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NASA Shuttle Specific Sections => Shuttle History - Pre-RTF => Topic started by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:07 PM

Title: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:07 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:09 PM
My first thought back then was: “First a politician, now a prince – okay, what’s next? The Pope? – And how on Earth are they going to place this name on a crew patch!”

But Mission 51-G not only became literally a royal effort in space, it was one of the smoothest Shuttle missions to date. The first flight of a crew consisting of representatives from three nations – USA, France and Saudi-Arabia – had a lot of tasks on their agenda: Launching three telecommunications satellites, releasing and retrieving a reusable science platform, performing a bulk of life sciences and geological studies – they even got shot at by the Air Force during an SDI-related laser-experiment…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:13 PM
France became the first nation making spaceflights with both the USA and the Soviet Union. Patrick Baudry had been Jean-Loup Chrétien’s backup during Soyuz T-6 in June 1982; three years later they took turns performing the same space adaptation syndrome experiments. This time Baudry could start data collection immediately after Discovery had reached orbit; due to cramped quarters aboard the Soyuz capsule Chrétien had to wait two days for that, until he had reached the Salyut 7 space station. 
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:16 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:18 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:21 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:23 PM
His Royal Highness Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al-Saud – and yes, his family name was short enough to be put on the crew patch – was the first member of a royal family to be sent into space. He was a nephew of then Saudi King Fahd; his father Prince Salman bin Abdul-Aziz was Governor of Riyadh at the time. Due to the launch contract between the Arabsat organization and NASA, one of its 22 member countries was permitted to select a payload specialist, which was to accompany Arabsat 1-B aboard the shuttle. Saudi Arabia was the largest funder of Arabsat, and so Prince Sultan, Acting Director of the Department of Advertising in the Saudi Ministry of Information, won the slot. In 1984 he already had represented his country as PR manager during the Los Angeles Olympiad.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:26 PM
At 28 years Prince Sultan would become the youngest astronaut aboard an American spacecraft (The all-time record is held by Soviet cosmonaut Gherman Titov, who was 25 when he was launched aboard Vostok 2 in 1961- four month after the first man in space, Yuri Gagarin, who had been 27 when Vostok 1 left the Earth) By the way – during Mission 51-B in April 1985 American astronaut Bill Thornton at 56 had just retained his record as oldest person in space.

During his short training at Johnson Space Center Prince Sultan, himself a commercial pilot, was accompanied by 36-year old Saudi Air Force Major Abdul Mohsen Hamad Al-Bassam, who acted as his backup.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:33 PM
With the beginning of the Space Shuttle program NASA had invited spaceflight participants from several foreign countries. But for the first time cultural and religious aspects played a role in media reports about a Shuttle Mission – and I don’t mean Frenchman Patrick Baudry wearing a beret during O&C walkout and speculations that he may smuggle a bottle of red wine aboard the orbiter. The first Arab astronaut, though he had studied mass communications at the University of Denver, Colorado, and was no stranger to western lifestyle, represented a highly conservative and religious country. Saudi society segregates men and women in many aspects of public life – and here was Prince Sultan, sharing quarters with Shannon Lucid aboard Discovery. And Shannon would be wearing shorts… :o (More about that later)

June 17, 1985 – the day of Discovery’s launch – also marked the end of the Muslim month of Ramadan. The sighting of the new crescent moon at the end of the dawn-to-dusk fast and the start of the Id al-Fitr holiday was an important event to be observed by the first Muslim astronaut. And of course Prince Sultan had to explain to insisting press representatives how he would perform his other religious commitments aboard Discovery – floating in zero-g, circling the Earth every 90 minutes…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:42 PM
Mission STS 51-G made astronaut Steve Nagel the 100th American in space – here are his recollections as recorded by JSCs Oral History Project: ‘Oh, I’m trying to remember now. I think it was like in the summer or so of ’83, I think it was. And it wasn’t called 51-G then. I was assigned to 51-D, I believe was the first—there were so many changes on that assignment. I’ve lost track, actually, but I think we had a TDRS satellite first. We were going to start training for a TDRS satellite. There was so much turmoil in the manifest at that time, there was just no stability at all. The crew assigned was Dan Brandenstein, John Creighton, John Fabian, and myself and Shannon Lucid. And we had two payload specialists, I think, with us from the beginning, was Greg Jarvis and Charlie Walker. I think they were assigned with us from the beginning.

