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General Discussion => Advanced Concepts => Topic started by: Prober on 10/23/2013 12:51 PM

Title: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/23/2013 12:51 PM
Header for 3D Print uses Space Related

Terms:  There seems to be a great deal of confusion regarding 3D Printing.
The term "3D Printing" covers a wide set of new tools, with many branches.  The public needs a great deal of "new education" to fully understand the innovations.

The term "Additive Manufacturing" is another term confusing the public.   The term is not fully defined atm and can in some cases be used interchangeably with "3D Printing"

New aerospace related articles are published every day, some of the links will be posted here.   

Give me a little time for a list.... :D

3D printer for space
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30212.0

Printed Food
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33345.msg0#new

Made in Space ISS program spin off programs
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35124.0

3D Printing Rocket engines
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=34421.0

Edit: add terms
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/23/2013 12:57 PM
Europe Launches Space Metal 3D Printing Project

http://news.yahoo.com/europe-launches-space-metal-3d-printing-project-114021700.html

==================

Side note from my own experience

Talked to one of my friends that manufactures 3D Printers.    He has been testing an add on tool for use in printing metals.   

Expect some type of metal printing to become available (low cost) for the home/hobbyist market.

Edit: cleaned up wording

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/25/2013 10:21 PM
Racing Powder — 3D Printed Titanium Horse Shoes
http://tinyurl.com/mneve6m (http://tinyurl.com/mneve6m)
Interesting story in the uses of advanced electron beam melting (EBM) .   Aerospace uses possible.
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/25/2013 10:35 PM
This story has a lot of meat into it.  The Fusing of Industries at the Additive/Aerospace Summit
http://tinyurl.com/m2u962t (http://tinyurl.com/m2u962t)
 SpiderFab project

http://cdn.3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/extrusion.jpg (http://cdn.3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/extrusion.jpg)   Extrusion also shown below


 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 10/25/2013 11:17 PM
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672 (http://"https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672")

Quote
@elonmusk

SpaceX SuperDraco inconel rocket chamber w regen cooling jacket emerges from EOS 3D metal printer

http://pic.twitter.com/Tj284OuAk1
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/26/2013 01:24 AM
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672 (http://"https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672")

Quote
@elonmusk

SpaceX SuperDraco inconel rocket chamber w regen cooling jacket emerges from EOS 3D metal printer

http://pic.twitter.com/Tj284OuAk1

good pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: manboy on 10/27/2013 07:11 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FenWULG2z7I
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/27/2013 02:43 PM
MakerBot and the James Webb Telescope
http://tinyurl.com/mfao4xp

MakerBot Explorers | Lockheed Martin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Hkk3XYiU_s
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/29/2013 11:34 AM
AM Benefits Environment Says EADS and EOS
http://tinyurl.com/l7vp7w9 (http://tinyurl.com/l7vp7w9)
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/01/2013 01:38 AM
This next post is very interesting.  Carbon Fiber reinforced PLA etc.

Starts out with new materials in a kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1375236253/proto-pasta-gourmet-food-for-your-3d-printer (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1375236253/proto-pasta-gourmet-food-for-your-3d-printer)
 
When you check the backgrounds of the people involved you find some aerospace: http://www.protoplant.com/lockheed-martin (http://www.protoplant.com/lockheed-martin)
 
 
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/11/2013 06:10 PM
This next bit of news comes from our friends down under in Brisbane, Australia.    It's another starting point project that has wide applications if it works as advertised.    It comes in the form of a Kickstarter  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cartesianco/the-ex1-rapid-3d-printing-of-circuit-boards

The EX¹ makes printing circuits as quick and easy as printing a photo - allowing you to print on the material of your choice.

 :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: QuantumG on 11/11/2013 08:50 PM
One of the co-creators of that printer was building rockets a year ago too. http://chokedflow.blogspot.com.au/

 :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 11/12/2013 03:15 AM
Oak Ridge is starting a 3D printing imitiatIive. 35,000 printers to schools plus R&D, including carbon reinforced polymer media - which  should be plenty useful in space.

http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/awx_11_08_2013_p0-635147.xml
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/12/2013 01:17 PM
Oak Ridge is starting a 3D printing imitiatIive. 35,000 printers to schools plus R&D, including carbon reinforced polymer media - which  should be plenty useful in space.

http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/awx_11_08_2013_p0-635147.xml

good material.......keep the material coming.

 This is excellent: "Large printed parts can warp because areas with different thicknesses cool at different rates—a core technical challenge with additive manufacturing. Adding 13% by volume of chopped carbon fiber to the thermoplastic-pellet feedstock provides twice the strength and four times the stiffness...."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 11/13/2013 11:42 PM
SpaceX SuperDraco inconel rocket chamber w regen cooling jacket emerges from EOS 3D metal printer

http://pic.twitter.com/Tj284OuAk1

It has been fired now, too
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/400776254082666496/photo/1

Q what inconel alloy was picked?

A 718, but maybe moving to 713 down the road
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 11/14/2013 05:07 AM
Further-
 
an SD could accelerate a Tesla Model S at 4G's, breaking the sound barrier in 9 seconds.

I think we have a thruster for the  Tumbler Batmobile  : )
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 11/22/2013 11:24 AM
Space medicine is important too.

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2013-11/21/3d-printed-whole-heart

Quote
Bioengineer: the heart is one of the easiest organs to bioprint, we'll do it in a decade

A team of cardiovascular scientists has announced it will be able to 3D print a whole heart from the recipients' own cells within a decade. "America put a man on the Moon in less than a decade. I said a full decade to provide some wiggle room," Stuart K Williams told Wired.co.uk.
>

(William's CV: http://cv2i.org/investigators/stuart-k-williams-ph-d-inv/ )
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 11/22/2013 12:20 PM
Quote
Bioengineer: the heart is one of the easiest organs to bioprint, we'll do it in a decade

Makes me wonder if it might be possible to design a heart that would be more suitable for microgravity.

Just sayin'
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: go4mars on 11/22/2013 12:51 PM
Quote
Bioengineer: the heart is one of the easiest organs to bioprint, we'll do it in a decade

Makes me wonder if it might be possible to design a heart that would be more suitable for microgravity.
Or keep a spare... In your body.  Just in case.    For extended missions...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: RonM on 11/22/2013 01:18 PM
Quote
Bioengineer: the heart is one of the easiest organs to bioprint, we'll do it in a decade

Makes me wonder if it might be possible to design a heart that would be more suitable for microgravity.
Or keep a spare... In your body.  Just in case.    For extended missions...

Two hearts? I'll let the Brits make the Doctor Who jokes.  :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/25/2013 05:11 PM
This next post is very interesting.  Carbon Fiber reinforced PLA etc.

Starts out with new materials in a kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1375236253/proto-pasta-gourmet-food-for-your-3d-printer (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1375236253/proto-pasta-gourmet-food-for-your-3d-printer)
 
When you check the backgrounds of the people involved you find some aerospace: http://www.protoplant.com/lockheed-martin (http://www.protoplant.com/lockheed-martin)

Update: this kickstarter was successful and the new materials will soon be available for purchase.   The "made in space" people should be able to use these 3 new materials, only need to test for the proper settings.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/04/2013 11:35 AM
This next bit of news comes from our friends down under in Brisbane, Australia.    It's another starting point project that has wide applications if it works as advertised.    It comes in the form of a Kickstarter  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cartesianco/the-ex1-rapid-3d-printing-of-circuit-boards

The EX¹ makes printing circuits as quick and easy as printing a photo - allowing you to print on the material of your choice.

 :)

Looks like this Kickstarter has made it.  More models in the future?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/07/2013 04:25 PM
moved from: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30212.msg977686#msg977686

Just bumped into more info on NASA's new printers.

good read: http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-plans-3-d-printing-rocket-engine-parts-120000574.html

PDF links

http://www.estechnology.co.uk/images/m1m2m3/m2cusing.pdf  (link no longer works)
 looking http://www.estechnology.co.uk
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/07/2013 04:30 PM
moved from:  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30212.msg983412#msg983412

US army builds its own 3D printer
The US military is working with 3D printers that can produce spare parts for spacecraft.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20269645

http://www.army.mil/article/90814/Smaller__cheaper_3_D_printer_offers_benefits___/

if the Military is using that Printrbot model I fear for the thinking going on.  They can do much better.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/23/2013 01:32 AM
Low-Cost Titanium Powder is the First of its Kind

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/12/13/low-cost-titanium-powder-first-kind/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/12/13/low-cost-titanium-powder-first-kind/)
 “The Metalysis process could reduce the price of titanium by as much as 75 per cent, making titanium almost as cheap as specialty steels."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
[youtube]Z_yChKb6tKQ[/youtube]

"Metalysis' low-cost titanium powder has been used to 3D print automotive and jet engine parts in the Mercury Centre at the University of Sheffield. The video shows part of the 3D printing process at the University of Sheffield, where several parts were built using Metalysis titanium, including guide vanes for jet engines.

Metalysis has developed a new environmentally benign and low-cost way of producing titanium powder, which heralds a new era in additive layer manufacture and will see greater use of titanium in components across the automotive, aerospace and defence industries. Metalysis takes rutile and transforms it directly into powdered titanium in one step using electrolysis."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/01/2014 12:32 AM
this is auto related, but the principles are the same.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vVEp1b8eao (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vVEp1b8eao)

 [youtube]4vVEp1b8eao[/youtube]
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: JayJR on 01/01/2014 01:26 PM
Here's the thing guys, I'm very much down for 3D printing, but it's very SLOW to do.  That means, say, if you want to build some sort of space station using metal from a nickel-iron meteorite (effectively stainless steel in a widmanstatten pattern), it's not terribly productive to 3D print all parts.  That's why you'd want 3D printing to be done in sort of a factory-like scenario for only corner joints, screws, nuts, bolts, custom pieces, etc.  For things like the actual structure, you'd need to cut from the meteorite the raw materials necessary either directly into raw sheets , or have an iron forge so you can do dozens of metal sheets, I-beams, all at the same time, etc.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/18/2014 07:07 PM
This latest news from Adobe opens up new doors to users who might not like working with Cad packages.

Latest Version of Photoshop CC from Adobe Includes 3D Printing Capabilities
http://tinyurl.com/n8dql7a

" The new version reportedly enables users to design new 3D models directly in Photoshop or to import existing models from other 3D software with further capabilities to edit, refine, preview and then 3D print them directly from within Photoshop CC."

http://youtu.be/0W3MkqidSAo (http://youtu.be/0W3MkqidSAo)
 [youtube]0W3MkqidSAo[/youtube]
Do they use Photoshop on the ISS?
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 01/19/2014 05:44 AM
From the Consumer Electronics Show....

http://www.engadget.com/2014/01/09/epson-3d-printer-ces-2014/

Quote
Epson won't make a consumer 3D printer, but promises big, industrial ones within five years
>
>
Usui wants the company to be able to print "anything" and reckons that could take around five years from now. And anything really means anything: The president mused on printing cars, which would make that eventual manufacturing hardware a fair bit bigger than a Cube 3.
>
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: darkbluenine on 01/20/2014 02:02 AM
This seems like an overly complex approach, especially in terms of the robotics.  But if there's a "killer app" for additive manufacturing in space, fabbing large apertures on orbit that could not otherwise be packed into a launch shroud seems like a strong candidate:

"Spiderfab will use 3D printing and robotics to build a lot bigger, lighter and cheaper in space"

http://nextbigfuture.com/2013/08/spiderfab-will-use-3d-printing-and.html
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/26/2014 07:51 PM
Not sure if the pizza printer video made it up here yet so...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISXqC-YPnpc

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/24/5342180/watch-this-3d-printer-make-pizza-fit-for-astronauts

Mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor won a $125,000 grant last year to build a prototype 3D printer designed to print food for astronauts on long missions. Contractor's goal was to print a pizza with his open-source RepRap Mendel 3D printer — and it looks like he succeeded.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 01/27/2014 12:00 PM
Buttitos too

http://m.fastcodesign.com/1670070/burritobot-a-3-d-printer-that-spits-out-burritos
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 01/27/2014 01:42 PM
Not sure if the pizza printer video made it up here yet so...

*snip*

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/24/5342180/watch-this-3d-printer-make-pizza-fit-for-astronauts

Mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor won a $125,000 grant last year to build a prototype 3D printer designed to print food for astronauts on long missions. Contractor's goal was to print a pizza with his open-source RepRap Mendel 3D printer — and it looks like he succeeded.


I don't understand why the additive 3D-printing approach would be best for laying down the dough for pizza crust. Here's a different approach used to make roti, an Indian style of unleavened flat bread

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsfccHgWDb0

I think that likewise for pizza, it would be better to start off with the blob of dough and then squash it to turn it into the flat round pizza crust. Otherwise, with the additive approach, then your pizza could end up quite flimsy, even after cooking.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 01/27/2014 05:09 PM
The taste and form factor of space food is an interesting subject.   It's possible to envision a texture-less, powder-based dehydrated food like Soylent (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_(food_substitute)), but various psychological observations suggest it might be a bad idea, considering how important food appears to be for the mood of crews in enclosed environments (like on sea ships).

But is this idea taken seriously enough that 3D-printing food would actually be justified in space?  I'm not sure.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 01/27/2014 05:49 PM
We'll see, but NASA is working on it too. So is Hershey's, and not just for candy. Fast food meat/vegetarian patties/buns? If flippers get the $15/hr they want, and that kind of evolved automated mass preparation has colonization writ all over it.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/28/2014 02:33 AM
"Contractor promised last spring that the cartridges the printer uses will last 30 years."

Comes from the pizza printer article.  Could become useful if 30 years works.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 01/28/2014 05:00 PM
Carbon fiber printer

Story: http://www.popularmechanics.com/_mobile/technology/gadgets/news/new-3d-printer-by-markforged-can-print-with-carbon-fiber-16428727

Site: http://markforged.com
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/28/2014 05:24 PM
Carbon fiber printer

Story: http://www.popularmechanics.com/_mobile/technology/gadgets/news/new-3d-printer-by-markforged-can-print-with-carbon-fiber-16428727

Site: http://markforged.com

nice find ....
http://vimeo.com/84989258
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: vyoma on 01/29/2014 01:53 AM
3D-printed aerospike rocket engine:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1108292587/3d-printed-aerospike-rocket-engine

Quote
740lbf regeneratively cooled 3d printed expander cycle liquid oxygen/propane rocket engine that will power upper stage of a two stage nanosatellite launcher.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: high road on 01/29/2014 10:24 AM
I was wondering. ESA has been experimenting with 3D printers to print out a moon base. But why would you want to 'glue' the regolith together? That means you have to bring a lot of aluminum with you. Even if you just canibalize the spacecraft that brought the printer there, it still requires a considerable effort to turn aluminum parts into 'ink'.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing]http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing]http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing)

http://www.fosterandpartners.com/news/foster-+-partners-works-with-european-space-agency-to-3d-print-structures-on-the-moon (http://www.fosterandpartners.com/news/foster-+-partners-works-with-european-space-agency-to-3d-print-structures-on-the-moon)

Wouldn't it be more logical to just smelt the regolith and print with that? It requires a lot of power, but that's readily available at the lunar poles.

Like a large scale version of this one, but with lasers powered by a (huge?) solar panel, instead of concentrated sunlight. And plagioclase instead of sand.

http://www.markuskayser.com/work/solarsinter/usg=AFQjCNHZvW35uan8jeSGJtw5mffxvuf81w&bvm=bv.60157871,d.d2k&cad=rja

I don't think the building material lacks structural strength, considering the enormous caves we have on earth. If the high temperatures and slow cool rate associated with working in a vacuum are the problem, a thermal cycle that 'preheats' the material a bit while seriously bringing down the temperatures in the new wall, would be an obvious (though complex) solution.

Any thoughts?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 01/29/2014 01:17 PM
Carbon fiber printer

Story: http://www.popularmechanics.com/_mobile/technology/gadgets/news/new-3d-printer-by-markforged-can-print-with-carbon-fiber-16428727

Site: http://markforged.com

Looks like it can only lay down the fiber in the horizontal plane:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnxyXiA8MbY


Google search says rival products are on the way too, so hopefully there'll be some competition and consumer choice.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: high road on 01/29/2014 01:25 PM
I was wondering. ESA has been experimenting with 3D printers to print out a moon base. But why would you want to 'glue' the regolith together? That means you have to bring a lot of aluminum with you. Even if you just canibalize the spacecraft that brought the printer there, it still requires a considerable effort to turn aluminum parts into 'ink'.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing]http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing]http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Technology/Building_a_lunar_base_with_3D_printing)

http://www.fosterandpartners.com/news/foster-+-partners-works-with-european-space-agency-to-3d-print-structures-on-the-moon (http://www.fosterandpartners.com/news/foster-+-partners-works-with-european-space-agency-to-3d-print-structures-on-the-moon)

Wouldn't it be more logical to just smelt the regolith and print with that? It requires a lot of power, but that's readily available at the lunar poles.

Like a large scale version of this one, but with lasers powered by a (huge?) solar panel, instead of concentrated sunlight. And plagioclase instead of sand.

http://www.markuskayser.com/work/solarsinter/usg=AFQjCNHZvW35uan8jeSGJtw5mffxvuf81w&bvm=bv.60157871,d.d2k&cad=rja

I don't think the building material lacks structural strength, considering the enormous caves we have on earth. If the high temperatures and slow cool rate associated with working in a vacuum are the problem, a thermal cycle that 'preheats' the material a bit while seriously bringing down the temperatures in the new wall, would be an obvious (though complex) solution.

Any thoughts?

Never mind, somebody's working on it. The future will decide which is the best method.

http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/2013/03/29/sinterhab-3d-printed-moon-base-concept-lunar-dust/ (http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/2013/03/29/sinterhab-3d-printed-moon-base-concept-lunar-dust/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/29/2014 07:11 PM
This next news is truly exciting.   Hope this is the future with aerospace, autos etc. 
Clearly Honda is again showing their strengths in leadership.
==============================================

Honda Releases Concept Model Data For 3D Printing, Including New Acura NSX
http://autos.yahoo.com/news/honda-releases-concept-model-data-3d-printing-including-182055332.html

"The Japanese automaker is making data from old concept models available so people can print them out at home. Through the Honda 3D Design Archives website, users can download files and make their own miniature Hondas under the Creative Commons 4.0 license."

the design files are located at:  http://www.honda-3d.com/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/30/2014 05:51 PM
Carbon fiber printer

Story: http://www.popularmechanics.com/_mobile/technology/gadgets/news/new-3d-printer-by-markforged-can-print-with-carbon-fiber-16428727

Site: http://markforged.com

Looks like it can only lay down the fiber in the horizontal plane:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnxyXiA8MbY


Google search says rival products are on the way too, so hopefully there'll be some competition and consumer choice.

Yes many products under development.   If you look a few posts above you see a kickstarter for Protopasta.  They are in the process of manufacturing the feed stock.   With it, a 500$+ printer will be possible to print carbon fiber parts.

Also found this: http://www.compositesworld.com/news/canadian-group-3-d-printing-of-continuous-fiber-composites-within-reach
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/30/2014 06:13 PM
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Develops Advanced AM Materials and Certification
http://tinyurl.com/jvjnnaf

 "Modifying the underlying structure of a material could be of huge benefit for any industry. In terms of aerospace, for instance, speciality lightweight materials that withstand the heat of jet engines could make flying more efficient and cut fuel costs.  Duoss adds, “It’s going to revolutionize manufacturing. It’s going to revolutionize it in terms of manufacturing itself. It’s about the ability to tailor properties and achieve property combinations that would have been previously impossible to create.”"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/31/2014 05:20 PM
http://tinyurl.com/mvac83m

Blackest Black Is the New Black – 3D Printed Carbon Nano Tube Art

"To create a perfect black, De Wilde looked to carbon nano tubes and nanotechnology. As part of a cooperative effort with Zonhoven Melotte and NASA, he came up with NASAblck-Crcl #1, a proof of concept which lies somewhere at the intersection of art, science, technology and entrepreneurial expertise."

"And the Melotte-NASA-De Wilde project may well have applications which go beyond their artistic merit and touch, ranging from efficient heat exchangers to better cinema projectors and invisible planes."

two videos contained in the article.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WX4ldIj1JNI#t=183
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/04/2014 06:14 PM
This video and story is very interesting: " The printer is large enough to produce objects up to almost six feet long (70” in the X axis), building each layer up 1/7000th of an inch using specially engineered sand coated in resin and can complete an object the size of its massive job box at a rate of 45 minutes per square inch."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgrGhJ5u5oM

link to the story
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/02/04/uni-students-train-future-using-one-north-americas-largest-3d-printers/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/05/2014 04:07 PM
LENS Engine Project the 'Recipe' for the 3D Printed Metal Future
http://www.3dprinterworld.com/article/lens-engine-project-recipe-for-3d-printed-metal-future

"The first of the two projects led by Optomec, working in partnership with Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control, MachMotion, TechSolve, and the U.S. Army Benet Laboratories, is aimed at developing a modular, cost-effective "LENS Engine" for integration with existing machine tools to enable 3D printing of metals"

NO SOUND video on how LENS works
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4kNkwmeqz8
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 02/07/2014 04:07 AM
NASA Goddard's 'Cutting Edge' flyer has an intetesting article  "NASA Jumps Aboard the 3D-Manufacturing Train"

http://gsfctechnology.gsfc.nasa.gov/newsletter/Current.pdf
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/10/2014 03:30 PM
NASA Goddard's 'Cutting Edge' flyer has an intetesting article  "NASA Jumps Aboard the 3D-Manufacturing Train"

http://gsfctechnology.gsfc.nasa.gov/newsletter/Current.pdf

Looks like someone used the material for parts of their story:  How NASA Is Launching 3D Printing Into Space
http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-launching-3d-printing-space-121527837.html

This is something I've posted before how the RL-10 can be upraged (cheap).
"NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, in collaboration with Aerojet Rocketdyne of West Palm Beach, Fla., recently built and tested an engine injector for the RL-10 rocket."

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/02/10/nasas-goddard-center-pursues-many-space-applications-3d-printing/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/12/2014 02:26 AM
Could future spaceships be built with artificial 'bone'?

« Now, using a high-tech 3D printer, scientists in Germany have created a lightweight but very strong material inspired by the intricate microscopic architecture of living tissue - our own bones. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could pave the way for future super-light materials that could be used in microfluidics devices or to make lighter (and thus cheaper) spacecraft. »

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-02-future-spaceships-built-artificial-bone.html#jCp
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/13/2014 01:59 PM
NASA Takes 3D Printing to Next Logical Conclusion: 3D Printed Trees

http://tinyurl.com/kgqj8or

"Chief scientist of synthetic biology at the NASA Ames Research Center, Lynn Rothschild, and her PhD student, Diana Gentry, were working on a project to 3D print “biomaterials out of thin air.” The team has been hard at work, using the $100,000 from their NIAC grant and have relayed some of their progress towards 3D printing synthetic biomaterials using cellular arrays."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/13/2014 03:21 PM
Simulated Melted Moon Rocks Used For 3D Printing

http://tinyurl.com/mvzj3c3

"What some US researchers have done is use a 3D printer to construct objects out of laser-melted simulated lunar rocks – simulated because the actual moon rocks are considered a national treasure with no possibility to stock up with additional space stones in the foreseeable future."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 02/13/2014 03:29 PM
Simulated Melted Moon Rocks Used For 3D Printing

http://tinyurl.com/mvzj3c3

"What some US researchers have done is use a 3D printer to construct objects out of laser-melted simulated lunar rocks – simulated because the actual moon rocks are considered a national treasure with no possibility to stock up with additional space stones in the foreseeable future."
Reminds me of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptUj8JRAYu8
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/13/2014 10:04 PM
Simulated Melted Moon Rocks Used For 3D Printing

http://tinyurl.com/mvzj3c3

"What some US researchers have done is use a 3D printer to construct objects out of laser-melted simulated lunar rocks – simulated because the actual moon rocks are considered a national treasure with no possibility to stock up with additional space stones in the foreseeable future."

Couple this with this:

« Inspired by the termites' resilience and collective intelligence, a team of computer scientists and engineers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has created an autonomous robotic construction crew. The system needs no supervisor, no eye in the sky, and no communication: just simple robots—any number of robots—that cooperate by modifying their environment. »

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-02-self-organizing-robots-robotic-crew-foreman.html#jCp

And you could have robots build a castle on the moon.  The 3D-printer would make the bricks and the robots would assemble them.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 02/13/2014 10:13 PM
And you could have robots build a castle on the moon.  The 3D-printer would make the bricks and the robots would assemble them.

This is really far into the future. "3D printer on the Moon" right now is like saying "abracadabra!" There's a puff of smoke and suddenly a Moonbase appears. It's not like that at all.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/13/2014 10:17 PM
And you could have robots build a castle on the moon.  The 3D-printer would make the bricks and the robots would assemble them.

This is really far into the future. "3D printer on the Moon" right now is like saying "abracadabra!" There's a puff of smoke and suddenly a Moonbase appears. It's not like that at all.

Well, notice that I wrote "castle" and not "moonbase".   I was thinking of something that would be more of an art project than any kind of life-support-capable habitat.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 02/13/2014 11:25 PM
Well, notice that I wrote "castle" and not "moonbase".   I was thinking of something that would be more of an art project than any kind of life-support-capable habitat.

If unicorns provide the labor, I'm 100% in favor of it.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/14/2014 12:26 AM
If unicorns provide the labor, I'm 100% in favor of it.

Have you even looked at the link I gave, or do you just knee-jerk react whenever you read something about robots in space?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2e4GIZ3W1o
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 02/14/2014 12:37 AM
If unicorns provide the labor, I'm 100% in favor of it.

Have you even looked at the link I gave, or do you just knee-jerk react whenever you read something about robots in space?

I am familiar with the link. I am very familiar with space-based 3D printing concepts. And I am very much in favor of robots in space.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/14/2014 12:42 AM
I am familiar with the link. I am very familiar with space-based 3D printing concepts. And I am very much in favor of robots in space.

Then don't use words such as "unicorns" in laconic statements.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 02/14/2014 12:48 AM
I want to see robots do it with dirt and rocks on Earth and /then/ we talk about similar stuff on the Moon.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: grondilu on 02/14/2014 12:54 AM
I want to see robots do it with diet and rocks on Earth and /then/ we talk about similar stuff on the Moon.

Yeah good point.  Kind of ironic that I'm being thrown this one, though.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/14/2014 01:50 AM
To me a moon base would be a combo of this type of construction with habs from say Bigelow.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZL0A0IMFVY

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/09/30/university-south-california-realization-3d-printed-houses/

"Using this method, the professor has created walls that are six feet high, with layers that are 6 inches high and 4 inches thick, and he believes that it can be expanded to whole buildings, saying that, with Contour Crafting, it’s possible to construct the entire structure of a 2,000 square foot house (floors, walls, and roof) in less than twenty hours.  The 3D printer, mounted onto a gantry frame and weighing about 500 lbs"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/14/2014 02:43 AM
This Lander/Bot combo looks real good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwFrCpYavt4

This video and more comes from this material loaded article: SinterHab: Insectoids, Microwaves and 3D Printed Moon Bases (NASA, JPL)

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/03/05/sinterhab-insectoids-microwaves-and-3d-printed-moon-bases/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 02/14/2014 03:06 AM
I kinda like Tethers Unlimited's SpiderFab, as it melds 3D printing of trusses with light assembly work robot arms. I think there will still be plenty of cases where additive 3D printing and some robot arm CNC subtractive machining+assembly might be the better hybrid choice.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/14/2014 06:03 PM
The ESA's 3D printed moon base from this article: 

Home Away From Home: 3D-Printed Habitats on the Moon
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/02/05/home-away-from-home-3d-printed-habitats-on-the-moon/


"Architects at Foster + Partners are designing an inflatable, pressurized dome meant to house four astronauts and protect against “micrometeoroids and space radiation”, according to the ESA’s website.  A 3D printer, controlled via robot, will then construct an outer shell from lunar soil, called regolith." 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 02/15/2014 03:45 AM
Pioneers in the West didn't take shelters with them. They took saws, axes and auger drills. The rest was ISRU. I'm getting the feeling additive manufacturing will be one of the tools essential for offworld living.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 02/15/2014 12:40 PM
Pioneers in the West didn't take shelters with them. They took saws, axes and auger drills. The rest was ISRU. I'm getting the feeling additive manufacturing will be one of the tools essential for offworld living.

as will be the tech that produces the refined feedstock for the additive fabbers, by grabbing the existing raw materials.

That tech may likewise have to be "additive" (subtractive?) - ie. able to produce the fully refined feedstock by directly grabbing it from the environment.

It seems to me you'd need a machine which would dig the dirt right out of the ground and break it down into components that would be used as feedstock for the additive fabbers, and this would have to be done with minimal chemical inputs (since these would be in scarce supply), thus likely making the process more energy intensive.

So the whole idea seems limited by your available power supply. Once you have that, then many things are possible.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/21/2014 12:03 AM
They call this story

NASA part 3 (4 on its way)  http://tinyurl.com/k4p4k4v

3D Printing & Space (Part 3): NASA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrWHwHuWrzk

Edit: cleanup
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/23/2014 02:45 PM
US Department of Energy’s Mission to 3D Print New Metal Alloys
  http://tinyurl.com/mzseba5

"Rare-earth elements are finite and, yet, we depend on them for some of our most essential technologies, such as those that involve X-Rays, lasers and magnets. In order to head off the inevitable shortage of rare earth metals, the Critical Materials Institute at the US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory is hoping to synthesize new ones with 3D metal printing."

Edit cleanup
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/23/2014 02:52 PM
Carbon fiber printer

Story: http://www.popularmechanics.com/_mobile/technology/gadgets/news/new-3d-printer-by-markforged-can-print-with-carbon-fiber-16428727

Site: http://markforged.com

nice find ....
http://vimeo.com/84989258

Update video with more information.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5wjjDBdgeE

"Designed to overcome the strength limitations of traditional 3D printed materials, the revolutionary Mark One 3D printer is the world's first 3D printer designed to print continuous carbon fiber. Now you can print parts, tooling, and fixtures with a higher strength-to-weight ratio than 6061-T6 Aluminum."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/23/2014 03:08 PM
Older article: More R&D Into Graphene for 3D Printing
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/05/01/more-rd-into-graphene-for-3d-printing/

"American Graphite Technologies Inc. and the Khariv Insitute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine) are planning to work together in order to research the possibilities of using graphene contained materials for 3D printing applications."

nice video with general info on Graphene

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTSnnlITsVg

Edit: Updates .....
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/11/2014 12:45 PM

FABMOB 3D Prints Your Atmosphere
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/03/03/fabmob-3d-prints-atmosphere/

This is an amazing concept, can see many applications for research.

 "FABMOB is an atmospheric sensing device that 3D prints topographical representations of environmental data."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/11/2014 01:21 PM
A video has just come out with what might be the next generation, or future of one method of 3D Printing. 

This is so very exciting to people doing 3D printing with filament.   This concept prints out 3 d prints In FULL color from what is shown, and that's a game changer.   Looking at my screen grabs the 3D Printer stocks 6 colors of plastic and resembles a 3D version of an ink jet printer.

With the right price point this might be the perfect 3D printer for models in color.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X86mo6BSQlg#t=146
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: R7 on 03/11/2014 02:32 PM
About the 3D printed SuperDraco, is it known how much inner surface and coolant channel post-processing there is .. or none?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/11/2014 03:17 PM
About the 3D printed SuperDraco, is it known how much inner surface and coolant channel post-processing there is .. or none?

My guess is very little post processing.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/18/2014 03:42 AM
another day another brand new laser 3 d printer larger and faster than others.   http://www.concept-laser.de/

"Elsewhere in recent times in the aeronautical and space industries, there has been an increased need for applications using titanium and nickel-based alloys by organizations like NASA and EADS Group. These material classes are primarily attractive for the extreme requirements in the development of jet engine drives. In addition to drive technology components, these also include test beds in space flight and turbine parts in power plant engineering and aircraft construction"

the article: http://tinyurl.com/k3j5e6p 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwH66LSsGTk



Edit: make a smaller link to the story
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/19/2014 03:47 PM
3D Printing an Experimental Thermonuclear Reactor

"you’ll want to hear what they’re doing over at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) being built in St. Paul-lez-Durance, France."

If your interested in this subject a read of the article is in order as it has several links to research  ;)
http://tinyurl.com/ombvqrf

"Imagine planning out a one thousand ton, 60 foot stack of magnets and superconducting niobium-3-tin cables that will be a part of the plasma chamber for an enormous nuclear fusion reactor — something that will, hypothetically, produce 500 megawatts of output power."

"For that reason, the US ITER team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is using the technology to aid in the preparation process."

"In the process of designing the reactor, the researchers are creating “toy” scale models of such things as the 60 foot tall central solenoid mentioned earlier."  see pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/20/2014 01:00 PM
Q&A regarding the new "Laser Melting" Process.

Part 1:  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1173307#msg1173307

3DPI Interview with Dr. Florian Bechmann of Concept Laser

http://tinyurl.com/mkysphb

" The aerospace sector is driving forward innovations as well. High quality solutions are in demand here, including the use of reactive materials such as titanium or aluminum-based alloys that can only be produced reliably to a high quality in a closed system. In general, users such as the following are convinced that the process will become increasingly well-established: NASA, the German Aerospace Center, Honeywell, Snecma, Aerojet/Rocketdyne and Astrium Space Transportation from the EADS Group. "


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Jim on 03/20/2014 01:09 PM
You are still over selling it.  It can not be used to build a rocket engine.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/20/2014 01:22 PM
You are still over selling it.  It can not be used to build a rocket engine.

It ?

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1111675#msg1111675

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Jim on 03/20/2014 01:55 PM
You are still over selling it.  It can not be used to build a rocket engine.

It ?

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1111675#msg1111675



A thruster is not a rocket engine
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/20/2014 02:24 PM
You are still over selling it.  It can not be used to build a rocket engine.

It ?

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1111675#msg1111675



A thruster is not a rocket engine

ahhh,  your talking "Additive Manufacturing" for a completed part.   The term is not fully defined atm and can in some cases be used interchangeably with "3D Printing"

My posts outside of this thread refers to the use of "3D Printing".   A wide set of "new tools" to manufacture rocket "parts", assembly required  :D

this video explains just one of the new wide set of "new tools"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vVEp1b8eao


The rest falls under "Proprietary"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/21/2014 03:13 PM
Prob half a dozen posts in wait

Good News for Concert Halls and Submarines: Duke Engineers Demonstrate 3D Printed Acoustic Cloaking

http://tinyurl.com/qjh6aew

"The repeated holes in the 3D printed sheet material, layered on top of each layer forms a pyramid structure. Essentially, the cloak alters the trajectory of the sound waves to give the impression that they do not hit anything and simply progress as if an object were not in the way. While the end result looks elegantly simple, the effort and brain-racking proved arduous."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k13L8u2tACY

Published on Mar 11, 2014 


This video demonstrates the difference in how sound waves act with and without the acoustic cloak in their path. The red and blue lines represent the high and low points of the sound waves. As they return to the top of the frame, notice how the profile of the sound waves on the left with nothing in their way closely matches the profile on the right after interacting with the acoustic cloak. In contrast, the center trial shows the deformation of sound waves that occurs with an uncloaked sphere in their path.

NASA Link http://video.techbriefs.com/video/Worlds-First-3D-Acoustic-Cloaki;Materials

Edit: fix link add screen grab, add NASA link

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/21/2014 07:13 PM
Research At Cranfield Yields Large Scale 3D Printing Metal Process (UK)

http://tinyurl.com/nvmgv7q

"constructed from titanium utilizing Cranfield’s proprietary Wire+Arc Additive Manufacture (WAAM) process. Spar sections are critical structural parts within an aircraft wing, and using the WAAM process, this metal prototype took just 37 hours to construct, direct from a digital model. By comparison, using traditional manufacturing methods, the same part would typically take weeks."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/21/2014 07:20 PM
They do a lot of that sort at Langley Research Center.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/21/2014 07:23 PM
Chinese Rocket 3D-Printed Seats
  http://tinyurl.com/ncqaqj8

"Since 1998 Professor Cui Guoqi, director of the Rapid Prototyping Research Center in Tianjin University, has been creating 3D printed seats for Chinese space missions."

 “During launch and landing these specially designed seats… protect the astronauts, especially their backbones, from being hurt by the jolt during acceleration. Every seat [is] tested by the astronaut in person and undergo[es] adjustments to make it more precise.”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/22/2014 01:34 PM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap

===============================================
MoonBase Parts printer anyone?

This Reprap printer was enlarged:  The World’s “First” 3D-Printed House Begins Construction
http://tinyurl.com/kdgov22

"the actual 3D printing of the components for the “first” 3D printed house."

KamerMaker XL, a 3.5 m tall FFF printer, made its way to the Buiksloter Canal in Amsterdam on January 6, where it’s already begun printing. The printer, more or less a large RepRap housed in a shipping container, is using a type of plastic — an 80% bio-based hotmelt, developed by German chemical company Henkel — to print pieces that will be assembled into a complete house.





 http://vimeo.com/80355705
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/22/2014 02:03 PM
Another new Toolset

Soluble Support Material Supports Creation of Hollow Composite Parts

http://tinyurl.com/pr2855k

"if you’re just familiar with composite manufacturing, you’ll know that composite parts are made by laying down or wrapping composite materials and resin over moulds, patterns, cores and mandrels. Producing hollow composite parts is a difficult challenge, dealt with by forming two halves of an object in a mould, joining the halves, and cutting away excess material.  With soluble support materials, however, it’s possible to create the soluble skeleton for an object that can be wrapped in composite material and rinsed away, leaving a hollow part."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAnnh8DzrYU
 Published on Feb 11, 2014 
Working for Protech I helped ELiTH racing by optimizing parts for 3D printing and helped them to buld them using our Stratasys Fortus 400mc system using FDM technology.

Materials used ABS-M30, ULTEM 9085 and SR-100 support for the soluble cores
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/23/2014 04:09 PM
Possible new Space Medical uses?
================================

Two stories


EOS Releases Two Medical Grade Materials for 3D Metal Printing
http://tinyurl.com/qay7jfe

"new EOS Titanium Ti64ELI and EOS StainlessSteel 316L materials, the company will be able to 3D print new medical-grade metal parts."

"EOS Titanium Ti64ELI is a light metal alloy that is both corrosion resistant and biocompatible.  Conforming to the chemical composition and mechanical property standards of ASTM F136, meaning that the alloy, with its high grade of purity, is suitable for 3D printing medical implants. "

===============================

3D Printing Saves Face in Life Altering Reconstructive Surgery
http://tinyurl.com/phvh5n6

"Such surgeries include that of their recent patient, Stephen Power.  Power, 29, received multiple trauma injuries in his 2012 accident, breaking his top jaw, nose and cheekbones and fracturing his skull. Improvements in 3D printing have made it possible for Sugar to have custom prints made from Power’s CT scan, both for implant and to create surgical guides. By scanning their patient’s skull, they were able to reestablish the symmetry Power lost after the accident, printing a symmetrical 3D model of his skull."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/24/2014 02:50 AM
Didn't realize that Morpheus engine is partially 3D printed. See page 5.

 http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/November_2013_Lagniappe.pdf
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: go4mars on 03/24/2014 04:09 AM
I wonder if medical grade titanium printing will start to affect things like horse racing, "extreme piercing", enhancements, etc."

"Wobeween Package, onwy one miwion dowers.  Bwades fwom hand."
"You no wike?  Twy subduwa howmet.  Buwetpwoof head."
"Pahaps some stwonga toes fo da wittow bawawina?"


Wouldn't hurt to fortify them Martian colonists.  Longer stronger arms come in handy for the low-g quadrupedal galloping for example.   ;)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 03/24/2014 08:22 AM
I wonder if medical grade titanium printing will start to affect things like horse racing...

Wasn't there that article about 3D printed titanium horseshoes, in Australia? Yup, CSIRO doing some stunt printing...

http://www.csiro.au/Portals/Media/3D-printed-horseshoe-to-improve-racing-performance.aspx (http://www.csiro.au/Portals/Media/3D-printed-horseshoe-to-improve-racing-performance.aspx)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/24/2014 03:45 PM
Think NASA .......think Tethers
---------------------------------------
Example of using a $2000 dollar off the shelf 3D Printer to fix a problem.

Hospital Technician Tethers Cables & Saves Hospital Money with 3D Printing



https://www.youtube.com/watch_fragments_ajax?v=twP4aX2sd8c&tr=time&frags=guide

Uploaded on Mar 18, 2014 
Steven Jaworski, a biomedical technician, had to replace so many cables that monitor patients' vital signs that he ordered cable tethers from a medical supplier for $24.50 per cable, or $73.50 for a set of three. But surgical scissors cut through these tethers easily.

Then Jaworski appealed to the Brookhaven administration that a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer could help solve his cable problem. He designed a tamperproof cable tether. Between the dense black PLA and thick wire, it costs $7.94. It holds all three cables, and surgical scissors can't cut through it.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/24/2014 07:22 PM
Greats uses for modern 3D toolsets & Great article for any space Geek.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How NASA brought the monstrous F-1 “moon rocket” engine back to life
The story of young engineers who resurrected an engine nearly twice their age.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/04/how-nasa-brought-the-monstrous-f-1-moon-rocket-back-to-life/3/

"Each Pyrios booster will feature a pair of F-1B engines, built with techniques that more resemble 3D printing than traditional casting or milling. The main combustion chamber and nozzle in particular will undergo tremendous simplification and consolidating; the parts count for those two assemblies together will be reduced from 5,600 manufactured elements in the original F-1 down to just 40."

"are using techniques like selective laser melting and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) to "grow" entire complex engine parts out of metal powders. "

Links with: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30308.msg1176256#msg1176256

Edit: fix link
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Lobo on 03/24/2014 09:39 PM
Can you 3D print a 3D printer?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/24/2014 11:06 PM
Can you 3D print a 3D printer?

Yes and NO

http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap

"RepRap is about making self-replicating machines, and making them freely available for the benefit of everyone. We are using 3D printing to do this, but if you have other technologies that can copy themselves and that can be made freely available to all, then this is the place for you too"

Been a major driver for new innovations in the 3D Market under an "open source" model.  Sadly, many have taken the ideas and developed the designs into commercial products to make money.  The ideal of making 90-100 percent of the parts has gotten lost in the process.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/25/2014 09:06 PM
This F1B engine may yet find a home in a commercial LV if it is not to expensive. What would twin engine LV be capable of to LEO?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/25/2014 09:25 PM
Can you 3D print a 3D printer?

Yes and NO

http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap

"RepRap is about making self-replicating machines, and making them freely available for the benefit of everyone. We are using 3D printing to do this, but if you have other technologies that can copy themselves and that can be made freely available to all, then this is the place for you too"

Been a major driver for new innovations in the 3D Market under an "open source" model.  Sadly, many have taken the ideas and developed the designs into commercial products to make money.  The ideal of making 90-100 percent of the parts has gotten lost in the process.
Yeah, but this is a great strength of the open-source model: I can and has sprouted all sorts of commercial spin-offs. The amount of value created by the RepRap project indirectly by all these countless 3d printing start-ups is vast, probably in the billions of dollars (Makerbot--started by one of the founders of the Reprap community--alone was bought-out with a valuation of over $400 million and an additional $200 million in other value).

I agree, though, that it's important for the Reprap project to continue. I think they could be pretty close to building some of the major components with another 3d printer (including the stepper motors and xyz stages), though no one has put in the energy to do it (it wouldn't be as practical as buying conventional stepper motors and such). Also, progress is being made with circuits and the like.

My guess is that eventually someone will be able to print a 3d printer with almost entirely another 3d printer, but it'll take a lot of assembly and hard work.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/25/2014 11:11 PM
I've now seen 2 examples were parts count can be reduced by 100:1 on rocket engine using 3D printing. The injector NASA tested last year and article on F-1B. Between computer engine management systems, 3D printing and other modern manufacturing methods eg CNC, a 10:1 parts reduction count is not unrealistic for the F-1B engine. Besides less parts the manufacturing costs of the parts should also be cheaper than more traditional methods. 3D printing is still new so costs of creating a part should fall considerably in the next few years as 3D printers and their consumables drop in price.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: cordwainer on 03/26/2014 12:26 AM
I want to see robots do it with dirt and rocks on Earth and /then/ we talk about similar stuff on the Moon.
Makes me wonder if such a technique might be useful for cleanup and search and rescue of landslides and slurry floods like the ones that occurred in Arlington, WA or during the East Japan Great Earthquake. It seems to me that the eventual use of 3D printing technologies in space will happen for the very fact that they have to much utility here on Earth for them not to be developed further in the future. Why are you always such a downer, Robotbeat. These are advanced forums for discussing future applications if you want to make grounded criticisms that's fine but sometimes you come off a bit snide. 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/26/2014 01:39 AM
I want to see robots do it with dirt and rocks on Earth and /then/ we talk about similar stuff on the Moon.
Makes me wonder if such a technique might be useful for cleanup and search and rescue of landslides and slurry floods like the ones that occurred in Arlington, WA or during the East Japan Great Earthquake. It seems to me that the eventual use of 3D printing technologies in space will happen for the very fact that they have to much utility here on Earth for them not to be developed further in the future. Why are you always such a downer, Robotbeat. These are advanced forums for discussing future applications if you want to make grounded criticisms that's fine but sometimes you come off a bit snide.
Sorry if I come off as a downer, just being skeptical. :) I certainly have my unrealistic dreamer phases, too.

But I was serious about the "try it on Earth, first" thing. I follow groups like these guys:  http://vimeo.com/16106427

...who are attempting to do it with people. This stuff is hard.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: cordwainer on 03/26/2014 03:10 AM
Awesome thread Robotbeat, very browntech. I have always thought there should be more investment in stuff like that it is one of the areas where a technologically and industrially experienced country like the U.S. could really create new markets. We have a tendency to invent all the really cool stuff and then either sell it or license the production to someone overseas and then make our money off of spare parts or licensing. Browntech would be cheap enough and the demand great enough that we could keep the processes largely local in the U.S. and still make strong sales both here and overseas, but at the same time make items that people could repair themselves. As with anything people will reverse engineer stuff but if you make a good product at the correct price-point then people will have less reason to do so. I know its a primarily charitable idea for investment from charities, governments and NGO's but I see a lot of potential for private investment as well.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: go4mars on 03/26/2014 11:50 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEez9lNh8Uw

Peter Thiel has been vocal in advocating the philosophy;
Developing new technology (doing more with less - his definition) is more charitable than "charity", and benefits welfare more than welfare

"Developed nations" is a misnomer.  We haven't arrived. 

This thread has reinforced some of my views on technocracy.

Prober:  Thanks for all of the stunning examples you've brought to this thread to highlight.  Please keep them coming!  I believe their future impact on spacefaring is underappreciated, and these examples help us to imaginate.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/26/2014 12:22 PM
Looks like a new model printer with new material
=====================================

German 3D Printer manufacturer Voxeljet modernizes a 5,000 year old wax investment casting process using 3D printing

http://tinyurl.com/knj44k2

"Investment casting, or lost-wax casting, is a 5000 year old process that has largely remained unchanged since it was first used by the ancient Chinese. The emergence of 3D printing technologies through the 1990’s made an impact on the process, but now 3D printing  — renowned for its detail and precision — is proving more viable for investment casting applications than ever before"

"by producing perfect investable patterns quickly, precisely and cost-effectively. 3D printed PMMA models can completely replace wax models,  the most important part: the production of the plastic models using 3D printing is very simple, accurate and fast. No tooling is required, as the digital printing process is based on the CAD data for the component;"

"The material used is PMMA, which already softens at 73°C and burns without residue at temperatures over 700° C. "

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSic92P7JJs
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/26/2014 12:29 PM
This F1B engine may yet find a home in a commercial LV if it is not to expensive. What would twin engine LV be capable of to LEO?

