed cargo unloading from the Dragon vehicle last week. This week, the Crew has started to pack items for return. Approximately 26 hours of cargo loading remains to be completed in preparation for Dragon’s departure on January 13, 2019.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: On Saturday December 15, the Robotic Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite (WS) 6 to 7. Then, they maneuvered the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS) to grapple the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM). Following that, the SSRMS maneuvered SPDM towards still grappled to the Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3) Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) and successfully installed it onto its final location on Express Logistics Carrier 1 (ELC1) site 3. On Sunday,  they maneuvered the SSRMS and stowed SPDM on the Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Fixture (PDGF) #2. After SSRMS released SPDM PDGF, the MT was translated from WS7 to WS4. Finally, SSRMS was maneuvered as required to Walk off onto Lab PDGF and SSRMS was position at park position.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: centaurinasa on 12/18/2018 08:37 pm
December 18, Tuesday
4:40 p.m. - ISS Expedition 58/57 Change of Command Ceremony (Gerst hands over to Kononenko, and transmits it the "station key")
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 12/19/2018 12:31 pm
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/19/2018 01:25 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/18/2018

Change of Command Ceremony:  Expedition 57 CDR Alexander Gerst handed off station command to Expedition 58 CDR Oleg Kononenko this afternoon. The Expedition 57 Crew (Alexander Gerst, Sergey Prokopev, Serena Auñón-Chancellor) are scheduled to undock from ISS tomorrow, December 19 at 7:40PM CT with landing set to occur at 11:03PM CT.

Advanced Plant Experiment-05 (APEX-05): Today the APEX-05 Petri Plate was removed from the FIR/LMM (Fluids Integrated Rack/Light Microscopy Module), closing out the experiment. The team reports that successful imaging of root tips was accomplished.  Originally the APEX-05 experiment flew on SpaceX-13 and was partially completed except for the imagery of the two LMM (Light Microscopy Module) plate samples as the LMM was not operating at the time. A new LMM wide-field camera has been installed, and two LMM samples were re-flown on SpaceX-16. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space.

Airway Monitoring: The crew performed the necessary calibrations, followed by Low nitric oxide (NO) and High NO measurements for the ambient pressure session in the US Lab.  The ground team reported they believe they obtained a good data set from today’s session. The ESA Airway Monitoring investigation aims to determine in detail the pulmonary NO turnover in weightlessness and in combined weightless, hypobaric and hypoxic environments.  The goal is also to determine the lung diffusion capacity for NO with dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere.  This investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This will help to identify health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, such as to the Moon and Mars, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding such conditions.

Grip Supine session: The crew performed the GRIP science tasks while restrained on the chair and wearing a noise-cancelling system. ESA’s Grip investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects.  Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments.  They also support design and control of haptic interfaces to be used in challenging environments such as space, and provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Nanoracks Module 74:  Today a crewmember sequentially placed the 6 microplates into the Plate Reader-2 for scanning, and then stowed them back into Module-74. This is day 10 of the scanning operations.  The Module-74 experiment investigates the Effects of Microgravity on Controlled Release of Antibiotics and Curing Mechanism of a Novel Wound Dressing (Hydrogel Formation and Drug Release in Microgravity Conditions) and studies the formation and drug release from cross-linked or mixed hydrogels in microgravity.

TangoLab-2 card cube replacement: Today a crewmember swapped out experiment cubes on Card #12 and re-inserted the Card back into the TangoLab-2 unit. The new cube (EMLT_TOC01) mission name is Organs-On-Chips as a Platform for Studying Effects of Microgravity on Human Physiology.  Its goal is to analyze the effect of microgravity and other space-related stressors on the brain-blood barrier (BBB).  It uses fully automated tissue chip technology, a Brain-Chip consisting of living neuronal and vascular endothelial cells in a micro-engineered environment.
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/20/2018 03:28 am
Expedition 57 Crew Departs Station, Begins Ride Back to Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on December 19, 2018

NASA Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Soyuz commander Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos undocked from the International Space Station at 8:40 p.m. EST to begin their trip home.

Deorbit burn is scheduled for approximately 11:10 p.m., with landing in Kazakhstan targeted for 12:03 a.m. Thursday (11:03 p.m. local time). NASA will resume coverage on TV and online at 10:45 p.m. for deorbit burn and landing.

At the time of undocking, Expedition 58 began aboard the space station under the command of Roscosmos’ Oleg Kononenko. Along with his crewmates Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, the three-person crew will operate the station for a little more than two months.

Nick Hague and Christina Koch of NASA and Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos will launch aboard Soyuz MS-12 Feb. 28, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, to join their fellow crewmates following a six-hour journey. Expedition 59 will begin when the new trio docks to the space station.

For landing coverage and more information about the mission, visit: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/. Get space station news, images and features via social media on Instagram at: @iss, ISS on Facebook, and on Twitter @Space_Station and @ISS_Research.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/19/expedition-57-crew-departs-station-begins-ride-back-to-earth/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/20/2018 04:51 am
Expedition 57 Trio Back on Earth After 197-Day Space Mission

Mark Garcia Posted on December 20, 2018

Three members of the International Space Station’s Expedition 57 crew, including NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, returned to Earth Thursday, safely landing at 12:02 a.m. EST (11:02 a.m. local time) in Kazakhstan.

Auñón-Chancellor and her crewmates, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Soyuz commander Sergey Prokopyev, launched June 6 and arrived at the space station two days later to begin their mission.

The Expedition 57 crew contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science aboard the world-class orbiting laboratory. Highlights included investigations into new cancer treatment methods and algae growth in space. The crew also installed a new Life Sciences Glovebox, a sealed work area for life science and technology investigations that can accommodate two astronauts.

During the 197 days, they circled the globe 3,152 times, covering 83.3 million miles. This was the first flight for Auñón-Chancellor and Prokopyev and the second for Gerst, who – with a total of 362 days in orbit – now holds the flight duration record among ESA astronauts.

For the last 16 days of her mission, Auñón-Chancellor was joined by fellow NASA astronaut Anne McClain, marking the first time in which the only two U.S. astronauts on a mission were both women.

Prokopyev completed two spacewalks totaling 15 hours and 31 minutes. He and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos launched four small technology satellites and installed an experiment during a spacewalk Aug. 15. Then during a 7 hour, 45 minute spacewalk Dec. 11, he and Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos retrieved patch samples and took digital images of a repair made to the habitation module of the Soyuz MS-09 in which the Expedition 57 trio rode home. The space station crew located and, within hours of its detection, repaired a small hole inside the Soyuz in August. The spacecraft was thoroughly checked and deemed safe for return to Earth.

Auñón-Chancellor will return home to Houston, Gerst will return to Cologne, Germany, and Prokopyev will return to Star City, Russia, following post-landing medical checks and research activities.

The Expedition 58 crew continues operating the station, with Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos in command. Along with his crewmates Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, the three-person crew will operate the station for a little more than two months until three additional crew members launch Feb. 28, 2019 to join them.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/20/expedition-57-trio-back-on-earth-after-197-day-space-mission/
Title: Re: Expedition 57 Thread
Post by: Rondaz on 12/20/2018 03:04 pm
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/19/2018

55 Soyuz (55S) Undock and Landing: The 55S crew, Sergey Prokopev, Alexander Gerst, and Serena Auñón -Chancellor, are scheduled to return to Earth tonight. Undock is scheduled for 7:40 PM CT with landing at 11:03 PM CT. The crew is scheduled to arrive at Ellington on Friday, December 21.