The TDRS, at some point in time that flight changed to be LDEF retrieve. Do you remember what that was? The Long Duration Exposure Facility. So we trained for that one with those two PSs, right up to—this is kind of funny, because we did our preflight press conference, which we’re talking like a month or less, three to four weeks before the flight. We did our preflight press conference about the LDEF, walked back to the Astronaut Office, and we didn’t have the flight anymore. It was gone.’
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:45 PM
‘And so we’re shuffling, and I can’t remember the reasons for all this. But anyway, okay, so we’re shuffling again. This is like March of ’85 by that time. Dan, I owe Dan a lot. He is a real people person, and before I even thought about it—I’m jumping ahead here. Sorry. But somewhere in that process when I was training for 51-G, Mr. Abbey assigned me to another flight. So I had two flights going. He assigned me to 61-A, a German Spacelab flight. Great, as a pilot. And the two flights were sitting about a year apart or so. The spacing was nice.

Well, 51-D, then G, just kept slipping, and the other one didn’t. So we just kept crowding the other flight, so when we got back from this press conference and lost our flight, and now we’re going to be in the summer, now those two flights are like four months apart. Before I even thought about that, I wasn’t even thinking about it yet, Dan said, “You’re in trouble here.” So he went over and talked to Mr. Abbey about it that day, and negotiated for me to stay on both flights, that I could train for both for a while, then stop training for the second one, finish out the first one. I don’t think they’d ever do that today. So I owe Dan—the fact that I was able to hang on to both of those. That worked out nicely.’
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:49 PM
'So anyway, then we pick up two other PSs. Just because of change in flights, we lost Greg and Charlie, and we picked up Sultan and Patrick. Sultan al-Saud. There’s a “Bin” with a lot of other names in the middle. I can’t remember. And so that whole experience was funny, too, because a different mission—okay. Here it is March. We’re going to fly in June. It’s a different mission. We had different satellites. We’ve got all this other stuff to train for, and now we’ve got two other PSs, and one is from Saudi Arabia. And Dan, again, being the people person he is, is worried about a cultural gap. So he arranged for ARAMCO, Arab American Oil Company, to come down and give us some briefings on the cultural differences.

This is humorous. I remember they were good briefings, very good briefings. But I remember he says, “No camel jokes. No harem jokes. Don’t do that around them.” So after all that, we go over and we meet Sultan over in Building 32 there, and the first thing he told us was a camel joke and a harem joke. :D

He had gone to school at the University of Denver he’d been around the world. I mean, he was more western in some ways, anyway, than most of us. Very well educated. Really nice guy. He gets with Dan. All of us were sitting around the table, and he said—we don’t even know each other yet, and he said, “I want to fly a camel.” And Dan thought he said “camera.” And Dan said, “No, no, it’s okay. NASA provides all the cameras. You don’t need to bring your own camera.” He said, “No, I want to fly a camel, so I can have the fastest camel in the world.” There’s camel races over in Saudi Arabia. It’s a really big deal. It’s a national thing. So that’s how Sultan was. He was a funny guy.

Patrick was a test pilot from France, and he was fine. So we all got along fine. We had a very short time to train together, just two to three months at the most, and we flew. We picked up 51-G as a mission that had belonged to Joe Engle and his crew, and we got that mission and flew it.’
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 06:56 PM
Steven Nagel remembers: ‘See, 51-G had three satellites in it that were PAMs, payload assist module. John Fabian had already done that on a mission, so he was well experienced in that. So that wasn’t that hard for him to do, to train. So he was the primary person on that. You divide all this up. No one person knows it all or does it all, or is the expert on all that. So John did that.

There was the first flight of the SPARTAN, the little satellite that you grapple. It was an in-house project that you can put different scientific payloads, and this had a little telescope in it, so it was the first flight of the SPARTAN, but I mean Dan had already trained. We, as a crew, had already trained to do the rendezvous and everything, so to release the SPARTAN to fly away from us, it’s not hard to come back and rendezvous. It’s very similar to the rendezvous you train for the LDEF. So it’s not like you start from scratch; you’ve just got to learn some differences. So it was a lot to do, but it wasn’t that difficult, either.