Double Zenit's Payload?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/26/2014 12:40 PM
People have been using 3d printing for investment casting for a while. Armadillo Aerospace used it for the ring thruster structure member on one of their last Rockets, done by a local Minnesotan company.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: wizzzard3 on 03/26/2014 04:21 PM
http://3dprint.com/1786/new-factum-high-speed-sintering-3d-printer-prints-objects-in-under-a-second/

if they cloud make it roll to roll process  and combine it with this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dahz8wYWvos
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/27/2014 12:59 AM
http://3dprint.com/1786/new-factum-high-speed-sintering-3d-printer-prints-objects-in-under-a-second/

if they cloud make it roll to roll process  and combine it with this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dahz8wYWvos

Great find Wizzard and a construction technology that is only viable with 3D printers.
I've only considered 3D printing for creating solid rocket engine parts but this opens up a whole new area of space related uses. Here are few ideas.

Building the lunar bases. Use this to build a very strong ultra light structure over which is placed sintered regiloth blocks for radiation and meteorite  protection. The light weight means only small amounts of plastic or metal needs to be transported to moon to construct large structures. Creating structures on site using 3D printers means designs can be changed to suit location and shipping volume is small.

Creating ultralight weight LV, I can see this being done before aircraft.

Creating ultralight space structures.Technology may even be able to be used for construction of solar panels. Last article I found quoted 250W per Kg for solar panels, if this technology could increase this to 2.5KW/Kg SSPs might start to become viable.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: cordwainer on 03/27/2014 02:52 AM
US Department of Energy’s Mission to 3D Print New Metal Alloys

http://tinyurl.com/mzseba5


"Rare-earth elements are finite and, yet, we depend on them for some of our most essential technologies, such as those that involve X-Rays, lasers and magnets. In order to head off the inevitable shortage of rare earth metals, the Critical Materials Institute at the US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory is hoping to synthesize new ones with 3D metal printing."
Could this be used to recycle current supplies of rare earths or is that what they mean by "synthesize"?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2014 02:00 PM
good find seems this new tech is a very hot topic

http://3dprint.com/1786/new-factum-high-speed-sintering-3d-printer-prints-objects-in-under-a-second/

if they cloud make it roll to roll process  and combine it with this
"Instead of using an extruder like many polymer based 3d printers do to slowly melt the plastic into a layer that is placed methodically in a given pattern, or using a laser to sinter metals as they are deposited, FACTUM uses a sweeping heat lamp to sinter larger areas of the material at a lower temperature. The ironic part is that the lamp applies heat to the material 10,000 times longer than a laser does, yet the print process is exponentially faster."

=====================================================
Additive Manufacturing with HSS could replace Injection Moulding and That’s a Factum
http://tinyurl.com/mcozdmd

" Unilever, a global multi-brand distributor, got involved. At the opposite end of the spectrum is BAE (aerospace) and Cobham Antenna Systems (space telecommunication), "

"With HSS, we predict for a substantial range of products it will always be cheaper than injection moulding, which won’t be able to compete on cost in these cases. We think this is a very profound first for additive manufacturing.”


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2014 02:18 PM
US Department of Energy’s Mission to 3D Print New Metal Alloys

http://tinyurl.com/mzseba5


"Rare-earth elements are finite and, yet, we depend on them for some of our most essential technologies, such as those that involve X-Rays, lasers and magnets. In order to head off the inevitable shortage of rare earth metals, the Critical Materials Institute at the US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory is hoping to synthesize new ones with 3D metal printing."
Could this be used to recycle current supplies of rare earths or is that what they mean by "synthesize"?

think they could recycle materials if they could get them back to a powder form......Will have to review the material.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2014 02:32 PM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap


New material announcements.  Not bad new materials for the Home user 3D Printer less than 500$

========================================================

Arevo Labs want to See Makers 3D Printing with Carbon Fiber and Carbon Nanotubes
http://tinyurl.com/jw9rxv6

"the company has produced carbon fiber and carbon nanotube materials for the purposes of composite reinforcement 3D printing. Carbon nanotubes are hollow tubes made up of graphene, one atom thick layers of carbon. These nanotubes, which are stronger than steel, can be used to reinforce objects"

“We are excited about enabling 3D printed Ultra Strong Polymer Parts for the first time. OEMs in the aerospace and defense industries, in particular, can now use lighter and stronger production parts not possible to manufacture using conventional methods until now.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOjCIE3nZlA

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2014 10:23 PM
World's Largest 3D Printed Titanium Aircraft Part On Display In China
http://www.3dprinterworld.com/article/worlds-largest-3d-printed-titanium-aircraft-part-display-china

"The world's largest 3D printed titanium aircraft part was displayed at the 16th China International High-tech Expo earlier this year. The part was built on a Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) 3D printer and is a critical component for the J-20 or J-31 Chinese stealth fighter. The company behind the creation of the hi-tech jet part is AVIC Laser, formed in part by Professor Huaming Wang, creator of the mammoth 3D LENS printer used to build the part."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2014 10:36 PM
Mammoth 3D Laser Printer Developed In China
http://www.3dprinterworld.com/article/mammoth-3d-laser-printer-developed-china

"The build area for Wang's LENS printer is pretty impressive. The exact measurements have not been publicly released but the team has displayed aircraft parts up to thirteen feet long that were built on the printer. As if the sheer size of the printer weren't impressive enough, the 3D printed parts can cost up to 90% less to produce than traditionally manufactured parts. "This new 3D printing method is an efficient tool to help improve manufacturing levels and, as such, can play a major role in upgrading China's high-end industries." Wang said."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/29/2014 02:39 AM
Clearly the titanium piece was extensively machined. It's near-net-shape, not 3d printing.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/29/2014 01:31 PM
Clearly the titanium piece was extensively machined. It's near-net-shape, not 3d printing.

You believe they hyped the story a bit?    It might be possible as no video was given.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 03/29/2014 02:58 PM
Clearly the titanium piece was extensively machined. It's near-net-shape, not 3d printing.

You believe they hyped the story a bit?    It might be possible as no video was given.



I suspect there's also a question about how one defines "large." Lockheed Martin has made an experimental base plate for Orion using the same technology. Somebody could compare the dimensions of this to the Orion base.

There's a lot of stuff that goes into making the technology useful. 3D printers of all kinds tend to be slow. This thing might simply be a stunt, and they don't intend to make it this way at all because it might take too long to fabricate.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/29/2014 08:06 PM
One articles from a link Prober submitted was for printer that can create alloys by having 4 hops with  different metal powders. They using to experiment with different metal combinations, this quick way to create a new alloy.

The other possibility is to create an item with a mixture of alloys in it. Eg build steel item already chrome or even stainless steel plated.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/01/2014 03:15 AM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap
=====================================================

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX8JG1tqEM4

 
Care to 3D print your next house? Really BIG 3D printers are coming! Our heavy duty, open source, stepper motor drivers (The THB6064AH from
http://www.linistepper.com ) are driving this beast. It's actually a prototype that fills a 2 car garage and prints segments of full sized walls with space for insulation, insets for windows, doors, etc...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 04/01/2014 03:24 AM
{snip}
Care to 3D print your next house? Really BIG 3D printers are coming! Our heavy duty, open source, stepper motor drivers are driving this beast. It's actually a prototype that fills a 2 car garage and prints segments of full sized walls with space for insulation, insets for windows, doors, etc...

To make this printer space related we need a version that uses regolith as its ink.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/01/2014 03:49 AM
{snip}
Care to 3D print your next house? Really BIG 3D printers are coming! Our heavy duty, open source, stepper motor drivers are driving this beast. It's actually a prototype that fills a 2 car garage and prints segments of full sized walls with space for insulation, insets for windows, doors, etc...

To make this printer space related we need a version that uses regolith as its ink.

That's one way to do it.....for laying quick foundations maybe another mix.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 04/01/2014 08:30 AM
To make this printer space related we need a version that uses regolith as its ink.

The Contour Crafting group would be a potential lead in terms experience with large structural prints of simple materials (concrete), but their working relationship with Caterpillar may introduce patent encumbrances. Then there are the italian sandstone analogue guys, but they do a powder with a spray binder rather than a melt.

That said, a desert solar thermal sand melter on a rover chassis in the US southwest would provide an alpha level of attempting a regolith build. After that, stuffing regolith simulants into the melter chamber would get you closer. Final testing would be putting the melter rover inside that big vacuum chamber at JSC and point heat lamps at it (if they don't strangle you for excessive outgassing in there). Solar thermal melting limits you to maybe 5 days out a lunar 2 week light cycle depending on your light collector/mirror configuration, and you have to be careful about melt in the pipes/printhead freezing/remelting (schedule a print run to finish before sunset then gravity flush the system?).
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/01/2014 08:02 PM
This post will be a mess for a while......but decent info if you wish to do some research.  I'm finding layer after layer (@12 atM) of new information.   So be kind
====================================

Sigma Labs Files Patent for 3D Printing Quality Control Sensor System
http://tinyurl.com/q6b8hj5

"The project, titled “In-Process Quality Assurance (IPQA) for Laser Powder Bed Production of Aerospace Components”, involves General Electric Aviation, Honeywell Aerospace, and Aerojet Rocketdyne."


"part of a Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) project" 

I discovered this video that should be watched to the end to understand what this is all about


"By inspecting product in-process as opposed to post-process, Sigma Labs can help its customers dramatically reduce their overall inspection costs by only inspecting product identified as suspect during the manufacturing process, aka inspection-for-cause."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gZB4YdgNp0

http://www10.mcadcafe.com/nbc/articles/1/1236323/Sigma-Labs-Inc.-Awarded-Contract-Extension-Honeywell-Aerospace-Additive-Manufacturing-Support-DARPA-Open-Manufacturing-Program?interstitial_displayed=Yes
 

Edits
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/02/2014 03:01 AM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap
======================================================

This is the open source layer (for the moment) of Sigma Labs (the story above)

Sigma Labs and Michigan Technological University to Co-Develop Low-Cost 3D Metal Printer
http://tinyurl.com/ohhdqed
&
Michigan Tech Releases Open-Source 3D Metal Printer for Less Than $2,000
http://tinyurl.com/okqpqtu

The lab has put out a report titled “Low-Cost Open-Source 3D Metal Printing”, available on Academia.edu, that instructs readers on how to build their own 3D steel printer for just over $1,000.

The files and much, much more.  http://www.appropedia.org/Open-source_metal_3-D_printer

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grab these files if you want them very quickly.   Some companies can see making $$ and are working to make this a "CLOSED" model.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZIVJ1Rb48I
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/03/2014 06:01 PM
3D Printing’s Potential for Space Apps Is Getting Astronauts’ Imagination Flying

http://tinyurl.com/mo4jsde  (some conflicting days, dates etc. in the article)

"The 3D printer developed by Made in Space is expected to be delivered to the ISS for the “3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment” by SpaceX’s robotic refurbishing mission in Fall 2014. The machine, which is capable of printing about 30% of the tools needed aboard the ISS, will be used to provide scientific foundations for future additive manufacturing away form Earth and demonstrate the long-term effects of micro-gravity on 3D printing. It will also lay the foundation for a full Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) to be flown into orbit at a later date, to enable multiple space based 3D prints."

"Reid Weiseman, the NASA astronaut bound for the ISS in May, where he will be the first person to test Made in Space’s 3D printer"

NSF Links:  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=26310.msg869604#msg869604

http://www.madeinspace.us/made-in-space-and-nasa-to-send-first-3d-printer-into-space

Edit: add Links
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 04/03/2014 09:59 PM
The WAAM 3d printing technology could be used to build metal shelters on moon and maybe in space. Feed stock may eventually be extracted from regolith.  You need to Google it as I don't have a LINK. Same goes for SpiderFab.

Tethers Unlimited's SpiderFab also has great potential for developing large space structure' s. Would be perfect for SSPs.

 

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/03/2014 10:57 PM
The WAAM 3d printing technology could be used to build metal shelters on moon and maybe in space. Feed stock may eventually be extracted from regolith.  You need to Google it as I don't have a LINK. Same goes for SpiderFab.

Tethers Unlimited's SpiderFab also has great potential for developing large space structure' s. Would be perfect for SSPs.

believe all are posted in one way or another under this thread.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/04/2014 08:50 PM
Can you 3D print a 3D printer?

This just released video will be of interest to you.   It relates to the "Bot Farm" 

This might shock a few readers.    A few will say there is a cheaper way to do this type of manufacture.  As a business model this works.  For test models in short run quantities, or test models with various materials this works.  Many firms have mini or small "Bot Farms", including myself  8)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_jUObUGLTA&feature=youtu.be

====================================================

Who Will Hold the Coveted Title of Most 3D Printers Operating in Unison?
http://tinyurl.com/lalxjun

“to my knowledge, LETU is the only university in the country to require all of its incoming freshmen engineering students to build their own individual 3D printers. Many schools have teams that build 3D printers, but we are, I believe, the first to require that all incoming freshmen build and operate their own individual 3D printers, which the students then can use throughout their college career to build prototypes of things they design.”


Edit: add article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 04/08/2014 01:21 AM
The lastest SpaceShow's 6th Apr guest speaker is 3D printer expert.

http://www.thespaceshow.com/detail.asp?q=2222
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: guckyfan on 04/08/2014 01:30 PM
The lastest SpaceShow's 6th Apr guest speaker is 3D printer expert.

http://www.thespaceshow.com/detail.asp?q=2222

I did not listen to it in full but a lot of it. Quite interesting but some weird points in it too.

He emphasized repeatedly and very strongly that 3D-printing is a very promising and important development but will not make a single conventional production method obsolete. It is an addition, not a replacement. I emphatically agree with that. It will be useful in space but not replace conventional production.

He knows nothing about inflatable habitats and on the basis of this lack he strongly doubts their viability.

He is aware of the problem of inflatable habitats and their need to withstand pressure. He does not propose to build them with his 3D-printers. He proposes building landing pads, roads and non inflatable structures. Those structures could provide radiation and micrometeorite shielding with habitats inside.

His knowledge about metal printing seems also limited. He explained that forging and rolling produces products with more strength. That's obviously true but he concludes that 3D-printing cannot produce high stress metal components. It seems he has not heard of products like 3D printed regeneratively cooled combustion chambers and nozzles.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 04/09/2014 04:57 AM
His area of expertise is more with construction of structures. The caller seem to miss the point, show was about 3D printing not inflatable lunar bases.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/09/2014 03:25 PM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap3D     

 ==================================================
Metal printers

Potential Home Metal 3D Printer: The Vader

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/09/30/potential-home-metal-3d-printer-vader/

Process: Liquid Metal Jet Printing (LMJP) (under development)

"LMJP is similar to ink jet printing, whereby every individual molten drop is printed in a specific location."

A head akin to that of an ink jet printer lays down droplets, layer by layer, building up the molten aluminum additively. By changing the extrusion orifice size, molten spheres of metal are then deposited.
http://www.vadersystems.com/#!list/c18jg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WimDI3LX2w
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/09/2014 04:22 PM
Another follow-up New Materials &  Graphene
======================================
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1163550#msg1163550

Additive Graphene With Grafoid & Altamat Atomisation Agreement   http://tinyurl.com/mnjtj84

“Success in 3D graphene printed materials markets comes from an ability to create the highest performing products at the lowest possible cost on a safe and environmentally sustainable basis. Our agreement with Altamat and Dr. Henein’s engineering expertise adds yet another element to Grafoid’s expanding portfolio of MesoGraf™ graphene development,”

To quote: ‘…analysts forecast the global graphene market to grow at a CAGR of 60.4 percent over the period 2012-2016. One of the key factors contributing to this market growth is the growing demand for graphene due to its superior attributes.’ - Infiniti Research Limited, October 2013
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/09/2014 04:50 PM
Most of the DIY and driving force for 3D Printers comes out of the Reprap "open source" http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap3D    New Material Print your own Bearings.
=================================================

Another Revolution in the Making with Igus’ First Tribo Filament   http://tinyurl.com/m2bxuj8

"Those who “make with” 3D printers may not be familiar with the name but those who “make” 3D printers know all about it: German multinational plastic component producer igus makes parts for a vast majority of desktop FDM and RepRap FFF 3D printers."

"all components produced by igus are tribologic, meaning they do not require lubricants to move because they are made of technopolymers that are more resistant to abrasion than standard plastics."

http://tinyurl.com/kl7ddb7
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/10/2014 06:53 PM
Couple of Medical uses.   Long term space travel might need these.
========================================

Printing Skin Cells on Burn Wounds
http://www.wakehealth.edu/Research/WFIRM/Research/Military-Applications/Printing-Skin-Cells-On-Burn-Wounds.htm

"WFIRM scientists designed, built and tested a printer designed to print skin cells onto burn wounds. The "ink" is actually different kinds of skin cells. A scanner is used to determine wound size and depth."
======================

The first 3D printed organ -- a liver -- is expected in 2014
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9244884/The_first_3D_printed_organ_a_liver_is_expected_in_2014

"To spur on the development of bio-printed organs, the Methuselah Foundation, a Springfield, Va.-based not-for-profit that supports regenerative medicine research, this month announced a $1 million prize for the first organization to print a fully functioning liver. "
The Prize PDF
http://www.neworgan.org/pdf/new_organ_press_release_fact_sheet.pdf
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/10/2014 11:25 PM
Meet Jimmy, Intel’s Open Source, 3D Printable Robot
http://tinyurl.com/kgu5z5u
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
How about replacing that GM bot (http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/default.asp) on the ISS with a space upgraded Jimmy?  or How about putting some Moon tracks on it and make a sexy moon rover?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Johnson also saw that the robot of the future would be accessible and affordable.  By making Jimmy open source and 3D printable, he hopes to keep the price of building the robot under $500. In addition, access to Jimmy’s design files allows users to project their own vision onto him, personalize him and make him their own. As Johnson put it, “the future is for everybody”, so everyone should be able to make it what they want."
Files available (may) http://21stcenturyrobot.com/archive
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXlmQ1ilpbs#t=776

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: nec207 on 04/13/2014 02:32 AM
People should not confused 3D printers with star trek replicator that work by rearranging subatomic particles, which are abundant everywhere in the universe, to form molecules and arrange those molecules to form the object.That is beyond today's technology.

Way too many subatomic particles to move around and for computer to keep track of them all.May be if we had quantum computers they would be powerful enough? But today's computers are too crude.

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 04/14/2014 06:10 PM
That's where the relatively new science of molecular self-organization comes in.

TEDxVienna - Klaus Stadlmann - The world's smallest 3D printer

http://youtu.be/D2IQkKE7h9I
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: KelvinZero on 04/25/2014 10:47 AM
People should not confused 3D printers with star trek replicator that work by rearranging subatomic particles, which are abundant everywhere in the universe, to form molecules and arrange those molecules to form the object.That is beyond today's technology.

Way too many subatomic particles to move around and for computer to keep track of them all.May be if we had quantum computers they would be powerful enough? But today's computers are too crude.
Anyone confused about that should look at all the amazing things we can do with nothing like that level of technology, as mentioned above. Take the organ printing for example. You are working at a comparatively crude level and letting the cells do all the really complex stuff of connecting to their neighbors. Maybe one day we will be printing titanium boned, dinosaur shaped chickens with technology like that.. but what do startrek script writers use those molecule-accurate replicators for? a cup of tea.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: RanulfC on 05/01/2014 12:41 PM
You DO realize how damn difficult it is to make a decent cup of tea right?

Randy :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: nec207 on 05/01/2014 08:17 PM
People should not confused 3D printers with star trek replicator that work by rearranging subatomic particles, which are abundant everywhere in the universe, to form molecules and arrange those molecules to form the object.That is beyond today's technology.

Way too many subatomic particles to move around and for computer to keep track of them all.May be if we had quantum computers they would be powerful enough? But today's computers are too crude.
Anyone confused about that should look at all the amazing things we can do with nothing like that level of technology, as mentioned above. Take the organ printing for example. You are working at a comparatively crude level and letting the cells do all the really complex stuff of connecting to their neighbors. Maybe one day we will be printing titanium boned, dinosaur shaped chickens with technology like that.. but what do startrek script writers use those molecule-accurate replicators for? a cup of tea.

I read we are about 50 to 100 years out from having a replicator like in star trek if computing power does not slow down.Main problem is computers are too crude today for it.

I read they have done experiments in lab moving molecules around.Not atoms yet.

Scientists build world's first single-molecule car 
http://phys.org/news7438.html
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/05/2014 01:33 AM
Update Q&A on the Printer In Space program.

Update to this thread...
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1179409#msg1179409

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svwSmNPhu5M#t=123
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: wizzzard3 on 05/05/2014 11:14 PM
http://3dprint.com/3154/exone-inconelr-alloy-3d/

iconel for turbine blades from a 3d metal printer
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/06/2014 01:00 AM
In regards to using 3D printer for creating spares for Space station.
Currently there may only be a few percent of spares needed that can be printed because ISS was never designed for spares to be printed in space. Future space stations will be designed to make the maximum use of 3D printers for spares manufacturing. This may involve rationalising materials so bulk of components are made from printable materials.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 05/06/2014 01:58 AM
In regards to using 3D printer for creating spares for Space station.
Currently there may only be a few percent of spares needed that can be printed because ISS was never designed for spares to be printed in space. Future space stations will be designed to make the maximum use of 3D printers for spares manufacturing. This may involve rationalising materials so bulk of components are made from printable materials.

It sorta depends upon how you want to count. Made In Space claims that there are a large number of parts used inside the station like clamps for wires, braces, things like that, that can be made by their printer. So we're not talking about large structural items or things that don't break, but stuff that's used in day to day work.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/19/2014 01:55 AM
10 minutes into video on this link.  Adam talks about Spacex 3D printing engine parts.

 http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=34774.msg1200447.msg#1200447
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 05/19/2014 07:43 PM
10 minutes into video on this link.  Adam talks about Spacex 3D printing engine parts.

 http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=34774.msg1200447.msg#1200447

Hmmmm.... Merlin pintile, Raptor segment (thougjt that was for Stennis), ? ? ? ?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/23/2014 12:11 AM
Lockheed are also embracing 3D printing.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140519-lockheed-uses-3d-printing-and-virtual-pathfinding-to-lower-satellite-costs.html
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/23/2014 12:48 PM
Lockheed are also embracing 3D printing.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140519-lockheed-uses-3d-printing-and-virtual-pathfinding-to-lower-satellite-costs.html

you forgot that fantantisish video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=perMGY0oajs

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 05/28/2014 05:33 AM
In the email.  Confirmed 16,000 lbf 3D printed SupetDraco engine. Check out the throttling and pulse rate.

Quote
Each SuperDraco produces 16,000 pounds of thrust and can be restarted multiple times if necessary.  In addition, the engines have the ability to deep throttle, providing astronauts with precise control and enormous power.

The SuperDraco engine chamber is manufactured using state-of-the-art direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), otherwise known as 3D printing.  The chamber is regeneratively cooled and printed in Inconel, a high-performance superalloy that offers both high strength and toughness for increased reliability.

“Through 3D printing, robust and high-performing engine parts can be created at a fraction of the cost and time of traditional manufacturing methods,” said Elon Musk, Chief Designer and CEO.  “SpaceX is pushing the boundaries of what additive manufacturing can do in the 21st century, ultimately making our vehicles more efficient, reliable and robust than ever before.

http://youtu.be/lIGVi_rMFGw
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 05/28/2014 05:37 AM
Something on topic, http://sites.nationalacademies.org/DEPS/ASEB/DEPS_084763
Space-Based Additive Manufacturing of Space Hardware
Quote
The National Research Council will appoint an ad hoc committee to explore the implications of space-based additive manufacturing technologies for space operations and the manufacture of space hardware. In conducting the study and preparing its report the committee will:

    Assess the current state of additive manufacturing in the United States and worldwide (especially in the aerospace industries, universities, and national laboratories engaged in the design and manufacture of small satellites or respective subassemblies);
    Characterize the future states envisioned by the aerospace industries, universities, and national laboratories with respect to additive manufacturing and aerospace systems;
    Discuss the feasibility of the concept of space-based additive manufacturing of space hardware (including, but not limited to, a fully functional small spacecraft) that can conduct or enable missions of relevance to NASA, the Air Force, and/or the national security space communities;
     
    Identify the science and technology gaps between current additive manufacturing capabilities and the capabilities required to enable a space-based additive manufacturing
    concept, including those gaps that current trends indicate may be closed with commercial investments in additive manufacturing and those gaps that are likely to require
    dedicated investments by the federal government.
     
    Assess the implications that a space-based additive manufacturing capability would have on launch requirements (e.g., launching raw materials versus fully assembled
    spacecraft); overall satellite and payload designs; and in-space operations, such as possible reductions in mass and their implications for activities such as
    maneuverability.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 06/01/2014 03:20 AM
What exactly is the name and type of machine that manufactures the SuperDraco engine, which Musk says is 3D-printed? What technology is this 3d printer based upon?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 06/01/2014 03:43 AM
What exactly is the name and type of machine that manufactures the SuperDraco engine, which Musk says is 3D-printed? What technology is this 3d printer based upon?
It's an EOS DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) machine. From Musk on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672/photo/1
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 06/02/2014 07:41 AM
What exactly is the name and type of machine that manufactures the SuperDraco engine, which Musk says is 3D-printed? What technology is this 3d printer based upon?
It's an EOS DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) machine. From Musk on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/375737311641628672/photo/1

Maybe, maybe not. At the Dragon V2 Q&A Helodriver recorded Musk as saying they use EOS, SLM and Concept metal printers. Concept Laser's printer is huge with a print volume of ~125 liters, enough to print a V-6 engine block.

I'd bet as soon as Musk gets one large enough to print a booster engine chamber he'll try it, if for no other reason than to explore the possibilities.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/02/2014 09:44 AM
I'd betting a lot of Raptor's parts a 3D printed.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Garrett on 06/02/2014 10:18 AM
Lockheed are also embracing 3D printing.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140519-lockheed-uses-3d-printing-and-virtual-pathfinding-to-lower-satellite-costs.html

you forgot that fantantisish video
(YouTube video snipped: ?v=perMGY0oajs)
Very epic vid! Really shows how big they are compared to companies such as SpaceX.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 06/02/2014 03:42 PM
Another development

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/05/31/pisces/

Quote
The second PISCES-NASA project involves 3D printing on a construction scale using basalt. Here on Earth, 3-D printers are already building houses using recycled materials. In space, however, blasting construction materials via a rocket is too costly. Basalt could be the key to building infrastructure in space using robots. Because Hawaii’s basalt is so similar to the regolith found on Mars and the Moon, it could be used to 3D print shelters, landing pads, and tools ‘in-situ’ – or on-site- on other planets
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 06/02/2014 04:13 PM
BTW i dont think this thread has the references to the other 3d printed rocket chambers yet

LLNL has been working on this for a long time
https://manufacturing.llnl.gov/additive-manufacturing/metal-additive-manufacturing

And you can buy your own here
http://rocketmoonlighting.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 06/03/2014 12:10 AM
Seems that recent LLNL 3D printing work on rocket engine chambers/nozzles is interesting, and the throwaway comment about improving the material properties via EBM rather DMLS is key. Ventions LLC seems to be the major outside contractor on the engine design, with assorted liquid propellant engines using various levels of 3D printed parts (chamber, nozzle, turbine pumps). There seem to be some hotshots at Ventions as well.

I hadn't heard of LLNL's new (Nanosat launch vehicle eXperimental One) NX-01 microsat launcher design though. Partially reusable TSTO, reusable VTVL first stage, expendable second stage. Shades of LLNL's Bricklifter, though Mockingbird was a reusable SSTO...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: nec207 on 06/03/2014 02:58 AM
It would be interesting to see how 3D-printed would bring space cost down.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/13/2014 02:43 AM
Made In Space Just put a news release out.

http://www.madeinspace.us/3d-printer-headed-space-station-ready-launch

Due to the project meeting all milestones with minimal risk, the 3D Printer has been moved up to a launch on SpaceX CRS-4 in August 2014 instead of the originally slated SpaceX CRS-5.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/13/2014 03:44 AM
Nice to see a space project actually launching ahead of schedule.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 06/15/2014 05:20 AM
Swedish 3D metal printer maker Arcam  (electron beam melting) has added Inconel 718 to its aerospace alloy capabilities.

Link.... (http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/06/11/following-spacexs-historic-3-d-printing-announceme.aspx)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/17/2014 05:36 PM
LM gets it in a big way    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/features/2014/additive-manufacturing.html

http://3dprintingindustry.us6.list-manage.com/track/click?u=bda8170a38ff902659605b718&id=c48f0111df&e=6c74a82be4

“We’re deploying our design engineers to the factory floor, working side by side with our manufacturing engineers, where they learn what additive manufacturing is really capable of. Our experience has been engineers depend heavily on the left side of their brains, the hemisphere that favors the logical, sequential and analytical. 3D models and designs engage the right side, the hemisphere responsible for more creative and holistic thinking. When our engineers engage both their left and right brain, we are realizing geometrically complex designs, features and parts never seen before.” 

http://www.youtube.com/embed/KyWuHcvyqD0?rel=0&autoplay=1&wmode=opaque

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/17/2014 07:11 PM
Airbus also came out with a decent video worthy of a post.
They added another new term Additive layer.

Airbus 3D Printing technology transformation underway

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cy3V3KR1LWc

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/18/2014 03:25 AM
Thanks guys, just watched both videos. The LM was an eye opener, printing and building a drone with robots.

Airbus were talking of printing 30t a month of metal parts in next few years. That requires quite few printers.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 06/18/2014 09:06 PM
3-D Printing at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center

NASA student intern Victor Ruiz demonstrates the uses and capabilities of the recently acquired high-resolution 3-D printer at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center. In the NASA Armstrong Subscale Aircraft Research Lab, the 3-D printer provides an efficient means for creating quality, low cost proof-of-concept parts for small-scale aircraft. Most parts are created in less than an hour, although that varies by complexity. Once the plastic prototypes are verified to meet the correct part specifications, the final product is made in NASA Armstrong machine shop.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNb_R6aU4z0
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 06/18/2014 09:07 PM
by: RealNASA

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a commercial company called Made in Space are working together to send a 3-D printer to the International Space Station, the first step toward realizing a suite of capabilities for in-space manufacturing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTxb43yiDUo
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: wizzzard3 on 06/27/2014 03:13 AM
http://3dprint.com/7355/3d-printed-engine/

Aerojet Rocketdyne 3D Prints An Entire Engine in Just Three Parts
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/27/2014 04:15 AM
Does anybody know if this engine is just a proof of concept for 3D printing or has been built for a specific use.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 06/27/2014 08:14 AM
http://3dprint.com/7355/3d-printed-engine/

Aerojet Rocketdyne 3D Prints An Entire Engine in Just Three Parts

Another link... (http://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/newsaerojet-rocketdyne-successfully-tests-bantam-engine-made-with-additive-manufacturing-4301281)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: guckyfan on 06/27/2014 09:41 AM
Does anybody know if this engine is just a proof of concept for 3D printing or has been built for a specific use.

With the massive flange connecting components it looks much like proof of concept.

BTW isn't the SuperDraco a complete engine in one piece, including the regen nozzle?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/27/2014 12:17 PM
Does anybody know if this engine is just a proof of concept for 3D printing or has been built for a specific use.

With the massive flange connecting components it looks much like proof of concept.

BTW isn't the SuperDraco a complete engine in one piece, including the regen nozzle?

No
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/27/2014 12:26 PM
http://3dprint.com/7355/3d-printed-engine/

Aerojet Rocketdyne 3D Prints An Entire Engine in Just Three Parts

Wow, a very impressive article with lots of info of the directions within Aerojet Rocketdyne.

This week we got word that an even more impressive feat has taken place around the additive manufacturing space. Aerojet Rocketdyne, a GenCorp company, announced that they had manufactured and successfully tested an engine which had been entirely 3D printed.

"A typical Bantan engine consists of dozens of different part, and will take approximately a year to design and manufacture. Using additive manufacturing, Aerojet Rocketdyne printed the engine in just three parts which included the throat and nozzle section, the injector and dome assembly, and the combustion chamber. The entire design and manufacturing process only took a couple of months and saved the company a staggering 65% of their usual manufacturing costs."

Edited their article sigh
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: RanulfC on 06/27/2014 01:50 PM
"Bantam" engines just FYI not "Banton" engine.

Edit: Several "conflicts" in both articles. The name in the first and the second calls the Bantam a LOX/Kero engine when the pictures clearly show signs saying the engine is a LOX/GH2 engine

Randy
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 06/27/2014 02:17 PM
Better article

Link.... (http://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/newsaerojet-rocketdyne-successfully-tests-bantam-engine-made-with-additive-manufacturing-4301281)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/27/2014 06:43 PM
"Bantam" engines just FYI not "Banton" engine.

Edit: Several "conflicts" in both articles. The name in the first and the second calls the Bantam a LOX/Kero engine when the pictures clearly show signs saying the engine is a LOX/GH2 engine

Randy

didn't put that screen grab out as I believed it was a test for the RL-10.   These article writers  ::)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: RanulfC on 06/27/2014 06:52 PM
"Bantam" engines just FYI not "Banton" engine.

Edit: Several "conflicts" in both articles. The name in the first and the second calls the Bantam a LOX/Kero engine when the pictures clearly show signs saying the engine is a LOX/GH2 engine

Randy

didn't put that screen grab out as I believed it was a test for the RL-10.   These article writers  ::)

Hey they take what's given in the press kit and expect it to be right :)

Actually the sign on the wall on the other side of the engine is what says: "NASA GRC Rocketdyne Additive Manufactured Injector Testing: LOX-GH2" but the second article says the whole ENGINE that was tested was LOX/Kerosene. (Then goes on to point out that the whole Bantam engine familiy has been run on many fuels. I'm assuming they had different injectors for each :) ) In any case the exahust in both pictures looks to be hydrogen and oxygen flames...

Come on! This is the NSF boards, who's gonna do the spectroanylysis then? :)

Randy
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/28/2014 03:21 PM
"Bantam" engines just FYI not "Banton" engine.

Edit: Several "conflicts" in both articles. The name in the first and the second calls the Bantam a LOX/Kero engine when the pictures clearly show signs saying the engine is a LOX/GH2 engine

Randy

didn't put that screen grab out as I believed it was a test for the RL-10.   These article writers  ::)

Hey they take what's given in the press kit and expect it to be right :)

Actually the sign on the wall on the other side of the engine is what says: "NASA GRC Rocketdyne Additive Manufactured Injector Testing: LOX-GH2" but the second article says the whole ENGINE that was tested was LOX/Kerosene. (Then goes on to point out that the whole Bantam engine familiy has been run on many fuels. I'm assuming they had different injectors for each :) ) In any case the exahust in both pictures looks to be hydrogen and oxygen flames...

Come on! This is the NSF boards, who's gonna do the spectroanylysis then? :)

Randy

checked for the real source; AR and its a pure text news release....so the people writing the articles are taking some liberties.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/29/2014 08:41 PM
Carbon-fiber epoxy honeycombs mimic the material performance of balsa wood

http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2014/06/carbon-fiber-epoxy-honeycombs-mimic-material-performance-of-balsa-wood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnGPYwNM4rE

===========================
Using 3D Printing to Improve On Balsa Wood
http://www.3dprinterworld.com/article/using-3d-printing-improve-balsa-wood?utm_source=3D+Printer+World+Newsletter&utm_campaign=51a88cc25f-3DPW_Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3fa8f5b0b9-51a88cc25f-83402857

Edit: added much better article

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 06/29/2014 09:32 PM
Meh, not actually stronger, just stiffer than the plain resin (probably because they didn't lay fibers in the logical direction of strain). Also, lots of people have used thermoplastics with chopped fibers (carbon fiber, glass, even carbon nanotube) and printed honeycomb with it and got better strength with it. Heck, EVERYONE prints honeycomb all the time because that's the default in-fill pattern on most 3d printers that I've seen. The only thing here is they use a thermoset epoxy instead of a thermoplastic. Interesting, but not really a big deal.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 06/30/2014 12:01 AM
Hat tip to the Upship Blog,

New DMG Mori hybrid milling/laser additive machine called the Lasertec 65, which appears to use a 5 axis milling machine arm with swappable milling and laser deposition heads.

Appears to use blown powder laser metal deposition rather than powder bed sintering.

http://en.dmgmori.com/products/lasertec/lasertec-shape/lasertec-65-shape (http://en.dmgmori.com/products/lasertec/lasertec-shape/lasertec-65-shape)

Allegedly the interesting point is it can keep switching back and forth between milling and printing modes, so you can carve/clean a surface prior to laser additive work, and work up shapes faster using intermediate milling methods, even if the final shape prevents milling. If it can change metal powders (almost) on the fly, then you might be able to make rocket chambers with internal heat transfer paths of high heat conductivity metals.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/30/2014 11:52 AM
Meh, not actually stronger, just stiffer than the plain resin (probably because they didn't lay fibers in the logical direction of strain). Also, lots of people have used thermoplastics with chopped fibers (carbon fiber, glass, even carbon nanotube) and printed honeycomb with it and got better strength with it. Heck, EVERYONE prints honeycomb all the time because that's the default in-fill pattern on most 3d printers that I've seen. The only thing here is they use a thermoset epoxy instead of a thermoplastic. Interesting, but not really a big deal.

right; your on to it: Key to the versatility of the resulting fiber-filled inks is the ability to control the orientation of the fillers.   Might not seem like much but it is.   10 to 20 times stiffer than commercial 3D-printed polymers, and twice as strong as the best printed polymer composites. The ability to control the alignment of the fillers means that fabricators can digitally integrate the composition, stiffness, and toughness of an object with its design.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 06/30/2014 12:12 PM
But you /already/ control the fiber orientation with the filled thermoplastic stuff jut because the nature of FDM. Not super impressive.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/30/2014 12:27 PM
But you /already/ control the fiber orientation with the filled thermoplastic stuff jut because the nature of FDM. Not super impressive.

Do you? :D
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 06/30/2014 05:32 PM
But you /already/ control the fiber orientation with the filled thermoplastic stuff jut because the nature of FDM. Not super impressive.

Do you? :D
Yes.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/01/2014 01:35 AM
But you /already/ control the fiber orientation with the filled thermoplastic stuff jut because the nature of FDM. Not super impressive.

Do you? :D
Yes.

partly, see the fiber material isn't focused in one direction in the filament making process.   End result some fibers will be oriented to the side vs one direction, or no fibers in that given area.   It's all experimental at the moment.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 07/01/2014 02:06 AM
Does that imply fiber directional control for chopped fiber means you need to chop the fiber within the print head? But by that notion, wouldn't continuously extruding a fiber filament jacketed with thermoset epoxy and cutting when the print head has to move away be easier?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/01/2014 02:09 AM
But you /already/ control the fiber orientation with the filled thermoplastic stuff jut because the nature of FDM. Not super impressive.

Do you? :D
Yes.

partly, see the fiber material isn't focused in one direction in the filament making process.   End result some fibers will be oriented to the side vs one direction, or no fibers in that given area.   It's all experimental at the moment.
For the small extrusion nozzles typically used, you get a lot of sheer which tends to align the fibers.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 07/03/2014 11:33 PM
http://markforged.com

Quote
Designed to overcome the strength limitations of traditional 3D printed materials, the revolutionary Mark One 3D printer is the world’s first 3D printer designed to print continuous carbon fiber. Now you can print parts, tooling, and fixtures with a higher strength-to-weight ratio than 6061-T6 Aluminum.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/04/2014 07:03 PM
http://markforged.com

Quote
Designed to overcome the strength limitations of traditional 3D printed materials, the revolutionary Mark One 3D printer is the world’s first 3D printer designed to print continuous carbon fiber. Now you can print parts, tooling, and fixtures with a higher strength-to-weight ratio than 6061-T6 Aluminum.

right, they have done two special improvements over standard Reprap printers 
Don’t settle for plastic with a dash of chopped carbon fill. Longer is stronger.

 The magic is in the printhead. Our special blend of thermoplastics immediately hardens during printing.


will have to watch this printer/supplies once it hits the market  atm its only experimental in a video.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 07/04/2014 07:42 PM
I'm sure the ISS could find a few uses for printing in carbon fibre.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/05/2014 04:56 PM
I'm sure the ISS could find a few uses for printing in carbon fibre.

yes  ;D
Many won't invest the time and watch the video that's in this thread with the Made in Space printer.  This looks to be a extensive ISS program with NASA.   It's combined with Education, scanners, and design of a brand new printer for space.   

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 07/06/2014 08:27 AM
I've seen other SpiderFab structures mentioned in Advanced, but the Trusselator doesn't show up in search.  It's an additive manufacturing device that fabricates trusses for spacecraft, complete with a solar array on one side.

http://www.tethers.com/index.html

http://www.tethers.com/SpiderFab.html

http://www.tethers.com/papers/SPACE2013_SpiderFab.pdf

Quote
SpiderFab™

Additive Manufacturing and Assembly On-Orbit

TUI is currently developing a revolutionary suite of technologies called "SpiderFab" to enable on-orbit fabrication of large spacecraft components such as antennas, solar panels, trusses, and other multifunctional structures. SpiderFab provides order-of-magnitude packing- and mass- efficiency improvements over current deployable structures and enables construction of kilometer-scale apertures within current launch vehicle capabilities, providing higher-resolution data at lower life-cycle cost.
>
>
The Trusselator Effort:

Under a NASA/LaRC Phase I SBIR contract, TUI is currently implementing the first step in the SpiderFab architecture: a machine that uses 3D printing techniques and robotic assembly to fabricate long, high-performance truss structures. This "Trusselator" device will enable construction of large support structures for systems such as multi-hundred-kilowat solar arrays, large solar sails, and football-field sized antennas.
>
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/11/2014 04:47 PM
Some brand new 3D Printer technology coming out of Auzze country.

Hardcotton Elemental Pressure Controlled 3D Printer    http://tinyurl.com/nvd7uhp

"Utilizing pressure control, Hardcotton has developed a 3D printer that employs SLA technology – but creates the 3D print without the use of a mechanical platform," said co-founder and CEO of Hardcotton, Scott Pobihun. "Because there are very few complex parts to be assembled in Elemental, we see this architecture as being the basis for the mass manufacture of 3D printers very soon."


While this printer doesn't fix the issues dealing with Gravity and liquids, its the first 3D Printer using pressure (a new direction).  For space use this might be the first step.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/11/2014 05:11 PM
This one looks to be a game changer as it fixes many of the problems in current 3D Metal Printers out there.
Looks like some of the stuff is coming out from behind the closed doors. :)

Sciaky’s Giant 3D Metal Printers Available for Sale   http://tinyurl.com/o3vymzf

Sciaky’s electron beam additive manufacturing (EBAM) technology, starting this fall, can be purchased by companies wishing to 3D print enormous metal prototypes.  EBAM has a build volume of 19′ x 4′ x 4′ and can 3D print with such metals as titanium, tantalum, stainless steel, and Inconel.

Lockheed had created their parts 1/4″ larger than their desired size and would subsequently machine them down to ensure they were built accurately.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A10XEZvkgbY
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/12/2014 04:59 AM
Electron beam welding is a NEAR net shape process. It's not what I would call "3D Printing." You have to machine it extensively afterward or it isn't really useful for anything but art. Real net shape processes might need threads cut or something, but otherwise are ready to go.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/12/2014 12:36 PM
Electron beam welding is a NEAR net shape process. It's not what I would call "3D Printing." You have to machine it extensively afterward or it isn't really useful for anything but art. Real net shape processes might need threads cut or something, but otherwise are ready to go.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1111675#msg1111675

sorry some do.....The term "Additive Manufacturing" is another term confusing the public.   The term is not fully defined atm and can in some cases be used interchangeably with "3D Printing"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 07/12/2014 11:04 PM
Electron beam welding is a NEAR net shape process. It's not what I would call "3D Printing." You have to machine it extensively afterward or it isn't really useful for anything but art. Real net shape processes might need threads cut or something, but otherwise are ready to go.

Machine the part with robotic arm afterwards or partway through the build. Still cheaper than machining the complete part out of solid block of metal or creating a mould and casting it. The other plus to this technology is it can be scaled in theory a ship could be printed.
This could be used in space or on the moon to create structures.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/13/2014 04:12 AM
Oh, it is better than just starting with stock, but I wouldn't class it as 3d printing. That Chinese part that people point to as an "impressive" display of "3d printing" is not comparable at all to, say, the SuperDraco which actually was 3d metal printed. The Chinese part could've been easily just machined from stock, though with greater waste.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/15/2014 01:49 PM
This came up as a news item today.
It might translate well as a new tool for ISS research?

Students Create a Bio Printer To Test Drugs on Your Own 3D Printed Human Cells Rather than Animals
http://tinyurl.com/nw39gk3

Ali and her research partners’ proposed business would outline ways to bioprint your own human cells using their dual nozzle Ducali bio printer.

The Ducali prototype has already 3D printed human bone cellular material and Ali claims that the process will work on any cellular tissue type.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=So1j0Nm8Z0Y
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 07/17/2014 12:47 AM
NASA has been looking at 3D printing custom shields for electronic circuits. The shield would fit PCB like a glove and vary the shield thickness depending on each components shielding requirements.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/storied-tradition-potentially-expanded-through-3-d-manufacturing/#.U8ccFZSSzv0
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 07/18/2014 09:32 PM
http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/nrc-finds-too-much-hype-about-in-space-3-d-printing?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Spacepolicyonline+%28SpacePolicyOnline+News%29

NRC Finds Too Much Hype About In-Space 3-D Printing
Marcia S. Smith
Posted: 18-Jul-2014


The National Research Council (NRC) released a report today that makes no bones about its skepticism regarding the utility of 3-D printing in space at the present time, saying claims in the popular press are “exaggerated” and it is no “magic solution.”

Formally called “additive manufacturing,” this technology allows three-dimensional (3-D) parts to be built directly from computer files.  It has been in use terrestrially since the 1980s and is becoming more wide-spread. Using it in space presents unique challenges, however.  The vacuum, lack of gravity and intense thermal fluctuations are obstacles that must be overcome; they are important not only in completing the manufacturing process, but in the integrity of the final product, according to the NRC.

Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert D. Latiff  (Ret.), who chaired the NRC committee, and his colleagues found that while 3-D printing “is a fairly mature technology for components that can be manufactured on the ground, its application in space is not feasible today, except for very limited and experimental purposes.”

“Many of the claims made in the popular press about this technology have been exaggerated,” Latiff said in a press release.  Even in the longer term, it will be “one more tool in the toolbox” and “not a magic solution.”

That is not to say that the committee rejected the idea of in-space 3-D printing entirely.  Indeed, the report begins by saying it has “the potential to positively affect human spaceflight operations by enabling the in-orbit manufacturing of replacement parts and tools,” thereby reducing logistics requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and human trips beyond low Earth orbit.  However, the “specific benefits and potential scope … remain undetermined, and there has been a substantial degree of exaggeration, even hype, about its capabilities in the short term.”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/18/2014 11:52 PM
Adds some more hype this ...on demand event that floods my email.
Do what u will with it.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a long term strategy for In-space Manufacturing which includes fabricating components and equipment on-demand for human missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. To support this strategy, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Made in Space, Inc. have developed the 3D Printing In Zero-G Technology Demonstration for the International Space Station (ISS). The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment ('3D Print') will be the first machine ever to perform 3D printing in space

The technology to produce parts on demand, in space, offers unique design options that are not possible through traditional manufacturing methods while offering cost-effective, high-precision, low-unit on-demand manufacturing. In addition to the obvious benefits of disrupting the traditional, and costly, supply chain for space missions, there is the value of being able to design and build a part in the microgravity environment, thus removing the standard structural constraints due to launch loads. This opens up a whole new design arena — designing for "zero-g" structures.

The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment will serve as the enabling first step to realizing an additive manufacturing, print-on-demand "machine shop" for long-duration space missions.
 
http://www.techbriefs.com/webinar224

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/19/2014 01:25 AM
Advantages over traditional manufacturing are not high precision or even (for the most part) un-machinable geometries. It's the very, very short turnaround.

And really, the Made In Space 3d printer is the first machine tool of any sort (not counting simple power drills, etc) that can produce real parts in space. THAT is a big deal. It's a necessary step for space settlement, definitely, but also needed for deep space missions in general. Submarines often have a small machine shop on board so that things can be fixed at sea. Hopefully the humble, plastic-only FDM 3d printer is just a start and that other machine tools will also arrive.

But I don't think astronauts will be spending time tending a 3d printer except in case of unforeseen problems or new solutions. Astronaut time is too valuable.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/19/2014 02:08 AM
Advantages over traditional manufacturing are not high precision or even (for the most part) un-machinable geometries. It's the very, very short turnaround.

And really, the Made In Space 3d printer is the first machine tool of any sort (not counting simple power drills, etc) that can produce real parts in space. THAT is a big deal. It's a necessary step for space settlement, definitely, but also needed for deep space missions in general. Submarines often have a small machine shop on board so that things can be fixed at sea. Hopefully the humble, plastic-only FDM 3d printer is just a start and that other machine tools will also arrive.

But I don't think astronauts will be spending time tending a 3d printer except in case of unforeseen problems or new solutions. Astronaut time is too valuable.

agree, the learning curve is going to be very interesting to watch.   Astronauts have enough time being spent to keep the ISS toilet and other systems up and running.   The 3D printer adds a new skill level. 

was looking at this new report and a couple things hit me in the skim read.   RECYCLING IN SPACE (dead end) someone should have researched the user base on earth.  No one has a working system that can output a quality printed part.

Save the money and forget about automated printing stations in space.  Millions of low end to high end printers have proven the needs for the human interface. Special still levels are going to be required.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: KelvinZero on 07/19/2014 03:30 AM
Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert D. Latiff  (Ret.), who chaired the NRC committee, and his colleagues found that while 3-D printing “is a fairly mature technology for components that can be manufactured on the ground, its application in space is not feasible today, except for very limited and experimental purposes.”
I had always assumed this to be true, but it also describes HSF in general. HSF is most interesting in terms of pretty long term goals. I mean, Im also very interested in ISRU. Apart from solar power (obviously) ISRU is a million miles from being useful today, or a quarter million anyway. To understand this comment better it might help to understand the sorts of claims he is refuting.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 07/19/2014 11:24 AM
Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert D. Latiff  (Ret.), who chaired the NRC committee, and his colleagues found that while 3-D printing “is a fairly mature technology for components that can be manufactured on the ground, its application in space is not feasible today, except for very limited and experimental purposes.”
I had always assumed this to be true, but it also describes HSF in general. HSF is most interesting in terms of pretty long term goals. I mean, Im also very interested in ISRU. Apart from solar power (obviously) ISRU is a million miles from being useful today, or a quarter million anyway. To understand this comment better it might help to understand the sorts of claims he is refuting.

You could try reading the report.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: KelvinZero on 07/19/2014 12:23 PM
Sorry, yes I missed that. It is right there at the end of the article.

The bit I should have quoted was this, and not directly from the report:

“Many of the claims made in the popular press about this technology have been exaggerated,” Latiff said in a press release.  Even in the longer term, it will be “one more tool in the toolbox” and “not a magic solution.”

Though the report may still contain the answer to this somewhere. I will have a look.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/19/2014 04:47 PM
3d printing is just one tool in the shop, but it's a really convenient one. You'll see people bending over backwards to make a part work with the technology because sending it to the machinist has a long turnaround time and isn't cheap.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Blackstar on 07/20/2014 02:33 AM
3d printing is just one tool in the shop, but it's a really convenient one. You'll see people bending over backwards to make a part work with the technology because sending it to the machinist has a long turnaround time and isn't cheap.

Read the report.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 07/20/2014 04:38 AM
MatterFab Unveils 3D Metal Printer At a Tenth the Cost of Existing Metal Printers

http://3dprint.com/9592/matterfab-reveals-their-affordable-metal-3d-printer-an-order-of-magnitude-cheaper/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRXymDoYoWQ
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 07/20/2014 07:49 AM
3d printing is just one tool in the shop, but it's a really convenient one. You'll see people bending over backwards to make a part work with the technology because sending it to the machinist has a long turnaround time and isn't cheap.

Read the report.
Don't know what your point is. I was speaking from experience. I basically agree with the report: the field is chronically over-hyped.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 07/20/2014 05:46 PM
MatterFab Unveils 3D Metal Printer At a Tenth the Cost of Existing Metal Printers

http://3dprint.com/9592/matterfab-reveals-their-affordable-metal-3d-printer-an-order-of-magnitude-cheaper/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRXymDoYoWQ
This will bring it within the price range of small businesses. If they price it for $ 100-200k, their will sell truck loads.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/20/2014 07:24 PM
MatterFab Unveils 3D Metal Printer At a Tenth the Cost of Existing Metal Printers

http://3dprint.com/9592/matterfab-reveals-their-affordable-metal-3d-printer-an-order-of-magnitude-cheaper/

This will bring it within the price range of small businesses. If they price it for $ 100-200k, their will sell truck loads.

It really depends on how much money they wish to make off each printer.   The prints they were doing were from the Reprap community.

Another article has come out this morning. MatterFab Launches Affordable 3D Metal Printing     http://tinyurl.com/nvq763a

Unfortunately, the price of 3D metal printers often lays in the tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars range. MatterFab is seeking to remedy that problem with a low-cost 3D metal printer.

Printing stainless steel at about $120/kg., the MatterFab 3D metal printer can focus its laser to 3D print any number of objects, like injection molds, dental crowns, and non-essential aircraft parts.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 07/23/2014 02:52 AM
But how cheap is the MatterFab machine itself? We've already been told that the Vader System will be somewhere under $10-20K, but we haven't heard what the Matterfab machine will be priced at.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: KelvinZero on 07/26/2014 03:37 AM
I guess this is still at the sci-fi end of 3d printing, but I still thought it was interesting.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_laser#Applications
Atom holography might be used to project complex integrated-circuit patterns, just a few nanometres in scale, onto semiconductors

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: wizzzard3 on 07/26/2014 04:55 AM
mayby use them for making a nanofactory
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/28/2014 06:32 PM
Moving from conceptual to actual manufacturing.

GE Announces the Launch of Mass 3D Printing Facility
GE news release http://www.geaviation.com/press/other/other_20140715.html
Article:  http://tinyurl.com/qjm9syy

GE’s 3D printed full nozzles represent the beginnings of 3D printing used for mass production, rather than low-volume prototyping.

By the beginning of 2015, the company will start production on its 3D printed fuel nozzle to fulfill the 6,000 orders already made for the company’s LEAP engine.
==================================

3D Printed, Mass Produced Parts To Give GE’s New Jet Engines an Extra Boost
http://tinyurl.com/nw9rm2n

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0SXlkrmzyw&list=PLSlru5PbHgUHpT0IXpboDr-HRqQQBPhzc

Edit: added 2nd updated article and utube video

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 07/29/2014 01:22 AM
moar 3D printing stuff! this time printing multiple metals a the same time for spacecraft parts:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140728192056.htm

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sdsds on 07/29/2014 05:51 AM
MTI in Oregon announces their success with 3D printing using C-103, a niobium based alloy that has been, "widely used in space applications." They are doing it with a 3D Systems ProX 300, which uses a 500 watt laser.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 07/29/2014 04:45 PM
Found this PWR paper about a 3 printed (EBM) turbopump  impeller

Unlike the size limit of 12x8" they note the Arcam Q20 appears capable of 13.779x14.960" (350x380mm)

http://www.calraminc.com/newsletters/Impeller_Paper.pdf

Quote
Discussion

This limited study of the electron-beam, layer-build process produced three impellers with all required drawing details. It also demonstrated that surface finishing techniques presently available are capable of producing finishes sufficiently smooth for operational use. Work planned for the coming year will include a detailed dimensional capabilities analysis; however, preliminary findings are favorable.  The mechanical properties results indicate that tensile and yield strengths are comparable to wrought product, such as forgings, while the ductility and toughness at cryogenic temperatures are superior. The very good ductility and notched toughness obtained are due undoubtedly to the very fine grain size resulting from the rapid solidification pattern of this particular process. Even without an oxygen content meeting that specified for ELI grade, the elongation and reduction in area values obtained at liquid hydrogen temperatures are over twice those typical for wrought Titanium-6Al-4V ELI and the notched-to-unnotched ratio is nearly equivalent to the more ductile, but less producible Titanium-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy. (Note that the minimum -253C notched tensile ratio for AMS 4930 Ti-6Al-4V ELI was 0.75 before this requirement was dropped from the latest versions of the specification). Although more work needs to be done, it would appear that the electron beam, layer-build process is viable for the production of complex hardware. The only limitation is one of size, as the working bed of present machines is a 12” diameter x 8” high.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: J-V on 08/01/2014 05:31 AM
I guess this belongs here:
http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed (http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/01/2014 03:59 PM
moar 3D printing stuff! this time printing multiple metals a the same time for spacecraft parts:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140728192056.htm

this is getting a lot more press now.

http://www.nature.com/srep/2014/140619/srep05357/full/srep05357.html

JPL Breakthrough Promises Chameleon-like SuperMetals

http://tinyurl.com/mojls3l 

John-Paul Borgonia, a mechanical engineer at JPL, says that while these so-called "gradient alloys" have, in the past, been created in research and development, this discovery marks the first time such composite materials have been used in making actual, practical objects.

"We're taking a standard 3D printing process and combining the ability to change the metal powder that the part is being built with on the fly. You can constantly be changing the composition of the material," s


Edit: add photo 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: FutureSpaceTourist on 08/01/2014 04:18 PM
I guess this belongs here:
http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed (http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed)

There's a thread on it in the SpaceX General forum: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35319.0 (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35319.0)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 08/03/2014 10:54 AM
http://m.aviationweek.com/awin-only/lockheed-martin-testing-3-d-printed-subsystems-a2100-space-bus

Quote
Lockheed Martin Testing 3-D-Printed Subsystems On A2100 Space Bus

FARNBOROUGH — Within the next three years, Lockheed Martin Space Systems expects more than half of its A2100 satellite bus to be built through additive manufacturing, the revolutionary fabrication process that promises drastically reduced hardware development costs and production cycle times.
>
>
"But my goal is to have over 50% of the structures 3-D-printed within two to three years," Ambrose said in an interview on the sidelines of the Farnborough air show here.
>
Ambrose says some brackets can take up to 30 hr. to machine by hand, while additive manufacturing can produce 300 of the same parts in a single day that are just as structurally sound.
>
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/03/2014 02:00 PM
http://m.aviationweek.com/awin-only/lockheed-martin-testing-3-d-printed-subsystems-a2100-space-bus

Quote
Lockheed Martin Testing 3-D-Printed Subsystems On A2100 Space Bus

FARNBOROUGH — Within the next three years, Lockheed Martin Space Systems expects more than half of its A2100 satellite bus to be built through additive manufacturing, the revolutionary fabrication process that promises drastically reduced hardware development costs and production cycle times.
>
>
"But my goal is to have over 50% of the structures 3-D-printed within two to three years," Ambrose said in an interview on the sidelines of the Farnborough air show here.
>
Ambrose says some brackets can take up to 30 hr. to machine by hand, while additive manufacturing can produce 300 of the same parts in a single day that are just as structurally sound.
>

those are some amazing numbers when you think about it. 

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/03/2014 11:19 PM
Yeah, 3d printing is great for that kind of quick stuff. Machine shops often over-charge hours because they don't know exactly how long something will take.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/07/2014 02:04 AM
NASA engineer set to complete first 3-D-printed space cameras

http://phys.org/news/2014-08-nasa-d-printed-space-cameras.html

"Anyone who builds optical instruments will benefit from what we're learning here," Budinoff said. "I think we can demonstrate an order-of-magnitude reduction in cost and time with 3-D printing."

Next year, he also plans to experiment with printing instrument components made of Invar alloy, a material being prepared for 3-D printing by Goddard technologist Tim Stephenson. The 100-year-old iron-nickel alloy offers extreme dimensional stability over a range of temperatures. The material is ideal for building super-stable, lightweight skeletons that support telescopes and other instruments.

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: J-V on 08/07/2014 07:01 AM
I guess this belongs here:
http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed (http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/07/31/spacex-launches-3d-printed-part-space-creates-printed-engine-chamber-crewed)

There's a thread on it in the SpaceX General forum: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35319.0 (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35319.0)

Which was created after my post.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/07/2014 07:40 AM
NASA engineer set to complete first 3-D-printed space cameras

http://phys.org/news/2014-08-nasa-d-printed-space-cameras.html

"Anyone who builds optical instruments will benefit from what we're learning here," Budinoff said. "I think we can demonstrate an order-of-magnitude reduction in cost and time with 3-D printing."

Next year, he also plans to experiment with printing instrument components made of Invar alloy, a material being prepared for 3-D printing by Goddard technologist Tim Stephenson. The 100-year-old iron-nickel alloy offers extreme dimensional stability over a range of temperatures. The material is ideal for building super-stable, lightweight skeletons that support telescopes and other instruments.

Looks like high end camera lenses will become a lot more affordable.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 08/07/2014 08:23 AM
NASA engineer set to complete first 3-D-printed space cameras

http://phys.org/news/2014-08-nasa-d-printed-space-cameras.html

"Anyone who builds optical instruments will benefit from what we're learning here," Budinoff said. "I think we can demonstrate an order-of-magnitude reduction in cost and time with 3-D printing."

Next year, he also plans to experiment with printing instrument components made of Invar alloy, a material being prepared for 3-D printing by Goddard technologist Tim Stephenson. The 100-year-old iron-nickel alloy offers extreme dimensional stability over a range of temperatures. The material is ideal for building super-stable, lightweight skeletons that support telescopes and other instruments.

Looks like high end camera lenses will become a lot more affordable.

Lens bodies yes, lenses not so much...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 08/08/2014 02:38 AM
I thought 3D-printed optics have become a reality:

http://www.engineering.com/3DPrinting/3DPrintingArticles/ArticleID/6268/3D-Printed-Lenses-Coming-Soon.aspx

http://www.luxexcel.com/

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/3d-printed-lens-turns-smartphones-into-1-microscope-detect-diseases-1446204
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/14/2014 09:23 PM
Many news items on 3D printing this week.

1) First Low Cost SLS 3D Printers Hit the Scene    Breaks down the history a tad on the patents & talks about the first low cost laser printers.  This will be a new wild ride!  http://tinyurl.com/n2p3bvb

2) Tuft Researchers Grow Miniature 3D Brains with Big Potential for 3D Bioprinting   http://tinyurl.com/kn4xexd

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/24/2014 11:41 AM

Lawrence Livermore Researchers Control Microscopic Cushioning Properties with 3D Printing

http://tinyurl.com/k64yvjp

As with their previous work, LLNL’s researchers are able to program the material properties of a 3D printed object at the microscopic level, this time creating new cushioning materials that may overcome the limitations of foams and gels.

In the future, LLNL’s researchers plan to explore the use of these padding materials to create inserts for shoes and helmets, cushioning materials for sensitive instruments, and to control temperature fluctuation and vibrations in aerospace parts.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 08/26/2014 02:09 AM
I'm imagining that vibrational damping could particularly benefit from such tailored materials.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 08/29/2014 05:35 PM
Sparks Fly as NASA Pushes the Limits of 3-D Printing Technology
RELEASE 14-233 August 28, 2014

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector --a highly complex part that sends propellant into the engine -- with design features that took advantage of 3-D printing. To make the parts, the design was entered into the 3-D printer's computer. The printer then built each part by layering metal powder and fusing it together with a laser, a process known as selective laser melting.

The additive manufacturing process allowed rocket designers to create an injector with 40 individual spray elements, all printed as a single component rather than manufactured individually. The part was similar in size to injectors that power small rocket engines and similar in design to injectors for large engines, such as the RS-25 engine that will power NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, the heavy-lift, exploration class rocket under development to take humans beyond Earth orbit and to Mars.

"We wanted to go a step beyond just testing an injector and demonstrate how 3-D printing could revolutionize rocket designs for increased system performance," said Chris Singer, director of Marshall's Engineering Directorate. "The parts performed exceptionally well during the tests."

Using traditional manufacturing methods, 163 individual parts would be made and then assembled. But with 3-D printing technology, only two parts were required, saving time and money and allowing engineers to build parts that enhance rocket engine performance and are less prone to failure.

Two rocket injectors were tested for five seconds each, producing 20,000 pounds of thrust. Designers created complex geometric flow patterns that allowed oxygen and hydrogen to swirl together before combusting at 1,400 pounds per square inch and temperatures up to 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit. NASA engineers used this opportunity to work with two separate companies -- Solid Concepts in Valencia, California, and Directed Manufacturing in Austin, Texas. Each company printed one injector.

"One of our goals is to collaborate with a variety of companies and establish standards for this new manufacturing process," explained Marshall propulsion engineer Jason Turpin. "We are working with industry to learn how to take advantage of additive manufacturing in every stage of space hardware construction from design to operations in space. We are applying everything we learn about making rocket engine components to the Space Launch System and other space hardware."

Additive manufacturing not only helped engineers build and test a rocket injector with a unique design, but it also enabled them to test faster and smarter. Using Marshall's in-house capability to design and produce small 3-D printed parts quickly, the propulsion and materials laboratories can work together to apply quick modifications to the test stand or the rocket component.

"Having an in-house additive manufacturing capability allows us to look at test data, modify parts or the test stand based on the data, implement changes quickly and get back to testing," said Nicholas Case, a propulsion engineer leading the testing. "This speeds up the whole design, development and testing process and allows us to try innovative designs with less risk and cost to projects."

Marshall engineers have tested increasingly complex injectors, rocket nozzles and other components with the goal of reducing the manufacturing complexity and the time and cost of building and assembling future engines. Additive manufacturing is a key technology for enhancing rocket designs and enabling missions into deep space.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/sparks-fly-as-nasa-pushes-the-limits-of-3-d-printing-technology/ (http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/august/sparks-fly-as-nasa-pushes-the-limits-of-3-d-printing-technology/)

[youtube]nyveRd36FR8[/youtube]

Photo Caption:
Engineers just completed hot-fire testing with two 3-D printed rocket injectors. Certain features of the rocket components were designed to increase rocket engine performance. The injector mixed liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen together, which combusted at temperatures over 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit, producing more than 20,000 pounds of thrust.
Image Credit: NASA photo/David Olive
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/02/2014 11:18 AM
A new material to 3D Print with:  Tungsten

Tungsten Checks In: Smit Röntgen Unveils 3D Tungsten Printing Technology   http://tinyurl.com/okhkrdh

"As mentioned when reporting on ExOne’s venture with rp+m, Tungsten, as an RoHS compliant material, can replace lead as a means of protecting against X-rays in doctors’ and dentists’ offices, with rp+m’s Russell Wolff saying, “It’s roughly double the density of lead so the advantage of tungsten is that you can get by with 40 to 50 percent less wall thickness and less mass than lead.”  As a medical parts supplier, Smit Röntgen would then have a vested interest in taking on the powerful material to replace lead in the medical field, but its high melting-temperature and tensile strength is sure to have benefits in other fields, as well."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 09/03/2014 12:22 PM
tungsten will actually survive a nuke. during studies related to project Orion. tungsten was studied for a covering/cladding for the launch pad.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: JasonAW3 on 09/03/2014 01:42 PM
I remember reading about a technique that involved lasers and supercooling tyhat would allow deposition of single atoms while launching them in the laser beam one at a time.  In theory, this should allow one to assemble whole new alloys and materials never even imagined before.

     Problem is, as slow as this technique is, it would take thousands, if not millions of years to build up something useful.

     On the other hand, if all you are trying to do is prove a particular type of molecular structure is both possible and stable, this might be a direction for experimentation.  (figuring out whether you can MAKE a substance is the first part of the battle.  The next is finding out what it could eb good for, and then figuring out how to mass produce asid materials.

     Using this technique in Microgravity may produce materials that wouldn't be able to be created in a 1 Gee environment.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/04/2014 11:55 AM
Patent For 3D Printed Batteries Powers Graphene Potential  http://tinyurl.com/mtgbvfe

“A 3D printed battery can be incorporated into a 3D printed object during the building process. In addition, 3D printed batteries have several advantages over traditional batteries. Their shape, size and specifications can be freely adjusted to fit the particular design of the device. Our batteries are based on graphene and can potentially outperform conventional batteries. Graphene 3D plans to perform live demonstrations of our 3D printed batteries.”

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 09/05/2014 07:56 AM
Another 3d printed battery technology.

http://www.technologyreview.com/demo/521956/printing-batteries/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 09/14/2014 02:44 AM
The Strati is a car that was printed in 6 days by a company called Local Motors, and is supposed to be fully drivable:


http://3dprint.com/15139/local-motors-3d-printed-strati/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWjIa0uO0BE


I wonder if this could one day be how ground vehicles on Mars would be made?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/16/2014 12:00 PM
EOS + Cooksongold Put the Bling in 3D Printing with Precious Metal Printer   http://tinyurl.com/kgmbbmk

The Precious metal we are talking about is GOLD, a very useful but expensive metal.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6vnTbCGf14

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/18/2014 12:17 PM
LAMP 3D Printing Process May Just Revolutionize Investment Casting    http://tinyurl.com/lv4ad56

"In traditional investment casting production, there are generally 12 major process steps involved, and LAMP technology will completely eliminate seven of them. According to DDM Systems core and wax tooling design, core and wax tooling manufacture, ceramic injection, wax injection, wax melt-out, slurry coating, and stucco coating are all completely eliminated with this new process. This reduction of required steps drastically reduces the amount of time and associated costs with investment casting."

the video:  http://vimeo.com/105584259

"DDM Systems sees the process being applied to the manufacture of turbine engine components like airfoils, vanes, shrouds and panels in single-crystal, directionally solidified and equiaxed nickel-base superalloys. Basically, fancy engine parts. The cores for many of these types of components are extremely complicated and difficult to produce, but the LAMP process allows the creation of complex aerodynamic shapes as well as hollow internal passages that are often impossible to create using traditional methods. And because the process is so precise, there is no need for additional tooling or milling to complete the mould or core."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: aero on 09/18/2014 05:41 PM
I wonder if the guts of a klystron tube could be printed more precisely than the way they are currently made.

Currently, tubes are somewhat noisy and not tuned all that precisely to the desired frequency, IIUC.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 09/21/2014 11:19 PM
According to investment site Motley Fool, a New York-based architecture team will ambitiously attempt to print a McMansion-style estate on a 5-acre parcel of land in Gardiner, NY (80 miles north of NYC):

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/09/21/mega-scale-3d-printing-is-here-the-worlds-first-fu.aspx


EDIT: Here's more

http://inhabitat.com/nyc/worlds-first-3d-printed-estate-will-boast-a-pool-and-2400-sq-ft-house/

http://www.6sqft.com/interview-architect-adam-kushner-on-building-the-worlds-first-3d-printed-estate/

Quote
Kushner also teamed up with Enrico’s local contact James Wolff, co-founder of Deep Space Industries, which works with NASA on asteroid prospecting, mining, and processing. The three men, along with Nigel Woods, founded D-Shape Enterprises New York. Adam’s construction company In House Group, Inc. will hire D-Shape Enterprises to build the estate.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/22/2014 03:01 PM
3D Nanoparticle Printer Unveiled at Northeastern University    http://tinyurl.com/n4xe7cu

Nanoscale Offset Printing System (NanoOps) is capable of 3D printing layers as thin as 20 nanometers, 4,000 x thinner than a human hair.

Directed assembly allows 3-D printing to be faster, cheaper, and multiscale. It can do nano, micro, and macro simultaneously over a large area. No 3-D printer can do that; this is beyond the current 3-D printing technology. This will reduce the cost of expensive electronics such as an iPhone for less than $10 and sensor systems for a fraction of a dollar. These could be sensors for health, the environment, infrastructure, water resources, anything. They will make advanced products affordable to people in all income classes, not just high-income populations or countries.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/24/2014 02:12 PM
A Sub-$4,000 Metal 3D Printer?  http://tinyurl.com/olk6eqb

Very exciting watch the video of these would be rocket boys :)

This printer could be considered Reprap meets JPL research   http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1237498#msg1237498

<iframe width="640" height="480" src="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/460400892/affordable-3d-metal-printer-aurora-labs/widget/video.html" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"> </iframe>

"Aurora Labs has come up with a technique they call “Acute Angle Printing”.  Though they don’t go into specific details about how it works (other than to say that they’ve “developed some remarkable new technologies”), their campaign claims that it allows them to 3D print multiple metals simultaneously, with the potential to sinter ceramics and plastics in the future.  They also boast to print objects that are 99.5% dense, almost as dense as investment cast parts, at layer thicknesses of about 50 microns and feature sizes of about 100 microns."

"all three machines can print with the following metals: “316 Stainless Steel, 420 Stainless Steel, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Hastelloy C, Brass, Bronze, Mild Steel, And many more!”"
=======
Revolutionary? Aurora Labs Reveals Their S1 Metal 3D Printer For Under $4,000 http://tinyurl.com/mg6shfz

“We see a time in the near future where every engineering workshop has a couple of these and most homes have one as well,” stated the company. “With this machine people can build a 10,000 pound (4,500 kg) thrust rocket motor – for about the price of a plasma TV ($500-$1,000) in materials.”


Edit: add another article & quote
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/14/2014 07:24 PM
Magnificent 3D Printed Robotic Observatory Available from OSA: The Ultrascope  http://tinyurl.com/ltk9etx

Print your own Lumia-powered space Ultrascope.
 http://conversations.nokia.com/2014/10/09/print-your-own-lumia-powered-space-ultrascope-makeithappen/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4fuABCtMwQ

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 10/20/2014 02:16 AM
We all know that for conventional FDM/FFF printing, the lack of dimensional stability among some materials causes various printing problems (eg. warping, cracking as printed materials cool)

Is there any 3d printing technology which allows material expansion/contraction to be harnessed for useful purposes? I'm talking about like memory materials and things like that. Like suppose you could print some shape, and if that shape was exposed to the warming rays of the sun, it would cause the item to unfold, and then if those warming rays were removed, the item would fold back up again.

(Maybe the printing approach wouldn't involve FDM/FFF itself, which obviously involves the application of heat)

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 10/20/2014 02:26 AM
Yes.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 10/20/2014 09:34 AM
The colloquial term used for printing with memory materials and self assembly in mind is 4D printing, and MIT's Self-Assembly Lab is involved.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/20/2014 06:14 PM
We all know that for conventional FDM/FFF printing, the lack of dimensional stability among some materials causes various printing problems (eg. warping, cracking as printed materials cool)

Is there any 3d printing technology which allows material expansion/contraction to be harnessed for useful purposes? I'm talking about like memory materials and things like that. Like suppose you could print some shape, and if that shape was exposed to the warming rays of the sun, it would cause the item to unfold, and then if those warming rays were removed, the item would fold back up again.

(Maybe the printing approach wouldn't involve FDM/FFF itself, which obviously involves the application of heat)

out of the Reprap community many new materials every day.  Stretch-flexible materials are in fashion right now with trade names of Ninja-flex, flex etc.   Print out the product, fold for shipping will return to shape and size when unpacked.   

Also just saw a news item for a new material, the so called "memory foam".

Now You Can 3D Print with Memory Foam http://tinyurl.com/kt46m8y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w-9KvBHago

Edit: add links
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 10/20/2014 09:51 PM
Warping and stuff is nearly eliminated in professional printers by using a heated print enclosure (not just an enclosure or heated build platform but an oven).
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/22/2014 02:48 PM
3DXTech Releases Two Game Changing Carbon Nanotube ESD Filaments http://tinyurl.com/k5ovack

3DXTech has introduced two new grades of ESD-safe materials that have been developed specifically for use in desktop 3D printers. ESD filaments are a family of specialty filaments that utilize multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) to obtain targeted levels of electrical conductivity while retaining maximum base resin properties.


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 10/30/2014 12:53 AM
HP's 'Multi-Jet Fusion' technology to bring tenfold improvement in speed:

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/hp-multi-jet-fusion-3d-printer,news-19845.html
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 10/30/2014 01:10 AM
HP's 'Multi-Jet Fusion' technology to bring tenfold improvement in speed:

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/hp-multi-jet-fusion-3d-printer,news-19845.html
Looks likes 3D printers a moving from low to medium volume production levels.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/30/2014 03:32 PM
Spaceward Bound For Large SLS Part   http://tinyurl.com/kr7t9ux
Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)


"The support was produced by Goteborg, Sweden based RUAG Space AB with advanced design software by Troy, Michigan based Altair. The antenna support was presented at the European Space Agency (ESA) Conference in Noordwijk, Netherlands on Tuesday this week."

 "the size of the part produced by EOS is significant, one of the largest produced by powder bed printing"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 11/03/2014 11:35 AM
3D-printed deployment mechanism

While this might look like a postmodern sculpture, this weirdly organic design is actually a 3D-printed deployment mechanism for satellite solar panels. This prototype titanium version, by Thales Alenia Space, is called the Adel’Light, being a lightweight version of their existing Adele mechanism.

The 3D-printed version slashes the number of separate parts needed and reduces its mass by 80%. The spiral hinges in the foreground cannot be produced as a single part in any other way.

The device was on show this week during ESA’s Additive Manufacturing for Space Applications workshop at its ESTEC technical centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. More than 350 experts from across Europe came together to discuss the potential of 3D printing to transform the space industry and begin preparing common standards for its use.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/10/3D-printed_deployment_mechanism

Related article: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering/Mirror_mirror_testing_3D_printing_for_space

Image credit: ESA–A. Le Floc'h
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/03/2014 04:22 PM
Sculpteo’s 3D Printed Model Determines Optimal Rosetta Landing Site  http://tinyurl.com/l7qx4q6

“Even though I heard a lot about 3D printing, I had never seen a 3D print with my own eyes. I’m really satisfied with the final version we got from Sculpteo,” Gaudon explains.

Sculpteo = Contract 3D Printing service

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Nilof on 11/03/2014 05:06 PM
Spaceward Bound For Large SLS Part   http://tinyurl.com/kr7t9ux
Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)


"The support was produced by Goteborg, Sweden based RUAG Space AB with advanced design software by Troy, Michigan based Altair. The antenna support was presented at the European Space Agency (ESA) Conference in Noordwijk, Netherlands on Tuesday this week."

 "the size of the part produced by EOS is significant, one of the largest produced by powder bed printing"

Huh, that's odd. I visited RUAG in Gothenburg roughly five months ago, and I was told by the employee showing my group around that they weren't using 3D printing.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/03/2014 05:59 PM
Buzz Aldrin rides a hoverboard at the 123D office   http://tinyurl.com/q7ke2e7

"If you needed any evidence that the future is now, here you go! Astronaut Buzz Aldrin visited our office where he rode a Hendo hoverboard partly designed using Autodesk tools."

You just can't make this stuff up, watch the video  ;D
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 11/03/2014 07:46 PM
3D-printed deployment mechanism

While this might look like a postmodern sculpture, this weirdly organic design is actually a 3D-printed deployment mechanism for satellite solar panels. This prototype titanium version, by Thales Alenia Space, is called the Adel’Light, being a lightweight version of their existing Adele mechanism.

The 3D-printed version slashes the number of separate parts needed and reduces its mass by 80%. The spiral hinges in the foreground cannot be produced as a single part in any other way.

The device was on show this week during ESA’s Additive Manufacturing for Space Applications workshop at its ESTEC technical centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. More than 350 experts from across Europe came together to discuss the potential of 3D printing to transform the space industry and begin preparing common standards for its use.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/10/3D-printed_deployment_mechanism

Related article: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering/Mirror_mirror_testing_3D_printing_for_space

Image credit: ESA–A. Le Floc'h
The 80% weight saving is significant, if it is eg 10kg that is another 10kg of station keeping fuel the satellite can carry. Alternatively less fuel required to place it in orbit reducing satellite weight by considerably more than 10kg.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/05/2014 01:49 AM
3D-printed car being built at SEMA Show this week in Las Vegas
http://www.jrn.com/ktnv/news/3D-printed-car-gets-built-at-SEMA-Show-this-week-281529621.html

Video in the article.

"Using a 3D printer by Cincinnati Inc. at the Convention Center, the vehicle called Strati, will be built in three phases during the four-day show. It takes 44 hours to print the car, then workers will assemble it. Finally on Friday, it will be driven out on the Las Vegas Strip."

"The average car today has 25,000 parts because when you have sheet, you have brackets, you have adhesives, you have grommets, all those things," said Jay Rogers, of Local Motors. "The printer takes care of all of that."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 11/05/2014 04:41 AM
HP's 'Multi-Jet Fusion' technology to bring tenfold improvement in speed:

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/hp-multi-jet-fusion-3d-printer,news-19845.html
Looks likes 3D printers a moving from low to medium volume production levels.

Take a look at the intricacy of detail / resolution - looks pretty sweet:

http://recode.net/2014/10/31/hewlett-packards-3-d-printer-is-essentially-a-replicator/

(http://recodetech.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/hp-multi-jet-fusion-3-d-object.jpg?w=640)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0grzTE3m34
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/06/2014 05:06 PM
Princeton 3D Prints Breakthrough Quantum Dot LEDs    http://tinyurl.com/m57qtp8

"A team of scientists at Princeton University have made a breakthrough in the 3D printing of functional electronic components"

“The big push in 3D printing these days is to try to print two or more polymers at once. In our latest research, we go way beyond that. We show that we can print interwoven structures of quantum dots, polymers, metal nanoparticles, etc, to create the first fully 3D printed LEDs, in which every component is 3D printed.”

"To further demonstrate the possibilities of their process, the Princeton researchers were even able to print the QLEDs onto a contact lens."

“This work outlines an exciting breakthrough that enables the direct printing of functional, embedded, active 3D nanoelectronics using only a 3D printer. Indeed, this is the first time to our knowledge that semiconducting nanoparticles have been 3D printed, and the first time that such a broad array of diverse functional materials have been fully interwoven entirely using a 3D printer.”
=====================================
A 2nd article has come out on this subject and fills in some blanks.

Princeton Research Team 3D Prints LED Lights http://tinyurl.com/kr8u23w
"and his team made the LEDs using a custom 3D printer which took them six months and nearly $20,000 to assemble."
"McAlpine believes that 3D printing, with its ability to deliver a third dimension, will be used to manufacture "things that people haven't imagined yet, like structures that could be used in the body."



Edit: fix broken link, add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 11/06/2014 06:32 PM
3D-printing a lunar base (video)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2014/11/3D-printing_a_lunar_base
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/12/2014 03:24 PM
This is a follow on to other GE related posts

GE Test Fires Mini 3D Printed Turbine Engine   http://tinyurl.com/lb3dwy9

Video: Miniature Jet Engine Made through Additive Manufacturing  http://www.mmsonline.com/blog/post/video-miniature-jet-engine-made-through-additive-manufacturing

"To further explain the advantages of 3D printing in production, GE created a functioning engine for a radio-controlled airplane and made a video outlining the process."

"Bartosik explains that, with the technology, not only could he create complex geometries unattainable with other manufacturing techniques, but that they were able to produce the parts for the engine with high-temperature, high-strength alloys that they wouldn’t have been able to create parts with otherwise. After post-processing the printed parts with machining tools, Bartosik’s team tested the RC engine in a test cell at GE Aviation, getting it to run up to speeds of 33,000 RPMs."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 11/13/2014 10:15 PM
Another NASA test of 3D rocket engine.

http://spacefellowship.com/news/art42040/3-d-printed-engine-parts-withstand-hot-fire-tests.html

Because this is a NASA supported( financed?) test, is this technology freely available to US companies?
In this case it would the alloy they used and printing process involved.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 11/13/2014 10:26 PM
Another NASA test of 3D rocket engine.

http://spacefellowship.com/news/art42040/3-d-printed-engine-parts-withstand-hot-fire-tests.html (http://spacefellowship.com/news/art42040/3-d-printed-engine-parts-withstand-hot-fire-tests.html)

Because this is a NASA supported( financed?) test, is this technology freely available to US companies?
In this case it would the alloy they used and printing process involved.

The article makes it sound like the whole 3d-printing effort is NASA's idea. Hogwash! The fact of the matter is that commercial companies were developing this technology before NASA even knew it existed.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 11/14/2014 02:21 AM
I known 3D printing is available and used by SpaceX etc. The question is whether the IP regarding this particular alloy and process is available to these companies.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 11/14/2014 01:58 PM
POP3D printer

Funded by the Italian space agency ASI, the POP3D (Portable On-Board Printer) for 3D printing will reach orbit in 2015 as part of ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti’s Futura mission. The compact, cube-shaped printer measures 25 cm per side and weighs 5.5 kg in Earth gravity. It prints in biodegradable and harmless PLA plastic, using a heat-based process called ‘fused deposition modelling’. POP3D should take about half an hour to produce a single plastic part, which will subsequently be returned to the ground for detailed testing, including comparison to an otherwise identical part printed on the ground. The Italian Institute of Technology will assist with post-flight examinations.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/11/POP3D_printer

Related article: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering/Europe_s_3D_printer_set_for_Space_Station

Image credit: Altran
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/14/2014 03:09 PM
Another NASA test of 3D rocket engine.

http://spacefellowship.com/news/art42040/3-d-printed-engine-parts-withstand-hot-fire-tests.html (http://spacefellowship.com/news/art42040/3-d-printed-engine-parts-withstand-hot-fire-tests.html)

Because this is a NASA supported( financed?) test, is this technology freely available to US companies?
In this case it would the alloy they used and printing process involved.

The article makes it sound like the whole 3d-printing effort is NASA's idea. Hogwash! The fact of the matter is that commercial companies were developing this technology before NASA even knew it existed.

One of the best posts in this thread Clongton, you get it

NASA, and Aerospace in general is late in the game to adopt.   The reason they are late has to do with the recession.   Normally NASA, and Aerospace companies team up with firms and develop the equipment.  After a time the 1st generation of new technology filters down to the auto industry, then down to the general machine shops.  This historically is how its done.

This time its different;  Many people lost their jobs, had time on their hands and skills.  Thousands of garage mechanics are developing this technology, and its dirt cheap and available.  The commercial companies are in a buyout mode to incorporate the new technology, and stay in business.


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/14/2014 03:25 PM
I known 3D printing is available and used by SpaceX etc. The question is whether the IP regarding this particular alloy and process is available to these companies.

Google is your friend;  Think some linkage is in this thread.  AR/NASA is doing the procedures to certify the process.

The real question; are the two NASA centers working together?  JPL has the better process under development in the lab.  Sadly, they are behind :(

A small shop has developed a similar printer to the more advanced JPL process.  Its a bit different but allows the printing of multi-types of metal via software.  I'll have one in my shop shortly :)  Never thought the day would come that I could design a part, and print in Titanium alloys in my shop.




 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: oldAtlas_Eguy on 11/14/2014 04:59 PM
I known 3D printing is available and used by SpaceX etc. The question is whether the IP regarding this particular alloy and process is available to these companies.

Google is your friend;  Think some linkage is in this thread.  AR/NASA is doing the procedures to certify the process.

The real question; are the two NASA centers working together?  JPL has the better process under development in the lab.  Sadly, they are behind :(

A small shop has developed a similar printer to the more advanced JPL process.  Its a bit different but allows the printing of multi-types of metal via software.  I'll have one in my shop shortly :)  Never thought the day would come that I could design a part, and print in Titanium alloys in my shop.

Your mention of a 3D printer using titanium reminds me of the fact that the lunar regolith has high concentrations of titanium.

A 3D titanium or a 3D aluminum printer could turn regolith once it has been refined and turned into ingots usable by the printers into anything. Considering that almost all the space metallic objects are of some type of aluminum or titanium alloy this technology is significant for ISRU ultimate utilization.

Now all we need is the tech to produce the 3D printer alloy ingots from lunar regolith or asteroid sources.

BTW this is an interesting article that metions regolith processing using lower temps and a fluorine process to produce O2, Fe, Al, Ti, SI, and other byproducts that can then be more easily seperated in pure or nearly pure form.  Use it as a starting point for how to get to the production of ingots for use in a 3D printer.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20060004126.pdf (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20060004126.pdf)

Now we just need someone to design the ISRU ingot production hardware and test on the Moon.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/15/2014 01:11 PM
I known 3D printing is available and used by SpaceX etc. The question is whether the IP regarding this particular alloy and process is available to these companies.

Google is your friend;  Think some linkage is in this thread.  AR/NASA is doing the procedures to certify the process.

The real question; are the two NASA centers working together?  JPL has the better process under development in the lab.  Sadly, they are behind :(

A small shop has developed a similar printer to the more advanced JPL process.  Its a bit different but allows the printing of multi-types of metal via software.  I'll have one in my shop shortly :)  Never thought the day would come that I could design a part, and print in Titanium alloys in my shop.

Your mention of a 3D printer using titanium reminds me of the fact that the lunar regolith has high concentrations of titanium.

A 3D titanium or a 3D aluminum printer could turn regolith once it has been refined and turned into ingots usable by the printers into anything. Considering that almost all the space metallic objects are of some type of aluminum or titanium alloy this technology is significant for ISRU ultimate utilization.

Now all we need is the tech to produce the 3D printer alloy ingots from lunar regolith or asteroid sources.

BTW this is an interesting article that metions regolith processing using lower temps and a fluorine process to produce O2, Fe, Al, Ti, SI, and other byproducts that can then be more easily seperated in pure or nearly pure form.  Use it as a starting point for how to get to the production of ingots for use in a 3D printer.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20060004126.pdf (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20060004126.pdf)

Now we just need someone to design the ISRU ingot production hardware and test on the Moon.

might have to take a look into that type of project.

If you look at the GE turbine article above

GE is moving to an aerospace material titanium aluminide (TiAl).
http://tinyurl.com/k6admjw

"The GE Report states: “The idea was to improve the manufacturing of parts made from an advanced aerospace material called titanium aluminide (TiAl). The material is 50 percent lighter than the nickel-based alloys typically used for low pressure turbine blades. Blades made from the material can reduce the weight of the entire low pressure turbine by 20 percent.”

Seems the moon has some very valuable materials :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Hanelyp on 11/16/2014 12:24 AM
If I recall correctly from the article I ready several years ago (around the time of the X-30), titanium aluminide is made by mixing powders of the component metals, then heating to start an exothermic reaction.  Interesting process to combine with laser sintering additive manufacturing.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/17/2014 10:28 PM
Looks like the Made in Space Printer is being installed.
Look up in this thread for several posts.

3D Printer Installed as Station Preps for New Trio   https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2014/11/17/3d-printer-installed-as-station-preps-for-new-trio/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 11/17/2014 11:14 PM
This experiment will be interesting to watch because in my experience with additive processes, it is gravity that holds the powder in place until the sintering  laser can pass over it. I want to see how that is mitigated.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/17/2014 11:58 PM
This experiment will be interesting to watch because in my experience with additive processes, it is gravity that holds the powder in place until the sintering  laser can pass over it. I want to see how that is mitigated.
It's mitigated because they're using FDM, like a RepRap. "Hot glue gun on a robot arm" as they say. You can print with it upside down, if you felt like it.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 11/18/2014 12:02 AM
This experiment will be interesting to watch because in my experience with additive processes, it is gravity that holds the powder in place until the sintering  laser can pass over it. I want to see how that is mitigated.
It's mitigated because they're using FDM, like a RepRap. "Hot glue gun on a robot arm" as they say. You can print with it upside down, if you felt like it.

Then they are very limited with the materials they can use because FDM is limited to plastics. Certainly titanium alloys, and the like, are excluded. They need to be able to do metals in zero-g for it to actually be fully useful.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 11/18/2014 01:08 AM
This experiment will be interesting to watch because in my experience with additive processes, it is gravity that holds the powder in place until the sintering  laser can pass over it. I want to see how that is mitigated.
It's mitigated because they're using FDM, like a RepRap. "Hot glue gun on a robot arm" as they say. You can print with it upside down, if you felt like it.

Then they are very limited with the materials they can use because FDM is limited to plastics. Certainly titanium alloys, and the like, are excluded. They need to be able to do metals in zero-g for it to actually be fully useful.
Actually a plastic printer like commercial version they have planned for delivery in 2015, could have produced 30% of failed parts that have been replaced on the ISS to date.

It is not just replacing faulty parts but also creating items to solve a problem eg modify an experiment.

Made in Space are also working on a metal printer.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/18/2014 01:14 AM
This experiment will be interesting to watch because in my experience with additive processes, it is gravity that holds the powder in place until the sintering  laser can pass over it. I want to see how that is mitigated.
It's mitigated because they're using FDM, like a RepRap. "Hot glue gun on a robot arm" as they say. You can print with it upside down, if you felt like it.

Then they are very limited with the materials they can use because FDM is limited to plastics. Certainly titanium alloys, and the like, are excluded. They need to be able to do metals in zero-g for it to actually be fully useful.
Well, YEAH metal 3d printing in space would be nice, but you can make a lot of things out of plastic, especially if you start using engineering plastics like Nylon-6 and FEP (teflon) and the like. And there is possibility of extending the technology much further via functionalizing the plastic in various ways (like making it conductive, mechanical stiffness via fillers, pliable materials, etc) and even more advanced techniques (which I'm working on).
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 11/18/2014 05:07 AM
3D porcelain

Link... (http://3dprint.com/25077/shapeways-porcelain/)

F-Electric: new metal filament for printed electronics on PLA printers

Kickstarter... (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/391466300/worlds-most-conductive-3d-printing-filament/description)

Article... (http://mobile.extremetech.com/computing/222303-new-metal-lets-todays-3d-printers-make-tomorrows-electronics?origref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F)

Quote
Today, we are able to extrude filament with a volume resistivity that measures under 1 ohm/cm (available conductive 3D filaments measure in the 1,000 - 10,000 ohm*cm range). As a result, Functionalize materials can be used to create a range of new, truly functional, 3D printable products that have electrical or mechanical capabilities. 

Printed circuits on paper

Link... (http://m.sciencedaily.com/4.0/#!/article/94930/98514739)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/21/2014 09:10 PM
3D Printing to Support COSMIC-2 Satellite in Space   http://tinyurl.com/o67n46w

"Most recently, the lab (JPL) turned to 3D printing to create 30 antenna array supports for the FORMOSAT-7 Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2) satellite mission, due to the low-cost and quick turnaround of the 3D printing process."

" Typically, JPL would machine parts from astroquartz to create the supports for their satellite arrays, but, to maintain their project timeline and budget and, moreover, due to the complexity of the parts,..."

http://www.redeyeondemand.com/3d-printing-case-studies/nasa-3d-printed-satellite/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2ElMIVKfOE&index=1&list=UURDrKX28NSHt2Shoy4E_A0Q

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/21/2014 09:18 PM
Another article about GE with a different product line.

GE’s New Advanced Manufacturing Lab Comes with Robots, 3D Printing  http://tinyurl.com/o48cjfk

"The AML is meant to bring together the company’s advanced manufacturing engineers and engineering design team to enhance production from the early design stages to manufacturing.  GE is implementing what it calls its FastWorks methodology, in which design and production are dynamic processes quickly influenced by customer feedback."

 “It is like a toy room for engineers. Our employees are excited every day to work with the latest 3-D printers and BAXTER, our advanced manufacturing robot.”