I guess we must have picked up new mid-deck experiments. We had to learn some things like that. It was a crunch, but it was very doable. It wasn’t that bad. So we flew in June, mid June of 1985.‘
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:01 PM
Here are the events leading to the launch of STS 51-G as reported by Brevard County’s “Today” newspaper:

May 16: A 200-pound steel I-beam was knocked from its mountings by a crane and crashed in Discovery's open cargo bay, but did not damage the shuttle's aluminum fuselage, NASA sources said. Results of an investigation into a similar accident which occurred March 8 are expected next week. In the latest incident, the steel beam was mounted near the aft of the shuttle cargo bay, where it is used as part of a system to calibrate the orbiter's Ku-band communications system. "The beam was installed and it was in the raised position, so that when the overhead crane was moved, it hit the beam," said Jim Ball, NASA spokesman. NASA and Lockheed Space Operations Co. officials said there the force of the crane hitting the beam broke two welds that hold the beam on its pedestal. When the beam fell, the platform broke its fall and its electrical cables helped stabilize it, Ball said.

The Spartan experiment platform, scheduled to be carried aboard the shuttle next month, was in Discovery's cargo bay when the accident occurred. It was in the front bay and not near the impact area, officials said. None of the other three satellites scheduled to go into space June 12 were in the bay when the accident happened, Ball said. Since no injuries or major damage was incurred, there will be no formal inquiry into the latest accident, he said. The incident is not expected to affect Discovery's processing timetable.

Gary Sutherland, 35, of Port St. John, said he is ready to go back to work at Kennedy Space Center where he was injured by a falling work bucket on March 8. Sutherland, a Lockheed Space Operations Co. employee, sustained two breaks in his left leg and a bruised shoulder. Sutherland said his employer and NASA have been helpful during his rehabilitation period. "I got a nice big picture from the astronauts; they all signed it for me," he said. "It didn't help my broken leg any, but it made me feel better."

May 22: Kennedy Space Center workers expect to roll Discovery from its hangar to the Vehicle Assembly Building early on the morning of May 28. NASA said the June 12 launch window runs from 7:31 to 7:35 a.m. At the VAB, Discovery will switch places with Atlantis, the newest NASA shuttle, which has been stored there since its arrival at KSC earlier this month. Atlantis is being outfitted for its first mission in September. Work also continues on Discovery's wing flap, damaged when a tile loosened during its last flight. This allowed superheated air to flow underneath protective tiles and burn through its aluminum skin.

May 23: A mechanical problem with two of the satellites Discovery is scheduled to deploy on its next mission has delayed the shuttle's launch date to no earlier than June 17, Kennedy Space Center officials said. Engineers at Hughes Aircraft Co., manufacturer of the satellite involved in the delay, discovered a potential problem with an antenna positioning mechanism during routine tests of similar spacecraft, said KSC spokeswoman Lisa Malone. "This problem could affect the in-orbit performance of the AT&T Telstar 3D and Morelos satellites scheduled for launch aboard Discovery," Malone said. Morelos is the communications satellite being placed into orbit for the Mexican government.

May 28: NASA officials indefinitely ruled out any shuttle landings at Kennedy Space Center. "We're not scheduled to go into KSC under any circumstances," Discovery Commander Daniel Brandenstein said, discussing NASA's decision to avoid a Florida landing at all costs until a shuttle brake problem is better understood. NASA sources in Washington said the decision on using the virtually endless dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base in California is being made on a flight by flight basis, but may extend for the next five missions. The announcement that KSC won't be considered even as a bad weather backup site is unprecedented.

June 2: NASA is considering sanding or painting part of the 15,000-foot Kennedy Space Center runway to prevent its rough concrete surface from damaging rear shuttle tires so badly that they can't be reused after a landing. Most landings at Edwards Air Force Base in California have been on the dirt lake bed rather than the concrete runway. To insure good traction, the concrete runway surface at KSC was roughened by brushing as it dried, and that is what may be causing excess tire wear. (THE ORLANDO SENTINEL, Jun. 3, 1985)

June 3: It will be at least October before Rockwell International engineers can redesign the shuttle's steering system and NASA is ready to resume KSC landings. Once the new system is in place, however, KSC landings are expected to become "99 percent routine," with or without crosswinds. The steering redesign is intended to reduce the stress put on the shuttle's braking system when the vehicle lands at Kennedy Space Center. U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson (D-Melbourne, FL), head of a congressional committee that oversees NASA, said he agrees with its decision to avoid shuttle landings at KSC for the near future. "Until we get the brakes fixed, it's prudent to land at Edwards," he said in an interview from France, where he is attending the Paris Air Show.