Highly recommend looking at the article and watching the robot video.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/24/2014 04:32 PM
Building on what's been posted as Reprap the driver for the innovations in 3D Printing.  This "open source" project is lighting up thousands of developers with excitement.  http://tinyurl.com/puvqbxb

James Chang is Working on the Biggest CMYKW 3D Printer Known to Humanity
                                                               Full color

"The Super 3D Printer is 1L x 1W x 0.8H (3.3′ x 3.3′ x 2.6′) in size and, if he can pull off the color blending technique, his massive printer will be able to mix standard cyan, magenta, yellow, black, and white filaments into any number of color combinations.  Though he has had some success mixing two colors with a 2-into-1 extruder, he is still researching the ability to combine all five."

"The beauty of open source is that the project can be a huge collaborative project, so, if you’re interested in giving James your input or keeping track of his developments"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocgPAAJouPs#t=64
==============

Why all the excitement about this color mixing?   Currently, you want a full color printer you need to source one from the big companies. 

Besides making full color models, the ability to mix is special.  For example you can use this "system" to mix other materials on the fly.  Being "open source" you can take the basic design and engineer your own design starting from the standard cheap parts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ApbFaFBy4GI


Edit: add 2nd video
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/25/2014 08:39 PM
NEWS the Made in Space Printer...
made its first Print (below the video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BAy2fiBElU#t=246




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/25/2014 09:26 PM
Made In Space Linkage:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30212.0

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1179409#msg1179409

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1193633#msg1193633

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1213380#msg1213380

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1215458#msg1215458

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1229046#msg1229046

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1229094#msg1229094
===========================================

Space 3D Printing Has Arrived with the First Print in Space   http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/11/25/space-3d-printing-first-print-in-space/

"At 9:28pm GMT on November 24th, the Zero G Printer from Made in Space completed its first print on the International Space Station (ISS), making it, not only the first 3D printer to make it to space, but also the first to actually function up/out/over there, as well."

"The print is a part of the printer itself, the faceplate for the extruder’s printhead, symbolizing the possibility of, one day, 3D printing a 3D printer in space and embodying the mission of the RepRap 3D printer movement. "   :)

"Up next, more tests from the ISS crew."

 Edit: add article & pics

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 11/26/2014 01:31 PM
Thought this report might be of interest to readers of this thread.  As well as the main subject of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) it has 12 pages describing the uses of 3D printing within NASA centers.

Nondestructive Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing
State-of-the-Discipline Report
TM-2014-218560  November 1, 2014, 47 pages

Abstract:
This report summarizes the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) state of the art of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for additive manufacturing (AM), or "3-D printed", hardware. NASA's unique need for highly customized spacecraft and instrumentation is suited for AM, which offers a compelling alternative to traditional subtractive manufacturing approaches. The Agency has an opportunity to push the envelope on how this technology is used in zero gravity, an enable in-space manufacturing of flight spares and replacement hardware crucial for long-duration, manned missions to Mars.

The Agency is leveraging AM technology developed internally and by industry, academia, and other government agencies for its unique needs. Recent technical interchange meetings and workshops attended by NASA have identified NDE as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing. The impact of NDE on AM is cross cutting and spans materials, processing quality assurance, testing and modeling disciplines. Appropriate NDE methods are needed before, during, and after the AM production process.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140016447.pdf (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140016447.pdf)

(copy also attached)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/27/2014 11:25 AM
3D Printing with Platinum Glass Achieved by Tanaka Holdings   http://tinyurl.com/lnlqrqm

"Tanaka Holdings parent company Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo received a patent for their platinum metallic glass in 2004, however it took them almost a decade to perfect the optimum particle diameter and fluidity for use with existing SLS 3D printers. This was ultimately achieved by using the company’s own proprietary equipment and processes."

"Metals in the platinum group are highly sought after for usage in the electronics, semiconductor, automotive and aerospace industries due to its durability and high melting point; however, many platinum alloys have limitations because of the inability to form complex shapes with traditional methods. Being able to 3D print objects using powder materials means that users will now be capable of forming objects with extremely complex shapes and dimensions."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 11/28/2014 05:14 AM
3D printing of pure graphene nanostructures:

http://3dprint.com/27324/graphene-nano-3d-print/


This seems interesting, since graphene's properties are related to its orientation, given its sheet-like nanostructure.
So if you can print a part layer-by-layer, properly orienting the graphene as you go along, then your final part might have very pronounced properties or characteristics.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/28/2014 12:11 PM
Just received an email about new materials available for testing.
Mixing of PLA a thermoplastic with metals.   In this case Magnetic Iron or stainless steel.

It comes available from this startup company http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1123795#msg1123795   They are aerospace guys.

EditL add the video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oM32toifODk#t=16
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 11/29/2014 12:36 PM
Enabling Technologies for Entrepreneurial Opportunities in 3D printing of SmallSats
28th AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites; 4-7 Aug 1024; Logan, UT; United States

Abstract:
A consortium of innovative experts in additive manufacturing (AM) comprising Northrup Grumman Technical Services, University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and Youngstown State University, have made significant breakthroughs in the goal of creating the first complete 3D printed small satellite. Since AM machines are relatively inexpensive, this should lead to many entrepreneurial opportunities for the small satellite community. Our technology advancements are focused on the challenges of embedding key components within the structure of the article. We have demonstrated, using advanced fused deposition modeling techniques, complex geometric shapes which optimize the spacecraft design. The UTEP Keck Center has developed a method that interrupts the printing process to insert components into specific cavities, resulting in a spacecraft that has minimal internal space allocated for what traditionally were functional purposes. This allows us to increase experiment and instrument capability by provided added volume in a confined small satellite space.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140011334.pdf (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140011334.pdf)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 11/29/2014 04:08 PM
Is anyone able to list actual spacecraft components that can be made via AM using materials that actually work in zero-g?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/29/2014 04:15 PM
yes, several are listed in this thread

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1291720#msg1291720
more in the last few pages.

Note: have not listed all the ones from the 3D printer magazines, you might like to do a proper google search.

At a much smaller scale; as a training tool or other:   http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29378.msg932729#msg932729


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Hanelyp on 11/29/2014 09:11 PM
Is anyone able to list actual spacecraft components that can be made via AM using materials that actually work in zero-g?
You mean the printing process itself works in microgravity?  That would present difficulties in any powder consolidation process.  A centrifuge is an obvious remedy.  Electromagnetic pseudogravity might be considered, though that is a strictly short rage effect.

A filament or paste extrusion process would seem to be enhanced by microgravity, but material options seem limited for those.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 11/29/2014 09:42 PM
Is anyone able to list actual spacecraft components that can be made via AM using materials that actually work in zero-g?
You mean the printing process itself works in microgravity?  That would present difficulties in any powder consolidation process.  A centrifuge is an obvious remedy.  Electromagnetic pseudogravity might be considered, though that is a strictly short rage effect.

A filament or paste extrusion process would seem to be enhanced by microgravity, but material options seem limited for those.

My point exactly.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/30/2014 10:49 AM
Is anyone able to list actual spacecraft components that can be made via AM using materials that actually work in zero-g?
You mean the printing process itself works in microgravity?  That would present difficulties in any powder consolidation process.  A centrifuge is an obvious remedy.  Electromagnetic pseudogravity might be considered, though that is a strictly short rage effect.

A filament or paste extrusion process would seem to be enhanced by microgravity, but material options seem limited for those.

My point exactly.

huh? seems like no one is even reading this thread ::)

what material are we missing?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/01/2014 10:08 AM
The next wave of SLM equipment and obsolesce?

Fraunhofer ILT Presents New Multispot SLM Machine Design    http://tinyurl.com/kphkz7r

"Now the famed German institution is going one step further in presenting not just a new laser but a new, faster and more efficient, multispot SLM machine design."

"until now productivity had been mainly boosted by using higher laser power in combination with optics systems that allow operators to adjust the beam diameter."

"The new approach, designed and built at the Aachen site,  will instead do away with scanner systems altogether and instead rely on a printer head featuring several individually controllable diode lasers, moving on linear axes."

"The obvious advantage of such an approach is that it can be scaled in terms of build-rate by simply adding virtually unlimited numbers of beam sources, without any need for modification to the system’s basic design, exposure control or process parameters. Furthermore the build space can be increased by extending the travel lengths of the axis system, without changing the optical system."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Jim on 12/01/2014 12:53 PM
Is this just becoming a generic 3D printer thread without any regards to spaceflight applications.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: mmeijeri on 12/01/2014 12:55 PM
Does 3d printer technology make Aerojet Rocketdyne platelet technology (or at least its current production method) obsolete?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 12/01/2014 01:52 PM
Is this just becoming a generic 3D printer thread without any regards to spaceflight applications.

You're right - it is getting away from space. That's why I asked the question upthread about a list of specific zero-g applications for this tech. So far I don't see any.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/01/2014 03:30 PM
Is this just becoming a generic 3D printer thread without any regards to spaceflight applications.

You're right - it is getting away from space. That's why I asked the question upthread about a list of specific zero-g applications for this tech. So far I don't see any.

Not really, the wide applications of 3D printing outside of aerospace aren't listed here.  Probably, 24 articles hit my email box each day regarding 3D printing.

The next generation (lighter) Satellites are starting to be listed.  You have more please list them ;)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 12/01/2014 04:04 PM
Is this just becoming a generic 3D printer thread without any regards to spaceflight applications.

You're right - it is getting away from space. That's why I asked the question upthread about a list of specific zero-g applications for this tech. So far I don't see any.

Not really, the wide applications of 3D printing outside of aerospace aren't listed here.  Probably, 24 articles hit my email box each day regarding 3D printing.

The next generation (lighter) Satellites are starting to be listed.  You have more please list them ;)


The question isn't about space related AM that takes place on the ground and is then used in space, the question is about AM actually done *IN* space, in zero-g. So far I have not seen a single proven application. I would like to, but I haven't seen one.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 12/01/2014 06:38 PM
Here is space related article.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2654/1
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 12/02/2014 02:32 AM
Is this just becoming a generic 3D printer thread without any regards to spaceflight applications.

You're right - it is getting away from space. That's why I asked the question upthread about a list of specific zero-g applications for this tech. So far I don't see any.

Not really, the wide applications of 3D printing outside of aerospace aren't listed here.  Probably, 24 articles hit my email box each day regarding 3D printing.

The next generation (lighter) Satellites are starting to be listed.  You have more please list them ;)


The question isn't about space related AM that takes place on the ground and is then used in space, the question is about AM actually done *IN* space, in zero-g. So far I have not seen a single proven application. I would like to, but I haven't seen one.
Just about anything injection molded can be 3d printed in principle with the machine on station right now. How have you not seen that?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Darkseraph on 12/02/2014 04:49 AM
I heard floated about, the idea of micro and nanolaunchers by that Pooley fellow and I can't take it seriously because the bottom end of  orbital rocketry capability is both too expensive for most hobbyists, and horrendously inefficient...which is like the opposite of computers, which get cheaper and more efficient as they scale down. Carmack and co did impressive stuff just at the suborbital scale, but blew through millions doing it.


What I do think can be miniaturized by hobbyists and universities is the robotics and satellite end of things. And 3D printing will aid massively in rapid prototyping of robotics combined with off the shelf sensors and boards that are coming from the the massive expansion of the smart mobile market. This is much more plausible and to an extent this can be combined in the future with new low cost launchers like the Firefly system and others, to put these capabilities in the hands of societies, universities and even just groups of hobbyists..as just one payload among others. That is plausible, and positive. I think robotic exploration of the moon by a major university in the 2020s without a prize money gimmick is actually very likely, but will get away from the paradigm of congress picking such missions, even if its not profitable! This is very exciting! Robotics needs to go through a lot of trial and error to advance and i'd say this fits the wright brothers mode of operation more than making rockets in your bikeshop, as Gingrich implied. Payloads are the often ignored interesting part.


(ps. i don't think the US government will let just anyone build an ICBM in their backyard)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 12/02/2014 05:28 PM
DSI to use 3D printing.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/12/01/dsi-forms-strategic-partnership-solid-prototype/#more-54063
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 12/03/2014 08:40 AM
RedEye, a Stratasys Company (Nasdaq:SSYS) and leading provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing services, has partnered with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to 3D print 30 antenna array supports for the FORMOSAT-7 Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2) satellite mission.

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=44553
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/05/2014 01:53 PM
Orion Spacecraft to Carry a Bit of 3D Printing Onboard  http://tinyurl.com/kusyvow

 "Assistant Professors Ron Aman and Tim Horn of the Industrial & Systems Engineering Department at North Carolina State University have 3D printed a small titanium coin that will be aboard the Orion has it makes its multi-hour, two-orbit test around the Earth."

"The coin was printed by the university lab’s Arcam A2 Electron Beam Melting (EBM) machine to 3D print the coin.  Using magnetic fields to send electrons close to the speed of light toward the vacuum build chamber, the electrons’ kinetic energy melted the titanium powder layer by layer. "

Though the coin serves no practical function in the flight test, it does continue a tradition of stowing symbolic trinkets aboard spacecraft.  Horn explains the significance of 3D printing for the flight test, “If the human race is going to travel the solar system, we are going to have to make things along the way. This idea of 3D printing is that you can make what you need, when you need it. We are a long way away from that ideal but we are getting there.” 

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/05/2014 02:17 PM
Graphene 3D and Taulman to Create Graphene-Enhanced Nylon Printing Material    http://tinyurl.com/kt92rfw

Graphene the magic material everyone is looking at goes into production "and sales of the product are expected to begin during the first quarter of 2015."

with some tweeking the Made in Space Printer should be able to use this new material.


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/10/2014 11:51 AM
3D Printing Helps SatNOGS Head to Space   http://tinyurl.com/p548cyf

"SatNOGS is an affordable, modular network of open source satellite ground stations that anyone can participate in. As the project website puts it, “We love satellites! And there are thousands of them up there. SatNOGS provides a scalable and modular platform to communicate with them.” The modular design is simple to construct using easy-to-find and readily available software, electronics and hardware that can be sourced just about anywhere by virtually anyone."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2Syjb8kIq0



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/12/2014 01:01 PM
3D Printers For Space from America, Europe & Now China   http://tinyurl.com/olmvb2n

"on Monday, this week the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASTC) announced that it has completed a 3D printer that is ready for orbital space. China has stated that it is joining the growing list of regions that are working on low-gravity, three-dimensional printing for space"

"The 3D printer uses long-wave fiber and short-wave carbon dioxide lasers to fabricate items from stainless steel, titanium alloy and a nickel-based super alloy. The space-capable additive manufacturing machine has a maximum production size of 250 millimeters (9.8inches). "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/16/2014 11:39 AM
"potential of LaserCUSING"
Concept Laser and RSC Engineering Form Partnership Around LaserCUSING   http://tinyurl.com/lofeyp2

"LaserCUSING design is an approach that produces components with optimized geometries and new possibilities in areas such as functionality or resilience."

"An exhaust gas probe developed by RSC Engineering is an excellent example of ”intelligent additive design.” The probe is used to safely determine the composition of engine exhaust gases in a test system. This is a good thing, considering that the exhaust gas heats up to 2100°C and is under a high amount of pressure. These high temperatures require that the exhaust gas probe feature cooling channels for coolant flow, as well as six additional pipes for collecting the exhaust gas. Though welding conventional exhaust gas probes is a time-consuming process, the exhaust gas probe by RSC Engineering GmbH was manufactured in one step, including all flow-optimized channels, using LaserCUSING."

"Phase 1: Systematic evaluation of the potential of the component. What will it do? What were the advantages and disadvantages of previous solutions? Are there special objectives, such as cost reduction or lightweight construction? By answering these questions, the possible advantages of the LaserCUSING process are defined.

Phase 2: Create precise specifications. This involves “drafting binding functional requirements, determining the timeframe and defining batch sizes.”

Phase 3:  The actual design process."

 "The product costing analysis for the exhaust gas probe showed that we reduced manufacturing costs by almost 60%. This demonstrates the incredible cost-cutting potential of this technology"

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/18/2014 11:45 AM
Brookhaven National Labs Jumps Into 3D Printing For Intergalactic And Earthbound Engineering & Educationhttp://tinyurl.com/ovparuj

Some decent links to other stories within this article.

"Now, everyone around the lab uses them, highlighting the versatility of the printers to provide unique and useful solutions based on a person’s previous experience and field of expertise.  Instrumentation Division uses them for work on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Central Fabrication Services has added one to their making arsenal."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 12/18/2014 12:36 PM


Brookhaven National Labs Jumps Into 3D Printing For Intergalactic And Earthbound Engineering & Education  http://tinyurl.com/ovparuj

Some decent links to other stories within this article.

"Now, everyone around the lab uses them, highlighting the versatility of the printers to provide unique and useful solutions based on a person’s previous experience and field of expertise.  Instrumentation Division uses them for work on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Central Fabrication Services has added one to their making arsenal."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 12/20/2014 02:23 AM
A wrench was e-mailed to ISS and printed there

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-12/19/3d-printed-space-wrench

Information has no mass and thus requires no propellant!  8)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/20/2014 11:16 AM
Composite-based additive manufacturing (CBAM)

Impossible Objects Secures $2.8 Million for Composites 3D Printing  http://tinyurl.com/odcpdd2

"Impossible Objects has created a 3D printing technology that it calls composite-based additive manufacturing (CBAM), which can be used to fabricate functional parts using a number of materials, from carbon fiber and aramid (Kevlar) to fiberglass and polyster, as well polymer binders like PEEK.  According to an interview with the Chicago Tribune, the process lays down polymer material atop thin sheets of a given fiber.  The layers are then heated to the point that they are melted into a single piece.  Then, via mechanical abrasion, excess material is removed.  Impossible Objects suggests that, not only can CBAM yield composite parts, but that it is also faster than existing 3D printing processes."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 12/23/2014 04:10 PM
Perfect use of 3d prints : fit checking of complex piping and assemblies.

http://3dtoday.ru/blogs/rec/the-use-of-additive-technologies-in-the-design-and-prototyping-of-asse/

This is appears to be a part of KVTK upper stage, RD-0146D engines pneumatic/hydraulic servo amplifier and control block assembly.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/29/2014 12:45 PM
Anyone know of a standardized non-toxic "Space Adhesive" ?

Students Design a Machine to 3D Print Large Woven Structures  http://tinyurl.com/mwp9czg

"The Space Weaver is a machine that prints large structures in three dimensions, using a 3-axis gantry system and super glue hardened fibrous materials. Created by Prerna Auplish, Evan Bowman, and Ryan Chen from San Francisco’s California College of the Arts, the Space Weaver was designed to create large, ultra-lightweight woven structures with a high strength-to-weight ratio and no support structures, while producing no waste."

"The seven-foot-tall machine was frankensteined together using 3D printer technology, a CNC gantry, a square tube carbon steel frame and custom-designed electronics in less than eight weeks and the students have documented"

"The Space Weaver is capable of using a variety of thread materials including nylon, carbon fiber and glass fiber."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=260bgU0DXGo

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/01/2015 03:58 PM
Welcome 2015 New RepRap paste printer materials announced.

ColorFabb Introduces BrassFill 3D Printing Filament   http://tinyurl.com/maj6hxs
Note: Also Copper fill and 3 wood based fills.

"Founded in 2013, ColorFabb has quickly become one of the 3D printing industry’s premiere filament manufacturers."

Here is a short video on the ColorFabb filament production and distribution system:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EjuL5i1IwU

"The new BrassFill material is based on a completely new PLA formulation that is proprietary to ColorFabb. BrassFill is a PLA based filament that has been combined with real brass powder. It completely meets RoHS safety standards and is REACH compliant. "


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/02/2015 10:50 AM
This next post I'm going to add a little justification for the post.  It should be oblivious. ::)

The NASA program with Made in space wishes in the future for part designs to be distributed to the public where they improve the design and send the files to the ISS.  This is the working, in operation program on earth.

Linkage:  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1283407#msg1283407
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1255052#msg1255052


Free 3D Printable Model of the Week: The 3D Printed Strati Car http://tinyurl.com/kucp294

"This week’s free 3D printable model comes from Local Motors design engineer Nestor Llanos.  It is 1/10 the size of the actual Strati"

"In cost engineering, the questions integrate into the range of flexibility afforded to creating a whole new design.  Using Oak Ridge National Lab’s hybrid technology of additive and subtractive technology (referred to as Direct Digital Manufacturing), a large extruder head 3D prints out large base structures, and then a router comes back and cuts away excess material to fine tune the design where specified.  So, now you can take the files for an object, modify them, print them out and take their design solutions someplace entirely different if you like." 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wm9wRooDcGg


Edit: add linkage
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/04/2015 08:18 PM
Perfect use of 3d prints : fit checking of complex piping and assemblies.

http://3dtoday.ru/blogs/rec/the-use-of-additive-technologies-in-the-design-and-prototyping-of-asse/

This is appears to be a part of KVTK upper stage, RD-0146D engines pneumatic/hydraulic servo amplifier and control block assembly.
Ok, starting some translation work on this....its a good article Translation by Google...general flavor very good
some terms or phrasing need some work.

The use of additive technology in the design and prototyping of units and units for space-rocket systems.


"Currently, we are witnessing a revolution in technology and production. They occur in the course of development of additive technology, in particular, in the application of 3D-printers."
Pic of Angara

"At this point, in many areas of high-tech production, humanity is beginning to balk at the ceiling technical capabilities of traditional methods of processing materials. Introduction of innovative methods of prototyping and production, such as 3D-printing allows you to move beyond these barriers and realize the most daring ideas of designers and scientists."

"The use of additive technologies increasingly affects the accelerated introduction of breakthrough ideas in design, engineering and rocketry course."

"Of course, the greatest interest for the production and manufacture of advanced rocket and space technology (CT) represents a "seal" in the metal. Print to plastic at the moment is not adapted for the manufacture of standard products and flight due to small structural properties of plastics."

"However, very interesting is to consider the manufacture of parts and assemblies made of plastic on a 3D printer for the experimental development of new models CT. Thus, seal in plastic is a compelling interest for designers in the design, layout and production design layouts newly created complex products, consisting of a large number of different units and units with complex geometric alignment. Today widely mastered and implemented the technology of 3D design of new products in a variety of computer-aided design (CAD) systems such as Compass 3D, Solid Works, NX and others. Computer 3D modeling greatly facilitates the work of the designer, while avoiding a number of errors in the manufacture of a new product, "iron", and provides much greater visibility."
cad model image

"However, computer simulation, remaining virtual, does not solve all problems and can not detect all errors and defects in the design of products and their units, ie. E. The complex modular systems consisting of aggregates of different purposes and interconnected "tricky" geometric layout (a vivid example of such systems are the rocket engines and related systems). These problems have to be solved in the assembly of models in metal products, which can lead to the re-production of parts and assembly units to change their geometry in the process of linking the layout of the product. In connection with the above waiver layout (design and layout the more samples) is premature."

"3D printing technology in the plastic come here for help, contributing to a substantial reduction in price, simplify and accelerate the production of new models of design of a product."

"In KBhimmash them. AM Isaev within the work on the latest oxy-hydrogen upper stage of a heavy class (RB KVTK) for heavy Angara rockets carried out research the possibility of using the additive 3D printing technology for the manufacture of plastic materials design layout board power supply (BIP). BIP is designed to supply hydraulic fluid to the set parameters (flow, pressure, temperature) 2 servo hydraulic system electrohydraulic actuators (HS EGS) for the operation of the engine RD0146D Angara rocket."

"To assemble the design layout was originally planned to print individual units (valves, regulators, etc.), power circuit elements (brackets, pads, bearings, etc.), finished with piping geometry (on 3D models) and fasteners. However, at the first stage of preparation of solid models for printing was considered more prudent to abandon print and use metal fasteners bolts, nuts, etc. to build the layout. This decision was due on the one hand the implementation complexity of 3D models with fasteners "drawn" thread and this thread increments as low as 1 mm (which is required for acceptable accuracy print), on the other hand the availability and distribution of various fasteners of metal."

"At the stage of printing models, it was decided to abandon the idea to print lines given geometry (3D term: stretch of the hot plastic within a given direction?). The decision taken was explained by the presence of shrinkage and inaccuracies in the geometric dimensions of manufactured plastic models and inability to bend or fit plastic pipe "in place" on the assembled layout. As a result, miss-coordinate of the end of pipeline components with coordinates response elements was too high. The use of metal pipes take this opportunity to issue "hems" pipes "in place". However, the metal and, consequently, heavier lines pose a significant burden on the layout of the bearing elements made of plastic. As a result of the analysis was chosen a compromise: piping components (elbows, caps, tees, etc.) are made of plastic and metal pipes. The thickness of the pipe wall can possibly be substituted with 1 mm to 0.5 mm in order to facilitate the assembly."

"Due to the problematic implementation of threads with a printer, it was decided to perform their Mechik and dies on the finished plastic parts. Having problems with the implementation of external threads on the cylindrical surface of the parts, but they were quite solved simply by increasing the percentage of fill material (they increased the fill rate) in the printing elements."

"At the moment, most of the problems successfully solved and KBhimmash almost completed assembly of experimental design layout made using 3D printing technology, with the result that we can draw some conclusions. Performing the same functions as a conventional metal Design layout, such as checking the collection, development of the technology assembly, troubleshooting and inaccuracies in the design documentation, installation of electrical, etc., The layout of plastic costs much cheaper. According to preliminary estimates, the cost is 10-15 times less than the cost of the design layout of metalla.Pri no need to attract a large number of related services and performers who perform such works as: order and metal cutting, design and manufacturing of dies, turning, milling and other mechanical operations, etc. Chain performers reduced to "designer - 3D printer operator - locksmith garbage" that, in turn, significantly speeds up and simplifies the process of making the design layout."

"For the manufacture of the design layout board power supply for heavy Angara rocket was used ABS plastic Russian company OOO "REC"."

Many more pics in the article.




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/05/2015 10:30 AM
Google’s Project Ara Looking at 3D Printing for Future  http://tinyurl.com/lps4gqe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIz1k9qrEKw

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 01/07/2015 09:42 PM
Podcast on 3D printing in Space

http://spirit.as.utexas.edu/~fiso/telecon/Bredt_1-7-15/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/11/2015 01:17 PM
The Prober Report on CES

This video is making the rounds.....good until I can write it up.

https://screen.yahoo.com/ces-musical-235245650.html

Ran into one of the NASA centers looking to get the same printers I was.   More on this as time permits..

Edit: add video
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 01/11/2015 05:42 PM
I havent read the entire thread so maybe this already came up but..

if we managed to get a SLS printer to mars, could it help making sealed sample containers for sample return? ( among other things of course )
I know some sort of welding solutions has been considered of for that purpose before.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/11/2015 09:47 PM
I havent read the entire thread so maybe this already came up but..

if we managed to get a SLS printer to mars, could it help making sealed sample containers for sample return? ( among other things of course )
I know some sort of welding solutions has been considered of for that purpose before.

maybe glass fiber/plastic print up a atmosphere bottle.  Could analyze the smell taste etc.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/15/2015 01:04 PM
Turbomeca Opens 3D Printing Facility for Helicopter Engine Parts  http://tinyurl.com/lh7jgxm

"The new facility in Bordes, France will be utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) to fabricate these nozzles both for their Arrano test engines, and their production engines.  The process is capable of melting layers as fine as 100 micrometres thick.   And, using a nickel-based super-alloy powder, the company suggests that their fuel injector nozzles will be able to exhibit advanced injection an cooling fucntions, thanks to the ability to fabricate the parts as single, complex pieces."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 01/16/2015 09:18 AM
Instrument housing produced with 3D printed mould

3D printing offers engineers various ways to construct hardware that simply could not be built in any other manner – such as this single-piece casing to house an optical instrument for Earth observations.

In this case, the desired shape was initially 3D printed in wax. The wax model was then dipped into a ceramic slurry to create a hard shell.

The wax was then melted away and molten aluminium poured in the hollow ceramic mould to produce the final part.

This prototype casing demonstrates another potential advantage of using 3D printing to create very complex space parts in a single piece.

Extremely complicated shapes can be manufactured without the need for joins or welds, using less raw material and energy than traditional manufacturing, and with a reduced number of steps.

ESA’s Product Assurance & Safety Department is looking at how 3D printing can be applied to space missions, including the development of common industrial standards for manufacturing and testing of products.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/01/Instrument_housing_produced_with_3D_printed_mould

Image credit: ESA–Anneke Le Floc'h
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 01/19/2015 05:04 PM
This looks very exciting - it's called Selective Inhibition Sintering and it could make 3D printing of metal much cheaper:

http://3dprint.com/24009/selective-inhibition-sintering/

It's being developed by Prof Behrokh Khoshnevis of USC, who is already famous for his work on Contour Crafting (macro-sized 3D printing of homes and buildings which could be useful on the Moon or Mars)

So basically it's the inverse of SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) and it has a print head applying a sucrose solution to the metal particles to prevent them from fusing. So everywhere the print head doesn't go gets fused into the part, while everywhere the print head applies the inhibitive solution then the metal particles don't fuse.

Quote
Because of the fact that an expensive laser or electron beam generator is not needed, and instead only a simple printhead capable of spraying a liquid inhibitor is required, such a printer should be a couple of orders of magnitude more affordable. Additionally, prints should be quite a bit faster since only the boundaries of the object need to actually be printed, and not the actual object itself.




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 01/19/2015 06:39 PM
A couple of presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from a September 2014 JANNAF meeting that may be of interest:

Additive Manufacturing Design Considerations for Liquid Engine Components (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140016675.pdf)

Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Demonstration Hardware for a Turbopump Application (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140016517.pdf)

Abstract
The Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department has gained significant experience in the last year designing, building, and testing liquid engine components using additive manufacturing. The department has developed valve, duct, turbo-machinery, and combustion device components using this technology. Many valuable lessons were learned during this process. These lessons will be the focus of this presentation.

We will present criteria for selecting part candidates for additive manufacturing. Some part characteristics are 'tailor made' for this process. Selecting the right parts for the process is the first step to maximizing productivity gains.  We will also present specific lessons we learned about feature geometry that can and cannot be produced using additive manufacturing machines.

Most liquid engine components were made using a two-step process. The base part was made using additive manufacturing and then traditional machining processes were used to produce the final part. The presentation will describe design accommodations needed to make the base part and lessons we learned about which features could be built directly and which require the final machine process.

Tolerance capabilities, surface finish, and material thickness allowances will also be covered. Additive Manufacturing can produce internal passages that cannot be made using traditional approaches. It can also eliminate a significant amount of manpower by reducing part count and leveraging model-based design and analysis techniques. Information will be shared about performance enhancements and design efficiencies we experienced for certain categories of engine parts.

(copies of files also attached)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/20/2015 12:13 AM
The Prober Report on CES [/i]
Old World Labs : Unveils New Range Of Professional-Grade 3D Printers  http://tinyurl.com/ld258un

had some trouble on this one; how would I write it up? Many issues, and things that open up with more questions than answers.

"OWL customers are working on the future of everything - medicine, science, engineering, robotics, art - and need to be able to create things that are tomorrow-ready, today. OWL printers have 250x the resolution of other 3D printers, making them most precise option for laboratories and research facilities."

In Bold is the issue at hand.  This printer was desgned for research and laboratories, why was it at CES a Consumer Electronics Show?

"are available via a service plan subscription, which allows customers to upgrade their hardware as the technology is refined, ensuring small-volume, high-value manufactured parts are printed at optimum quality."

This firm get's it and has an excellent business model.  If you wish to use the printer you write a check for $26,000.   The each month your lease payment is $1,000. per month.  Now for the best part.  I've been trying to express the full nature of this new industry, and the built in obsolescence.  The Owl business model addresses that.  At least once a year while under this lease, you get the next generation model of the printer. You turn in the printer you have.

Now for some of the other issues.  Clearly, the many foreign countries, and non us firms, that wish for this printer are going to run into some from of ITAR?   Just can't see this printer being treated the Televisions in the next hall, something will be in place on the export of this printer.  Frankly, a small stand showing the printer behind closed doors would have been better, combined with an NDA.  Had that with my solar panel purchase. CES is a public place, and this was poorly handled.

Now to address the NASA Center that wants to obtain this printer.  I like your project, heard all the details on it, and I'm sure everyone else that shows up looking at the printer gets the same information.  I'm not sure at what level you wished the information out to the public, where there you have it.

So a couple of pics I took ...these are raw. You can process them yourself for a clearer image.  Was planning on cleaning them up a bit and putting a red circle around the tiny gears there.  But that's for your enjoyment.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: llanitedave on 01/20/2015 12:49 AM
Our friend Steve Jurveston has been playing with 3D printing rocket parts too.


http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150116-going-supersonic-with-steve-jurvestons-3d-printed-rockets.html (http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150116-going-supersonic-with-steve-jurvestons-3d-printed-rockets.html)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/20/2015 09:55 AM
European Space Agency Awards €500k for New Cold Spray 3D Printing Technology   http://tinyurl.com/kh253qt

 "helium gas carries metallic particles at 2,462 km/h, twice the speed of sound.  The professor elaborates, “Engineering components usually start with a large piece of metal and this is reduced to the size and shape you need. Cold spray works like a painting machine, applying layer after layer to build up a shape, but done in a matter of seconds… You accelerate the gases to supersonic velocity and if you inject particles into the gas they will also reach supersonic speeds. The particles are moving fast enough to penetrate into the surface and bond in a quick way so you can build up say five millimetres of material in a mater of seconds, 1,000 times faster than other techniques.”

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/20/2015 10:41 AM
Teen Takes 3D Printing into “ORBit” with New ORB Technology   http://tinyurl.com/qfus9tt

"Thomas Suarez is the prototype of a teenager for the new century and not just because, at age 15, he was born right across the turn of the millennium. He is a “21st century teen” because his passions are the passions of the new millennium: apps for smartphones, Google Glass, and 3D Printing. He seems to be pretty good at it and his company, CarrotCorp, has already published five Apps. The real game changer could be his ORB 3D printer."   http://orbprinter.com/

"Furthermore, the entire system will be modular and open source, so that there is an individual module to handle the extrusion and the disc rotation, allowing anyone to create personalized modules to fit their own specific requirements."

"For instance, an object which is described by 381 lines of Gcode, only required 24 lines of ORB print code."
==========================
The Magnetic Filament should be looked at for an ISS printer.




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/20/2015 04:58 PM
High-performance PEKK-based 3-D printing a first     http://articles.sae.org/13830/

 "The technology has been in development at Oxford since 2006,"

"OXFAB-N is composed of unmodified neat PEKK, a material with a very low microwave dielectric constant that is well-suited for radomes and other “unique” electrical applications. OXFAB-ESD is a carbon-filled PEKK compound with enhanced mechanical properties that make it suitable for structural applications. "

"an ultra-high-performance polymer with improved strength, chemical resistance, low- and high-temperature performance, radiation resistance, enhanced wear properties, and ultra-low outgassing."

Wait for it..... :)


"OXFAB’s strength-to-weight ratio is superior to that of cast aluminum, magnesium, and nylon,”

“Anywhere aluminum is used OXFAB is viable,”




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Hanelyp on 01/21/2015 04:59 AM
Quote
“Anywhere aluminum is used OXFAB is viable,”

I doubt the thermal or electrical properties are nearly a match for aluminum.

Superior strength/weight is not always enough for a structural replacement.  If the density is too high or strength too low you'd have to redesign.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 01/21/2015 09:53 AM
Quote
“Anywhere aluminum is used OXFAB is viable,”

I doubt the thermal or electrical properties are nearly a match for aluminum.

Superior strength/weight is not always enough for a structural replacement.  If the density is too high or strength too low you'd have to redesign.

I think it's either/or for strength or dielectric (OXFAB-ESD and OXFAB-N)...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/21/2015 04:47 PM
Quote
“Anywhere aluminum is used OXFAB is viable,”

I doubt the thermal or electrical properties are nearly a match for aluminum.

Superior strength/weight is not always enough for a structural replacement.  If the density is too high or strength too low you'd have to redesign.

I think it's either/or for strength or dielectric (OXFAB-ESD and OXFAB-N)...

right, someone looked up the article...

"OXFAB-N is composed of unmodified neat PEKK, a material with a very low microwave dielectric constant that is well-suited for radomes and other “unique” electrical applications. OXFAB-ESD is a carbon-filled PEKK compound with enhanced mechanical properties that make it suitable for structural applications."

The pdf's are on their site if anyone wishes to run & compare numbers.  I'd like to see what you chart ;)
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/21/2015 05:03 PM
Quote
“Anywhere aluminum is used OXFAB is viable,”

I doubt the thermal or electrical properties are nearly a match for aluminum.

Superior strength/weight is not always enough for a structural replacement.  If the density is too high or strength too low you'd have to redesign.

Keep in mind under additive its the engineering that counts, not the tools.

In this case we have one base material with two off the shelf mixes.
A) Structural
B) electrical

All kinds of ways to make this work and get the best features of both. 

Could lay down two layers of A followed by 1 layer oF B, back to two layers of A followed by 1 layer of B.  The base material is the same, all you need is a dual extruder/hot end system, cheap.

2nd example, build the Structural and use the B material as the infill.  That also might do the job.


 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/28/2015 01:52 AM

New article on the Made in Space printer  An Overview of All 25 Parts NASA & Made In Space Have 3D Printed in Space    http://3dprint.com/40026/3d-printing-in-space/

Worth a look has 2 videos....
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/09/2015 11:55 AM
This 3D Printed Toyota Engine Really Revs  http://tinyurl.com/k3jcwq6

Files and more information located on this site: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:644933
"Completely reverse engineered Toyota 22RE 4 cylinder engine. Can completely print a fully rotating model. Working crank, pistons, and valve train. The valves open and close!!!. It may not be the most exciting engine but its the only one I had in my garage. "


What makes this interesting is that the project was done.
Tolerances
Printed on a 1st generation Prusa Mendel 3year old technology 300-400$ Printer

The PLA plastic has been used in metal castings, or the new metal filament can be used.  Shows how many possibilities are now open at low cost.

"The 22RE was a popular 4-cylinder engine produced by Toyota from 1985-1995 that had an output of 105hp and a maximum 137lb-ft torque. Unlike the original 22R, the 22RE was fuel injected. Over time, it proved to be extremely versatile and became used in everything from Toyota’s pickup trucks to commuter cars.

Even though this engine hasn’t been manufactured in twenty years, there are still plenty of replacement parts available online. Someday, however, that might not be the case."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmK_LWOqRp8#t=37

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 02/12/2015 07:36 AM
3D printing regolith with laser.

http://3dprint.com/30302/3d-printing-on-moon-mars/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/15/2015 01:47 PM
Paper
Additive Manufacturing of Steel Alloys Using Laser Powder-Bed Fusion   http://tinyurl.com/o8aufyu

"Studying the additive manufacturing of AISI 420 stainless steel and AISI 4140 steel using a laser powder bed-fusion (L-PBF) process helped develop the corresponding process windows regarding the structural integrity of coupons, where systematic defects such as lack of fusion and porosity were minimized. In both cases (AISI 420 and AISI 4140), densities exceeding 99% theoretical were produced. Through precise control of the L-PBF parameters, it is possible to produce the desired shape of martensitic stainless steel grade 420 with an acceptable microstructure and hardness values."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/20/2015 02:59 PM
of late, passed on many stories, this one just couldn't pass on.

Rolls-Royce to Fly Largest 3D Printed Part Ever Flown     http://tinyurl.com/obqacap

"Rolls-Royce has announced that it will flight-test what it claims to be the largest 3D printed aerospace component to ever power an aircraft."

"Incorporated into its Trent XWB-97 engine, the UK aerospace manufacturer and defense contractor has 3D printed a titanium structure that measures 1.5m in diameter and 0.5m-thick. The front bearing housing contains 48 aerofoils "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/15/2015 08:04 PM
ARTSAT 3D Printed Satellite Sends ‘Poetry’ Back from Space   http://3dprint.com/51027/artsat-3d-printed-satellite/

The first 3D printed satellite in history, the ARTSAT was both a sculpture and a space vehicle, and it was a project launched by a collaborative initiative between Tama Art University and the University of Tokyo.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/20/2015 11:46 AM
Airbus 3D Printed Components to Launch on Next UK Satellite     http://tinyurl.com/nd2hvez

"After spending two years in R&D on the project, UK defense manufacturer Airbus Defence and Space is 3D printing space-qualified satellite components for the UK Space Agency and Innovate UK’s National Space Technology Programme."

"The bracket, meant for mounting the telemetry and telecommand (TMTC) antennas onto the E3000, significantly improves upon previous designs made with traditional methods.  With 3D printing, the team was able to transform a bracket made up of four main parts and 44 rivets into a single, laser-melted piece that is 40% stiffer and 35% lighter than its predecessor.  "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 03/20/2015 11:32 PM
"...that is 40% stiffer and 35% lighter than its predecessor.  "
Note that progression from a copy of the existing part to one that plays to the strengths of the process, something similar happens when parts are changed from conventional alloys to carbon fibre.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/20/2015 11:42 PM
"...that is 40% stiffer and 35% lighter than its predecessor.  "
Note that progression from a copy of the existing part to one that plays to the strengths of the process, something similar happens when parts are changed from conventional alloys to carbon fibre.
...bingo. And it's very important to keep the process in mind, just like how carbon fiber is not "black aluminum."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 03/21/2015 06:57 AM
"...that is 40% stiffer and 35% lighter than its predecessor.  "
Note that progression from a copy of the existing part to one that plays to the strengths of the process, something similar happens when parts are changed from conventional alloys to carbon fibre.
...bingo. And it's very important to keep the process in mind, just like how carbon fiber is not "black aluminum."
Exactly

Clearly not impossible but it takes some time to understand and develop to those constraints.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Nilof on 03/21/2015 12:36 PM
Not (yet) space related, but this looks like a very interesting new approach to 3D printing: http://3dprint.com/51566/carbon3d-clip-3d-printing/

there is also a TED talk about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihR9SX7dgRo

the approach of using chemistry rather than heating to modulate the printing process is interesting. Apparently this approach significantly extends the range of polymer materials that can be printed. It would be great if high performance space rated materials like Zylon or Kapton could be printed into interesting shapes.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/21/2015 12:47 PM
It's a Ted presentation, so by definition it's over-hyped, but it is true that DLP printing has a serious advantage in the complexity vs speed trade-off due to using a 2D element rather than a point element for deposition.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 03/21/2015 08:16 PM
It's a Ted presentation, so by definition it's over-hyped, but it is true that DLP printing has a serious advantage in the complexity vs speed trade-off due to using a 2D element rather than a point element for deposition.
True, but that speed up factor....  :)

It's like the difference in speed between powdered metal sintering and passing a current through the mold using FAST, turning hours into minutes.

This also give the option of acting as a mold in a lost wax casting process.

Sadly despite FAST powder metallurgy does not seem to have taken off.

I guess it's a question of showing a decisive advantage to using it in the first place.  :(
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 03/21/2015 08:33 PM
True, but that speed up factor....  :)

It's like the difference in speed between powdered metal sintering and passing a current through the mold using FAST, turning hours into minutes.

This also give the option of acting as a mold in a lost wax casting process.

Sadly despite FAST powder metallurgy does not seem to have taken off.

I guess it's a question of showing a decisive advantage to using it in the first place.  :(

The speed up may allow this printer technology to be used in actual medium scale manufacturing.

The ball they made had a complex internal structure. Current casting techniques prevent items having closed compartments since the wax has to get out. This may permit the manufacturing of new types of items.

The lack/smallness of grain may permit items to be made without additional machining and little polishing. Possible cost savings there.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 03/22/2015 08:56 AM
The speed up may allow this printer technology to be used in actual medium scale manufacturing.
True. A 10 min cycle should be acceptable for various short or one off production runs.
Quote
The ball they made had a complex internal structure. Current casting techniques prevent items having closed compartments since the wax has to get out. This may permit the manufacturing of new types of items.
If there are closed compartments within those struts then yes but if it's just the strut pattern I think you can do multiple slip coats of ceramic powder onto the structure then do a "lost foam" casting.
Quote
The lack/smallness of grain may permit items to be made without additional machining and little polishing. Possible cost savings there.
True.

Keeping in mind the title of this thread this really needs a demonstrator in space to show it can be made to work in micro gravity.

The other issue I can see with this tech (apart from scale) is that some of those plastic precursors might be very aggressive toward the O2 membrane in the base of the tank, which is a key part of making this work. If this ever makes it to orbit they'd better make sure they've got a few spares.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 03/23/2015 09:18 PM
If we can find a way of producing cogs without using supports then we can make sophisticated machines that need little assembly.  A two chemical printer could make the manufacturing supports out of wax that can be etched away.

If the internal structure contains pipes small chemical analysis equipment is possible. Doubly so if valves and pumps are possible. Although mechanical power can be provided from outside the ability to build in tiny solenoids will be useful.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/17/2015 06:57 PM
Tethers Unlimited Wins NASA Grant to Convert Plastic Waste to 3D Printer Filament In Space http://3dprint.com/58962/positrusion-recycler/

"NASA has selected the Tethers Unlimited, Inc. Positrusion Recycler for use on the International Space Station and awarded a Phase II SBIR to the company for their patent-pending technology which will turn plastic waste into 3D printer filament for in-space manufacturing of tools, replacement parts, and various satellite components."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/21/2015 01:14 AM
Rocket maker for NASA and the AF (ULA)   

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2911821/3d-printing/rocket-maker-for-nasa-and-the-air-force-to-begin-3d-printing-parts.html

The article doesn't allow some forms of capture but its a decent read and has a video

http://bcove.me/jjkq9jp1

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/27/2015 11:45 AM
NASA to Evaluate and Standardize AM Parts with Innovative NDE Methods   http://tinyurl.com/lld7v5c

"NNWG will develop NDE methods for verifying and inspecting AM parts initially for those that are used in launch applications and then, later, for those used in space. For AM, these methods can be developed to be used while the part is being built, evaluating it at every layer, or for parts post-manufacturing. Waller points out that, “It will be the first of its kind – the standard for AM parts – and NASA is taking the lead on that. "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/08/2015 01:45 PM
ISS and SpaceX Freezers Customized with Stratasys 3D Printing  http://tinyurl.com/o99flq6

"Slowly, we developed into producing incubators and freezers capable of reaching -20ºC. The most current unit, Polar, is only -95°C, but our Glacier unit is capable of -160°C.” The project evolved as a byproduct of the labs’s research work on protein crystals and it might end up carrying it out in the end. Only in space."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/13/2015 06:27 AM
3D printed espresso cup.
Nice to see the astronauts putting their new printer to good use.

http://3dprint.com/62744/3d-print-espresso-iss-nasa/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/13/2015 06:38 AM
Here is a more serious use of the 3D Printer.


http://www.futureengineers.org/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efwHYbYMOSM

If you are a K-12 Student in the United States, your challenge is to create a digital 3D model of a container for space. Astronauts need containers of all kinds - from advanced containers that can study fruit flies to simple containers that collect Mars rocks or store an astronaut’s food. The ability to 3D print containers in space - on demand - will let humans venture farther into space. That's why we are challenging students to start designing for space now. It could be a container designed for zero-gravity on the International Space Station, or a container designed for future astronauts on Mars or beyond! Space is a big place, but your imagination is even bigger. Good luck!

This is great idea, containers are used for everything on ISS and they are expensive to transport as most supply vehicles are volume limited. The plan is to recycle packaging into feedstock for printer, Tethers Unlimited are being funded by NASA to do this.
The containers can be used for holding waste which is then disposed off in next disposable supply vehicle departure eg Cygnus, HTV, Progress.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/14/2015 01:03 PM
nice LM video (update on the EBAM) process posted long ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS9VesV4oCY
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/19/2015 04:02 PM
Space Clothing anyone?

The Electroloom Becomes the World’s First 3D Printer of Fabric

 http://3dprint.com/65959/electroloom-3d-fabric-printer/

They have a real nice video in the article that uses ISS images (worth the look see) ;)

"The Electroloom is a 3D printer unlike any 3D printer you have probably ever imagined. It has the ability to 3D print fabric using a process similar to the electroplating of metals."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 05/22/2015 10:23 PM
GE uses Direct Metal Laser Melting (DMLM) to 3D-print a small jet turbine:

http://www.geek.com/news/ge-pushes-a-3d-printed-mini-jet-engine-to-33000rpm-1623020/

http://www.manufacturingglobal.com/technology/446/WORLD-FIRST:-GE-have-3d-printed-a-working-jet-engine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6A4-AKICQU

I've heard of DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) before, but this is the first time I'm hearing of DMLM.

So if this can be used to make small jet engines for the R/C hobbyists, then why can't it also be used to make rocket engines for small sounding rockets?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/26/2015 02:57 PM
Posted the .stl file linkage on this thread http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29378.msg1379988#msg1379988

Topic: can we start to make very low cost Rovers?   This article, and the work done begs the question.

Russian Developer 3D Prints His Own Working Curiosity Rover Model
   http://3dprint.com/67428/3d-printed-curiosity-model/

"The rover is connected to a PC using Bluetooth and operated by a remote that connects to the PC via USB. The remote allows all six wheels to be moved independently, so Curiosity has a full range of movements and motion. It has a range as far as the Bluetooth connection will allow and because the head gimbal is also completely motorized you can move the camera in virtually any direction that you need and watch back on your computer screen.

Here is a video of Grishchenko’s Curiosity Rover in action":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Uq0uGN5r50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQRujfaa0QU


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/02/2015 09:40 PM
Article on 3D printing in aerospace.

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/06/02/7-key-improvements-3d-printing-brings-to-the-aerospace-industry/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=3dpi%2Btwitter
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 06/17/2015 10:14 AM
3D-printed platinum thruster chamber and nozzle

The world’s first thruster with a combustion chamber and nozzle 3D-printed with platinum seen with thermal instrumentation after firing. The chamber and nozzle for the 10 N hydrazine thruster were printed in platinum–rhodium alloy using a laser beam applied to a metal powder bed.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/06/3D-printed_platinum_thruster_chamber_and_nozzle2

Related video:

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2015/06/Hot_firing_of_world_s_first_3D-printed_platinum_thruster_chamber

Related article:

- Hot firing of world's first 3D-printed platinum thruster chamber

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Hot_firing_of_world_s_first_3D-printed_platinum_thruster_chamber

Image credit: Airbus Defence & Space
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: RonM on 06/19/2015 03:39 PM
Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3-D

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150617091750.htm (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150617091750.htm)

This can be very useful for bases or colonies that grow their own crops. There will be a lot of plant waste material that can be converted into feed stock for cellulose 3-D printers.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/19/2015 08:47 PM
Former Pratt & Whitney Team Members Launch 3D Printing Start-Up
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/06/19/former-pratt-whitney-team-members-launch-3d-printing-start-up/

a NASA part

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: JasonAW3 on 06/19/2015 09:24 PM
Here's a thought;

     Use a 3d printer of exceptional size to help build a space colony.  (Actually, you'd need several, but you get the idea).
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 06/19/2015 10:22 PM
Here's a thought;

     Use a 3d printer of exceptional size to help build a space colony.  (Actually, you'd need several, but you get the idea).
Think bigger. put huge print heads on even larger gantry frames on articulated arms in some cases. That way the "print heads" can move while laying down layers to make pieces bigger than themselves. you could then make capital ships or large station components or colony segments if on a planet, moon or planetoid.

This was envisioned in fiction from time to time. Even Star Wars (novels) had these sorts of things on the Republic/Empire home world of Coruscant constantly building, destroying or rebuilding sections of the planet, whose entire surface was an urban built up area with thousands of years of prior buildings and cities under the present surface. An awful thing to do to a living planet but at least useful for planets where there was no existing biosphere.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 06/20/2015 02:26 PM
Think bigger. put huge print heads on even larger gantry frames on articulated arms in some cases. That way the "print heads" can move while laying down layers to make pieces bigger than themselves.

For example:

(https://s.yimg.com/lo/api/res/1.2/lvpJHe03qzltFFfy0c9RGQ--/YXBwaWQ9bWFnYXppbmVzO3c9ODAw/https://s.yimg.com/os/en-US/homerun/cnet.cbs.com/3e6a655bb95375127af13289af0685da) (http://3dprint.com/72682/amsterdam-3d-printed-bridge/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/29/2015 07:11 PM
3D Printed Monolithic Ceramic Thruster for Rocket Engine Survives Hot Fire Testing 

http://3dprint.com/77347/3d-printed-ceramic-thruster/

"The research, several years in the making, has developed the world’s first 3D printed ceramic catalyst bed. The 3D printed component works flawlessly with the ESA’s monopropellant based on hydrogen peroxide, which offers a ‘green’ alternative to the previously ubiquitous hydrazine, which is toxic and unstable."

"Tests for the parts were developed by the University of Birmingham team in conjunction with partners at DELTACAT and the University of Southampton. The 3D printed monolithic catalyst beds created using this newly developed technique showed, in several areas, superior results in hot fire testing compared to the ceria pellets catalyst beds used as a baseline."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/30/2015 02:01 PM
Interesting story Samsonium: Scientists Develop Nylon Titanium Material

http://3dprint.com/77305/samsonian-nylon-titanium/

“Samsonium has superior performance for any number of applications. We first started to develop a material specifically for making high strength low weight satellite applications for an orbital manufacturing project,” said engineer Dr. Daniel J. Thomas, responsible for creating the new material. “However, after we determined that it has ultra efficient slippage qualities and impact-absorbing properties then we re-engineered it to become a low cost treatment for arthritis. The secret to its high strength is the added matrix of titanium 6/4, these millions of individual bonds increases its strength by an additional twenty five percent.”

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/01/2015 02:07 PM
Microsoft Publishes Improved Oculus Rift Lenses for 3D Printing

http://tinyurl.com/p5zu44b

"Microsoft’s lens offers less chromatic aberration and a sharper image than the Oculus, but the improvement in the technology ups the price considerably."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/07/2015 10:37 PM
3D Printed Aircraft Fuselages? Constellium, STELIA Aerospace & CT INGENIERIE Partner

http://3dprint.com/79389/3d-printed-fuselage/

3D printing and AM offer a wide range of alternatives for the design and production of large aerospace components such as their fuselages. He says existing available technology falls short when it comes to the design of large scale modules, but he adds that 3D fuselage printing will allow for simpler design modification, parts duplication and customization.


“The goal of the FAST project is to change the way innovative technologies are implemented and to expand the usage of 3D printing,” Chenal says. “3D printing will allow us to create metal shapes and properties that were previously impossible to produce.”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/15/2015 03:13 PM
Helping the Skylon Spaceplane Reach Orbit with a 3D Printed Injector Mechanism

http://3dprint.com/81151/skylon-spaceplane-3d-printing/

Video of the test Fire:
https://vimeo.com/130617927

"The SABRE engine needs a propellant injector system capable of injecting a precise mixture of water and methanol at specific points into the air path. This forces the water to evaporate and will rapidly cool the air. Current manufacturing techniques are completely incapable of creating an injector system with the required internal geometry that is small and light enough for the design. In order to propel the spaceplane fast enough to break orbit, the weight of the craft and the engine needs to be minimal. But new advances in metal 3D printing technology can create solid metal parts with geometries complex enough to produce injectors capable of delivering the methanol/oxygen coolant mixture correctly."


Edit: add the test engine pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/04/2015 05:39 PM
1) NASA 3D Prints Parts for Future Space Drones — May Explore Volcanoes on Mars or Asteroids
http://3dprint.com/86313/nasa-space-drones-3d-print/


2) NASA 3D Prints Space Drones to Explore Mars for Habitable Sites
http://tinyurl.com/qgts5dc

"The difference between NASA’s drones and those you might see on Earth are a number of upgrades that put terrestrial UAVs to shame.  And the space agency has already created a number of prototypes relying on off-the-shelf components and 3D printed parts."

"NASA has already constructed a few different models of their drones, including a palm-sized ducted fan flyer that they’ve been test flying inside of their 10 x 10 foot test space and an EAF designed for asteroid exploration, which they’ve suspended in a gimbal to understand how it will maneuver in zero gravity (shown in the video below). While these drones will help researchers explore the world’s of space, they may also help first responders in accessing hazardous areas on Earth."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYjfI7ffF6w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gW7G7nequ8

Edit: added 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/04/2015 05:42 PM
NASA future plans....

"In addition to 3D printing rocket parts, the space agency is keen to 3D print objects in space using natural materials, such as regolith found on the Earth or Mars. In the interview with Florida State University embedded below, you can hear Roger Mueller discuss their plans for 3D printing in depth."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH2laON2wqo
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/07/2015 07:09 PM
Some interesting thinking; what can I say your US tax dollars at work.

Encore: Research Allows for 3D Printed Augmentation of Everyday Objects

http://3dprint.com/87595/encore-3d-print-augment/

"Funded by the National Science Foundation under grant NSF IIS 1217929, Encore is a multifaceted tool which enables three different techniques to augment already existing objects. The researchers call these three techniques Print-Over, Print-to-Affix and Print-Through, all of which allow for the adherence of newly 3D printed attachments to other objects. "

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0VBwd3Oceo
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/11/2015 05:25 PM
Made In Space can now print in a vacuum. 

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/08/11/space-breakthrough-gravity-vacuum-3d-printing/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/11/2015 09:41 PM
Made in Space & NanoRacks Sign Deal to Build & Deploy 3D Printed Satellites In Orbit

http://3dprint.com/88514/made-in-space-and-nanoracks-sign-deal-to-build-and-deploy-cubesats-in-orbit/

"They call it “Stash & Deploy,” and the service will leverage the NanoRacks heritage in CubeSat deployment and the capability of Made In Space to provide 3D printing capabilities and deliver – on-demand – satellite manufacturing, assembly, and deployment in the space environment."

“Stash and deploy opens a new chapter in space utilization,” says Jeffrey Manber, the CEO of NanoRacks. “Looking out a few years, this option may be more desirable than launch and deploy.”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/13/2015 02:35 PM
Open Space Agency Opens Era of Distributed Space Observation with 3D Printing
http://tinyurl.com/nkmx9pe

"the Open Space Agency (OSA) program, a community which is following in the footsteps of Elon Musk, arguably the Steve Jobs – as in the leading inspiration – of current and future generations of entrepreneurs. OSA is made up of “astropreneurs” who believe that the technology, skills, and industrial base to meaningfully contribute to space exploration are now within the reach of small teams of passionate individuals."

"Basing its mission upon the emergence of platform technologies – such as CubeSats, additive manufacturing, and low-cost micro controllers – that are further driving down the cost of space exploration, OSA believes that anybody can now conceive and launch their own space program. One of the first elements in this citizen-led space program (which, perhaps a bit too hastily, bypassed the “commercial era” of space exploration) is the Ultrascope, an open source kit telescope that could reduce the cost of pro-level astronomy by an order of magnitude."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/16/2015 04:26 PM
Researchers Redesign the Conventional Battery Via 3D Printing
http://3dprint.com/87807/battery-3d-printing/


"As technologies progress and multiply and even become steeped within one another, like 3D printing and electrical components, it makes perfect sense that batteries could be 3D printed right into innovative products busy coming down the line today like 3D printed wearables, various displays, and virtual reality pieces."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/16/2015 07:01 PM
Researchers Redesign the Conventional Battery Via 3D Printing
http://3dprint.com/87807/battery-3d-printing/


"As technologies progress and multiply and even become steeped within one another, like 3D printing and electrical components, it makes perfect sense that batteries could be 3D printed right into innovative products busy coming down the line today like 3D printed wearables, various displays, and virtual reality pieces."
Adda 3D print solar panel or wireless charge circuit and charging is sorted without chunky connectors.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/19/2015 07:11 PM
LED.W: 3D Labs Unveils Incredible New Shape Memory Resin for SLA 3D Printing

http://3dprint.com/90263/led-w-shape-memory-3d-print/

"One company, based out of southern Germany, called 3D Labs, is at the forefront of material research when it comes to SLA printing, as well as a variety of other major printing methods."

" The LED.W material contains a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA), meaning that that objects printed with it can be reshaped multiple times and then reverted back to their original form. The way it works is quite simple. Once an object is printed and completely cured, a heat source like a hair dryer can be applied to it. This will soften the object allowing the user to reform it (for instance they used an example of a printed figurine, which they then repositioned the arms and the legs). Once a desired position is formed, the object can be placed into cold water to thoroughly harden and maintain that new position. Where the shape memory comes into play is that heat can then be reapplied to the 34object and it will revert back'

They had a video up, but has become locked.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Scylla on 08/19/2015 07:36 PM

They had a video up, but has become locked.
Here ya go.
https://youtube.com/watch?v=0rGPzsTaXsc
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/20/2015 05:16 PM
Google invest heavily in 3D printer company.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/aarontilley/2015/08/20/google-and-yuri-milner-invest-100-million-in-this-hot-3d-printing-startup-at-a-1-billion-valuation/?utm_campaign=ForbesTech&utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=social&utm_channel=Technology&linkId=16432154
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/21/2015 03:13 PM
Breakthrough Glass 3D Printing Platform Unveiled by Neri Oxman & MIT

http://tinyurl.com/qyw72tg

"3D printing glass could render new methods for making fiber optic cables that are exponentially more efficient at transmitting light, and, therefore, data. "

" With this technology, the group will begin to test various architectural systems relying on 3D printed glass parts, which will allow the MIT group to design geometrically complex components, including structures with internal channels for distributing air, water, and biological matter in unique ways.  And, because of the design-to-manufacture process involved, all of this could be customized for a given project or client."

"The process, shown in the video below, could both improve fiber optic design and streamline its use by incorporating it into building construction.  According to Oxman, “Now consider printable optoelectronics, or the possibility of combining optical fibers for high-speed data transmission by light, combined within glass printed building facades. Or consider the possibility of printing spatial pockets and channels containing photosynthetic media. Think Centre Pompidou without functional or formal partitions. Instead consider a single transparent building skin that can integrate multiple functions and can be shaped to tune its performance.”

https://vimeo.com/136764796
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: clongton on 08/22/2015 12:38 AM
As that process gets more mature, it could provide the answer we need to build the nuclear lightbulb engine; a way to form pure silica into a nozzle.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 08/23/2015 08:32 AM
nuclear engine parts or... glass colony domes!
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/23/2015 04:55 PM
MIT Develops Possible Holy Grail of 3D Printers–Prints Up to 10 Materials At Once for Under $7k 
http://3dprint.com/90963/mit-multifab-3d-printer/

"The 3D printer, which the researchers call the MultiFab, is a vision-assisted multi-material 3D printer capable of printing with 10 different materials within a single build, with a current material library consisting of 15 possibilities. Some of the materials included within the library are a rigid material (RIG), elastic material (ELA), high refractive index material (HR), low refractive index material (LR), and a support material (SPT)–and this library should continue to expand substantially with further research."

"The system works by utilizing multiple piezoelectric inkjet printheads from 2D printers, which have been specifically adapted for 3D printing to eject photosensitive materials onto a m4build platform or upon already printed layers of an object. Just like with any typical stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer, a UV light then cures the material as it’s placed down. The construction of the printer has been based on a modular architecture which allows for quick and easy swapping of components on the fly."

Key point piezoelectric inkjet printheads from 2D printers   The ISS uses/Used Epson Printers.  The Epson 2 d printer is based on the piezoelectric print head.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poRFPjiB9vw




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/23/2015 05:23 PM
NASA technology at work

"Originally created by NASA to be used in rocket fuel, a ferrofluid is precisely what it sounds like, a liquid with magnetically reactive properties. The intention was for it to be bonded to a fuel source that could be used in a weightless environment. The fuel would be drawn towards the engines with a simple magnetic field rather than complicated pumps or the need for gravity."

Nike 3D Prints Seemingly Impossible Ferrofluid Shoe Display
http://3dprint.com/91044/nike-ferrofluid-shoe/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoUgHUcEhP4


"Two powerful neodymium magnets are mounted inside of the shoe and move back and forth on tracks hidden inside of the hollow sneaker. The magnets pull the ferrofluid up from the pool and cause some pretty eye popping geometric shapes to form. "
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 08/23/2015 06:08 PM
{snip}
"Two powerful neodymium magnets are mounted inside of the shoe and move back and forth on tracks hidden inside of the hollow sneaker. The magnets pull the ferrofluid up from the pool and cause some pretty eye popping geometric shapes to form. "

Ah. That is how TARDISes change shape. ;)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: kch on 08/23/2015 07:00 PM
{snip}
"Two powerful neodymium magnets are mounted inside of the shoe and move back and forth on tracks hidden inside of the hollow sneaker. The magnets pull the ferrofluid up from the pool and cause some pretty eye popping geometric shapes to form. "

Ah. That is how TARDISes change shape. ;)

It would explain the pipe organ ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WgLFdRXRa0

:)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/24/2015 12:43 PM
First-of-its-Kind Coffee 3D Printing Filament

"Their latest is called “Wound Up” and, to put the third ‘r’ in “reduce, reuse, and recycle”, the material is made from recycled coffee grounds."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY5equ2yxFM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: ArbitraryConstant on 08/25/2015 07:25 PM
Given SuperDraco and Rutherford engines being 3D printed, that's a significant fraction of the new engines to be designed in the last 10 years, especially at the small size.

This is making me think it's going to be the go-to technology at that size even for advanced cycles.

Some examples that got me thinking along these lines are S5.98M (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S5.98M), a Russian staged combustion engine used on upper stages. It uses hypergolics and gets a very good ISP for that combination. A new engine could use hypergolics like SuperDraco, or could use cryogenics with methane.

For expander, copper or aluminum alloys are compatible with 3D printing. jongoff wrote this (http://selenianboondocks.com/2011/03/xcorula-aluminum-rocket-nozzle-announcement/) in regards to using aluminum, though copper alloys are also printable, and with a 3D printed engine the needed cooling channels would be easy to embed. Here again methane would be the obvious choice. The engine could be further simplified by using an open expander cycle.

The companies that might go after this could be Rocket Lab/Firefly looking to build a block 2 with increased performance, and something in that thrust range would be great for some sort of COTS to the moon program.

An engine like this wouldn't require 3D printing to work, but could very easily reduce the cost and complexity of building it to the point where it becomes viable.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 08/26/2015 11:58 AM
http://phys.org/news/2015-08-3d-printing-microscopic-fish-team-method.html

microfiche? no it's micro-fish: little robots with various applications.

Hmmmm. I gotta make this space related.... OK.

How about millions of these little swimmers exploring the oceans of the gas giant moons?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/26/2015 04:05 PM
http://phys.org/news/2015-08-3d-printing-microscopic-fish-team-method.html

microfiche? no it's micro-fish: little robots with various applications.

Hmmmm. I gotta make this space related.... OK.

How about millions of these little swimmers exploring the oceans of the gas giant moons?

you could have pulled in the key lines in the article :)

"various locomotion mechanisms, such as microjet engines, microdrillers and microrockets."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 08/26/2015 04:08 PM
I understand but that really isn't the key either. this thing is powered by peroxide. those things  you mentioned were prior art in the field. (I think)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Scylla on 08/26/2015 05:42 PM
Successful NASA Rocket Fuel Pump Tests Pave Way for 3-D Printed Demonstrator Engine

One of the most complex, 3-D printed rocket engine parts ever made, a turbopump, got its “heartbeat” racing at more than 90,000 revolutions per minute (rpms) during a successful series of tests with liquid hydrogen propellant at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. These tests along with manufacturing and testing of injectors and other rocket engine parts are paving the way for advancements in 3-D printing of complex rocket engines and more efficient production of future spacecraft.

Additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, is a key technology for enhancing space vehicle designs and enabling affordable missions to Mars. The turbopump is a critical rocket engine component with a turbine that spins and generates more than 2,000 horsepower--twice the horsepower of a NASCAR engine. Over the course of 15 tests, the turbopump reached full power, delivering 1,200 gallons of cryogenic liquid hydrogen per minute--enough to power an upper stage rocket engine capable of generating 35,000 pounds of thrust.

“Designing, building, and testing a 3-D printed rocket part as complex as the fuel pump was crucial to Marshall’s upcoming tests of an additively manufactured demonstrator engine made almost entirely with 3-D printed parts,” said Mary Beth Koelbl, deputy manager of Marshall’s Propulsion Systems Department. “By testing this fuel pump and other rocket parts made with additive manufacturing, NASA aims to drive down the risks and costs associated with using an entirely new process to build rocket engines.”

The 3-D printed turbopump has 45 percent fewer parts than similar pumps made with traditional welding and assembly techniques. Marshall engineers designed the fuel pump and its components and leveraged the expertise of four suppliers to build the parts using 3-D printing processes. To make each part, a design is entered into a 3-D printer's computer. The printer then builds each part by layering metal powder and fusing it together with a laser -- a process known as selective laser melting.

“NASA is making big advances in the additive manufacturing arena with this work," said Marty Calvert, Marshall’s design lead for the turbopump. “Several companies have indicated that the parts for this fuel pump were the most complex they have ever made with 3-D printing.”

During the tests, the 3-D printed turbopump was exposed to extreme environments experienced inside a rocket engine where fuel is burned at greater than 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit (3,315 degrees Celsius) to produce thrust.  The turbopump delivers the fuel in the form of liquid hydrogen cooled below 400 degrees Fahrenheit (-240 degrees Celsius). Testing helps ensure 3-D printed parts operate successfully under these harsh conditions. Test data are available to American companies working to drive down the cost of using this new manufacturing process to build parts that meet aerospace standards. All data on materials characterization and performance are compiled in NASA’s Materials and Processes Technical Information System, called MAPTIS, which is available to approved users.

“Our team designed and tested the fuel pump and other parts, such as injectors and valves, for the additive manufactured demonstrator engine in just two years,” said Nick Case, a propulsion engineer and systems lead for the turbopump work. “If we used traditional manufacturing processes, it would have taken us double that time. Using a completely new manufacturing technique allowed NASA to design components for an additively manufactured demonstration engine in a whole new way.”

In addition to sharing test data with industry, the innovative engine designs can be provided to American companies developing future spaceflight engines. The engine thrust class and propellants were designed within the performance parameters applicable to an advanced configuration of NASA's Space Launch System, referred to as Block II. It will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever built and provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons) to enable missions even farther into our solar system to places like Mars.
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2015/successful-nasa-rocket-fuel-pump-tests-pave-way-for-3-d-printed-demonstrator-engine.html

https://youtube.com/watch?v=sVEPP0uHiJ8

Credits: NASA/MSFC/David Olive
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/26/2015 06:08 PM
Reprap related ie you can print on a $300 US printer.
"This new form of graphite called graphene, was isolated for the first time just 11 years ago at the University of Manchester."

"In March (2015), Graphene 3D Lab released the first 3D printing filament containing graphene, a nanocomposite PLA with graphene nanofibers."

What Can We 3D Print with Graphene Filament?
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/08/26/what-can-we-3d-print-with-graphene-filament/

Conductive paths
Stronger parts
Electromagnetic shields
Sensors
=================================
Husband And Wife Team Unveil The World's First 3D-Printed Graphene Battery
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasperhamill/2014/10/23/husband-and-wife-team-unveil-the-worlds-first-3d-printed-graphene-battery/

==============================================================
Innovations in Material Science Brings Functional Filaments to Market
http://printing.cioreview.com/cxoinsight/innovations-in-material-science-bring-functional-filaments-to-market-nid-6345-cid-7.html

===========================================================
more info:  http://www.graphene3dlab.com/s/home.asp

Edit: add more Graphene Filament articles
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/27/2015 07:01 PM
Using Shapeways to 3D Print a Tiny, Fuel Free Microwave EMDrive Thruster?

http://3dprint.com/91880/3d-print-emdrive-thruster/

"So making one is the subject of no little interest, so Paul Kocyla, a professional hardware developer, coder and space enthusiast, has used 3D printing to take on the task of studying the effect."

"The megaphone-shaped cavity in Kocyla’s example was 3D printed in silver, which he says is “a very suitable material for waveguides due to its conductivity.” The cavity was created in polished silver by Shapeways, and then isolated in a set of 3D printed plastic mounts."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfZoJ8cs7Sc&feature=youtu.be

More linkage to the project can be found ...
https://hackaday.io/project/5596/gallery#3958eb217ce44334768e8df65a1e7e6e
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/28/2015 05:24 PM
Manufacturing on Mars: RedWorks’ Plan to 3D Print Settlements in Outer Space

http://tinyurl.com/nj8ptva

"The internal build of RedWorks’ space habitat, which is laid out like a spiraling staircase, is built with multiple levels that are individually designed to serve specific needs. The layout contains four main sections, which from top to bottom of the structure, includes one for habitat maintenance and surface exploration, another for living quarters, the third for laboratory facilities, and the last for storage and life support purposes. RedWorks have also refined initial designs to deal with the challenge of wind erosion and radiation that may become an issue once the settlements make it onto Mars. These designs (which are laid out in the picture below) seem structurally sound and innovative in nature, but the most exciting part of the concept isn’t what RedWorks is planning to build, it’s how they’re planning on building it."

"Ultimately, RedWorks’ vision is to combine traditionally natural building methods from Earth (such as the pueblo) with the process of 3D printing with Martian resources."

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/29/2015 10:17 PM
NASA 3D printed turbopump for 35,000 pound upper stage engine. This to power their 3D printed engine.


http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/08/29/nasa-tech-rocket-fuel-pump-tests-pave-3d-printed-engine/

The technology is available to approved domestic companies and even better still so is the complete engine design.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 08/31/2015 05:31 PM
nuts and bolts and  nuts and bolts...

http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/Science-Fiction-News.asp?NewsNum=4595

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/31/2015 05:32 PM
we've had jet engine articles before....but another that you just can't help be impressed with.  Falls under "what's possible".  Printed in a Prusa i3 3D printer with ABS Plastic, 0.3mm nozzle 0.1mm layer height.

This 3D-Printed Working Model of a 787's Jet Engine Has Impressive Thrust
http://toyland.gizmodo.com/this-3d-printed-working-model-of-a-787s-jet-engine-has-1727684811

"Harcoreta’s scale replica, which includes over 60 3D-printed blades and vanes on the inside, isn’t just a model destined to collect dust on a shelf. It actually produces more than enough thrust to power a remote-controlled airplane, and that’s exactly what its creator intends to use it for.

To make the design and build of the replica even more challenging, but also more accurate to the real thing, Harcoreta has even incorporated a functional thrust reverser into his engine. So when he’s eventually bringing an RC airplane in for a landing, he’ll be able to stop his creation in time before it runs off the end of a runway"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=138&v=9LkgHB5bgmc
=================================
Designer 3D Prints Working Scale Model of Boeing 787 Jet Engine at Desktop, Includes 60 Blades 
http://3dprint.com/93014/3d-print-boeing-engine/

Specs for the design are as follows:
◾18 blades for the main fan at 100mm diameter
◾24 outlet guide vanes
◾18 blades for the internal turbine at 34mm diameter
◾Thrust reverser, complete system with translating cowl, blocker doors and cascades
◾NTM 1400kv 35mm motor
◾Thrust target > 0.5Kg with 3S or 4S maximum
◾Simplified engine pylon
◾Minor reduction on the exhaust area, about 95% fsa

Edit: add 2nd article
Click the first gif
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/01/2015 08:33 PM
Can You 3D Print a Laser? In Fact, You Can! Sort of.

http://3dprint.com/92997/3d-print-a-laser-sort-of/

"Mysterious YouTuber KreAture is a maker and dabbler in electronics who decided to see if he could use 3D printed parts to help build a CO2 laser. While 3D printing a device capable of creating a gas laser sounds pretty implausible, KreAture was more than happy to make it plausible. The CO2 laser is one of the earliest gas lasers to be invented and despite being created way back in 1964, remains one of the most used today."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_DbF0tpZjc
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/04/2015 08:06 PM
ArtiVasc 3D: Hybrid Inkjet & Laser 3D Printing Process Bio-Fabricates Artificial Blood Vessels

http://3dprint.com/93885/artivasc-3d-blood-vessels/

"ArtiVasc 3D is set to unveil a micro- and nano-scale manufacturing technology which promises the generation of entirely “vascularised bioartificial tissue.” What it means is tissue which can use nutrition and metabolism and the “bioartificial vascularised skin” engineered using ArtiVasc 3D may well be the first system capable of creating replacement tissue for human use."

===================================================
Lots in the Bio area:
BioBot 1 Desktop 3D Bioprinter Set to Officially Launch at 2015 TERMIS Next Week

http://3dprint.com/93992/biobot-1-desktop-3d-bioprinter/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gO4JoRoHwEg



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/08/2015 07:12 PM
New 3D Printed Whiskey Space Glass Allows Astronauts to Catch a Buzz
http://3dprint.com/94360/3d-printed-space-glass/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzWla2dXI_k

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/08/2015 07:29 PM
SMU Unveils Video of Unique LBDMD Metal 3D Printing Process Using 6-axis Robot
http://3dprint.com/94375/smu-lbdmd-multifab-3d-print/

"Laser-based Direct Metal Deposition (LBDMD), and when combined with the Universitiy’s MultiFab System, provides for several benefits over other more common methods of additive manufacturing."

“MultiFab combines depositions by welding and laser cladding, multi-axis machining, and in-situ inspection into one highly integrated system based on a 6-axis robot and a 5-axis high speed CNC machining center, providing the next generation technology for rapid and precise net-shape manufacturing using metals and ceramics,” Radovan Kovacevic explained.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkDMNZcrOx0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jPValHxhW0

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/11/2015 07:25 PM
Colonizing Mars With 3D Printed Sfero Habitats Made from Local Materials
http://3dprint.com/95170/mars-3d-printed-sfero-habitats/

"Their idea is for a robot capable of burrowing itself into the surface of Mars in order to extract the high concentrations of iron in the soil. The iron will be used to 3D print metal domes that will be insulated with a layer of water, also extracted directly from Martian soil. The habitat called Sfero is a contraction for “Sphere,” “Iron” and “Water,” for obvious reasons. "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Scylla on 09/15/2015 04:26 PM
NASA 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge
Design Competition Finalists
http://3dpchallenge.tumblr.com/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/18/2015 02:22 PM
A Look into Powder Materials for Metal 3D Printing
http://tinyurl.com/qx32as4

Metals powders: How are they produced?

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/18/2015 02:32 PM
Toyota & Materialise Team to 3D Print Lightweight Car Seat
http://tinyurl.com/njtbc74

"Toyota Motor Corporation decided that they wanted to produce a prototype for a car seat that was as lightweight as possible, they found themselves face to face with a complex project that was meant to be handled by 3D printing technology."

"Despite it’s size, the 3D printed prototype weighed just a staggering 7kg, and also reduced the heat capacity of the car seat from the standard 35.4 J/K (joule per kelvin) to just 14.5 J/K. With a big helping hand from Materialise’s engineers, Toyota was able to manufacture a car seat with a low volume that would have been unfathomable without the 3D printing process advancements"
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/22/2015 06:42 PM
3D Printing Goes 4D with Smart Memory Materials That Self-Assemble
http://3dprint.com/96864/4d-smart-memory-materials/

"This technology could allow for the development of products that can be manufactured or 3D printed to be entirely flat or rolled up in a tube for shipment. Once ready to assemble a single source of stimulation can be applied, causing the flat object to respond with precisely timed movements that will create entirely new 3D structures."

Lots of material and some linkage in the Article.

https://vimeo.com/139936481
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/25/2015 06:48 PM
3D Bioprinting Takes Another Step Forward with Launch of First Living Cellular Bioink Kits
http://3dprint.com/97382/first-living-cellular-bioink/

"These kits will enable high-fidelity mixing and printing of living cellular constructs by combining RoosterBio’s stem cell systems with the universal bioinks that have been created by CELLINK. This combination provides the materials needed for a wide variety of commercial applications such as the creation of human tissue needed for research and testing. In fact, continued experimentation made possible through these materials could ultimately lead to the ability to create replacement organs for patients in need of a transplant."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/27/2015 04:34 PM
NASA 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge
Design Competition Finalists
http://3dpchallenge.tumblr.com/
Winner just happened....#20?
Video Replay avail later...
http://makerfaire.com/new-york-2015/live/
Article & Videos
http://makezine.com/2015/09/27/nasa-winners-3d-printed-habitat-challenge/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=236&v=3aRRW2SdAzQ

Edit: winner material added
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/28/2015 01:51 PM
China successfully launches Pijiang-1 satellite featuring 3D printed parts into space
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150928-china-successfully-launches-pijiang-1-satellite-featuring-3d-printed-parts-into-space.html

"The Pujiang-1 was one of four satellites that were carried into space on 25 September by the solid-fuel Long March-11 rocket. Lift-off took place at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Gansu (Northwestern China), at 9:41 AM (local time)."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/28/2015 02:12 PM
Norsk To Industrialize Aerospace Additive Manufacturing
http://aviationweek.com/technology/norsk-industrialize-aerospace-additive-manufacturing

"In a bold move to bring industrial-scale 3-D printing to the aerospace supply chain, Norway’s Norsk Titanium (NTI) is partnering with a U.S. state to establish a facility to produce aircraft and engine components using additive manufacturing. NTI has developed a plasma-arc-based direct metal deposition technology that can produce aerospace-grade parts from titanium wire. "

New York State to Build $125 Million Industrial-Scale 3D Printing Plant in Partnership with Norsk Titanium
http://3dprint.com/99101/ny-3d-printing-plant-norsk/

Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/29/2015 10:05 PM
NASA Selects the 3D Printed Mars Habitat Challenge Finalists
http://3dprint.com/97936/nasa-mars-habitat-finalists/

a more detailed article from a 3D Printer POV.
Back in August the 165 submissions were narrowed down to the top 30 semifinalists
http://3dpchallenge.tumblr.com/

See the top 10 designs
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/picture-galleries/11896687/Top-10-Mars-habitats-from-NASA-space-habitat-challenge.html?frame=3456038

"As the design challenge moves into phase two it will be divided up into two levels. Level 1 is the Structural Member Competition which focuses on the technologies needed to fabrication and manufacture the habitat structures using components made from a combination of local materials and recycled parts, or from local materials alone. Level 2 is the On-Site Habitat Competition which challenges the competitors to fabricate a full-scale version of their habitat from local materials or from local materials combined with recycled parts. Both levels of the competition opened for registration on Sept. 26 with a $1.1 million prize up for grabs from the new teams."

Pics of 1st, 2nd & 3 winners.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/29/2015 10:20 PM
French Start-Up Z3DLAB Produces Titanium-Ceramic Material for Metal 3D Printing
http://tinyurl.com/o668yvt

"The malleability of Titanium mixed with the hardened nature of Zirconia makes for a lightweight, yet tough, metal-based powder able to withstand over 1000 degrees Celsius of heat. The two elements are extremely complementary to one another, not only because they contain similar natural expansion properties, but also in part because each of the materials covers the weaknesses of the other. The Titanium is known for its tough physicality, but deteriorates quickly due to low abrasion resistance, while Zirconium’s strongest suit is the ability to resist this type of wear and tear, yet lacks where Titanium reigns in tenacity."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/29/2015 10:53 PM
Talented maker builds 3D-printed ion thruster, shares files
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150929-maker-develops-3d-printed-ion-thruster-shares-files.html

"Whilst the maker accepts that his 3D-printed device will not be launching spacecraft to Mars anytime soon, he believes it functions well as a scientific demonstration of the process or accelerating ions and the ion thruster working principle. The project osmanthus has educational value, both for creators constructing the machine and for those who can later operate it, seeing how the science works. The machine, partially created with 3D printing technology, creates a steady flow of air without using any moving parts."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=11&v=9A_nihLENpI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=56&v=dyXfz3Iiflw


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 09/30/2015 12:12 AM
Talented maker builds 3D-printed ion thruster, shares files
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150929-maker-develops-3d-printed-ion-thruster-shares-files.html

"Whilst the maker accepts that his 3D-printed device will not be launching spacecraft to Mars anytime soon, he believes it functions well as a scientific demonstration of the process or accelerating ions and the ion thruster working principle. The project osmanthus has educational value, both for creators constructing the machine and for those who can later operate it, seeing how the science works. The machine, partially created with 3D printing technology, creates a steady flow of air without using any moving parts."

{snip}

Ion thruster can be solar powered. On Mars propellant is the biggest weight, ion thrusters use the atmosphere instead of propellant. What level of thrust and energy are needed to fly a 3kg payload around in the Martian atmosphere?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: nadreck on 09/30/2015 12:25 AM
Talented maker builds 3D-printed ion thruster, shares files
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150929-maker-develops-3d-printed-ion-thruster-shares-files.html

"Whilst the maker accepts that his 3D-printed device will not be launching spacecraft to Mars anytime soon, he believes it functions well as a scientific demonstration of the process or accelerating ions and the ion thruster working principle. The project osmanthus has educational value, both for creators constructing the machine and for those who can later operate it, seeing how the science works. The machine, partially created with 3D printing technology, creates a steady flow of air without using any moving parts."

{snip}

Ion thruster can be solar powered. On Mars propellant is the biggest weight, ion thrusters use the atmosphere instead of propellant. What level of thrust and energy are needed to fly a 3kg payload around in the Martian atmosphere?
between > 10000 times what is practical to 'fly' anything even a dirigible
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/30/2015 08:06 PM
Reprap Related

ColorFabb Rolls Out New 3D Printing Filament–corkFill
http://3dprint.com/98271/colorfabb-new-corkfill/

"far as the imagination can reach, corkFill is a natural and lightweight material that offers great flexibility in creating. It also boasts a deep and rich brown color"

 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/01/2015 03:20 PM
Ion Thruster Part 2

Part 1
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1431024#msg1431024

This is the 2nd article with a lot more background on the building/thinking into the project.  The takeaway; can be used as a starting point for great educational opportunities.  Can also be used as a starting point (transforming into metal) for say a university nano sat project.

3D Print Your Own Working Ion Thruster Spacecraft Engine
http://3dprint.com/98450/3d-printed-ion-thruster/

“First of all, I love space! So, everything related to space is always attractive to me. Another thing I love is to work with high voltage! As an electrical and electronics engineer I’m always involved in interesting projects, but high voltage usually tops everything else. And finally there’s 3D printing, which is relatively new to me, even though I had a previous success with my DNA Lamp. I thought I could use my new learned skills to make it even more special looking, by creating some kind of launching platform looking or engine testing facility, using 3D printed parts,”

Edit: add links
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/01/2015 03:41 PM
UTEP Receives $2.1 Million America Makes Grant to Develop All-in-One Electronics 3D Printer
http://3dprint.com/98377/utep-america-makes-grant/

"UTEP’s all-in-one 3D printer is being called the “factory of the future” and will be able to 3D print using multiple plastic materials as well as print with conductive wiring materials and conductive inks. The printer will include robotic arms capable of placing non-printable components like wiring, circuit boards and mechanical components. It will also be equipped with tools to perform instant micro-machining, including the cutting, shaping and finishing of plastic and metallic parts. The end result will be the ability to fabricate fully functional electronic devices that will require little to no additional processing. Cell phones, remote controls, toys and even
 small satellites    could conceivably be manufactured this way."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/03/2015 02:51 PM
Inexpensive and Super Strong Graphene 3D Printing Materials are Closer Than Ever with New Patent Filinghttp://3dprint.com/98086/graphene-3d-lab-patent/

" We’ve been told that graphene will alter the way that we store energy, manufacture personal electronics and revolutionize the development of super strong composite materials. But so far very little has managed to be made of it to test those assertions. Mainly because currently it isn’t especially easy to make graphene, and doing so in large quantities would be absurdly expensive and produce a large amount of of toxic waste byproducts."

"Specifically, the process separates nanoscale particles of graphite that consist of small stacks of graphene about one to fifteen nanometers thick called graphene nanoplatelets (GNP). When the particle is combined with the correct mix of polymers, the resulting composite materials will alter the properties of the plastics and give them barrier properties that can make them as tough as most refined metals."

"As the first manufacturer of an inexpensive graphene material, this patent would place them in position to virtually corner the graphene market entirely."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 10/08/2015 08:17 AM
Made In Space and their ISS 3D printer feature on this FISO teleconference.

http://spirit.as.utexas.edu/~fiso/telecon/Napoli_10-7-15/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/08/2015 08:43 PM
NASA Space Use: Education (train the young)

The NASA 3D Space Container Challenge Junior Finalists are Bound for Space Camp
http://3dprint.com/99641/nasa-3d-challenge-junior/

"NASA asked that students ranging in age from five to fifteen to design useful and innovative containers that could be 3D printed in space. The students simply needed to submit a digital 3D model of a container of their own design that they believed would be able to help astronauts keep the space station tidy and organized, or replace existing containers that currently need to be launched into space."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/10/2015 08:55 PM
Toronto doctor using 3D printer to solve the problems of space travel
http://tinyurl.com/nthoo6e

Toronto doctor testing ways astronauts can create their own tools and supplies in space

"The Mars Desert Research Station habitat, an isolated white pod in the ruddy Utah desert, is just eight metres wide and two storeys high. For weeks at a time, crews of up to seven people share the cramped space.

But when Toronto doctor Julielynn Wong travelled to the habitat last December, her bag held a rather bulky item: a 3D printer. She wanted to test what tools can be fabricated on the fly to treat ill or injured astronauts.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/13/2015 03:33 PM
KT Corp Set to Launch Largest 3D Printed Spacecraft Parts into Orbit
http://tinyurl.com/nkd3w3b

"Korean satellite manufacturer KT Corporation has beat the size of those parts, working with Thales Alenia Space to fabricate what will be the largest 3D printed spacecraft parts yet made.

Thanks to their 3D printed, biologically-inspired design, the parts offer 22% in weight savings and 30% in cost savings, in comparison to traditionally manufactured counterparts.  In addition, 3D printing reduces the production schedule down by one or two months, while increasing performance.  At the same time, these parts were able to pass vibration acceptance tests, necessary for launch."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/26/2015 12:16 PM
The Netherlands: Researchers 3D Print Polymers Killing Bacteria & Eliminating Infection
http://3dprint.com/102216/netherlands-researchers-3d-print-polymers/

"Ongoing studies by the researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands have resulted in ‘expanding on the repertoire of 3D printable materials to include antimicrobial polymer resins.’ This is really of enormous significance, simple as it sounds, as it could lead to the elimination of some infections."

=========================================

China’s Sichuan Revotek Announces Creation of Stem Cell Bio-Ink Technology, 3D Bio-Printer, Software
http://3dprint.com/102431/sichuan-revotek-stem-cell/

"The building of a foundation toward 3D printing organs is very important in that scientists could transform the traditional process of offering patients organ transplants. It’s possible that the days of long waiting lists and issues with organ rejection would be eliminated as 3D printing would offer immediate results with patient specific tissue. Being able to create the artificial network required with blood vessels is one more huge advance for the medical industry toward the eventual fabrication of organs."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/28/2015 09:51 AM
Dolomite’s Fluidic Factory 3D Prints $1 Microfluidic Chips
http://tinyurl.com/qawaqna

"When we write that 3D printing is not just a new technology as much as it is a new way to make things, all things, we mean it and we are fairly certain that we are going to see 3D printing get into a lot more sectors than it has thus far. One sector, for example, is that of sealed microfluidic devices, "

 “a multidisciplinary field intersecting engineering, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, nanotechnology, and biotechnology, with practical applications to the design of systems in which low volumes of fluids are processed to achieve multiplexing, automation, and high-throughput screening”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/29/2015 10:55 PM
Lowe’s and Made in Space will Launch First Commercial 3D Printer into Space and First In-Store VR Design Tool
http://3dprint.com/102841/lowes-made-in-space-3d-printer/

"As the first commercially available manufacturing service in space, the AMF will make Lowe’s the very first retailer to have a presence in space. The 3D printer will be controlled from the mission operations center at MIS HQ in the NASA Ames Research Park, where Lowe’s branded hardware can be designed and then digitally transmitted up to the space station to be printed out remotely or by technicians on the station. The Lowe’s AMF is expected to arrive on the ISS some time in early 2016 and they will also be installing a replica of the AMF that will be on the ISS in one of their Bay area store locations where customers can have objects printed with the Made in Space 3D printer."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JetTmlHjcqY

Edit: wrong video
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 10/30/2015 06:54 AM
Prober, the thread is specifically "space related". Can you keep the posts restricted to that? If someone is interested in general 3d-printing news they can go to a 3d-printing focused site, like 3dprint.com (http://3dprint.com/) and their forums.

In the last page you've got car seats, bio-inks, microfluidic chips, graphene filament... frickin' cork filament? C'mon.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 10/30/2015 07:40 AM
Prober, the thread is specifically "space related". Can you keep the posts restricted to that? If someone is interested in general 3d-printing news they can go to a 3d-printing focused site, like 3dprint.com (http://3dprint.com/) and their forums.

In the last page you've got car seats, bio-inks, microfluidic chips, graphene filament... frickin' cork filament? C'mon.

Ah, but low weight seats for capsules are a thing, and cork's been used for reentry shields so...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 10/30/2015 12:55 PM
Ah, but low weight seats for capsules are a thing, and cork's been used for reentry shields so...

So.... what? Many things are made of plastic, so every single story about 3d printing with plastic is relevant? Unless someone is using these tools for specifically space-related tasks, leave it for the dozens of 3d-printing and and hundreds of general pop-science blogs and forums.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/01/2015 04:58 PM
3D Printed Device “Extrudes” Tape to Make Life Sized Furniture Prototypes
http://tinyurl.com/pq9clhr

"A new “fun project” by the Human Computer Interaction Lab at the Hasso Plattner Institut used 3D printing to create the functional prototype of a device that can be used to create “physical sketches” of room sized objects at actual scale."

Real nice Pdf off the article

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beRA4sIjxa8
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 11/02/2015 03:46 AM
3D Printed Device “Extrudes” Tape to Make Life Sized Furniture Prototypes
{snip}

"A new “fun project” by the Human Computer Interaction Lab at the Hasso Plattner Institut used 3D printing to create the functional prototype of a device that can be used to create “physical sketches” of room sized objects at actual scale."
{snip}

A 3D printer that can produce pipes on the Moon, Mars and in space may be useful. Pipes transported flat will save scarce volume in cargo holds. The pipes would have to be air and water tight. They would also have to connect together permitting fluids to pass, not just be taped like in the video.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/02/2015 02:54 PM
3D Printed Device “Extrudes” Tape to Make Life Sized Furniture Prototypes
{snip}

"A new “fun project” by the Human Computer Interaction Lab at the Hasso Plattner Institut used 3D printing to create the functional prototype of a device that can be used to create “physical sketches” of room sized objects at actual scale."
{snip}

A 3D printer that can produce pipes on the Moon, Mars and in space may be useful. Pipes transported flat will save scarce volume in cargo holds. The pipes would have to be air and water tight. They would also have to connect together permitting fluids to pass, not just be taped like in the video.

or uses now could be quick planning on earth, mockups, or the Apollo 13 type event.
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/07/2015 02:34 PM
MIT 3D Prints Bacteria to Create Organically Reactive Material
http://tinyurl.com/pbgxool

Spacesuit application?

"What makes this bacteria ideal for a reactive material is its ability to expand and contract, depending on the moisture of the surrounding environment. These natto cells are first grown within the MIT bio lab, measured with an Atomic Force Microscope, and scanned with AFM probes in order to reach nano resolution, where the resulting bacterial material is extruded onto the bioLogic ‘bio-skin’, with a micron-resolution bio-printer.