June 4: The seven-member crew for Discovery's June 17 mission arrived at Kennedy Space Center to watch the shuttle roll out to its launch pad. The six-man, one-woman crew consists of Cmdr. Daniel Brandenstein, Pilot J. O. Creighton; mission specialists John Fabian, Steven Nagel and Shannon Lucid; and payload specialists Patrick Baudry (France) and Prince Sultan Al-Saud (Saudi Arabia).
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:04 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:08 PM
June 6: The seven astronauts who will fly the June 17 shuttle mission aboard Discovery went through a countdown rehearsal and their commander Dan Brandenstein said "we hope to leave a big streak in the sky in about a week." The crew, which includes a Saudi Arabian prince, climbed into the cabin of the shuttle for the final two hours of the test, running through procedures for launch day. "We had a dry countdown that went perfectly," Brandenstein told reporters after the practice was completed. "I very much wish we could have launched today," said Sultan Salman Al-Saud, one of two foreigners flying on the international crew. "We have 11 days to go. It seems like 11 years." The other foreign astronaut is Patrick Baudry, a French military pilot who will conduct medical experiments. (THE ORLANDO SENTINEL, Jun. 7, 1985)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:11 PM
June 14: The seven crew members of Discovery's STS 51-G mission landed on the KSC runway shortly after 1:00 p.m. declaring themselves fit and ready for the June 17 liftoff. At their landing field press conference the weather became the main topic of interest. Daniel Brandenstein, mission commander, said the crew was "trained and ready to go if the weather would cooperate." Payload specialist Sultan Salman Al-Saud, who will be the first Arabian in space, offered a solution for better weather on launch day. Speaking in both English and Arabic, he said he wanted to exchange the rain along the Space Coast for the sunny weather of his native Saudi Arabia. French payload specialist Patrick Baudry said he knows he is the envy of many of his fellow Frenchmen. "I'm glad the first Frenchman (aboard the Space Shuttle) is me," he said. The other crew members are Steven Nagel, John Fabian, Shannon Lucid and John Creighton.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:12 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:15 PM
And on a personal note: STS 51-G was the first Space Shuttle flight I wasn’t able to follow at home, recording TV and radio reports on audio tapes (!), collecting newspaper clippings and borrowing Time, Newsweek and Discover magazines from my English teacher Mr. Fabry. Although I enjoyed a 3-week family vacation in Sweden – which started on June 17, the day of Discovery’s launch – I had to improvise this time. A friend of mine already owned a video recorder and helped me out. Remember – it was the 1980s, so there was no internet. It was at that time that I started listening to “Voice of America” on shortwave radio. Thanks to radio host Alan Silverman I stayed in contact with the space program for the following months and years to come – until my family got cable TV in the early 1990s and we were able to receive CNN shortly after that. That’s when I switched from Silverman to Holliman… :)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:18 PM
June 17, 1985 - Launch Day
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:21 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:26 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:30 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:39 PM
PAO: This is Shuttle Control at T-2 hours 31 minutes 35 seconds and counting and the flight crew is departing the Operations and Checkout Building… lead by Commander Dan Brandenstein they are getting into the elevator, where they will make the trip down to the ground floor. NASA Test Director has called the crew quarters and has verified that we are ready to support the flight crew’s departure from the crew quarters and their subsequent arrival at the pad. A crowd of news media representatives and employees has gathered at the walkway the crew will use to exit the building. Standing by is the astronaut van which will take the crew to the launch pad.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:44 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:46 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:48 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 07:54 PM
PAO: And here comes the crew for mission 51-G, lead by Commander Brandenstein. And they are waving to their well-wishers there outside the Operations and Checkout Building… Sultan al-Saud boarding the astronaut van, followed by John Fabian and Frenchman Patrick Baudry, MS3 Shannon Lucid, Steve Nagel, astronaut John Young and there is George Abbey, Director of Flight Crew Operations. And the 51-G flight crew will be departing shortly for launch pad 39A.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:00 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:08 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:15 PM
PAO: This is Shuttle Launch Control at T-2 hours 8 minutes 43 seconds and counting. The flight crew has arrived at the white room and each member will now put on his integrated egress harness and his launch and entry helmet before getting into the vehicle. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot John Creighton will be the first to get in, and they are presently getting into their gear. They will be followed by Mission Specialists John Fabian and Steve Nagel, and finally the two Payload Specialists Patrick Baudry and Sultan al-Saud, and MS3 Shannon Lucid. Pilot J.O. Creighton is getting his helmet on at this time.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:19 PM
PAO: We see Mission Specialist Shannon Lucid and Steve Nagel…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:24 PM
PAO: French astronaut Patrick Baudry, who is 39, is preparing to enter the orbiter at this point. He is a Lt-Col. in the French Air Force, he has held a number of test pilot assignments and has logged more than 4,000 hours of flying time…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:31 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:34 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:37 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:40 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:42 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 08:44 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:00 PM
PAO: We are at T-1 minute and counting, all systems go. The sound suppression water system is now being armed, pre-lift-off water will be released at T-16 seconds… T-48 seconds, Solid Rocket Booster development flight instrumentation recorder has now gone to record mode and the main propulsion liquid oxygen and hydrogen outward flow valves have been closed… we are coming up on auto-sequence start… T-31 seconds and we have a go for auto-sequence start. Discovery’s four redundant computers have primary control of critical vehicle functions. T-21 seconds and counting, SRB nozzle profile is now underway. T-16 seconds…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:02 PM
PAO: T-12… 11… 10… 9… 8… 7… 6… 5… 4… 3… 2… 1…  We have booster ignition and lift-off. Lift-off of Discovery and the shuttle has cleared the tower.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:05 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:07 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:13 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:17 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:18 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:20 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:22 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:24 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:31 PM
PAO: Discovery has cleared the tower at pad 39 rolling around to the proper azimuth to place the spacecraft on a 28.5 degree inclination orbit… all three Auxiliary Power Units are operation at 100 plus percent of their rated rpm of 72,000 rpm…

Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:35 PM
PAO: Throttling down to 84 and then 65 percent… the main engines… as the spacecraft passes through the maximum point of atmospheric compression…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:37 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:38 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:39 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:42 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:44 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:46 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:50 PM
CapCom: Discovery, Houston, you are go at throttle up.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston, go at throttle up.

PAO: Throttling back up to 104 percent… all engines showing 104 percent at this time…  14 miles downrange, velocity 4,890 feet per second…

Brandenstein: Pc less than 50, Houston.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:53 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:56 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 09:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 10:03 PM
PAO: We have confirmation of Solid Rocket Booster separation on time… velocity 5,290 feet per second, downrange 33 miles…

CapCom: Discovery, Houston, first stage performance low.

Brandenstein: Roger, low first stage performance.

PAO: Downrange 53 miles, velocity 6,093…

Capcom: Discovery, Houston, two-engine TAL capability.

Brandenstein: Roger, two-engine TAL.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 10:11 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 10:17 PM
PAO: Main Engine Cut-Off is confirmed… There will be no OMS-1 maneuver; this is a direct insertion trajectory. There will be approximately 45 minutes from now an OMS-2 to circularize the orbit at 191 nautical.

CapCom: Discovery, Houston, we confirm no OMS-1 required, APUs off on time.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston, no OMS-1, APUs off on time.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/22/2012 10:19 PM
Discovery lifted off on time at 7:33 a.m., despite a lightning strike which hit the support structure of the launch pad at 6:10 p.m. the previous evening and only a cautiously optimistic weather forecast for launch morning. NASA's list of VIP guests for the launch included: ambassadors from Chile, France, and Mexico; Jacques Louis Lions, head of the French Space Agency, Gen. Bernard Capillon, head of the French Air Force; three Mexican astronauts and other officials; Charles Z. Wick, director of the U.S. Information Agency; and Gene Roddenberry, creator of the "Star Trek" TV series.

STS 51-G's launch was attended by 120 foreign news personnel, up from the usual 25 to 50. Most of the increase was in journalists from Mexico, Saudi Arabia and France. Payload Specialist Abdul Mohsen Al-Bassam, Saudi Arabia's backup for Prince Sultan Salman Al-Saud, watched the launch from KSC. "This is one of the greatest moments," Al-Bassam said. "He (Al-Saud) is the first Moslem to travel into space."Nearly 30 Saudi Arabian princes and an Arab sheik also were among the VIPs at KSC for the launch. Also on hand were ambassadors from Chile, Mexico, France and Saudi Arabia. Moments before liftoff, Christina D'Herrerra, a special guest from Mexico, read a poem in Spanish entitled "Mexican Star" to a capacity crowd at the VIP center.