The garment used by the bioLogic team is infused with the 3D printed natto cells, which allows the tight-fitting ’Second Skin’ garment to transform and respond to the wearer’s body heat and sweat."

https://vimeo.com/142208383

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 11/10/2015 07:15 PM
apparently we can now burn fully functional customized CPUs and GPUs to blu-ray disks? can you imagine the applications this would have?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: JasonAW3 on 11/10/2015 07:29 PM
3D Printed Device “Extrudes” Tape to Make Life Sized Furniture Prototypes
http://tinyurl.com/pq9clhr

"A new “fun project” by the Human Computer Interaction Lab at the Hasso Plattner Institut used 3D printing to create the functional prototype of a device that can be used to create “physical sketches” of room sized objects at actual scale."

Real nice Pdf off the article

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beRA4sIjxa8

This COULD be used with a metal tape, much the same as had been proposed in the 1980's, to build truss structures in Microgravity, and could be used, as a sort of "Duct Tape" gun, to help seal minor punctures in pressurized modules, at least temporarily.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/12/2015 08:48 PM
NASA Hopes to 3D Print Spacesuits on Mars
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/11/12/nasa-hopes-to-3d-print-spacesuits-on-mars (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/11/12/nasa-hopes-to-3d-print-spacesuits-on-mars)

"if the new Z-2 prototype spacesuit is actually produced for that trip, it will ideally incorporate a number of cutting edge technologies, including 3D scanning and 3D printing.

This will make it much easier for astronauts to walk on the planet, with the suits tailored to each wearer.

 In order to make it fit its astronauts perfectly, the space agency envisions, first, 3D scanning the crew and, then, 3D printing the astrogarb, possibly even in the depths of space or on the Red Planet itself."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tDuwIu_b9g (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tDuwIu_b9g)

=========================================

NASA Redesigns Z-Series Mars Spacesuit with Astronaut-Specific 3D Printed Gear in ‘Tron’ Technology Design
http://tinyurl.com/on9vume (http://tinyurl.com/on9vume)
or
https://3dprint.com/105350/nasa-z-series-spacesuit-mars/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/12/2015 08:57 PM
Xjet to Launch Revolutionary Inkjet Metal 3D Printing Nanotechnology
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/11/12/xjet-launch-revolutionary-inkjet-metal-3d-printing-nanotechnology/

"This may be the most disruptive approach so far in metal 3D printing and might very well set off another period of rapid growth and innovation. The technology promises to eliminate some of the biggest entry barriers to metal AM by lowering time and costs, without sacrificing accuracy and mechanical properties.

will allow digital additive manufacturing production of single, customized objects at prices that are a fraction of the cost of all current metal powder bed, laser-based technologies."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/20/2015 06:26 PM
Jet-Propelled 3D-Printed Drone Claims Speed Record
https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/jet-propelled-3d-printed-drone-claims-speed-record-152412847.html

"A new jet-powered drone might be the most complex flying machine ever built using 3D printing.

The UAV weighs just 33 lbs. (15 kilograms) and can fly at speeds exceeding 150 mph (241 km/h).

It has a 9-foot-long (3 meters) wingspan and an aerodynamic design that gives it a futuristic appearance. (very Naboo Star Wars look IMHO)

Aurora’s UAV is clear evidence of FDM’s ability to build a completely enclosed, hollow structure which, unlike other manufacturing methods, allows large — yet less dense — objects to be produced,

Some parts of the aircraft were made using 3D printing methods other than FDM, such as laser sintering, or SLS, a process in which small bits of material are heated up so that they fuse together to form an object. SLS is often used to print small, highly technical parts in metal. Yet, most of the new drone was printed in ultem, a resilient (and flame-resistant) thermoplastic resin. "

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/22/2015 04:19 PM
Made In Space Archinaut to 3D Print Large Structures in Space
http://tinyurl.com/q29rxeb

"The Archinaut project will see Made In Space work with Northrop Grumman and Oceaneering Space Systems to create the first system for 3D printing and assembling large structures in space, without direct, manual intervention on the part of an astronaut.

Together with Northrop Grumman and Oceaneering Space Systems, the company will work to first perform technology demonstrations as a part of their Phase I program, before, ultimately, aiming for 3D printing and assembling unlaunchable structures in space, including large-scale antennas and even base stations."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/24/2015 04:25 PM
Graphene Flex Foam: Graphene 3D Lab Introduces New Lightweight, Flexible Graphene Material
http://3dprint.com/107252/graphene-flex-foam/

“Graphene Flex Foam is an excellent substrate candidate in the manufacture of electrodes of lithium-ion batteries. Wearable electronics is an obvious application as the electronics, sensors and conductive properties will all need to be flexible with the wearable material. We also believe that this innovative product has a bright future for the next generation of flexible batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene Flex Foam offers energy storage as well as catalyst support in numerous organic synthesis reactions, gas sensors, flexible and ultrasonic acoustic device fabrication,” said Graphene 3D Lab co-CEO Daniel Stolyarov."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/08/2015 03:18 PM
LLNL Researchers 3D Print Blood Vessels for Brain-on-a-Chip Platform
http://tinyurl.com/hcksr2r

"Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in some pretty exciting research, including, but not limited to, 3D printing graphene and 3D printing metamaterials with unique properties and geometric structures.  Their latest advances fall directly into the bioprinting field, where LLNL has 3D printed structures meant to develop into blood vessels on their own."

For LLNL, however, the goal is to build their in vitro Chip-based Human Investigational Platform, or iCHIP, which will replicate the human body on a microscale."
 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/11/2015 10:47 PM
To Mars and Beyond: How RedWorks is Going to Help NASA Colonize Space
http://3dprint.com/110580/redworks-mars-and-beyond/

Extensive article building off this material.
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1420722#msg1420722

"The RedWorks team believes that their concept habitat design and the 3D printing process that they are developing to turn Martian regolith into 3D printing materials is part of a flexible manufacturing system that will create the shelter and tools necessary to survive on other planets. Most importantly they believe that their system will provide the lower costs needed to make settling on other planets achievable. And thanks to some recently passed laws and regulations, it is very likely that they are going to be given the chance to prove it sooner rather than later."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/16/2015 03:59 PM
Fabrisonic: Sound Waves are Building 3D Metal Prints Through Both Additive & Subtractive Processes
http://3dprint.com/111021/fabrisonic-3d-metal-prints/

"has developed a system for soundwaves to actually merge metal foil, allowing for dense, 3D objects forged from true metallurgical bonds in materials such as aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and titanium.

With this harnessing of sound during the ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) process, the use of extreme temperature and the need to melt the metal is eliminated. The objects are created in metal through numerous metal tapes that are welded together via the sound waves, with required details. "

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saSrmgEZJzM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 12/17/2015 09:19 PM
3-D Printed Engine Tests: What Is A Breadboard Engine?

Published on Dec 17, 2015
NASA propulsion engineer Nick Case explains how engineers configured engine parts to make and test additively manufactured engine parts as a system.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGWPR0mcCLs
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 12/17/2015 09:20 PM
A Bird's-Eye View of Smoke and Fire

Published on Dec 17, 2015
An unmanned aerial vehicle captured this view of a 3-D printed rocket engine test. The test laboratory at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, uses aerial cameras to contribute to imagery data analyzed after tests.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Czkp5NIBPdg
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 12/17/2015 09:21 PM
Feeling the Force of a 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Test

Published on Dec 17, 2015
A GoPro camera feels the force of 20,000 pounds of thrust during a test of 3-D engine rocket components tested together.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSkEu9_Wg7Y
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 12/17/2015 09:22 PM
3-D Printed Rocket Engine Roars To Life

Published on Dec 17, 2015
A team at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama tested 3-D printed rocket engine parts connected together in the same fashion that they would work in a rocket engine. The parts performance rivaled that of traditionally manufactured engine parts. During six separate tests, the engine generated up to 20,000 pounds of thrust.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeMzRUT46RE
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: docmordrid on 12/19/2015 08:51 AM
New "ink" for 3D printed phased array antennas/radars

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/544526/new-ink-opens-the-door-to-3-d-printed-radar/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/19/2015 03:35 PM
NSS Enterprise: 3D Printed Satellite Engineered by Made in Space & EIS Will Carry Student Experiments
http://3dprint.com/111845/nss-enterprise-satellite/

"Now, the NSS Enterprise will not only be the first 3D printed airframe in space, but it will also carry more than 100 passive and active student experiments into space and then back to Earth."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Bob Shaw on 12/19/2015 03:43 PM
Not strictly 'real' space hardware, but the BIS Daedalus starship is now sitting in my study:

https://www.shapeways.com/product/DGWAGSUKT/daedalus-spaceship?optionId=42526873&li=ostatus
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/19/2015 05:46 PM
Space Shuttle and Other Custom 3D Printed Designs Make Foreverence’s Urns Truly Personal
http://3dprint.com/111754/foreverence-3d-printed-urns/

Had issues where to post this; its not entertainment or hobby etc.   The finished work is excellent and this is very honorable.

"Felipe Herrera had already decided that he wanted to have his body be cremated when he passed away. As a former NASA engineer, working on the construction of the original Columbia shuttle was one of his most treasured memories. The idea of offering a worthy tribute is what motivated Yvette Wilson to order a customized urn for her 95-year-old father. She contracted Foreverence to design and print a scale replica of the Columbia so she could show it to him before he died so he would know where he would ultimately be laid to rest. After receiving the urn, Wilson, her son, daughter-in-law and fiancé surprised Herrera with the 22-inch space shuttle replica at his home in California a few months before he passed away."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8yfy6iQwTg


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/21/2015 03:30 PM
Additive Industries’ MetalFAB1 3D Printer Flies into Airbus Factory
http://tinyurl.com/h45u2fs

"The fully automated factory is coming and few large industrial manufacturers are more ready to embrace this concept than Airbus.

Airbus APWorks is the first confirmed Beta customer for Additive Industries and brings a broad range of experience with metal additive manufacturing. They cover the entire value chain, from optimizing component design to the choice of suitable materials, from prototyping to qualified serial production. Airbus APWorks supplies customers in robotics, mechanical engineering, automotive, medical technology and aerospace."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 01/04/2016 06:46 AM
http://nextbigfuture.com/2016/01/breakthrough-for-customizing-heat.html

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/04/2016 07:58 PM
Groundbreaking Ceramic Resin Developed by HRL Laboratories Has Potential to 3D Print Hypersonic Jets
http://3dprint.com/113532/hrl-labs-3d-ceramic-resin/

lots of articles out on this one...

"HRL, which is owned by Boeing and General Motors, has developed a ceramic resin that can be printed through stereolithography. The company actually calls it a “pre-ceramic” resin that prints like a typical plastic resin, and is then fired in a high temperature kiln, which turns it into a dense ceramic. The resulting objects are about ten times stronger than other 3D printed ceramics, have virtually no porosity, and can withstand temperatures higher than 1700°C."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K15VyqHN11E

-------------------------------------------------------
More details in this article
New Ceramic 3D Printing Method Able to Withstand over 2,500°F
http://tinyurl.com/gqtc864

"The stereolithography process fuses together this ‘silicon carbide ceramic’ powder and into the desired design shape via UV light, marking the first instance that this specific type of ceramic-based powder has been utilized in 3D printing technology. Once the powder is fused together, the material is heated at about 1,800°F, which transforms the pre-ceramic material into actual ceramic objects. In comparison to FDM-like ceramic printing methods used, the silicon carbide powder prints in more detail with fewer flaws."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/07/2016 08:40 PM
PV Nano Cell’s NanoMetal Inks Write Up 2016 as the Year of 3D Printed Electronics
http://tinyurl.com/hcmoclp

" It will become possible to directly 3D print electronic-capable products, such as photovoltaics, printed circuit boards, RFID, sensors, smart cards, touchscreens and advanced packaging."

“The idea here is to replace all the analogue production by using digital conductive printing, as part of an an additive process,” de la Vega explains.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: dougkeenan on 01/07/2016 08:47 PM
Planetary Resources & 3D Systems Reveal First Ever 3D Printed Object from Asteroid Metals

http://www.planetaryresources.com/2016/01/planetary-resources-and-3d-systems-reveal-first-ever-3d-printed-object-from-asteroid-metals/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 01/08/2016 08:05 AM
3DS does maraging steel.

http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf (http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf)

What else is made with maraging steel? Well, Bob Truax's Sea Dragon rocket. Now all we need is a shipyard sized printer...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 01/08/2016 08:35 AM
3DS does maraging steel.

http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf (http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf)

What else is made with maraging steel? Well, Bob Truax's Sea Dragon rocket. Now all we need is a shipyard sized printer...

The hulls and fuel tanks of rockets are basically long tubes. If you know its output going to be circular designing the print head to rotate is not hard. Alternatively the tube produced can rotate. Build it horizontally so the rocket can be very long.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/08/2016 03:26 PM
3DS does maraging steel.

http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf (http://www.3dsystems.com/sites/www.3dsystems.com/files/maraging_steel_us_0615_web.pdf)

What else is made with maraging steel? Well, Bob Truax's Sea Dragon rocket. Now all we need is a shipyard sized printer...

check into the work being done in ASIA.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/08/2016 05:09 PM
Case Study: Yet Another Way 3D Printing is Affecting Spacecraft Design
http://3dprint.com/114279/3d-printed-lubricant-cage/

"It’s not all fire and dazzling displays, however. Sometimes it’s ball bearings and lubricant. Some of the most important parts of building a spacecraft are the dullest, but 3D printing technology is lending itself to the mundane, if vital, aspects of aerospace manufacturing just as much as it is to the more glamorous ones.

 Croft worked with ESR to develop two concept designs for cages that would better contain the lubricant in the bearing system. Special attention was paid to the challenges presented by a space environment as the cages were designed."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Johnnyhinbos on 01/09/2016 12:22 AM
Though a bit off topic, it has direct implications for aerospace product development. Boston Dynamics is working towards using additive manufacturing to produce a future leg for its Atlas robot that has fluid plumbing built right into the structure. I can envision this technique used in spacecraft and engine design.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 01/10/2016 12:20 AM
Though a bit off topic, it has direct implications for aerospace product development. Boston Dynamics is working towards using additive manufacturing to produce a future leg for its Atlas robot that has fluid plumbing built right into the structure. I can envision this technique used in spacecraft and engine design.
The Boston Dynamics robots that use legs and arms maybe better for moon or mars. With protective soft shell (clothes) they would be immune to dust getting into moving parts. They can handle more terrain than robots with wheels or tracks, self righting would also be a useful option.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/11/2016 07:00 PM
Audi building 3D printed rover to drive across the moon
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160111-audi-building-3d-printed-rover-to-drive-across-the-moon.html

"In addition to Audi’s metal 3D printing expertise, their 35 years’ experience of creating four-wheel drive systems for some of the most reliable consumer vehicles on the road certainly didn’t hurt either. In order to avoid the worst case scenario, the Part Time Scientists and Audi engineers have developed a special Quattro Drivetrain—based on the same technology Audi uses in its Earth-bound cars—that can detect wheelspin on a shaft and transfer more torque to another axle, ensuring more torque on the ground and minimizing the risk of getting permanently stuck on a slope. So far, the team has tested their “Asimov Rover” in volcanic crater landscapes on the island of Tenerife with very promising results."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBsV2PAaHRo

====================================================
Another article
http://tinyurl.com/jpca2je
The Lunar Quattro Rover: One Small Step for Audi, One Giant Leap for 3D Printing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNCYECynTnQ



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/15/2016 03:37 PM
Circuits from Space! ESA to Develop 3D Printing Breadboard Machine for the ISS
http://tinyurl.com/hjomeod

"Now, instead of 3D printing for outer space, the ESA is hoping to 3D print in outer space, having commissioned four European tech companies to develop an Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) breadboard machine to use within the orbiting International Space Station."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/25/2016 01:57 PM
Open Space Agency Releases First Set of Files for the Open Source, 3D Printed Ultrascope Explorer Plus
http://3dprint.com/116420/open-space-agency-ultrascope/

"has created a network of amateur citizen scientists to supplement the work of the professional space agencies – or even create their own space programs – right from their backyards. At the heart of the collective is the Ultrascope, a robotic telescope, or automated robotic observatory, controlled by a smartphone.

In fact, OSA envisions the Ultrascope and its users playing a large role in NASA’s Asteroid Challenge Lab, which engages citizens to assist in seeking out asteroids that could pose a potential threat to Earth. Think about that for a moment: build yourself an Ultrascope, and you could literally save the world."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJhzVDK4XVU
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/25/2016 02:15 PM
GE Uses Breakthrough New Electron Gun For 3D Printing – 10X’s More Powerful Than Laser Sintering
http://3dprint.com/12262/ge-ebm-3d-printing/

"The turbine blades, which GE will be manufacturing, will consist of an advanced aerospace material called titanium aluminide. The material traditionally is very hard to work with, however, the fact that it is 50% lighter than nickel-based alloys, which are currently used in the production of turbine blades, makes it ideal for use within these particular blades.

 A 3-kilowatt electron gun is used to accelerate electrons which then melt powdered titanium aluminide, or whatever other metal a manufacturer desires. The electron beam gun is an entire order of magnitude (10 times) more powerful than that of lasers you see in typical additive manufacturing machines, allowing for the fabrications of products which are amazingly four times thicker. The speed of production is also incredible, allowing GE to fabricate eight turbine blades in just 72 hours from one machine."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 01/28/2016 04:40 PM
Ok, on the face of it this next post might seem placed in the wrong thread, but its not.
A dirt cheap 3D scanner (and knock offs) will become another game changer.

Apple Goes 3D: iPhone 7 Plus Likely to Have 3D Cameras for Mixed Reality Apps
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/01/27/apple-iphone-7-plus-likely-to-have-3d-cameras-for-mixed-reality/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/01/27/apple-iphone-7-plus-likely-to-have-3d-cameras-for-mixed-reality/)

===========================
Depth-Sensing Cameras Will Soon Turn Every Smartphone into a High-Quality 3D Scanner
http://3dprint.com/117809/depth-sensing-phone-cameras/

"Range imaging time-of-flight cameras are highly advanced LiDar systems that replace the standard point-by-point laser beams with a single light pulse to achieve full spatial awareness."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44vppay5UDc

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 01/29/2016 04:31 PM
GE Uses Breakthrough New Electron Gun For 3D Printing – 10X’s More Powerful Than Laser Sintering
http://3dprint.com/12262/ge-ebm-3d-printing/

"The turbine blades, which GE will be manufacturing, will consist of an advanced aerospace material called titanium aluminide. The material traditionally is very hard to work with, however, the fact that it is 50% lighter than nickel-based alloys, which are currently used in the production of turbine blades, makes it ideal for use within these particular blades.

 A 3-kilowatt electron gun is used to accelerate electrons which then melt powdered titanium aluminide, or whatever other metal a manufacturer desires. The electron beam gun is an entire order of magnitude (10 times) more powerful than that of lasers you see in typical additive manufacturing machines, allowing for the fabrications of products which are amazingly four times thicker. The speed of production is also incredible, allowing GE to fabricate eight turbine blades in just 72 hours from one machine."

I thought the Swedish company Arcam holds the patents on the Electron Beam Melting process. Is GE's technology somehow different from their EBM technology?

Those electrons are very nice for higher resolution work, since their higher mass corresponds to a lower deBroglie wavelength and thus greater precision.


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: e of pi on 01/29/2016 06:45 PM
I thought the Swedish company Arcam holds the patents on the Electron Beam Melting process. Is GE's technology somehow different from their EBM technology?
If you read the GE release (http://www.gereports.com/post/94658699280/this-electron-gun-builds-jet-engines/), you'll see it mentioned they're Arcam machines.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/01/2016 11:21 PM
I've long stressed the quick obsolesce and price reductions in new generations/models/companies getting into this business.   Such is the case with this new SLA printer.  The current standard equipment sells for around $3500 Retail.   This new one claims to do speeds 50X that model and retails for 1500- $2000.


The UNIZ Slash SLA 3D Printer Can Print 50 Times Faster Than the Formlabs Form 2
http://3dprint.com/117623/uniz-slash-sla-3d-printer/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syOFwZ8eYrs
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/02/2016 06:58 PM
Enterprise In Space & Made In Space to Build 3D Printed Orbiter for Student Projects


"Space: the final frontier. This will be the voyage of the NSS Enterprise, an eight-foot-long recoverable spacecraft to be 3D-printed by Made In Space (http://madeinspace.us/). Its one-week to one-month mission: to boldly orbit and return to earth with 100 worldwide student experiments and communicate with student teams using an artificial intelligence, just like the computer aboard the fictional USS Enterprise.


“Fred is our Chief Engineer and has worked on a number of NASA missions,” Shawn continues, “including the Space Shuttle, Space Station, X-33, Atlas, Delta, Pegasus, Taurus, Spitzer Space Telescope, Lunar Prospector, Pluto New Horizons, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Gravity Probe B. He was part of mission control for the first Shuttle flight and has made one flight aboard the NASA Zero-G Aircraft. He’s got an electrical engineering degree and has done graduate work in physics, futures studies, and space systems engineering. And he’s also a NASA encyclopedia.”

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: rocx on 02/03/2016 12:48 PM
That seems like a really stupid way to reach a polar orbit, launching from Cape Canaveral with a huge dogleg...  ;)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/04/2016 07:44 PM
BNNTs: Canada’s NRC Sees Future for Boron Nitride Nanotubes in 3D Printing Due to High Heat Tolerance
http://3dprint.com/118095/bnnts-3d-print-heat-tolerance/

"But that’s about to expand much further, as the National Research Council of Canada furthers their production of a nanotube in boron nitride form. These lightweight structures, known as BNNTs, do not generally conduct electricity, but are of extreme interest to many due to their tubular structure and extremely high tolerance to heat (up to 800° C), withstanding double the temperatures of carbon nanotubes.

Discovered as far back as 1944 by Marvin Cohen, a materials scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, we have not seen BNNTs emerge onto the scene for use in manufacturing until now,"

"With 3D printing, however, it would seem that the conditions for using BNNTs may be a close and suitable match—not so with carbon nanotubes generally, that cannot tolerate the heat involved with melting and liquefying powders. The potential seems enormous however."

Potential components and innovations for BNNTs include:
•Energy harvesting – Because of their ‘piezoelectric properties,’ BNNTs can actually begin to generate a current when under mechanical stress. Automated sensors, motors and other energy generating devices could be created to work under extreme conditions.
•Transparent armor – BNNTs may prove useful to the military for items like shields for both vehicles and soldiers, as well as offering benefit due to their insulation and protection against radiation. The NRC is currently working with the Department of Defense on these concepts.
•Fire-retardant products – This would seem to be a logical idea, especially for production of insulation, packaging, and clothing.
•Eliminating cancerous tumors – Amazingly, researchers have found that with the addition of small BNNT strands to tumors, cancer cells can be zapped. This happens during irreversible electroporation, using electrical pulses that cause cancer cells to die. It is thought that BNNTs may promote this process further in strengthening the electric fields.
•Hydrogen storage – BNNTs may work to store large volumes of hydrogen, and then would be able to offer power for vehicles.
•Desalination of water – Because BNNT material can reject nearly all the salt in a solution, it was reported previously by researchers in Australia that this might be a viable and very effective new way of desalinating.
•Power generation – Because ‘osmotic flow’ between BNNTs produces incredibly strong currents, it’s thought that they may be helpful in working to create clean electricity.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Elmar Moelzer on 02/07/2016 01:07 AM
Seeing that 3D printing is now a reality in many areas of aerospace manufacturing, shouldn't this thread be moved to a different forum section?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/08/2016 06:54 PM
Stratasys Custom Creates New ESD PEKK 3D Printing Material for Use in Space
http://3dprint.com/118719/stratasys-custom-material/ (http://3dprint.com/118719/stratasys-custom-material/)

"In orbit the temperatures will often rapidly shift anywhere from -150°C to +150°C, sometimes within the space of an hour. There is obviously no air flow in orbit, and electrostatic charges can build up very quickly and short out any delicate electronic components if they’re not shielded properly, leaving behind a very expensive piece of space debris. Space, especially in orbit around our planet, is an extreme environment that is incredibly inhospitable to technology. Any spacecraft that is designed for it needs to take that extreme environment into account, and anything that we launch into it needs to have a very high level of reliability."

Stratasys was asked by the design community for spacecraft and other launch vehicles to develop new materials that help them address the environmental conditions in space, and protect the delicate electronics in their satellites from the dangers of extreme temperatures and the risks of electrostatic discharge.

What they ended up with is a thermoplastic material called ESD PEKK (dissipative polyetherketoneketone) that combines the electrostatic dissipative properties of one of their specialty materials ABS-ESD7 with the high durability and heat resistance of their ULTEM 9085 (http://3dprint.com/tag/ultem-9085/) material. To top it off they included the chemical resistance of PEKK’s base resin, which offers a new material that will allow for the faster manufacturing of multi-functional production parts and components. The ESD PEKK material is ideally suited to the production of components like avionics boxes or components that provide the satellites with an internal structure.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: mikelepage on 02/11/2016 04:17 AM
Seeing that 3D printing is now a reality in many areas of aerospace manufacturing, shouldn't this thread be moved to a different forum section?

This thread has been covering a number of different topics, some of which are still advanced - 3D printing *in* space, and space manufacturing in general are sure to be huge topics in the future, versus the now well established practice of using 3D printing to create parts for aerospace.

Personally I think 3D printing should have its own section, but I may be somewhat biased.  I've already learnt that saying "I work in 3D printing" is like saying "I use computers" (immediate followup question: "for what?")
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/11/2016 01:14 PM
Seeing that 3D printing is now a reality in many areas of aerospace manufacturing, shouldn't this thread be moved to a different forum section?

This thread has been covering a number of different topics, some of which are still advanced - 3D printing *in* space, and space manufacturing in general are sure to be huge topics in the future, versus the now well established practice of using 3D printing to create parts for aerospace.

Personally I think 3D printing should have its own section, but I may be somewhat biased.  I've already learnt that saying "I work in 3D printing" is like saying "I use computers" (immediate followup question: "for what?")


Yes, I use this comparison 3D Printing is like when the home computer process happened.  Many that grew up during that time can understand the fast pace of change.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/12/2016 07:46 PM
French Researchers Make New Strides in Engineering Acoustic Absorption, Soon to 3D Print Metasurfaces
http://3dprint.com/119606/acoustic-absorption-research/

It’s hoped that with 3D printing, finally some of the obstacles in absorbing acoustic waves will be overcome, while also offering impact on numerous other applications. The general idea is that previously, shock absorbers have been too ungainly, making it difficult for use in realistic applications. Taking this problem and re-working it, the researchers have now designed a coiled-up acoustic metasurface which they will soon be hoping to fabricate via 3D printing, allowing for even further customization and exploration as they are finding that they can achieve total acoustic absorption in very low-frequency ranges.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/13/2016 05:36 PM
This Might Be the Strongest AND Lightest Material Ever Seen in 3D Printing
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/12/66608/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/12/66608/)

Published in the academic journal American Chemical Society (http://pubs.acs.org/), the California-based research team details their fabrication and testing of their graphene composite aerogels (aka 3D-GCA) via DIW 3D printing. The challenge for the team was developing the graphene composite ink to be successfully extrudable, as well as having to modify the 3D printing process in order to ‘accommodate aerogel processing’. What they found after succeeding in creating the graphene aerogel ink, were the “exceptional capacitive retention and power densities” that are found in graphene’s natural state. The team has already showed their success in manufacturing functional 3D printed supercapacitors out of their newly developed graphene-based aerogel.


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Eric Hedman on 02/13/2016 06:06 PM
I just received the Winter 2016 newsletter from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  There were three articles about 3D printing.  Two of these articles were about applications that could definitely apply to space related products.  One article is about topology optimization software that can optimize part designs for weight and strength on how this applies to minimizing material usage which is a definite advantage for space related parts.  A youtube video of the software developed at the university can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwCCMKP8McQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwCCMKP8McQ)

Another article is about using non-traditional manufacturing (3D printing) to create shapes for more efficient heat exchangers.  The link to this is here: http://www.engr.wisc.edu/news/archive/2015/Sept03b.html (http://www.engr.wisc.edu/news/archive/2015/Sept03b.html)

(http://www.engr.wisc.edu/cmsimages/HeatExchanger_V3FrontA_400w.jpg)
(http://www.engr.wisc.edu/cmsimages/printerandbucky-2-400w.jpg)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: sanman on 02/13/2016 10:43 PM
French Researchers Make New Strides in Engineering Acoustic Absorption, Soon to 3D Print Metasurfaces
http://3dprint.com/119606/acoustic-absorption-research/

It’s hoped that with 3D printing, finally some of the obstacles in absorbing acoustic waves will be overcome, while also offering impact on numerous other applications. The general idea is that previously, shock absorbers have been too ungainly, making it difficult for use in realistic applications. Taking this problem and re-working it, the researchers have now designed a coiled-up acoustic metasurface which they will soon be hoping to fabricate via 3D printing, allowing for even further customization and exploration as they are finding that they can achieve total acoustic absorption in very low-frequency ranges.

Hmm, so what could this type of low-frequency acounstic absorption be good for? Sound barriers against highway traffic noise? Could there be a way to absorb the heavy vibrations of a large rocket engine to protect the crew from noise?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/13/2016 10:53 PM
French Researchers Make New Strides in Engineering Acoustic Absorption, Soon to 3D Print Metasurfaces
http://3dprint.com/119606/acoustic-absorption-research/ (http://3dprint.com/119606/acoustic-absorption-research/)

It’s hoped that with 3D printing, finally some of the obstacles in absorbing acoustic waves will be overcome, while also offering impact on numerous other applications. The general idea is that previously, shock absorbers have been too ungainly, making it difficult for use in realistic applications. Taking this problem and re-working it, the researchers have now designed a coiled-up acoustic metasurface which they will soon be hoping to fabricate via 3D printing, allowing for even further customization and exploration as they are finding that they can achieve total acoustic absorption in very low-frequency ranges.

Hmm, so what could this type of low-frequency acounstic absorption be good for? Sound barriers against highway traffic noise? Could there be a way to absorb the heavy vibrations of a large rocket engine to protect the crew from noise?


how about applications within the ISS?

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 02/14/2016 08:33 AM
My understanding is some of the equipment on the ISS like the air handling systems are very noisy.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 02/15/2016 04:55 PM
hmmm. space related? ok... You were standing in from of your station's picture window taking in the spectacular view of earth when a micro-meteroid dashed through and lops your finger off which is then ate by a passing space cootie. what do you do?

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-02-scientists-feasibility-tissue.html

you print another one of course. Now the 200 micron size limit (due to vascularity issues) has been defeated. they can now print full sized organs and tissue.

OK; so it isn't immediately space related but this so important i had to share. ...or you know they could print artificial photosynthetic tissues for a living life support system or something.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Stormbringer on 02/15/2016 05:22 PM
Noise levels on the ISS:  https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Engineering_Acoustics/International_Space_Station_Acoustics_Challenges

Quote
The astronauts of the ISS are exposed to an average noise level of 72dBA for the entire duration of their stay on the ISS, which can last up to six months.

Thats just the average so 50 percent of the ISS exposure is above that and 50 percent is below that)  The NASA recommended maximum "dose" is 60 Dbs.

Astronauts hearing possibly damaged by high noise levels:  https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9379-noisy-iss-may-have-damaged-astronauts-hearing/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/16/2016 02:44 PM
3D Printing Has its Place in Martian Settlements, According to NASA
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/15/3d-printing-in-martian-settlements-nasa/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/15/3d-printing-in-martian-settlements-nasa/)


Facebook video in the article


===============
Linked article
NASA Funds 3D-Bio-Printer Development to Combat Universal Hunger


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/05/22/nasa-funds-3d-bio-printer-development-to-combat-universal-hunger/


"In a fantastic development, the application of additive manufacturing technologies that other 3D printing enthusiasts and myself have long been promoting, NASA has recently awarded a $125,000 grant to further explore and develop the application of 3D printing food for astronauts. Initially aimed at efficient food storage for long-haul space flights, the creator of this project – Anjan Contractor, a Senior Mechanical Engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation (SMRC) in Austin, Texas, USA — hopes this technology could ultimately help the continually exponentially increasing population on Earth."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Robotbeat on 02/16/2016 07:39 PM
It's not the 3D printed food, it's the 3D printer cartridges that are relevant to food shortages on Earth. 3D printing the food just affects the texture.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/16/2016 07:44 PM
NASA’s ICESat-2 To Feature 3D Printed Bracket Supporting ATLAS for Measuring Ice Sheets
http://3dprint.com/119855/nasas-icesat-2-3d-printed-bracket-atlas-data-ice/ (http://3dprint.com/119855/nasas-icesat-2-3d-printed-bracket-atlas-data-ice/)


"Currently, one new 3D printed part is garnering a lot of attention as part of the latest ICESat-2 project (https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/icesat-2/), which aims to examine and measure changes in ice-sheet elevations, sea-ice thicknesses, and global vegetation in Greenland and the Antarctic. The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 will bear a 3D printed bracket that supports the fiber-optic cables for the central instrument of this satellite: the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS).


The dissipative qualities ensure that electrostatically sensitive devices are more protected, due to the reduction of build-up in static electricity. Another interesting benefit is that little ‘outgassing’ is experienced with PEKK (think about the ‘new car’ smell as a good example of a symptom of this), again protecting instruments in helping to eliminate condensation on crucial devices.


This second ICESat mission is different in that for the first one, only a single laser was employed. ICESat-2 offers incredible new innovation, allowing for a green-light laser to split into six beams, arranged in three pairs, firing continuously at a rapid 10,000 pulses per second toward Earth—and offering much better data samples. Higher speed and higher resolution will mean much better performance and results from this study, due to the innovations and ‘dense crosstrack samples’ offered with ATLAS."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/16/2016 09:21 PM
It's not the 3D printed food, it's the 3D printer cartridges that are relevant to food shortages on Earth. 3D printing the food just affects the texture.

now, now a little thing like consumables isn't on the agenda yet :D


=================================================
2nd article this time with a video.....you tax money paid for it.


http://3dprint.com/121430/3d-printed-space-food/ (http://3dprint.com/121430/3d-printed-space-food/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6WzyUgbT5A (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6WzyUgbT5A)


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/17/2016 02:33 PM
How about upgrading this (dirt cheap) design.  A "human" touch on Mars?
Build Your Own 3D Printed Robotic Hand in Less than an Hour
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/16/build-your-own-3d-printed-robotic-hand-in-less-than-an-hour/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/02/16/build-your-own-3d-printed-robotic-hand-in-less-than-an-hour/)


"Now, the UK-based Open Bionics is ready to bring their designs to the masses with their first open source 3D printed robotic hand kit.


With the .STLs uploaded to Instructables, Thingiverse, Youmagine, and their own site (http://www.openbionics.com/downloads/), along with tutorials, instructions, and a bill of materials, the ‘Ada Hand’ is a completely open source kit that allows anyone to 3D print and build their own robotic hand. In total, the parts to build the device cost around £500, a fraction of the tens of thousands of dollars required to purchase a robotic hand from a manufacturer.  While it may take about 24 hours to print, Open Bionics says that it should take less than an hour to build it!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8QUceVSLWg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8QUceVSLWg)


====================================
I saw this design in operation last year, and they have improved on it under an open source model.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6PER99YK98
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: R7 on 02/20/2016 07:28 AM
(No oven big enough to shove the entire tank into).


Not needed, will be bypassed in the near future.
http://www.nmc.ctc.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=projects.details&projectID=288


I don't have the linkage but somewhere in Asia they are using Additive for cargo ships.  Think liberty ships of WWII  :P

Any info about the material properties these printers output? The aluminium and steel planned for Sea Dragon were top of the line in strength.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/21/2016 05:17 PM
(No oven big enough to shove the entire tank into).


Not needed, will be bypassed in the near future.
http://www.nmc.ctc.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=projects.details&projectID=288 (http://www.nmc.ctc.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=projects.details&projectID=288)


I don't have the linkage but somewhere in Asia they are using Additive for cargo ships.  Think liberty ships of WWII  :P

Any info about the material properties these printers output? The aluminium and steel planned for Sea Dragon were top of the line in strength.

Wide open question to answer ......let me try.


Strength of materials, almost unlimited.  What can you engineer, and what can you afford?
This is all brand new technology. Various new generation equipment comes out every day, obsoleting the last generation.  So you might want to read this thread and review the various processes. As an example (in metal) One system out allows you to for mix 3 different metals on the fly, layer by layer.  You may also embed finished parts within the build for greater strength.

 
Believe the real question you want to review .  What can the new tools do for a 1960's design/concept?
A very good example.
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1175892#msg1175892 (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1175892#msg1175892)
The scanners, software, and process in this example are now obsolete.   
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/21/2016 05:20 PM
HoloLens Beams NASA Scientist to Mars at TED2016
http://tinyurl.com/jpk8ale

"At the auditorium in Vancouver, NASA’s Jeff Norris, of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, appeared on stage.  Though Norris was physically across the street from the event, Kipman could see, through his mixed reality headset, a “hologram” of Norris walking and talking in front of him and, beneath his feet, the surface of the Red Planet. Norris said to the TED audience, “I’m actually in three places. I’m standing in a room across the street, while I’m standing on the stage with you, while I’m standing on Mars a hundred million miles away.”

The HoloLens utilizes a variety of sensors, a fish-eye lens, and what Microsoft refers to as a “holographic processing unit” to power its device. Altogether, this allows the HoloLens to perform spatial mapping at five frames per second.  While Microsoft emphasizes the new digital objects with which you’ll be able to populate your environment, there are implications for 3D printing abound.  You may be able to 3D scan items around you to modify them virtually before 3D printing them into reality."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/21/2016 05:35 PM
Cambits: The 3D Printed Camera You Can Reconfigure Yourself
http://tinyurl.com/zardnyp (http://tinyurl.com/zardnyp)

"With the help of 3D printing technology, that’s exactly what Columbia Engineering’s (http://engineering.columbia.edu/) Computer Science Professor Shree Nayar and Ricoh Corporation (https://www.ricoh-usa.com/) scientist Makoto Odamaki have joined together to do. Their DIY modular imaging system is called Cambits, which is composed of five different camera components, each of which is embedded into a 3D printed building block and connectable with one another.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEFAc3e7Oz4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEFAc3e7Oz4)

Each 3D printed block is easily configurable, physically connecting through magnets and electrically connecting by spring-loaded pins, which carry the power source, data, and control signals throughout each block. Within each Cambit block is a circuit board that was designed by Odamaki, including a microcontroller, an upstream interface, and a downstream interface, allowing control signals to travel in both directions."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/23/2016 06:50 PM
Binghamton Engineer Uses $500,000 Grant for Redefining 3D Printing via Electrospray
http://3dprint.com/119474/electrospraying-engineer-grant/ (http://3dprint.com/119474/electrospraying-engineer-grant/)

"With an eye on transforming manufacturing even further, Chiarot is examining the use of 3D printing on a finer scale than usual, which may offer further change in terms of how we make energy, offer healthcare, and even in dealing with security. The grant, funded by the National Science Foundation (http://www.nsf.gov/), centers around, not surprisingly, the further elimination of subtractive processes, focusing on printing electronics with a technique he refers to as electrospraying.


Further ambitions are to translate his technique onto a variety of objects aside from the flat plastic and glass substrates he normally works with. With this type of extrusion, he foresees it being used for affordable, small-batch production—and perhaps even in remote locations like space. "
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/23/2016 06:54 PM
Nano Dimension and Tel Aviv University Developing a 3D Printable Nickel Nano Ink
http://3dprint.com/121079/nanoparticle-nickel-ink/ (http://3dprint.com/121079/nanoparticle-nickel-ink/)

"Nickel also acts as a barrier against oxidation, which could greatly help in the production of printable circuit boards (PCBs). Protection from oxidation is critical, particularly in the production of elements made with nano-metric corrosive metals, which oxidize instantly as soon as they are exposed to air."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/24/2016 03:43 PM
Researchers Develop Mathematical Optimization Process to 3D Print the “Impossible”
http://tinyurl.com/h993rjy

"The automated software used by the research team produced a number of compelling objects that not only looked unique, but also functioned in ways that have never been seen before. The optimization process produced a uniquely calculated inner structure for their plastic fish model, which allows the fish to float just below the water surface. There was also a spinning top with a turtle, which was generated to have a balanced spin, despite the misleading physical properties of its external shape. Another unique design created by their mathematical optimization process (which you can view in the video below) was a 3D printed crooked bottle that tipped over when filled with water, but remained up right when filled with alcohol."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6o8w1BDajg

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/25/2016 07:30 PM
3D Printing of Levitating Objects Patented by Boeing
http://tinyurl.com/hz2kjer

"Now, you may be wondering what the actual benefits of a levitating 3D printing processes may be in space, besides sounding really awesome. As a matter of fact, there are quite a few… Since the ‘nugget’ is held up by magnetic fields, the printers can deposit materials on either side of the base, unlike conventional 3D printers that use bottom-up printing. These magnetic fields also allow the 3D printed ‘nugget’ to be rotated in any direction, which allows for much more complex shapes and features within the 3D printed object. Another distinct advantage of Boeing’s new 3D printing technology is that, since it uses multiple 3D printers at once, the print speed is also greatly increased."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNUQ8EpHC-g
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/25/2016 07:38 PM

3D Printing Brings Fresh Brewed Coffee to the ISS
http://tinyurl.com/jl8hqm4 (http://tinyurl.com/jl8hqm4)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L___xygPC94 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L___xygPC94)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Eric Hedman on 02/26/2016 04:07 AM
The following I guess could be space related in that children will now have some skills in 3D printing before they get to college and become engineers.  This is Mattel's new 3D printer to make toys and accessories for toys:

http://www.pocket-lint.com/review/136836-mattel-thingmaker-preview-3d-printing-for-the-minecraft-generation (http://www.pocket-lint.com/review/136836-mattel-thingmaker-preview-3d-printing-for-the-minecraft-generation)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/26/2016 01:00 PM
New Hyproline System Capable of High-Speed Mass Customization of Metal 3D Printed Parts
http://tinyurl.com/hzsqjx9 (http://tinyurl.com/hzsqjx9)

"The result is an automated assembly line that can produce a variety of custom parts at high speed.


In this case, the Hyproline machine uses 100 build platforms, a 3D scanner, metal deposition, and laser machining to produce 100 separate parts at speeds of 1-2 m/s. Once printed, the parts are machined and polished and removed from the printbed automatically. Parts can be produced with 20 μm resolution from steel, copper, and titanium and, due to the ability to laser machine the metal, the surface roughness can be as fine as 0.5μm. A Micro-Epsilon Scancontrol laser line scanner also allows the machine to perform in-process quality control, which relies on CADfix software from International TechneGroup Limited (ITI) (http://www.iti-global.com/cadfix) in the UK to inspect and analyze products, matching prints against their CAD files."


The Video is worth the watch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsSyGph33Hk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsSyGph33Hk)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/26/2016 01:16 PM
Researchers 3D Print Large-Scale Factory for Nano-Scale Particles
http://tinyurl.com/z93pqw4

"With the power to use unique materials for specialty applications, nanoparticles open up entirely new physical properties for the objects around us.  In 3D printing, we’ve often seen these particles, 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, mixed into conductive inks for electronics 3D printing, particularly by companies like Voxel8 and Nano Dimension. One big issue with these tiny materials, however, is the inability to scale up production for widespread use.


The cost is associated with the time it takes for a technician to mix the materials up in a lab by hand, using flasks and beakers.  To break this model, the team turned to microfluidics, 3D printing tubes 250 micrometers in diameter and assembled in a parallel network of four tubes.  They then ran two nonmixing fluids through the network, which, due to their non-mixing nature, had to compete to exit openings in the setup. This resulted in the formation of tiny droplets that forced the materials to mix together via chemical reaction and create nanoparticles.  Because each 3D printed tube can create millions of identical droplets, Brutchey and Malmstadt had essentially built a microfluidics factory."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5rFL4MIfac



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 02/26/2016 09:19 PM
Fraunhofer Invents New Method for 3D Screen Printing of Metals
http://3dprint.com/121541/fraunhofer-3d-screen-printing/ (http://3dprint.com/121541/fraunhofer-3d-screen-printing/)

"More and more, 3D printing is shaping into a “state of mind” rather than a technology, with new approaches appearing that cannot be replaced by any other approach. The number of technologies is multiplying rather than consolidating into a few dominate processes and that is because 3D printing is not just a new manufacturing technology but rather an entirely new way of making things, all things.


Screen printing works with a paste (a “powder/binder slurry”) made up of metallic powders. These can be both atomized, thus perfectly spherical, but also dendritical, which means that they are uneven and yet combine with each other in the paste material. Available materials include stainless steel, copper, titanium, hard metals, PM light alloys and even PM sintered metals. The printable mass goes through an “automated mask generated from a the CAD file” for layer on layer printing.


Examples of applications span across all fields where AM is generally implemented, including aerospace, energy management, precision mechanical engineering, electronics and automotive. These include fuel cell components, catalyst carriers, high precision lightweight construction, micro mechanics, heat exchangers and insulation, electrodes, bio­implants and even jewelry."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/01/2016 12:50 PM
Impossible Objects Reveals CBAM Carbon Fiber Composite 3D Printing
http://tinyurl.com/jt9zsfn (http://tinyurl.com/jt9zsfn)

"Impossible Objects uses a technique that almost resembles a combination of the Selective Deposition Lamination technology of Mcor and inkjet 3D printing.  A combination of additive and subtractive manufacturing, the process sees plastic inkjetted onto sheets of fabric – such as silk, polyester, Kevlar, cotton or carbon fiber – into the desired shape.  The shapes are then cut out and stacked atop one another, before they are baked in an oven and fused together.  Then, prints are sandblasted clean, removing excess material and revealing the final part"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xBxierGRrE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xBxierGRrE)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/01/2016 01:15 PM
NASA and Made In Space are Building a Multi-Armed 3D Printing Space Robot Named Archinaut
http://3dprint.com/121831/nasa-made-in-space-archinaut/ (http://3dprint.com/121831/nasa-made-in-space-archinaut/)

"The two-year-long, $20 million NASA project will culminate in a live, orbital demonstration of Archinaut’s ability to create large, complex structures sometime in 2018. The project is officially known as Versatile In-Space Robotic Precision Manufacturing and Assembly System. It was selected as one of several projects chosen by NASA as part of their Tipping Points campaign (http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-announces-opportunities-to-advance-tipping-point-and-emerging-space-technologies), a program to fund prototypes of space technologies that could potentially lead to significant government and commercial applications. The project was originally selected back in November 2015 as one of three projects, each with a focus on the robotic manufacturing and assembly of in-orbit spacecraft and structures."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 03/01/2016 05:42 PM
Impossible Objects Reveals CBAM Carbon Fiber Composite 3D Printing
A combination of additive and subtractive manufacturing, the process sees plastic inkjetted onto sheets of fabric – such as silk, polyester, Kevlar, cotton or carbon fiber – into the desired shape.  The shapes are then cut out and stacked atop one another, before they are baked in an oven and fused together.

Same technique as MCOR (http://mcortechnologies.com/resources/gallery/)'s 2d-printed, 3d paper models, but with structural materials.

Seems like an obvious development. (In a forehead-slapping, "why didn't I think of that", 20-20 hindsight way.)

[Edit: Good way to mix materials too. Doesn't solve the problem with composites having a preferred strength-direction. And hence the single-plane-of-strength will have issues with certain designs, compared to traditional moulding where the layering follows the shape of the part; so limited use in high-end aerospace. Still, massive savings in labour; so certainly massive savings in early development, before you pin down the design and invest millions in the final production moulds.]
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/02/2016 03:56 PM
SunSat & Enterprise In Space Join for Space-Based Solar Power & 3D Printed Spacecraft
http://tinyurl.com/jpnsc9p (http://tinyurl.com/jpnsc9p)

"Open to students and professionals worldwide, the SunSat Design Competition encourages teams to create designs for satellites that could actually collect energy in space for delivery back to Earth. This concept of space-based solar power (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space-based_solar_power) was conceived of in the 1970s as a means of capturing clean power from the sun from outside of Earth’s atmosphere, without the energy loss that occurs when collecting solar energy back on Earth. Since 2013, the Competition has contributed over $45,000 in funding to winning teams worldwide, increasing awareness around this fascinating source of renewable energy."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcSmLX3TzIQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcSmLX3TzIQ)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/02/2016 04:01 PM
SunSat & Enterprise In Space Join for Space-Based Solar Power & 3D Printed Spacecraft
http://tinyurl.com/jpnsc9p (http://tinyurl.com/jpnsc9p)

"Open to students and professionals worldwide, the SunSat Design Competition encourages teams to create designs for satellites that could actually collect energy in space for delivery back to Earth. This concept of space-based solar power (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space-based_solar_power) was conceived of in the 1970s as a means of capturing clean power from the sun from outside of Earth’s atmosphere, without the energy loss that occurs when collecting solar energy back on Earth. Since 2013, the Competition has contributed over $45,000 in funding to winning teams worldwide, increasing awareness around this fascinating source of renewable energy."




I can just imagine the wheels turning with a few on NSF once they see this video.  With some other uses for the platforms. 
One of my concepts that's on NSF would work well with this project.  The starting concept....


http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=37951.0


Edit: add linkage
Title: Re: Ultralight solar cells from MIT
Post by: TrevorMonty on 03/02/2016 04:25 PM
Deleted.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/03/2016 04:19 PM
Orion Space Capsule to Be 3D Scanned & 3D Printed for RAPID 2016
http://tinyurl.com/zulsrnq (http://tinyurl.com/zulsrnq)

"Announced at RAPID 2016 this week, the event’s host, SME (http://www.sme.org/), along with Lockheed Martin, FARO Technologies, Inc., Direct Dimensions, Inc., Met-L-Flo, Inc., Florida Institute of Technology and Cincinnati Inc. have begun 3D scanning the Orion crew module to 3D print 150 copies of this historic pod.


Technologies like 3D printing and 3D scanning are thought to play an integral part in the NewSpace industry, making the idea to 3D scan and print replicas of this next generation vehicle a natural one.


To create the replicas, scanner manufacturer Faro performed a 3D laser scan of an Orion spacecraft model.  Direct Dimensions then prepped the file for 3D printing by Met-L-Flo, who will, in turn, 3D print 150 small-scale replicas to be given away at RAPID 2016. Cincinnati Inc., known for the technology behind the 3D printed Local Motors cars, will 3D print a larger scale model to be assembled on stage at Rapid, as well. Florida Tech students will finally educate attendees on 3D printing and the project overall."

======================
2nd Article
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160302-3d-tech-companies-join-forces-to-3d-scan-and-3d-print-150-orion-spacecraft-replicas.html


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/03/2016 08:28 PM
Ultra-High Resolution 3D Printing at the Micro-Scale with Nanoscribe
http://3dprint.com/122337/nanoscribe-microscale-printing/ (http://3dprint.com/122337/nanoscribe-microscale-printing/)

"The Nanoscribe technology is essentially a micro-scale laser that 3D prints three dimensional constructs, almost like a very small pen, only it writes in photosensitive material at the nanoscale. The process is very similar to direct laser writing but the Nanoscribe process is capable of much more detail and precision. Primarily because of the near infrared laser, which is pulsed by the femtosecond so polymerization only occurs at the targeted area. Due to this pulsing, the photoreactive materials will not also harden along the entire path of the laser, providing an astronomical jump in fine detail and precision.


Nanoscribe is a world leader in the development and manufacturing of 3D printing technology that is capable of working at the nano, micro, and mesoscale. Their two-photon polymerization 3D printers are used throughout the research and scientific community, as well as manufacturing and industrial fabrication companies of all kinds. Their technology is regularly used to fabricate micro-optical components and microfluidic elements like filters or mixers on microfluidic chips.'


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/03/2016 08:34 PM
Russians Sending 3D Printed CubeSat Nanosatellite to ISS on March 31, Will Orbit for Six Months
http://3dprint.com/122279/3d-printed-nanosatellite-iss/ (http://3dprint.com/122279/3d-printed-nanosatellite-iss/)

“This is the first 3D-printed space probe ever built. Further advancement of this technology will eventually enable the mass-scale production of such small satellites,”


These sources say that the nanosatellite is built from Roscosmos-approved materials, and the 3D printed CubeSat is working to protect another first–a zirconium-ceramic battery. With the threat of destructive temperature fluctuations, numerous sensors will be employed to constantly measure the temperatures of chipboards and batteries, as well as monitoring the electric components onboard.


On March 31, the nanosatellite is scheduled to be ferried by a Progress MS-2 rocket to the ISS. From there, it will be put into a 400 kilometer orbit by the ISS crew during a spacewalk. The 300mm X 100mm X 100mm cube, which will hold everything required of the research satellite, will then be in orbit for six months."

More on this project can be found (turn translator on)
http://news.tpu.ru/news/2016/02/02/24769/

Edit add photo
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/04/2016 03:12 PM
SME and 3D Technology Companies 3D Scan Orion Crew Module and Model,  Will Print Miniature Replicas - See more at:
http://www.sme.org/SME-and-3D-Technology-Companies-3D-Scan-Orion-Crew-Module-and-Model-Will-Print-Miniature-Replicas/#sthash.5pg5XUGu.dpuf (http://www.sme.org/SME-and-3D-Technology-Companies-3D-Scan-Orion-Crew-Module-and-Model-Will-Print-Miniature-Replicas/#sthash.5pg5XUGu.dpuf)

"Today the companies 3D scanned a model of the Orion spacecraft on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. 

"FARO conducted a 3D laser scan of an Orion spacecraft model, while Direct Dimensions will be responsible for the file that is prepared and then 3D printed by Met-L-Flo. Met-L-Flo will print approximately 150 small-scale replicas of the Orion spacecraft to be displayed and used as giveaways at SME’s 3D technology event, RAPID. Students from Florida Tech participated in the scan and discussed how the next generation of manufacturing professionals are being educated on advanced manufacturing technology and applications. 

Cincinnati Inc. will be using their Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology to print an Orion replica in several large pieces and assemble onsite at RAPID 2016."
=============================
Another article
RAPID 2016 Will Feature Live 3D Printing and Assembly of Large-Scale Orion Module Replica
http://3dprint.com/122891/rapid-2016-orion-module/


Edit: add 2nd article and pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/04/2016 07:38 PM
ESA Meets Again to Discuss Moon Colonization—3D Printing & Robotics Will Be Key
http://3dprint.com/122447/esa-moon-colonization-3d-printing-robotics/ (http://3dprint.com/122447/esa-moon-colonization-3d-printing-robotics/)

"Now, the ESA has brought in more resources to expound on moon colonization via teamwork between robots and humans. While it may seem that moon talk is relegated to lower levels these days as we’re all hyped up about getting to Mars–post mass world viewings of The Martian–this is a very real plan, and considering how much time is being spent talking about colonization and building there, it’s probably safe to consider it might happen fairly soon.


This was all outlined recently at the European Space Research and Technology Center (http://www.esa.int/) in Noordwijk, Netherlands, during a symposium titled ‘Moon 2020-2030 – A New Era of Coordinated Human and Robotic Exploration (http://spaceflight.esa.int/humanrobotics/about/).’ The new Director General of the ESA (http://3dprint.com/23517/esa-3d-printing-on-mood/), Jan Woerner, led in explaining the vision they foresee for colonizing the Moon, we well as using it as something like a staging platform for other missions.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/09/2016 02:07 AM
http://tinyurl.com/jpg83as (http://tinyurl.com/jpg83as)
article with a couple things of interest.


by a number of speakers and companies at this year’s event. This includes Tim Geurtjens of MX3D (http://mx3d.com/), who will be discussing their project to 3D print a steel bridge in Amsterdam (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/06/14/mx3d-wants-buy-3d-printed-bridge-amsterdam/); Bastian Schaefer of Airbus (http://www.airbus.com/), the aerospace giant that is utilizing 3D printing technology on a daily basis (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/01/04/airbus-is-ready-for-3d-printing-industrialization-in-2016-peter-sander-reveals/); fashion (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/10/05/starers-beware-this-3d-printed-garment-knows-when-youre-looking-at-it/) and architectural designer
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/09/2016 06:15 PM
How about this for tests on the ISS?


“Person-on-a-Chip” Tech Results in Working 3D Heart & Liver
http://tinyurl.com/hzn3dob

"As with previous developments in bioprinting, the AngioChip would help the pharmaceutical industry ween off of animal testing and get drugs to market more quickly.  With the ability to connect different organ tissues, however, they’re able to expand upon other initiatives to see how these drugs affect the interactions between organs. In the future, Radisic believes that the AngioChip could involve into complete tissues for implantation, to repair damaged organs with cells from a patient’s own body. "



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/11/2016 04:38 PM
Autodesk Answers 3D Printing’s Suckiness with Project Escher Factory-in-a-Box
http://tinyurl.com/hyc33av (http://tinyurl.com/hyc33av)


"Project Escher is a pretty massive machine, figuratively and literally.  Made up of an assembly line of toolheads, the system is designed to work on large objects and quick speeds.  It does this through a unique software developed by Autodesk to allow each toolhead to work on different parts of an object at the same time. This process of “collaborative fabrication”, as Autodesk 3D Printing Research Scientist Andreas Bastian calls it, sees one computer, dubbed “The Conductor”, orchestrate a symphony of motion on the workbed through the firm’s Conductive Player software architecture."



https://vimeo.com/157523884
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/11/2016 07:48 PM
HP Will Start Shipping Their Multi Jet 3D Printer This Year, Presenting it at SXSW
http://3dprint.com/123793/hp-3d-printer-ship-this-year/ (http://3dprint.com/123793/hp-3d-printer-ship-this-year/)

"It has been almost two years (http://3dprint.com/21454/hp-3d-printer/) since HP announced that they were getting into the 3D printer business, and they have been uncharacteristically silent on the matter ever since. They’ve released a lot of general information about the printer, some basic tech details and shown a handful of 3D printed objects, but so far they have been quite cagey about going into details. But in an interview with Computer World (http://www.computerworld.com/article/3042983/3d-printing/hps-industrial-3d-printer-on-track-to-ship-this-year.html), HP’s president of 3D printing Steve Nigro

According to Nigro, the first iteration of HP’s industrial 3D printer will be slightly larger than a washing machine or an oven. It 3D prints parts ten times faster than current technology and production costs are up to 50% less. He said that an object that takes a typical FDM 3D printer 83 hours to complete or a selective laser sintering process 30 hours to complete will take the HP printer 3 hours. The final retail cost will range between $100,000 and $1,000,000. Nigro did not give any explanation for the price difference, clarify if that was simply an estimate, or if there would be different models that would offer different features."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUkvC59vidw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUkvC59vidw)
-----------
HP Inc.’s MultiJet Fusion 3D Printer Will Be Open Platform and Encourage Third Party Materials Development

http://3dprint.com/125912/hp-3d-printer-open-platform/


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/13/2016 01:47 PM
REAL 2016: Airbus & Autodesk Demonstrate Why Generative Design Equals Efficient Design
http://tinyurl.com/h4ajc96 (http://tinyurl.com/h4ajc96)

"Not many industries have felt the force of 3D printing technology quite like the aerospace industry. And outside of, maybe, General Electric, no company has utilized 3D printing as much as aerospace giant Airbus (http://www.airbus.com/). During REAL 2016, I had the pleasure of sitting in on a keynote by Bastian Schäfer, Innovation Manager at Airbus, and David Benjamin, head of Autodesk Research’s The Living (https://www.autodeskresearch.com/groups/living) studio. Together, they discussed how computer generative design helps lead to efficient design. Up on the REAL Talk stage, Schaefer detailed the algorithm-driven process undertaken by Airbus and Autodesk to create a bionic partition for the Airbus A320.

The design itself was composed of the overall macro-structure and the inner micro-structure. In order to increase stability and decrease weight, a lattice was generated within the outer rod design, a complex structure that could only be made with 3D printing technology. “This can only be achieved through 3D printing,” said Schafer. “We put a lot of thought into the lattice, which is good in terms of optimization and also good in terms of manufacturing at the same time. One of our objectives was to create structures which do not require any additional supports inside the rod.” For material, Airbus turned to unique Scalmalloy (http://www.apworks.de/en/scalmalloy/) metal-based powder, produced by their subsidiary APWorks (http://www.apworks.de/en). The Scalmalloy was a perfect fit for the project, since it has the lightweight properties of aluminum, but the toughness and material stability of titanium."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/16/2016 01:47 PM
From Carbon to Concrete: Pollution Converted into 3D Printing Feedstock for Construction
http://tinyurl.com/jsm2zlv (http://tinyurl.com/jsm2zlv)


https://vimeo.com/157380738

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 03/16/2016 03:13 PM
From Carbon to Concrete: Pollution Converted into 3D Printing Feedstock for Construction
http://tinyurl.com/jsm2zlv

Please don't use tinyurl or other url-hiders. People want to know what they are clicking on. I know your posts and trust you not to link somewhere nasty, but it's a bad practice.

If the url is too long, use url tags to shorten it. Ie, {url=http://www.google.com.au/search?&q=bbcode}alt-text{/url}. (Obviously with square brackets [] instead of braces {}.)

Eg,
From Carbon to Concrete (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/15/from-carbon-to-concrete-pollution-converted-into-3d-printing-stock/?utm_source=3D+Printing+Industry+Update&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=f3f45f2041-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_695d5c73dc-f3f45f2041-64388981)

---

Anyway, re: the article. Kind of information empty. Lot of poncing on about "3D printing" and "capturing CO2", but no details about how they actually turn CO2 gas into a building material, what the material is, and how they 3D print that material. Both the article and the 3+ minute video consisted of them paraphrasing "we capture CO2 from power plants and (somehow) 3D print concrete" over and over and over. Am disappoint.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/16/2016 07:07 PM
From Carbon to Concrete: Pollution Converted into 3D Printing Feedstock for Construction
http://tinyurl.com/jsm2zlv (http://tinyurl.com/jsm2zlv)

Please don't use tinyurl or other url-hiders. People want to know what they are clicking on. I know your posts and trust you not to link somewhere nasty, but it's a bad practice.

If the url is too long, use url tags to shorten it. Ie, {url=http://www.google.com.au/search?&q=bbcode}alt-text{/url}. (Obviously with square brackets [] instead of braces {}.)

Eg,
From Carbon to Concrete (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/15/from-carbon-to-concrete-pollution-converted-into-3d-printing-stock/?utm_source=3D+Printing+Industry+Update&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=f3f45f2041-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_695d5c73dc-f3f45f2041-64388981)

---

Anyway, re: the article. Kind of information empty. Lot of poncing on about "3D printing" and "capturing CO2", but no details about how they actually turn CO2 gas into a building material, what the material is, and how they 3D print that material. Both the article and the 3+ minute video consisted of them paraphrasing "we capture CO2 from power plants and (somehow) 3D print concrete" over and over and over. Am disappoint.


thanks for the input...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/17/2016 01:12 PM
ESA Experiments with 3D Printing Antennas for Space


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/16/esa-experiments-with-3d-printing-antennas-for-space/?utm_source=3D+Printing+Industry+Update&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=c7e9288382-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_695d5c73dc-c7e9288382-64388981 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/16/esa-experiments-with-3d-printing-antennas-for-space/?utm_source=3D+Printing+Industry+Update&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=c7e9288382-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_695d5c73dc-c7e9288382-64388981)


“Although the surface finish is rougher than for a traditionally manufactured antenna, we’re very happy with the resulting performance. We have a very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. Making a simulation based on a complete 3D model of the antenna leads to a significant increase in its accuracy. By using this same model to 3D print it in a single piece, any source of assembly misalignments and errors are removed, enabling such excellent results.”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/18/2016 12:24 AM
Why a NASA Grant?

3D Print Me a (Space) Pizza! A Few Questions For: BeeHex
http://3dprint.com/124802/a-few-questions-for-beehex/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/18/2016 06:45 PM
New Material HSHT

Stronger, Tougher, Better: MarkForged Introduces New and Improved Fiberglass Material
http://3dprint.com/124973/markforged-fiberglass-material/ (http://3dprint.com/124973/markforged-fiberglass-material/)


"It possesses a heat deflection point of 140°C (284°F), 30 percent higher than MarkForged’s standard fiberglass material.
This heat tolerance makes HSHT fiberglass ideal for so-called “under hood” applications. It’s hot under the hood of the car, and the need for materials that are strong, heat-tolerant and lightweight has made the manufacture of under-hood automobile (and aerospace) components tricky and expensive at times. "
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/21/2016 05:09 PM
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1157008#msg1157008    (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1157008#msg1157008Another)


Another (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1157008#msg1157008Another) Optomec technology

The Optomec Aerosol Jet 5X Five Axis Electronics 3D Printer is a Hit with the Internet of Things
http://3dprint.com/125166/optomec-aerosol-jet-5x/ (http://3dprint.com/125166/optomec-aerosol-jet-5x/)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1YqgEGrbPQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1YqgEGrbPQ)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/22/2016 02:50 PM
Made In Space Preps to Send First Commercial 3D Printer to ISS


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/21/made-in-space-preps-to-send-first-commercial-3d-printer-to-iss/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/21/made-in-space-preps-to-send-first-commercial-3d-printer-to-iss/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


Printed components from the original Zero-G printer.The going rate for AMF orders is somewhere between $6,000 and $30,000, according to Pitman, though educational orders receive discounts. While this may be an intimidating price point for your typical 3D Hubs order, it’s pretty reasonable when you consider that this is the first commercial 3D printing service in space.  NASA states (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/background/facts/astp.html_prt.htm) that it costs $10,000 to send a pound of payload in Earth orbit. This endeavor, along with Made In Space’s Archinaut project for 3D printing large-scale structures in space, is designed to enable manufacturing in space itself, to lighten the load for rockets on Earth. In addition to 3D printing parts for customers on Earth, however, the AMF could allow members of the ISS to replace and repair broken components, without the wait and cost associated with sending new items aboard a cargo ship.

If you’re looking to 3D print your own goodies aboard the ISS, Made In Space has a “Print Request Form” that you can fill out here (http://www.madeinspace.us/projects/amf/).  At the moment, it sounds as though only polymers may be printed, but my fingers are crossed for metals in the future.


Other relevant specs are listed below: Print Volume 18cm long x 14 cm wide x 10cm tall Material ABS, HDPE, PEI/PC Resolution* 0.1 – 0.44 mm Height Resolution Down to 75 micron layer height Maximum Wall Thickness 1 mm Overhangs Up to 3 inches Threaded holes>M10

New 3D Printer Heads to the ISS Today; Self-Sustainability in Space Continues to Expand
http://3dprint.com/125573/new-3d-printer-heads-to-iss/


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/22/2016 05:27 PM
US Navy’s Trident II D5 Missile Successfully Launches with 3D Printed Component from Lockheed Martin
http://3dprint.com/125470/navy-trident-missile-launch/ (http://3dprint.com/125470/navy-trident-missile-launch/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/25/2016 01:50 PM
Atlas V Rocket Soars with 3D Printed Parts

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/24/atlas-v-rocket-soars-with-3d-printed-parts/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9Z9xAvAofQ
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/25/2016 02:17 PM
Polymagnets: Showing Us the Possibility of 3D Printing Magnetic Fields

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/24/polymagnets-showing-us-the-possibility-of-3d-printing-magnetic-fields/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29


"In order to bring electromagnetism into the same conversation as 3D printing technology, the team behind Polymagnets have been working towards developing a system to arrange “maxes” (units of magnetic field). In the same manner that pixels are virtual units and voxels are physical units, the company has found that, by accurately arranging these ‘maxes’, they could achieve high precision control of magnetic fields. Polymagnet engineered their own machines that function similarly to your average 3D printer, but instead of using a print bed, these ‘maxes’ are arranged directly onto a magnet.


The ‘maxels’ themselves are aligned onto a 2D surface, much like that way electronics are currently 3D printed, but produce complex and precise 3D behavior, which is why Polymagnet can be considered an innovator in the 3D printing technology industry."


https://vimeo.com/106604885

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/25/2016 05:25 PM
PV Nano Cell and Their Sicrys Conductive Inks are Bringing Us One Step Closer to 3D Printed Electronics


http://3dprint.com/126128/sicrys-conductive-inks/


3D Printed Solar Cells anyone?



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: NovaSilisko on 03/28/2016 04:59 PM
Atlas V Rocket Successfully Launches with Multiple Components 3D Printed by Stratasys

http://3dprint.com/126300/atlas-v-rocket-stratasys/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/28/2016 05:44 PM
Atlas V Rocket Successfully Launches with Multiple Components 3D Printed by Stratasys

http://3dprint.com/126300/atlas-v-rocket-stratasys/ (http://3dprint.com/126300/atlas-v-rocket-stratasys/)


"The rocket has several of these 3D printed parts, primarily for an air ducting system in the rocket’s payload fairing that keeps vital electrical components cool during the launch. The parts included brackets, nozzles, panel close-outs and huge printed sections of ducting. Because many of the parts could be printed as large, single parts rather than smaller metal parts that would need to be assembled, 3D printing reduced the number of components in the ducting from 140 parts down to just 16.

By replacing the ducting with thermoplastic parts, the weight is reduced, which allows larger more complex payloads to be launched. It is also considerably cheaper, especially when it comes to disposable launch vehicles like the Atlas V. ULA is working closely with Stratasys to develop 3D printing material standards so the 3D printing process itself is verified and can be relied on to meet strict flight application guidelines. They also have the ability to trace every spool back to its raw, pellet form so the quality of the material can be verifiable."
 ;)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 03/29/2016 06:11 PM
Do3D Develops Revolutionary Multi-side “MAP” 3D Printing Technology
http://3dprint.com/126355/do3d-map-3d-printing-tech/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBdUIIg46gM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/01/2016 08:32 PM
New 3D Printing Technique Makes Complex Ceramics for Spaceships
https://3dprint.com/127537/3d-print-ceramics-spaceships/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/01/2016 08:39 PM
The Revolution Arrives: Carbon Releases M1 Commercial 3D Printer with CLIP Technology & New Resins
https://3dprint.com/127741/carbon-m1-3d-printer/ (https://3dprint.com/127741/carbon-m1-3d-printer/)


Carbon Finally Unveils First Commercial CLIP 3D Printer


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/01/carbon3d-finally-unveils-first-commercial-clip-3d-printer/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29



Edit add 2nd article and pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/02/2016 02:41 PM
Russia’s 3D Printed Microsatellite is Currently En Route to the ISS


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/01/russias-3d-printed-microsatellite-is-currently-en-route-to-the-iss/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29


decent coverage of this payload ;)

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/02/2016 07:04 PM
Update to this:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1494829#msg1494829


Nano Dimension Technologies Files for PCB Patent

"The company recently announced that its subsidiary, Nano Dimension Technologies, has filed a patent application with the US Patent and Trademark Office. This patent is for the 3D printing of scaled down “shielded conductors combined in a printed circuit board (PCB)” — a technology used mainly in the high speed telecommunications industry.


However, the boards can also cause “losses between the conductive traces (CROSSTALKS) and other phenomena arising from the multiplicity of signals.” This loss keeps electric circuits from functioning properly, and Nano Dimension believes it has a solution."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/06/2016 07:00 PM
Selective Separation Sintering: NASA Challenge Leads to an Entirely New 3D Printing Technology for the Moon and Mars
https://3dprint.com/128375/selective-separation-sintering/ (https://3dprint.com/128375/selective-separation-sintering/)

Planetary & Space 3D Printing May Be Possible with Selective Separation Sintering
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/07/planetary-space-3d-printing-may-be-possible-with-selective-separation-sintering/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/07/planetary-space-3d-printing-may-be-possible-with-selective-separation-sintering/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/06/2016 07:06 PM
Printable Hydraulics: MIT Researchers Predict One Day Customized Robots Will Walk Right Out of Your 3D Printer
https://3dprint.com/128228/printable-hydraulics-mit/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EAMCqH31Vo



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/09/2016 01:35 PM
Airbus Opens Aerospace 3D Printing Factory in Germany


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/08/airbus-opens-aerospace-3d-printing-factory-in-germany/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/15/2016 03:12 PM
“Cellulose” a promising material for 3D Food Printing.


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/14/cellulose-a-promising-material-for-3d-food-printing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/15/2016 04:25 PM
NASA funded study
Reconstituting Asteroids into Mechanical Automata

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/reconstituting-asteroids-into-mechanical-automata

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/15/2016 07:06 PM
The 3D Printing Space Race Continues as China Successfully Tests Zero-Gravity 3D Printer
https://3dprint.com/129710/china-zero-gravity-3d-printer/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 04/16/2016 01:33 AM
https://www.instagram.com/p/BDYmz1Qs19L/?taken-by=ursamajortechnologies
http://www.ursamajortechnologies.com/#connect

A number of Blue Origin alumni have started a propulsion company

Found through here : http://rocketmoonlighting.blogspot.com/2016/03/new-digs-new-gig.html


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/19/2016 09:23 PM
GE Global Research Uses 3D Printing to Create Mini Turbine That Can Power 10,000 Homes


https://3dprint.com/130177/ge-mini-turbine/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/20/2016 03:29 PM
Update article w/new video
3D Printed Ceramic: the next big thing?


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/19/3d-printed-ceramic-next-big-thing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/19/3d-printed-ceramic-next-big-thing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K15VyqHN11E (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K15VyqHN11E)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: catdlr on 04/21/2016 09:18 PM
Marshall Tests 3D-Printed, Methane-Powered Turbopump

NASA's Marshall Center

Published on Apr 21, 2016
This video shows a test with at 3-D printed turbopump made with 45 percent fewer parts than traditionally manufactured rocket fuel pumps. The pump’s turbine spins at more than 36,000 revolutions per minute. As the turbopump moves 600 gallons of liquid methane per minute, frost forms on the outside because the fuel is super-cooled to -255 degrees Fahrenheit. Methane burns out the flame pipe at the end of the test area.

Learn more about this test at: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2016/nasa-rocket-fuel-pump-tests-pave-way-for-methane-fueled-mars-lander.html


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Ufd2aV4Qa8
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/23/2016 01:19 PM
Siemens Research Team Develops Autonomous Mobile 3D Printing Spider-Bots


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/22/siemens-research-team-develops-mobile-3d-printing-spider-bots/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/23/2016 07:47 PM
NASA Begins Studying Aerosol Jetting Technology to 3D Print Electronic Assemblies


https://3dprint.com/130884/nasa-aerosol-jetting/ (https://3dprint.com/130884/nasa-aerosol-jetting/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 04/23/2016 08:38 PM
NASA Rocket Fuel Pump Tests Pave Way for Methane-Fueled Mars Lander
April 21, 2016 - Lee Mohon MSFC

NASA has tested a 3-D printed rocket engine turbopump with liquid methane – an ideal propellant for engines needed to power many types of spacecraft for NASA’s journey to Mars.

“This is one of the most complex rocket parts NASA has ever tested with liquid methane, a propellant that would work well for fueling Mars landers and other spacecraft,” said Mary Beth Koelbl, the manager of the Propulsions Systems Department at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “Additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, made it possible to quickly design, build and test two turbopumps with identical designs that worked well with both liquid methane and liquid hydrogen propellant.”

A turbopump is complex because it has turbines that spin fast to drive the pump, which supplies fuel to the engine. During the full power test, the turbines generated 600 horsepower and the fuel pump, got its “heartbeat” racing at more than 36,000 revolutions per minute delivering 600 gallons of semi-cryogenic liquid methane per minute – enough to fuel an engine producing over 22,500 pounds of thrust. Three other tests were completed at lower power levels.

Hydrogen turbopump component testing and testing with a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen breadboard engine were completed in 2015. These tests along with manufacturing and testing of injectors and other rocket engine parts are paving the way for advancements in 3-D printing of complex rocket engines and more efficient production of future spacecraft including methane-powered landers.

“Methane propulsion and additive manufacturing are key technologies for the future of exploration including NASA’s journey to Mars,” said Graham Nelson, a Marshall propulsion engineer who helped with the testing. “We’re excited to complete testing that advances both these technologies at the same time and improves the capabilities of future missions.”

Liquid methane is cooled to 255 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-159 degrees Celsius) whereas liquid hydrogen is cooled to 400 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-240 degrees Celsius). The higher temperature of liquid methane means it boils off more slowly and thus is easier to store for longer periods, a benefit for Mars missions. Also, technologies exist today to make it possible to manufacture methane rocket fuel from carbon dioxide, which is plentiful in the Red Planet’s atmosphere.

“By demonstrating the same turbopump can work with different fuels, we’ve shown that a common design would work for either engines fueled by methane or hydrogen,” said Marty Calvert, the Marshall engineer who designed the turbopump. “Because liquid methane is much more dense than hydrogen, it requires the turbopump to spin at a different speed to deliver the same amount of mass flow to the engine.”

Testing ensures 3-D printed parts operate successfully under conditions similar to those in landers, ascent vehicles and other space vehicles. Test data are available to American companies working to drive down the cost of using this new manufacturing process to build parts that meet aerospace standards. All data on materials characterization and performance are compiled in NASA’s Materials and Processes Technical Information System, called MAPTIS, which is available to approved users.

“Additive manufacturing allowed us to build the turbopump with 45 percent fewer parts,” said Nick Case, the Marshall propulsion engineer who led the testing. “This made it affordable to build two turbopumps, get them on the test stand quickly, and get results. Our next step will be to test the liquid methane turbopump with other 3-D printed engine components in a similar configuration to the liquid hydrogen tests completed last year.”

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2016/nasa-rocket-fuel-pump-tests-pave-way-for-methane-fueled-mars-lander.html (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2016/nasa-rocket-fuel-pump-tests-pave-way-for-methane-fueled-mars-lander.html)

Photo Caption: This rocket engine fuel pump has hundreds of parts including a turbine that spins at over 90,000 rpms. This turbopump was made with additive manufacturing and had 45 percent fewer parts than pumps made with traditional manufacturing. It completed testing under flight-like conditions at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Credits: NASA/MSFC
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/24/2016 06:41 PM

article and pics to go with above post

NASA Tests Methane Propelled TurboPump as 3D Printing Continues to be Catalyst for Space Travel


https://3dprint.com/131063/nasa-turbopump-3d-printing/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/25/2016 06:50 PM
GE Aviation Tests the Largest Jet Engine in the World, Featuring 3D Printed Fuel Nozzles


https://3dprint.com/131192/ge-aviation-big-jet-engine/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nurk_4zpx-s
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 04/28/2016 02:14 PM
3D printing reinvent foam, and it’s better
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/27/3d-printing-reinvent-foam-better/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/27/3d-printing-reinvent-foam-better/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)

3D Printed Foam Could Keep You Warmer and Safer for Longer


https://3dprint.com/131812/3d-printed-foam/ (https://3dprint.com/131812/3d-printed-foam/)


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/02/2016 01:44 PM
Allforge taking advance sales for desktop 3D molder


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/02/allforge-taking-advance-sales-desktop-3d-molder/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/02/allforge-taking-advance-sales-desktop-3d-molder/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jA-vjTbHwI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jA-vjTbHwI)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/02/2016 06:12 PM
Northwestern University Research Group Uses 3D Printing to Create Terahertz Lens


https://3dprint.com/132220/northwestern-terahertz-lens/ (https://3dprint.com/132220/northwestern-terahertz-lens/)


Terahertz lenses change our view of the world?

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/03/terahertz-lenses-change-view-world/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29

Edit add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/02/2016 06:22 PM
SpaceVR Raises $1.25 Million to Launch Virtual Reality Camera Satellites into Space


https://3dprint.com/132185/spacevr-camera-satellites/




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_MXDfmkv1I
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/05/2016 01:00 PM

3D Printed Sea Urchins in Space?!


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/04/3d-printed-sea-urchins-space/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/04/3d-printed-sea-urchins-space/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


"It is hoped that this design would be of interest to Nasa and Space X."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Johnnyhinbos on 05/05/2016 02:45 PM
 Thank you Prober for keeping these posts going. I find additive manufacturing fascinating and enjoy reading them...
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: mule169 on 05/05/2016 07:03 PM
Thank you Prober for keeping these posts going. I find additive manufacturing fascinating and enjoy reading them...
agreed. 

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/10/2016 07:33 PM

Researchers from the University of Jerusalem Developed 3D Printable “Smart” Machine Elements


https://3dprint.com/133398/3dp-smart-machine-elements/ (https://3dprint.com/133398/3dp-smart-machine-elements/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 05/11/2016 01:40 AM
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/features/2016/ssc-160304-A2100-building-a-modernized.html

Sneak Peek: Building a Modernized A2100

Quote
There are currently five satellites under contract including Arabsat 6A and Hellas-Sat-4/SaudiGeoSat-1 for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, JCSAT-17 for SKYPerfect Japan, and SBIRS 5 and 6 for the U.S. Air Force. Those satellites will all be built on a common design that benefits from a fully digital development environment, the latest in advanced manufacturing, and 3-D printed materials.
For example, Lockheed Martin has introduced a universal design that’s behind every satellite antenna. The backing structure, built in a honeycomb pattern with 3-D printed materials, can be quickly scaled larger or smaller and takes less parts and design time to manufacture.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/11/2016 01:45 AM
Thank you Prober for keeping these posts going. I find additive manufacturing fascinating and enjoy reading them...
Same here.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/14/2016 01:18 PM

Printer now installedMade in Space: Commercial 3D printer on ISS


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/13/made-space-commercial-3d-printer-iss/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29


"This state of the art printer is modular, with replaceable subassemblies. That means that the company can add to and upgrade the printer as technology improves. That should contribute to this one printer lasting the entire life of the International Space Station. It should never need to be replaced, unless technology simply renders the whole concept redundant."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/14/2016 01:23 PM
A spacewalk on Mars with 3D printed technology

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/13/spacewalk-mars-3d-printed-technology/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/13/spacewalk-mars-3d-printed-technology/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)

Zortrax 3D Printers are Helping Polish University Students Learn to Explore Mars https://3dprint.com/134312/zortrax-3d-printers-mars/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIsgz9LPEmo
Edit add 2nd article and video
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/17/2016 06:28 PM
HP’s Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printer Unveiled


https://3dprint.com/133713/hp-mjf-3d-printer-unveiled/ (https://3dprint.com/133713/hp-mjf-3d-printer-unveiled/)


HP Executives Tell 3DPrint.com All About the Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printer


https://3dprint.com/134105/hp-exec-interviews-mjf/ (https://3dprint.com/134105/hp-exec-interviews-mjf/)

HP Delivers World’s First Production-Ready 3D Printing System

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/17/hp-delivers-worlds-first-production-ready-3d-printing-system/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29 (http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/05/17/hp-delivers-worlds-first-production-ready-3d-printing-system/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeTdo-w6Qx8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeTdo-w6Qx8)




Edit: another article, video
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/18/2016 09:09 PM

shy on details but exciting (placeholder for more)

Graphene 3D Lab Introduces a New Graphene Foam That Can Absorb Up to 8,000% of Its Weight in Oil


https://3dprint.com/134517/graphene-3d-lab-foam/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/18/2016 09:17 PM
Check Out this Amazing 3D Printer That Prints Complex Structures in Midair Using Lasers and Metal Nanoparticles


https://3dprint.com/134771/metal-midair-printing-harvard/ (https://3dprint.com/134771/metal-midair-printing-harvard/)

https://vimeo.com/163751907




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Gliderflyer on 05/20/2016 04:35 AM
The UCSD SEDS group will be attempting to launch a 3D printed rocket engine at the Friends of Amateur Rocketry site in Mojave this Saturday: http://www.sedsucsd.org/launch/. The 750lb thrust engine burns a mixture of LOX and RP-1, and is printed out of Inconel 718. They have done several test fires of this engine, but this will be its first flight. Here are some videos of the previous engine runs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtmPVghPCZI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnSasFTiyX4
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: rocx on 05/20/2016 09:08 AM
Check Out this Amazing 3D Printer That Prints Complex Structures in Midair Using Lasers and Metal Nanoparticles


https://3dprint.com/134771/metal-midair-printing-harvard/ (https://3dprint.com/134771/metal-midair-printing-harvard/)

https://vimeo.com/163751907

I wonder if that will be easier to do without that nasty gravity pulling everything in one direction.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: nadreck on 05/20/2016 05:41 PM

I wonder if that will be easier to do without that nasty gravity pulling everything in one direction.

I am absolutely positive that there are some processes in additive manufacturing that can be enhanced by micro gravity but that some will benefit require, even if they occur in space, with some level of gravity or acceleration.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/22/2016 07:50 PM
MIT Creates Incredible 3D Printed Programmable Hair That Can Act as Sensors or Actuators


https://3dprint.com/135288/mit-3d-printed-programmable-hair/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AAP6EhyjRI
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/25/2016 09:13 PM
Airbus Files Patent for 3D Printing Process That Could Print Entire Super-Strong Airplanes


https://3dprint.com/135561/airbus-patent-airplanes/ (https://3dprint.com/135561/airbus-patent-airplanes/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/26/2016 06:15 PM
The UCSD SEDS group will be attempting to launch a 3D printed rocket engine at the Friends of Amateur Rocketry site in Mojave this Saturday: http://www.sedsucsd.org/launch/ (http://www.sedsucsd.org/launch/). The 750lb thrust engine burns a mixture of LOX and RP-1, and is printed out of Inconel 718. They have done several test fires of this engine, but this will be its first flight. Here are some videos of the previous engine runs:


Look Out, NASA – Here Comes Vulcan-1! Students Successfully Launch Rocket With Fully 3D Printed Engine


https://3dprint.com/136033/vulcan-1-3d-printed-engine/ (https://3dprint.com/136033/vulcan-1-3d-printed-engine/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Odj_QELTmqM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Odj_QELTmqM)


full stream Enjoy  :D


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKfJ3XxVisg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKfJ3XxVisg)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 05/27/2016 07:18 PM
Italy: New GE Oil & Gas Plant Employs First Fully Automated Production Line, Operated by Robots


https://3dprint.com/136111/ge-oil-gas-robot-plant-in-italy/ (https://3dprint.com/136111/ge-oil-gas-robot-plant-in-italy/)


GE Oil & Gas to use robotics and 3D printing in futuristic Talamona plant



http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/general-electric-oil-gas-use-robotics-3d-printing-80689/


Edit: add 2nd article & pics
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: e of pi on 05/28/2016 06:39 PM
I have one of those little baby printed turbines from the middle picture on my desk. They're smaller than you'd think, but very fun to fiddle with. :)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/02/2016 08:35 PM
On-the-Fly System from Cornell Puts the 3D Print Preview in Your Hand


https://3dprint.com/136828/on-the-fly-system-cornell/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X68cfl3igKE
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/03/2016 01:54 PM
3D Printing of Patterned Membranes


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printing-of-patterned-membranes-81262/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/03/2016 01:59 PM
xPrint: A new dawn in bioprinting and smart materials?


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/xprint-new-dawn-bioprinting-smart-materials-81243/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/04/2016 01:59 PM
Airbus unveils printed unmanned aircraft


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/airbus-unveils-printed-unmanned-aircraft-81276/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/airbus-unveils-printed-unmanned-aircraft-81276/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 06/05/2016 07:07 PM
This extract from Airbus article above.

It has taken a number of patents that could change the whole future of transport, not just the aerospace industry. One of its most recent patents involved a concept for printing a fuselage in one piece from Carbon Fibre Composite. This could easily apply to cars, buses and trains, and the company is coming up with novel uses for its German RepRap printers on an almost daily basis.

Could this also product LV fuselages/tanks and fairings.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/08/2016 12:27 PM

CRP Technology: “Racetrack to Orbit, an Additive Revolution”


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/racetrack-to-orbit-an-additive-revolution-81823/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/08/2016 06:16 PM
Made in Space Plans to 3D Print ‘Steampunk’ Ships From Asteroid Material

https://3dprint.com/137573/made-in-space-asteroid-ships/ (https://3dprint.com/137573/made-in-space-asteroid-ships/)

Can we turn asteroids into space ships?

http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/can-turn-asteroids-space-ships-82103/

Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 06/09/2016 11:14 AM
Made In Space story at Space.com (http://www.space.com/33079-turning-asteroids-into-spaceships-made-in-space.html), which includes larger images.

Example, click through for a readable version of this:

(http://www.space.com/images/i/000/055/965/i02/made-in-space-rama-diagram.jpg?1464993022?interpolation=lanczos-none&downsize=640:*) (http://www.space.com/images/i/000/055/965/original/made-in-space-rama-diagram.jpg)

(Why would there be a PGM "vein"? What's the concentration mechanism?)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/14/2016 06:50 PM
Ceramic Matrix Composite:  3Dynamic Systems Discovers Superior New Material Perfect for 3D Printing Aerospace Components


https://3dprint.com/138270/ceramic-matrix-3dynamic/ (https://3dprint.com/138270/ceramic-matrix-3dynamic/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/15/2016 09:45 PM
A New Wrench is Thrown into the 3D Printing Plan at the ISS: Check Out This Cool Tool from the AMF


https://3dprint.com/138473/wrench-3d-printing-iss-amf/ (https://3dprint.com/138473/wrench-3d-printing-iss-amf/)

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Paul451 on 06/16/2016 02:22 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wrjjiyiedCk/TivHtIkKlRI/AAAAAAAAEow/B1aQe2Paa2E/s1600/vlcsnap-2011-07-06-04h49m40s160.png) (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wrjjiyiedCk/TivHtIkKlRI/AAAAAAAAEow/B1aQe2Paa2E/s1600/vlcsnap-2011-07-06-04h49m40s160.png)

(https://cflxmovieoftheweek.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/2001-a-space-odyssey.png) (https://cflxmovieoftheweek.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/2001-a-space-odyssey.png)

(https://media1.giphy.com/media/12oQ0pDrzpZNUA/200_s.gif) (https://media1.giphy.com/media/12oQ0pDrzpZNUA/200_s.gif)

(http://momentumbooks.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/2001-A-Space-Odyssey-3.gif) (http://momentumbooks.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/2001-A-Space-Odyssey-3.gif)

(http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33141.0;attach=1340450;image) (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33141.0;attach=1340450;image)

(http://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/iss-640x353.jpg) (http://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/iss-640x353.jpg)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/16/2016 01:47 PM
Now that's creative  8)


==================================

Building the Future: Space Station Crew 3-D Prints First Student-Designed Tool in Space

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/multipurpose_precision_maintenance_tool (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/multipurpose_precision_maintenance_tool)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOBng-0dEZw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOBng-0dEZw)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL1K3odUvQk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL1K3odUvQk)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSg1gH76WRw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSg1gH76WRw)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/16/2016 06:49 PM
LLNL Researchers Isolate Enzymes with 3D Printing to Convert Methane to Methanol, Harnessing & Controlling Emissions


https://3dprint.com/138657/llnl-3dp-convert-methane/ (https://3dprint.com/138657/llnl-3dp-convert-methane/)

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/16/2016 06:52 PM
Heraeus Group and Exmet Have Developed a 3D Printing Process That Uses Amorphous Metals


https://3dprint.com/138610/3d-printing-amorphous-metals/ (https://3dprint.com/138610/3d-printing-amorphous-metals/)

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/17/2016 04:45 PM
Butterfly Wings Inspire Aussie Scientists to 3D Print Stronger Structures for the Future of Electronics


https://3dprint.com/138526/butterfly-wings-aussie-3d-print/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/17/2016 10:16 PM
High-Tech Partnership Reaches New High, 3D Printing Heart Tissue in Zero-G


https://3dprint.com/138833/zero-g-heart-tissue-bioprinting/ (https://3dprint.com/138833/zero-g-heart-tissue-bioprinting/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAzcB_3dVzE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAzcB_3dVzE)


==========================
Note: Blue New Shepard link in article

Techshot accomplishes 3D bioprinting in zero gravity

http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-bioprinting-zero-gravity-82894/
Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/19/2016 04:29 PM
3D Printing a Lab-on-a-Chip


https://3dprint.com/138681/3d-printing-a-lab-on-a-chip/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KPBqhE-Aog



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/22/2016 01:28 PM
Restoring Vision Platforms: Retinal Implant FDA Approved


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/restoring-vision-platforms-retinal-implant-fda-approved-82942/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JTWjovSjZk
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/23/2016 06:15 PM
Lunar 3D Printing as Pitstop to Life on Mars (ESA)


https://3dprint.com/139420/lunar-3d-printing-life-on-mars/





Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/23/2016 06:25 PM
This might be of some value?


Set Up Your Own Tend.ai Mini-Factory with a Robot Manager & Team of 3D Printers


https://3dprint.com/139557/tend-ai-robot-team-3d-printers/ (https://3dprint.com/139557/tend-ai-robot-team-3d-printers/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv_wrdx-FDI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv_wrdx-FDI)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5WYLnOcggY (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5WYLnOcggY)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/26/2016 12:32 AM
US Navy's Humble 3D Printed TruClip Design Sent to the International Space Station During Maker Faire



https://3dprint.com/139793/navy-truclip-space-station/


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/28/2016 06:18 PM
NASA Awards Grant to Tethers Unlimited for Microgravity 3D Printer/Filament Recycler[/size]



https://3dprint.com/140110/tethers-unlimited-refabricator/






Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 06/29/2016 06:21 PM
German Researchers 3D Print a Functional Micro-Camera Lens 0.1mm Wide


https://3dprint.com/140323/3d-print-micro-camera-lens/ (https://3dprint.com/140323/3d-print-micro-camera-lens/)

Tiny 3D Printed Cameras with Enormous Potential

http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/tiny-3d-printed-cameras-enormous-potential-83852/

Edit: add 2nd article & pics
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/06/2016 08:19 PM
UK Defense Firm BAE Systems Wants to “Grow” Drones in Vats with Chemical 3D Printing


https://3dprint.com/141144/bae-systems-grow-drones/ (https://3dprint.com/141144/bae-systems-grow-drones/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKt_zQHQ-0k (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKt_zQHQ-0k)



Can we really grow aircraft?
http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/can-really-grow-aircraft-84394/


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/08/2016 12:10 PM
Stealthy 3D Printing at Airshow?


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/stealthy-3d-printing-announcements-airshow-84523/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/11/2016 07:13 PM
https://3dprint.com/141718/wacker-3d-printer-silicones/ (https://3dprint.com/141718/wacker-3d-printer-silicones/)


Wacker Chemie Will Debut the First First Industrial 3D Printer for Silicones


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/12/2016 01:21 PM
Norsk Titanium Shakes Up Aerospace Industry with Latest Announcement


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/norsk-titanium-shakes-aerospace-industry-latest-announcement-85306/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/norsk-titanium-shakes-aerospace-industry-latest-announcement-85306/)


"The Norwegian additive manufacturing company has officially announced New York State’s and SUNY Polytechnic University’s funding of the initial lot of 20 patented MERKE IV™ Rapid Plasma Deposition™ (RPD) machines. NTi pride themselves on the belief that titanium is the metal of the future. This belief, along with years of dedicated research and development, has lead them to become the world’s only qualified supplier of aerospace-grade, additive manufacturing, structural titanium 3D manufactured components. Having developed an innovative additive manufacturing technology that cuts both time and cost of production, NTi has enabled engineers to work at a speed that matches the growing demand of new technologies. Below, is the company’s latest video, which aired at this year’s Farnborough International Air Show."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNGXVQsjTwA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNGXVQsjTwA)


Norsk Titanium's Plattsburgh Facility Will Be the World's First Industrial-Scale Aerospace Additive Manufacturing Facility

https://3dprint.com/141855/norsk-titanium-plattsburgh/ (https://3dprint.com/141855/norsk-titanium-plattsburgh/)


Edit: add 2nd article and pics
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/12/2016 01:38 PM
New filament means you can print metal on any 3D printer


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/now-can-print-metal-3d-printer-85255/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/now-can-print-metal-3d-printer-85255/)


"This new filament from the Wisconsin-based company could literally be a game changer, disrupting the current course of 3D Printed Metal. They’ve launched with copper and bronze, but you can expect to see more metals in the near future.


How does it work? It’s basically a highly infused plastic, just enough plastic to get it through your current printer. Currently this is a mere 11.5%, an amount considered below the theoretical limit only a year ago. The 88.5% of mass that remains is high purity metal powder. The prints can then be simply polished, or more interestingly be post-processed to remove the small amount of plastic. The resulting product is 99+% pure metal, which is as close to pure as many of us will ever need. The Virtual Foundry says they continue to improve the process and expect future versions to be closer to only 8% plastic."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/13/2016 06:37 PM
Thales Alenia Space Looks to Space with Large Qualified 3D Printed Satellite Components and a New Collaboration


https://3dprint.com/142012/thales-alenia-components/ (https://3dprint.com/142012/thales-alenia-components/)


===============================

Lockheed Martin Credits Sciaky's EBAM Metal 3D Printing for Cost-Saving Titanium Propulsion Tank
https://3dprint.com/142052/lockheed-martin-sciaky-ebam/ (https://3dprint.com/142052/lockheed-martin-sciaky-ebam/)

Sciaky to Provide Their Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing System to EWI


https://3dprint.com/143098/sciaky-ewi/

Edit add 2nd article and pic
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/13/2016 06:43 PM
Impossible Objects Now Offers 3D Printed PEEK Polymer Carbon Fiber Composite Parts


https://3dprint.com/142064/impossible-objects-peek/


"CBAM parts made with PEEK are up to 10 times stronger and can be manufactured up to 100 times faster than traditional methods. Standard CBAM parts made with carbon fiber or nylon have a tensile strength of 150 MPa (21,700 psi) with a heat resistance of 120°C (248°F). Alternately, CBAM parts made with PEEK perform more than 30% better, have a tensile strength of 205 MPa (29,700 psi) with a heat resistance of 250°C (482°F). They are also more than 50% lighter than traditional aluminum parts while maintaining 2/3rds of the strength. The PEEK composite materials are also recyclable."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/14/2016 09:15 PM
2 of my picks from this article (more there)

Check Out These Four Space-Themed 3D Printing Projects Inspired by NASA’s Juno Spacecraft from Wevolver


https://3dprint.com/142119/space-3d-printing-wevolver/ (https://3dprint.com/142119/space-3d-printing-wevolver/)


Here is a video about the development of the Ultrascope presented by Open Space Agency founder James Parr:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGnM2w2tLl0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGnM2w2tLl0)


Here is some video of Rafel Jorda from Open Cosmos explaining how QBCAN works:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4VlcYnWr4g (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4VlcYnWr4g)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/15/2016 01:57 PM
Launch Your Own Satellite into Space


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/launch-satellite-space-87190/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/launch-satellite-space-87190/)


Rocket Lab gets closer to Electron rocket launch with completed platform



https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rocket-lab-gets-closer-electron-rocket-launch-completed-platform-94673/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rocket-lab-gets-closer-electron-rocket-launch-completed-platform-94673/)

https://vimeo.com/179507781

Edit: Add 2nd article with update & pic


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/15/2016 06:45 PM
Researchers Are Able to Dissolve Support Structures in Metal 3D Printing, Offering Great Potential for Future


https://3dprint.com/142332/dissolving-support-structures/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/18/2016 06:25 PM
ORNL
Better Materials & Shapes: Researchers Improve Functionality of Heatsinks with 3D Printing

https://3dprint.com/142642/researchers-heatsinks-3d-printing/ (https://3dprint.com/142642/researchers-heatsinks-3d-printing/)

Boeing’s new 3D-printed tool for making wings is so large it’s set a Guinness World Record

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-printing-world-record/ (http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-printing-world-record/)

ORNL and Boeing Earn Guinness Book of World Records Title for Largest Solid 3D Printed Part

https://3dprint.com/147471/ornl-guinnes[/size]inted Part[size=78%]s-record/[/size]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVqWM7T8dcI

Edit: add 3nd ORNL/Boeing article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 07/19/2016 01:27 PM
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/New_lab_for_advanced_manufacturing_techniques_and_materials

Quote
ESA’s latest technical laboratory, inaugurated today by Director General Jan Woerner, will help to understand the capabilities of 3D printing and other advanced manufacturing techniques for future space missions.

The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory is at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Harwell, Oxfordshire, directly adjacent to ESA’s UK facility.

A key aim of the laboratory is to exploit the expertise and world-leading facilities that are available on the Harwell Campus, to assess new material processes, joining techniques and 3D printing technologies for application in space.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/20/2016 08:42 PM
The Dream of Eliminating Post-Processing is Finally a Reality: Introducing the Rize One Industrial Desktop 3D Printer    (in Beta)


https://3dprint.com/143010/rize-one-3d-printer/ (https://3dprint.com/143010/rize-one-3d-printer/)


The key to the Rize One is the company’s patented Augmented Polymer Deposition (APD) technology and Rizium One filament, a watertight engineering- and medical-grade thermoplastic that, according to the team, creates parts that are twice as strong as parts printed with similar technologies. During the printing process (which produces zero harmful emissions), a repelling ink called Release One is jetted between the part and its support structures, so that once the part comes off the print platform, the user can simply snap off the supports as easily as taking apart Legos. The printer also features a “marking ink” that allows for text or images to be printed on the parts."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F7pGjIKnqM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F7pGjIKnqM)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/21/2016 08:38 PM
Researchers Design LEGO-Like 3D Printable Modular Blocks That Can Be Used to Build Customized Lab Instruments


https://3dprint.com/143152/3dp-modular-lab-instruments/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YOuW22XJUA
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/21/2016 09:10 PM
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/New_lab_for_advanced_manufacturing_techniques_and_materials (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/New_lab_for_advanced_manufacturing_techniques_and_materials)

Quote
ESA’s latest technical laboratory, inaugurated today by Director General Jan Woerner, will help to understand the capabilities of 3D printing and other advanced manufacturing techniques for future space missions.

The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory is at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Harwell, Oxfordshire, directly adjacent to ESA’s UK facility.

A key aim of the laboratory is to exploit the expertise and world-leading facilities that are available on the Harwell Campus, to assess new material processes, joining techniques and 3D printing technologies for application in space.


ESA Opens New Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory for Study of 3D Printing, Other Advanced Technologies in Space Missions


https://3dprint.com/143063/esa-advanced-manufacturing/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/22/2016 04:35 PM
How 3D printing is giving MTU Aero Engines wings


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printing-giving-mtu-aero-engines-wings-87687/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printing-giving-mtu-aero-engines-wings-87687/)




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kF_nzOV3MdE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kF_nzOV3MdE)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/25/2016 12:59 PM
Nano Dimension: Factories in a box & 3D printing electronics


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nano-dimension-factories-box-3d-printing-electronics-87769/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nano-dimension-factories-box-3d-printing-electronics-87769/)


New Method of 3D Printing Electronics Transforms Electric Properties with a Flash of Light



https://3dprint.com/145082/3d-printed-electronics-rmit/


Edit add another article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/25/2016 01:08 PM
3D printing: helping the US blow stuff up


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printing-helping-us-blow-stuff-87875/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printing-helping-us-blow-stuff-87875/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/25/2016 10:29 PM
China Develops New Metal 3D Printing Technology, Combining Old and New Manufacturing Techniques


https://3dprint.com/143613/china-metal-3d-printing-tech/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/28/2016 11:34 AM
Russian nuclear agency builds industrial metal 3D printers![/size]


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/russia-goes-nuclear-3d-printing-90167/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/russia-goes-nuclear-3d-printing-90167/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoBCtpV9M-A (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoBCtpV9M-A)


Rosatom to Develop Russia’s First Industrial Metal 3D Printer for Nuclear Industry

https://3dprint.com/143970/rosatom-russia-nuclear-energy/

Ediit: add 2nd article and pics
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/28/2016 11:42 AM
GE & Textron Aviation Announce Next Generation Cessna Denali, Featuring 3D Printed Engine


https://3dprint.com/143841/cessna-denali-3d-print-engine/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 07/30/2016 01:25 PM
Single layer Graphene Oxide goes on sale


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/single-layer-graphene-oxide-goes-sale-90446/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/single-layer-graphene-oxide-goes-sale-90446/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/02/2016 02:10 PM
Rigid Vibration Absorption Now a Reality


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rigid-vibration-absorption-now-reality-90650/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rigid-vibration-absorption-now-reality-90650/)


The paper on the subject:


http://www.pnas.org/content/113/30/8386 (http://www.pnas.org/content/113/30/8386)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/04/2016 12:37 PM
Nanotech pioneer brings 3D printable metal to Makers


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nanotech-pioneer-brings-3d-printable-metal-makers-91202/ (http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nanotech-pioneer-brings-3d-printable-metal-makers-91202/)


"The scientist who helped developed nanotechnology for the next generation of flexible and wearable electronic devices is now bringing affordable 3D printed electronics to anyone with access to a basic 3D printer."




Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/04/2016 12:45 PM
3Dp rocket fuel is here thanks to Gilmour Space Tech.


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3dp-rocket-fuel-is-here-thanks-to-gilmour-space-technologies-91292/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5JjPvr5go0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtEp7ONwTwM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/05/2016 01:37 PM
A magnetic 3D bioprinter, in space!


http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/a-3d-bioprinter-in-space-91339/


A very limited article...


"The United Rocket and Space Corporation, which is based in the Skolkovo Innovation Centre, will focus on producing tissue and organ samples that are highly sensitive to the type of radiation that is only on offer in space."

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/10/2016 12:36 PM
Mars City Design will 3D print in Mojave Desert

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/mars-city-design-will-3d-print-mojave-desert-91706/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/mars-city-design-will-3d-print-mojave-desert-91706/)

Learn to Live & Love in Outer Space! 3D Printed Mars City Design Concepts to be Tested in Mojave Desert


https://3dprint.com/145412/3d-printed-mars-city-design/
Edit:add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/10/2016 11:15 PM
3D Printed CubeSat Among 50 Satellites to Be Launched into the Thermosphere This December


https://3dprint.com/145361/3d-printed-cubesat-satellite/ (https://3dprint.com/145361/3d-printed-cubesat-satellite/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26mCU9THhes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26mCU9THhes)



3D printed plastic satellites in space, seriously…
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printed-plastic-satellites-space-seriously-93573/

Edit: 2nd article & Pics
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/11/2016 08:09 PM
Stanford Researchers Use 3D Printing to Study the Microscopic Structures of Rocks from Earth, and Eventually from Mars

https://3dprint.com/145484/3d-printed-rocks-stanford/ (https://3dprint.com/145484/3d-printed-rocks-stanford/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/14/2016 12:25 AM
DARPA Researchers Bioengineering a New Class of Construction Materials: Will Homes Soon Repair Themselves?


https://3dprint.com/145788/darpa-bioengineering-homes/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/15/2016 06:22 PM
3D Mapping Dark Energy to Understand the Universe


https://3dprint.com/145885/3d-mapping-dark-energy/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/16/2016 07:09 PM
OR Lasertechnologie Develops Additive Manufacturing Method to Protect Sensitive Sensors


https://3dprint.com/145934/or-lasertechnologie-sensors/







Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/19/2016 07:04 PM
Step Inside Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory With Virtual Tours of Facility's 3D Printing Labs and the World's Biggest Laser

https://3dprint.com/146386/llnl-virtual-tours-3d-print-labs/ (https://3dprint.com/146386/llnl-virtual-tours-3d-print-labs/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnqOFmC2n8s


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_snOFH2K7A
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/20/2016 02:33 PM
Lockheed Martin files patent for a synthetic diamond 3D printe


https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/lockheed-martin-patents-synthetic-diamond-3d-printer-94375/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/lockheed-martin-patents-synthetic-diamond-3d-printer-94375/)


 "have filed a patent for a new kind of 3D printer. The patent, filed on April 4 by inventor David G. Findley, describes a new way of 3D printing which would use a pre-ceramic polymer and nanoparticle filler to create synthetic diamond objects of pretty much any shape you can dream up."

Lockheed Martin Files Patent Application for 3D Printer That Prints Diamonds


https://3dprint.com/146562/diamond-3d-printer-lockheed/


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/24/2016 07:34 PM
Large format 3D printing

Stratasys to Unveil Groundbreaking New Infinite Build and Robotic Composite 3D Printing Demonstrators at IMTS


https://3dprint.com/146938/stratasys-demonstrators-imts/ (https://3dprint.com/146938/stratasys-demonstrators-imts/)

"The Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator quite literally turns 3D printing on its side with a technology that prints on a vertical plane, allowing for virtually unlimited part size."

Stratasys announce Infinite Build and Robotic Composite,

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/stratasys-announce-infinite-build-robotic-composite-share-price-jumps-94711/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/stratasys-announce-infinite-build-robotic-composite-share-price-jumps-94711/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr_PneeyO34 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr_PneeyO34)


Edit: add 2nd article etc.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/27/2016 06:16 PM
Researchers Create Microstereolithography for 4D Printing, Potential for Impacts in Medical, Solar & More


https://3dprint.com/147312/microstereolithography-4d-printing/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/28/2016 06:34 PM
Plasmonics: Nanoscribe Photonic Professional GT 3D Printer Allows for Innovative Solutions


https://3dprint.com/147283/plasmonics-nanoscribe/ (https://3dprint.com/147283/plasmonics-nanoscribe/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 08/30/2016 12:47 PM
A new 3D printing technology, interview with Xjet’s Dror Danai


https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/new-3d-printing-technology-interview-xjets-dror-danai-94941/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wiZUr6Ryow
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/01/2016 10:24 PM
Thermwood Corporation Introduces LSAM: Large Scale Additive Manufacturing with a CNC Twist


https://3dprint.com/147866/thermwood-lsam-cnc-printer/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1bOGJGR47k
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/06/2016 04:07 PM
GE Announces $1.4 Billion Investment: Acquisition of Arcam AB and SLM Solutions
https://3dprint.com/148290/ge-acquires-arcam-slm-solutions/ (https://3dprint.com/148290/ge-acquires-arcam-slm-solutions/)

The company adds Arcam and SLM Solutions to its additive manufacturing portfolio.


Edit: change with a proper article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/09/2016 07:39 PM
NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts Program Seeks Submissions for Visionary Concepts


https://3dprint.com/148325/niac-visionary-concepts/ (https://3dprint.com/148325/niac-visionary-concepts/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cXrpSdcTEg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cXrpSdcTEg)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/10/2016 02:18 PM
A more detailed article on this new technology.
1st linkage  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1562301#msg1562301 (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1562301#msg1562301)

Rize CEO pre Rize C views game-changing 3D printing technology
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rize-ceo-previews-game-changing-3d-printing-technology-95453/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rize-ceo-previews-game-changing-3d-printing-technology-95453/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/13/2016 10:35 PM
Nikon Metrology Finds Great Benefit Using Micro CT to Verify Structure of 3D Printed Metal Parts


https://3dprint.com/149049/nikon-metrology-micro-ct/







Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/15/2016 06:17 PM

Look at the size of the operator ;)

ORNL Partners With Ingersoll Machine Tools to Develop Colossal 3D Printing System


https://3dprint.com/149303/ornl-ingersoll-wham/ (https://3dprint.com/149303/ornl-ingersoll-wham/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/15/2016 06:24 PM
Tecnica's CASA SLS Printer Blows the Competition Away, Prints Up to 250 Times Faster


https://3dprint.com/149344/tecnicas-casa-sls-printer/ (https://3dprint.com/149344/tecnicas-casa-sls-printer/)


“Schools and universities, manufacturers, prototypers, jewelers and designers can all afford a professional grade 3D printer for a hobbyist price,”
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: mikelepage on 09/19/2016 06:44 AM
Crossposted from the non-HSF spin gravity thread :) I've been working out how to fold up toroids into tall narrow cylinders that can fit in payload bays.  3D printing makes it so much easier to prototype this stuff :)
75 shells, 1 print.

Presenting... the DEployable Spin Gravity Array.  :)  Folded form is tall and narrow, deployed form is a wide torus.

Still a work in progress (doesn't deploy and fold up cleanly yet), but since I showed the models above, I thought you guys might be interested to see the 3D print.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGsJ-dIU7lU
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/21/2016 10:05 PM
3M Develops New Patent-Pending Technology for the 3D Printing of Fluoropolymers


https://3dprint.com/149969/3m-3d-printing-fluoropolymers/ (https://3dprint.com/149969/3m-3d-printing-fluoropolymers/)


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/21/2016 10:10 PM
North Dakota's OpenOrbiter Project Creates CubeSat Equipped With 3D Printed Experiment

https://3dprint.com/149973/open-space-frontier-cubesat/ (https://3dprint.com/149973/open-space-frontier-cubesat/)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/21/2016 10:14 PM
NASA Engineers Use ORNL Facility to Study How Neutrons Affect 3D Printed Parts that May Go into Space


https://3dprint.com/149965/nasa-ornl-neutrons-3d-print/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 09/27/2016 06:38 AM
Some new 3d printed propulsion bits from https://www.instagram.com/ursamajortechnologies/

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/28/2016 02:33 PM
SatRevolution to 3D print the first private Polish satellite

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/satrevolution-to-3d-print-the-first-private-polish-satellite-96363/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/satrevolution-to-3d-print-the-first-private-polish-satellite-96363/)

Poland: New Swiatowida Satellite from SatRevolution SA Features 3D Printed Housing

https://3dprint.com/151228/poland-swiatowida-satellite/


Edit: add 2nd article
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 09/30/2016 03:12 PM
Wide range article, a good read ;)

Lockheed Martin use 3D Printing in Search for Signs of Life on Mars


https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/lockheed-martin-use-3d-printing-search-signs-life-mars-96462/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/04/2016 03:27 PM
4 Enterprises (who are not SpaceX) Using 3D Printing to Reach Space

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/4-enterprises-not-spacex-using-3d-printing-reach-space-96578/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/4-enterprises-not-spacex-using-3d-printing-reach-space-96578/)

"at the recent 67th International Astronautical Congress (IAC), but as World Space Week begins today we present four enterprises using 3D printing to reach for the stars."


Virgin Galactic
Blue Origin
Surrey Satellites Technology Ltd. and the University of Southampton


12 Pics in the article from the IAC presentations.
New Shepard launch shortly so info and pics....


"Meyerson explained that the New Shepard spacecraft has “over 400 additively manufactured parts.” Blue Origin has also developed several generations of their Blue Engine (BE) series, of which The New Shepard system uses the BE-3 series to propel a reusable vertical landing spacecraft."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/05/2016 06:44 PM
Materialise and Atos Use Metal 3D Printing to Create Next-Generation Spacecraft Component


https://3dprint.com/151391/materialise-atos-aerospace/





Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/06/2016 01:08 PM
D-Orbit Protecting the Planet with 3D Printing


https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/d-orbit-protecting-planet-3d-printing-96612/







Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Gliderflyer on 10/11/2016 12:09 AM
National Geographic has a new series out called "The New Space Race", which has an episode on Made in Space and their 3D printing efforts.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/new-space-race-documentary/
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/11/2016 07:18 PM
Virginia Tech DREAMS Lab Wins America Makes Innovation Sprint Smart Structures Challenge
 “Smart Wing Project,”
https://3dprint.com/152005/virginia-tech-smart-structures/




https://vimeo.com/185066184
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/27/2016 02:15 PM
“Trusselelator” puts additive manufacturing into orbit
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/trusselelator-puts-additive-manufacturing-orbit-97450/


"Firmamentum plan to test their Trusselator technology, a proprietary carbon composite additive manufacturing device that works best in micro gravity environment. In essence, it’s a machine that uses 3D printing techniques and robotic assembly to fabricate long truss structures. According to Dr. Robert Hoyt, TUI CEO and Chief Scientist, "



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/29/2016 03:31 PM
Idaho’s first Satellite, 3D printed and ready for launch.
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/idahos-first-satellite-3d-printed-ready-launch-97593/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/idahos-first-satellite-3d-printed-ready-launch-97593/)[/size]

https://engineering.nnu.edu/research/makersat (https://engineering.nnu.edu/research/makersat)

The MakerSat, Idaho's First Satellite, is 3D Printed and Ready for Launch
https://3dprint.com/153892/makersat-idaho-satellite-3d-print/

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/29/2016 03:34 PM
Made in Space to make out of this world fiber optics


https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/made-space-make-world-fiber-optics-97602/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 10/29/2016 11:46 PM
Mars Medical Challenge Asks Students to Design 3D Printable Items to Keep Astronauts Healthy on Mars


https://3dprint.com/153838/mars-medical-challenge-3d-space/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFA96-iB8e8
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/01/2016 05:28 PM
Nanyang Technological University Researchers Improve Ultrasound Technology With 3D Printed Lens
https://3dprint.com/153984/3d-printed-ultrasound-lens/


"The main difference between standard ultrasound devices and the NTU device is that instead of glass, the lens, or transducer, is 3D printed with clear photopolymer resin from Formlabs (https://formlabs.com/). 3D printing allowed the research team to create lenses in any shape – meaning that they could generate acoustic waves of any shape, unlike glass lenses which are limited to simple planar, cylindrical or spherical shapes. 3D printing more complex lenses allowed the researchers to focus the waves at multiple points at once, as well as to control the phase of the waves and focus them on different points at different times."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: mfck on 11/02/2016 06:44 PM
Nanyang Technological University Researchers Improve Ultrasound Technology With 3D Printed Lens
https://3dprint.com/153984/3d-printed-ultrasound-lens/


"The main difference between standard ultrasound devices and the NTU device is that instead of glass, the lens, or transducer, is 3D printed with clear photopolymer resin from Formlabs (https://formlabs.com/). 3D printing allowed the research team to create lenses in any shape – meaning that they could generate acoustic waves of any shape, unlike glass lenses which are limited to simple planar, cylindrical or spherical shapes. 3D printing more complex lenses allowed the researchers to focus the waves at multiple points at once, as well as to control the phase of the waves and focus them on different points at different times."
Not as a snark, but a genuine question, what uses are there for high precision ultrasound in space? I couldn't think of any, except for materials inspection maybe, so interested to know.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/02/2016 07:09 PM
Nanyang Technological University Researchers Improve Ultrasound Technology With 3D Printed Lens
https://3dprint.com/153984/3d-printed-ultrasound-lens/ (https://3dprint.com/153984/3d-printed-ultrasound-lens/)


"The main difference between standard ultrasound devices and the NTU device is that instead of glass, the lens, or transducer, is 3D printed with clear photopolymer resin from Formlabs (https://formlabs.com/). 3D printing allowed the research team to create lenses in any shape – meaning that they could generate acoustic waves of any shape, unlike glass lenses which are limited to simple planar, cylindrical or spherical shapes. 3D printing more complex lenses allowed the researchers to focus the waves at multiple points at once, as well as to control the phase of the waves and focus them on different points at different times."
Not as a snark, but a genuine question, what uses are there for high precision ultrasound in space? I couldn't think of any, except for materials inspection maybe, so interested to know.
3D printing allowed the research team to create lenses in any shape –  My take away......there are many applications. 
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/02/2016 07:13 PM
ORNL Researchers 3D Print Permanent Magnets for Clean Energy Applications, Saving Time, Cost and Material
https://3dprint.com/154219/ornl-3d-printed-magnets-baam/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GJ2R9V93Eo
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/08/2016 06:46 PM
TU Wien: Researchers 3D Print Gold Using Basic Compounds & Electron Beams
https://3dprint.com/154744/tu-wien-researchers-3d-print-gold/


article linkage: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep34003



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/08/2016 06:53 PM
XJet Introduces New 3D Printing Breakthrough: Ceramic NanoParticle Jetting Technology
https://3dprint.com/154789/xjet-ceramic-nanoparticle-jetting/


"NanoParticle Jetting Technology prints ceramic materials in the same way as metals. A liquid dispersion containing ceramic nanoparticles, contained in sealed cartridges, is loaded into the printer, where it is then jetted onto the build platform, just like any inkjet printer. The high temperatures inside the build envelope cause the liquid to evaporate, leaving layers of ceramic behind to form parts with the same mechanical properties as traditionally manufactured ceramics"



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/10/2016 01:49 PM
Winner of space 3D printing competition selected
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/winner-space-3d-printing-competition-selected-98236/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3TangcGnM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 11/10/2016 10:22 PM
Winner of space 3D printing competition selected
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/winner-space-3d-printing-competition-selected-98236/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3TangcGnM

Those space tongs look good. Is the STL file for it publicly available?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Rei on 11/13/2016 12:22 PM
That gold one really got me thinking... what if you weren't printing using particle beams to evaporate / modify compounds, but literally doing (n, X), (p, X) or other nuclear reactions with particle beams?  I mean, that's grossly impractical for large scales, but since they're making things on the order of nanometers there...  It'd mean the ability - if you had an abundant particle source - to do nanoengineering without having to have all of the compounds needed available locally, just a single block of a single substance which is then altered by reactions with the beam.  You could control what reactions occur by controlling what particles and energies you use (simple neutron capture, multiple capture, neutron multiplication, spallation, etc), and thus produce a range of compounds with different properties in a target - conductors, insulators, gases, liquids, etc.  You'd also have (some) control over depth of where the beam modifies.  You'd also have the ability to create a variety of radioactive isotopes in the structure, and thus nanoscale RTGs, self-ionization for nanoscale structures that can be moved around by electric or magnetic fields, etc.

The printing would be messy (you never have complete control over what reactions will occur or very narrowly constrained depths), but I see no reason why it couldn't be done (on very small scales).  Probably not reasonable for most applications, but the concept occurred to me when I read that.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/13/2016 11:28 PM
Winner of space 3D printing competition selected
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/winner-space-3d-printing-competition-selected-98236/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/winner-space-3d-printing-competition-selected-98236/)


Those space tongs look good. Is the STL file for it publicly available?


Looked it up, not yet but you might track down the winner.


http://www.mouser.com/contests/iss-project-contest?entry_id=129720410
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/15/2016 05:24 PM
French aerospace manufacturers Safran expand into new frontiers
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/french-aerospace-manufacturers-safran-expand-into-new-frontiers-98529/



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/28/2016 12:15 AM
Russian Engineers to Develop Solar 3D Printer for Construction Activity on the Moon


very small article
https://3dprint.com/156606/swm-november-26-2016/

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 11/29/2016 12:53 PM
A-hands on approach to chemistry in 3d printed molecules (open source)
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/a-hands-on-approach-to-chemistry-in-3d-printed-molecules-99687/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/a-hands-on-approach-to-chemistry-in-3d-printed-molecules-99687/)

"Dr. Anthony Williams of the National Center of Computational Toxicology and the Environmental Protection Agency in the US, has developed a JMol searchable database (https://chemapps.stolaf.edu/jmol/3dprint/) of over 30,000 3D printable crystal models for use in education."

Interactive Dimonad Gif
www.gifs.com/gif/0gEVVy (http://www.gifs.com/gif/0gEVVy)

Edit: Cleanup

For more information about the production process and the models the article [/font][/size]is now available online. Downloadable link  http://jcheminf.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z (http://jcheminf.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z)

or Download PDF below
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/02/2016 04:45 PM
NASA gear up on the manufacturing of advanced materials for Jupiter mission
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nasa-gear-manufacturing-advanced-materials-jupiter-mission-99996/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nasa-gear-manufacturing-advanced-materials-jupiter-mission-99996/)



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/02/2016 04:55 PM
Audi move closer to putting a 3D printing microwave on the moon
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/audi-move-closer-putting-3d-printing-microwave-moon-100019/ (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/audi-move-closer-putting-3d-printing-microwave-moon-100019/)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hNa8uiNdR8



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/06/2016 07:58 PM
US Government Authorizes Moon Express to Send Robotic Spacecraft with 3D Printed Components to the Moon in 2017


https://3dprint.com/157846/3d-printed-spacecraft-to-the-moon/


SpaceX & Rocket labs linkage
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/08/2016 11:57 AM
“Super Inkjet Technology” enables desktop 3D printing for electronics
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/super-inkjet-technology-enables-desktop-3d-printing-electronics-100442/


"Japanese company Super Inkjet Technology (SIJT) Inc. have created a desktop printer that can print metal in sub-micro sized particles. Established in 2005 following work from a research institution, this “super fine inkjet” technology "


"According to the company, their method is unlike any of the current drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printing processes of Thermal DOD or Piezoelectric DOD. SIJ prints with much smaller droplet sizes using metals and conductive inks yet operates under normal temperatures and atmospheric conditions, rather than requiring a vacuum or high temperature build chamber."


"One advantage of SIJ Technology is that the high temperatures that are often associated with metal printing are not required since the melting point of metal particles smaller in diameter than 20 nanometres dramatically decreases. For example, a micron sized silver particle has a melting point of 961°C while a nano sized particle may be as low as room temperature. This has obvious advantages for the technology as it allows the printing of these substances in room temperature conditions without having to factor in heat management"



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/09/2016 06:21 PM
How a NASA Supplier & Thermoplastic Firm’s Material Allow 3D Printing in Space
https://3dprint.com/158277/green-pe-3d-printing-in-space/ (https://3dprint.com/158277/green-pe-3d-printing-in-space/)


"In an interview with Tech Insider (http://www.businessinsider.com/spacex-rocket-cargo-price-by-weight-2016-6/#vegetable-garden-more-than-145000-5), space station engineer Ravi Margasahayam recently confirmed that it costs around $500 million to $1.5 billion to launch a space shuttle to the ISS. He further noted that the multi-billion dollar deal NASA has with SpaceX (http://www.spacex.com/) and Orbital Sciences (https://www.orbitalatk.com/) means that it costs at least $43,180 per pound for Orbital Science’s Cygnus to send cargo into the ISS and around $27,000 per pound of cargo for SpaceX rockets. To put that into perspective, a bottle of water could cost anywhere from $9,1000 to $43,180 and an espresso machine could at least $1.9 million to deliver to the ISS. Astronauts need their espresso (https://3dprint.com/62744/3d-print-espresso-iss-nasa/), too.


Considering the costs of NASA, SpaceX and Orbital Sciences to send cargo to the ISS, the reason behind the demand for per-request manufacturing is fairly apparent. While it is difficult to calculate the precise amount of money Braskem’s technology could save, if a material like I’m Green plastic that is lightweight can be carried into space to create more dense and robust aircraft parts, construction materials and spare components, it could potentially save billions of dollars. 3D printing of spare parts (https://3dprint.com/32269/made-in-space-emails-wrench/) has helped astronauts out since the first 3D printer was installed on the ISS, allowing for creative options (https://3dprint.com/40026/3d-printing-in-space/) from raw materials."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/10/2016 12:40 PM
Micron3DP & MIT 3D printing in molten glass
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/micron3dp-mit-3d-printing-molten-glass-100702/


"An ability to manipulate glass in such a way is bursting with potential. Making something so finely controlled means that the process could be used to make equipment used in laboratories (https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/university-of-north-carolina-take-the-initiative-of-biomedical-testing-and-3d-printing-100634/) for example. It could also bring that production in-house, so that technicians can get a more proximate finish.


 The team at Micron 3DP are also currently targeting security, architecture and aerospace industries for possible use cases, encouraging engineers and artists to come forward with their ideas."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ju6BtrIzz08



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/10/2016 12:46 PM
3D printing at London Science Museum experiments with emerging technology
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/londons-science-museum-experiments-with-emerging-tech-100692/


"At the show there are seven areas including a chemistry bar where guests can order chemical potions, travel through space or experience lightning. The space features were created in partnership with the European Space Agency. All the scientific fields are covered, including physics for those who prefer explosive demonstrations."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/14/2016 01:33 PM
NASA gives $500,000 to Pittsburgh’s superalloy research
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nasa-gives-500000-pittsburghs-superalloy-research-100908/

"The overall goal is to ‘[create a] robust simulation toolkit capable of predicting microstructure in an as-fabricated AM part given the process parameters.’ Put simply, this tool will evaluate the strength of 3D printed metal for use in aerospace engineering, focusing on Inconel 718, a Nickel-Chromium ‘superalloy’ resistant to high temperatures and tensile pressure."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/14/2016 01:43 PM
Arconic and Airbus  (mini articles)
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/sliced-3d-printing-digest-featuring-octobot-airbus-adidas-100931/

"Arconic (NYSE:ARNC) are furthering their collaboration with Airbus with new agreements to 3D print nickel and titanium parts for Airbus planes. North American Arconic are a global engineering and 3D printing company and will supply components for the A320 planes starting in 2017."



Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/16/2016 08:01 PM
Harvard Researchers Develop First-Ever Fully Autonomous Soft-Bodied Robot: Meet the 3D Printed Octobot
https://3dprint.com/147094/harvard-octobot-soft-robot/


"The octobot is powered not by batteries or electronics, but by simple hydrogen peroxide that, when it decomposes to gas, flows into the octobot’s limbs and inflates them, causing them to lift and flex. The chemical reaction is controlled by a microfluidic logic circuit developed by chemist George M. Whitesides, a co-author on the study. The logic circuit, which involves a series of valves, channels and fuel reservoirs, is a soft analog of an electronic oscillator, and it dictates when the hydrogen peroxide decomposes to gas – meaning that the octobot requires no external cues from humans or computers."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vkQ3SBwuU4





Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Katana on 12/22/2016 10:00 AM
That gold one really got me thinking... what if you weren't printing using particle beams to evaporate / modify compounds, but literally doing (n, X), (p, X) or other nuclear reactions with particle beams?  I mean, that's grossly impractical for large scales, but since they're making things on the order of nanometers there...  It'd mean the ability - if you had an abundant particle source - to do nanoengineering without having to have all of the compounds needed available locally, just a single block of a single substance which is then altered by reactions with the beam.  You could control what reactions occur by controlling what particles and energies you use (simple neutron capture, multiple capture, neutron multiplication, spallation, etc), and thus produce a range of compounds with different properties in a target - conductors, insulators, gases, liquids, etc.  You'd also have (some) control over depth of where the beam modifies.  You'd also have the ability to create a variety of radioactive isotopes in the structure, and thus nanoscale RTGs, self-ionization for nanoscale structures that can be moved around by electric or magnetic fields, etc.

The printing would be messy (you never have complete control over what reactions will occur or very narrowly constrained depths), but I see no reason why it couldn't be done (on very small scales).  Probably not reasonable for most applications, but the concept occurred to me when I read that.

Ion injection for IC chips , though not yet nuclear.

Nuclear reaction have radioactive byproducts.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/26/2016 09:41 AM
Anti-Corrosion Intercept Technology Now Available in 3D Printable Form
https://3dprint.com/159174/intercept-technology-3d-printable/ (https://3dprint.com/159174/intercept-technology-3d-printable/)

"The new development means that complex parts and shapes can be 3D printed to protect onboard electronics, as well as other components that require strong corrosion and/or ESD (electrostatic discharge) protection. The non-volatile nature of the technology allows it to be used in high-end, clean applications; right now, spools are available for corrosion protection in a PLA base or corrosion plus permanent ESD protection in an ABS polymer base.


EMI’s claim to fame is Intercept Technology (http://www.intercept-technology.com/), licensed from original developer Alcatel Lucent Bell Labs.  (https://www.bell-labs.com/)The technology was actually created originally to repair corrosion on the Statue of Liberty and then further modified to provide protection for packaged goods. A reactive polymer barrier neutralizes corrosive gases before they reach the material inside the packaging, allowing safe transport through any conditions by land, air or sea."


Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/26/2016 09:57 AM
Aurora Labs Ships First 3D Printer in the S-Titanium Line, is Top IPO on ASX
https://3dprint.com/159742/aurora-labs-ships-first-3d-printer/ (https://3dprint.com/159742/aurora-labs-ships-first-3d-printer/)

One of the first companies to develop an affordable metal 3D printer was Aurora Labs (http://auroralabs3d.com/), which launched a Kickstarter campaign two years ago (https://3dprint.com/16298/aurora-labs-s1-s2-3d-printer/) for a metal 3D printer priced below $4,000 – an unheard-of cost. *Unfortunately, due to an intellectual property dispute with Kickstarter, the project ultimately fell through, but it had already raised more than three times its funding goal at the time of cancellation.

At that point, Aurora Labs moved on to the development of a large-scale metal printer (https://3dprint.com/90875/aurora-labs-metal-3d-printer/) that they claimed would be over 100 times faster than other machines on the market. The printer drew the interest of several large companies, as well as NASA, before its production was even completed, and now the Perth, Australia-based company has announced that they have shipped the first printer in their S-Titanium line, which includes the S-Titanium and S-Titanium Pro.


Each machine is also, essentially, three printers in one, capable of printing in three modes: selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), and directed energy deposition (DED). In DED mode, on-the-fly alloying and pseudo-alloying is an option thanks to three independently controllable powder hoppers."


*Full disclosure Ordered the $4000 Unit :) .  US National labs still doing the basic research at the time.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: AnalogMan on 12/29/2016 02:23 PM
Presentation from earlier this year (June 20, 2016 - 26 slides)

NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Initiative: Initial Results from International Space Station Technology Demonstration and Future Plans
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160007827.pdf (https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160007827.pdf)

Mostly direct comparisons of ISS flight and ground produced 3D printed parts (structure, strength, density, etc.)
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Prober on 12/31/2016 01:33 PM
$90/80€ (excluding VAT/taxes) add on for your $300 DIY printer

Swedish 3D Printer Distributor 3DVerkstan Launches New Olsson Ruby Nozzle Today
https://3dprint.com/160091/3dverkstan-launches-olsson-ruby/ (https://3dprint.com/160091/3dverkstan-launches-olsson-ruby/)


Daniel Ljungstig, the CEO of 3DVerkstan, told 3DPrint.com, “Ruby has among others already been used in water jets, inkjets, and air nozzles because of their resistance to chemical substances, hardness, stability under high temperature and remarkable electrical and thermal properties. We are thrilled to introduce this gem into the 3D Printing world in a manner that will make the ultimate difference in high-quality printing of hard materials. The Olsson Ruby nozzle with its possibility of printing all kind of abrasive materials, will unlock new applications both in manufacturing as well as in advanced research.”


"One of the great features of the Olsson Ruby nozzle is that it works with a large range of materials, including PLA, ABS, nylon, and composites that have abrasive additives such as steel, carbon fiber, tungsten, and phosphorescent pigment. Also, thanks to the ruby mounted at the tip, the nozzle is highly wear resistant, and assures that even the toughest of materials are printable. In fact, the nozzle was originally designed to print with a composite of B4C, also known as Boron Carbide, which is the third hardest material in the world."
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 01/20/2017 03:52 PM
How to build a 3D printed Astro Pi flight case (video)

This video explains how to build an Astro Pi flight case - from printing the 3D files and installing the Astro Pi hardware to  testing the buttons. The final result is a 3D printed flight case for the Astro Pi similar to the ones on the International Space Station. This video was designed for the 2016/2017 European Astro Pi Challenge.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2017/01/How_to_build_a_3D_printed_Astro_Pi_flight_case
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 05/03/2017 07:33 PM
Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

3 May 2017

Bricks have been 3D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight – proving in principle that future lunar colonists could one day use the same approach to build settlements on the Moon.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Printing_bricks_from_moondust_using_the_Sun_s_heat

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK7872tNHcM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 05/29/2017 05:50 PM
Something new to me. Sounds like a ton of new applications enabled for both metal and carbon fiber

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7IsFQLjRNU
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 05/29/2017 07:30 PM
Something new to me. Sounds like a ton of new applications enabled for both metal and carbon fiber

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7IsFQLjRNU
Made In Space ISS printer could be used to make metal parts, just need an oven to bake to part.

Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: savuporo on 05/29/2017 07:59 PM
Made In Space ISS printer could be used to make metal parts, just need an oven to bake to part.

You mean in it's current configuration ? Right now they can only do polymers with the FDM head. AFAIK they have talked about metal casting with printed mold, but not additive manufacturing of metal itself.
The advantage of Markforgeds process is no mess with powder, as in DMLS, and sounds like they are getting much stronger parts out, too.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 06/03/2017 06:59 AM
Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

3 May 2017

Bricks have been 3D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight – proving in principle that future lunar colonists could one day use the same approach to build settlements on the Moon.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Printing_bricks_from_moondust_using_the_Sun_s_heat

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK7872tNHcM

3D Printed Building Blocks using Lunar Soil

https://gsp.esa.int/documents/10192/43064675/C22835ExS.pdf/ce5dca46-e4c9-4980-a9d3-918decd24bd0
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 08/03/2017 09:38 PM
This 30ft mini sub hull was printed in carbon fibre in sections over a few weeks.
This sub hull is about same size as new small LV boosters eg Electron, Vector, LauncherOne. Cost savings should be similar. With 3D printed engines as well that is bulk of LV 3D printed.

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/07/30-foot-long-proof-of-concept-3d-printed-submarine-hull-will-be-ten-times-cheaper.html/amp
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 08/06/2017 12:45 PM
I don't want to start a new thread but I'd like to mention a technique which seems complementary to 3D printing. Femtosecond laser processing.

Femtosecond lasers are pulse lasers that emit pulses of in the 1x10^-12 to 1x10^-15secs range at PRF's in the 200KHz-1MHz range with an intensity of 2x10^15 W cm^-2

The very short pulse length is below the time for electron/phonon interactions. That means there is substantial changes to the material but not due to heating, as the duty cycle per pulse is very low (1/1000 000 of an on/off cycle).

Originally this was used to write waveguides into transparent materials by creating a local change to the refractive index. However this also makes the exposed areas a lot easier to etch, with a differential etch rate of 300:1. The etched area can also be a volume, and it can be below the surface, creating 3D ducts which can be etched by 8M KOH, as well as the usual (and highly dangerous) HF. Materials tested include soda lime glass (window glass), Silica and Lithium Niobium Titante LiNbTiO4

It can also lower the pulse energy needed in the case of Aluminum by about a factor of 15

Immersing an object in water, and focusing the beam at a spot above the surface creates micro explosions of intense heat and shock waves that can eat through 3mm metal in precise patterns.
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjK14Ocz8LVAhXOZlAKHdg3DHoQFggrMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdpi.com%2F2072-666X%2F6%2F12%2F1471%2Fpdf&usg=AFQjCNF5tqiZWu2avAd_Fvu-kPutocxzJw

This technology already exists as a COTS machine.
https://www.femtoprint.ch/

IOW it's broad spectrum, works with both conductors and non conductors, does not need a resist and can enable etching with relatively safe etches of transparent materials and machining of metals.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 09/13/2017 04:53 AM
"Backgrounder: the printed Aerospike Rocket Engine

Quick facts
* A joint Monash University/Amaero team of engineers successfully designed, built, and tested a rocket engine in just four months
* The engine is a complex multi-chamber aerospike design
* Additively manufactured with selective laser melting on an EOS M280
* Built from Hasteloy X; a high strength nickel based superalloy
* Fuel: compressed natural gas (methane); oxidiser: compressed oxygen
* Design thrust of 4kN (about 1,000 pounds), enough to hover the equivalent of five people (about 400 kg)"

http://www.scienceinpublic.com.au/media-releases/rocket-engine-backgrounder

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeezlwN5-Ss

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9egAVV5J_WM
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 09/13/2017 09:37 AM
"Backgrounder: the printed Aerospike Rocket Engine

Quick facts
* A joint Monash University/Amaero team of engineers successfully designed, built, and tested a rocket engine in just four months
* The engine is a complex multi-chamber aerospike design
* Additively manufactured with selective laser melting on an EOS M280
* Built from Hasteloy X; a high strength nickel based superalloy
* Fuel: compressed natural gas (methane); oxidiser: compressed oxygen
* Design thrust of 4kN (about 1,000 pounds), enough to hover the equivalent of five people (about 400 kg)"

This is very impressive in terms of 3d printing. Any data on T/W or Isp?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Asteroza on 09/14/2017 02:01 AM
I don't want to start a new thread but I'd like to mention a technique which seems complementary to 3D printing. Femtosecond laser processing.

Femtosecond lasers are pulse lasers that emit pulses of in the 1x10^-12 to 1x10^-15secs range at PRF's in the 200KHz-1MHz range with an intensity of 2x10^15 W cm^-2

The very short pulse length is below the time for electron/phonon interactions. That means there is substantial changes to the material but not due to heating, as the duty cycle per pulse is very low (1/1000 000 of an on/off cycle).

Originally this was used to write waveguides into transparent materials by creating a local change to the refractive index. However this also makes the exposed areas a lot easier to etch, with a differential etch rate of 300:1. The etched area can also be a volume, and it can be below the surface, creating 3D ducts which can be etched by 8M KOH, as well as the usual (and highly dangerous) HF. Materials tested include soda lime glass (window glass), Silica and Lithium Niobium Titante LiNbTiO4

It can also lower the pulse energy needed in the case of Aluminum by about a factor of 15

Immersing an object in water, and focusing the beam at a spot above the surface creates micro explosions of intense heat and shock waves that can eat through 3mm metal in precise patterns.
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjK14Ocz8LVAhXOZlAKHdg3DHoQFggrMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdpi.com%2F2072-666X%2F6%2F12%2F1471%2Fpdf&usg=AFQjCNF5tqiZWu2avAd_Fvu-kPutocxzJw

This technology already exists as a COTS machine.
https://www.femtoprint.ch/

IOW it's broad spectrum, works with both conductors and non conductors, does not need a resist and can enable etching with relatively safe etches of transparent materials and machining of metals.

Can the femtosecond laser explosive etching be used to make a very fine channeled plate, similar to printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE)?
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 09/14/2017 07:52 AM
Can the femtosecond laser explosive etching be used to make a very fine channeled plate, similar to printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE)?
Yes, with better aspect ratio, as photochemical machining (or chemical milling or whatever you want to call it) uses isotropic etches and without etch resist.

www.mdpi.com/2072-666X/6/12/1471/pdf

Gives details of the sort of detail you can do, and how fast they can be run.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 09/17/2017 06:40 AM
This is very impressive in terms of 3d printing. Any data on T/W or Isp?

The T/W is low since the engine was not designed for flight. I couldn't find any other technical information.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: john smith 19 on 10/14/2017 05:19 PM
This is very impressive in terms of 3d printing. Any data on T/W or Isp?

The T/W is low since the engine was not designed for flight. I couldn't find any other technical information.
Noted. Although a low T/W rocket engine is still considerably better than a gas turbine.
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 11/24/2017 12:52 PM
3D printed metal mutants arise from Europe's AMAZE programme

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/3D_printed_metal_mutants_arise_from_Europe_s_AMAZE_programme

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jk7huQj8mDc
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: TrevorMonty on 12/06/2017 06:26 PM
Relativity Space 3d print complete LV.


relativity-space-aims-to-3d-print-entire-launch-vehicles/?utm_content=buffer45f27&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
Title: Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
Post by: bolun on 12/15/2017 07:36 AM
3D-printed satellite imager design

Weirdly organic in appearance, this prototype is the first outcome of an ESA project to develop, manufacture and demonstrate an optical instrument for space with 3D printing.

A two-mirror telescope derived from the European-made Ozone Monitoring Instrument now flying on NASA’s Aura satellite, it was not so much designed as grown, with the instrument’s design requirements put through ‘topology optimisation’ software to come up with the best possible shape.

This prototype was developed for ESA by a consortium led by OHB System in Germany, with TNO in the Netherlands – original designer of Aura’s version – Fraunhofer IFAM, IABG and Materialise in Germany and SRON, the Netherlands Institute for Space Research.

This first ‘breadboard’ prototype has been printed in liquid photopolymer plastic, then spray-painted. The final version would be printed in metal instead. The project is intended to culminate in testing a working instrument in a simulated space environment.

The project is being backed through ESA’s General Support Technology Programme, to hone promising technologies to be ready for space and global markets.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/12/3D-printed_satellite_imager_design

Image credit: TNO