The launch of Discovery was threatened temporarily by an isolated power outage that cut Kennedy Space Center's regular supply of nitrogen gas for about an hour starting at 3:32 a.m. The nitrogen, used during shuttle fueling for fire prevention, is pumped to the launch pad from NASA's gas facility just south of KSC on SR 3. Florida Power & Light Co. spokesman Jim Rentz said that a line break occurred on Pine Island Road near the Indian River, possibly as a result of high winds from Sunday's thunderstorms. "We don't know what caused it, but one of the cross arms broke and one of the lines came down," Rentz said. "That's the only station that serves the Cape that requires manual switching." The utility had to send a crew to the site to repair the damage. KSC Shuttle Manager Tom Utsman and Launch Director Bob Sieck said pad crews retained pressure in the system by activating three backup compressors and diverting gas from lines used by Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

KSC Public Affairs information officer Mark Hess has been selected to succeed Bill O'Donnell in Washington, D.C., as public affairs officer for the space station. "Rocky" Raab leaves KSC next month for Ogden, Utah, to become public relations manager for Morton-Thiokol's rocket booster division. Raab will be on hand at KSC for future shuttle launches, however. (TODAY, Jun. 18, 1985)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:04 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:12 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:18 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:20 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:29 PM
Morelos A was one of two satellites scheduled for launch  by the Space Shuttle for the Mexican Secretariat of Communications and Transportation. The second one would follow aboard Atlantis in November 1985. Morelos A left the orbiter Discovery at 2:37 pm CDT on flight day one.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:32 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:38 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:39 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:50 PM
The French Echocardiograph Experiment (FEE) and the French Postural Experiment (FPE) will fly on flight 51-G as part of a cooperative project with the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) of France. The objectives of these experiments are to obtain on-orbit data regarding the response to weightlessness off the cardiovascular and sensorimotor systems. The system was previously flown on a Soviet Salyut mission in July 1982. These experiments accompany and will be performed by the French payload specialist Patrick Baudry with participation from other crew members.

French Echocardiograph Experiment (FEE)
The human cardiovascular system is adapted to compensate for the constant pull of gravity on Earth. During the first few days of spaceflight the crew is subjected to some significant changes as their systems adapt to the sharp reduction of gravitational effects. Such effects include the temporary pooling of blood in the head and upper torso, with changes in the size of some heart cavities and flow rates in major arteries. Data on these changes and the readaptation to gravity after the mission have important implications for crew health and safety.

The French echocardiograph uses a non-invasive, ultrasonic technique to obtain data on these events. The equipment weighs 176 pounds and is contained within two middeck double lockers. One double locker holds the electronics; the second holds the video tape recorder, the control monitor and a stowage drawer. Payload specialist Baudry will perform the FEE supported by mission specialist Shannon Lucid. The experiment will be performed at launch plus 4 to 6 hours and one other time during that day. Baudry and Lucid will then separately perform the experiment at approximately the same time each flight day. Preflight and post flight collection sessions will be required to correlate data collected in flight.

French Postural Experiment (FPE) I
The human sensorimotor functions may be categorized into four areas: muscular tone, posture, orientation and movement. All these functional modes interact to operate within the constant field of gravity experienced on Earth. Without the physical bias and point of reference provided by gravity, these sensorimotor functions must adapt. It is the objective of the EPE to learn more of this adaptive process. A better understanding of this process may provide new insights as to how these functional modes interact on Earth. Parametric measurements of electromyographic activity of muscles, angular head movement and up-and-down eye movement will be conducted. Measurements will be obtained using biochemical electronic sensors, data tape recorders and a camera. The five in-flight objectives of the FPE are: posture and movement; posture and vision; vestibule-ocular reflex; optokinetic nystagmus (involuntary oscillation); and spatial memory. During in-flight operation, the experiment will be conducted on a non-interference basis with the planned crew activity once a day by two crewmembers throughout the mission. Baudry and the Saudi payload specialist will be trained to perform the FPE and to assist each other. Each experimental session will require 65 minutes, including set-up and calibration, plus an additional 30 minutes for unstowage and stowage.

(Source: STS 51-G Press Kit)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:53 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 03:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:00 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:03 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:05 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:12 PM
June 18, 1985 - It looked awfully good going away

Sensor data from the Arabsat satellite indicated, that its solar arrays may have prematurely deployed inside the sunshield. Everybody, especially a certain Saudi prince, breathed a lot easier, when the sunshield was opened and everything checked out o.k.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:16 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:20 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:23 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:39 PM
“It looked awfully good going away”, reported John Fabian after he had launched the second satellite in two days. “When it came out of the shuttle, I started breathing again”, Prince Sultan explained later. “A very, very good job. – My job now is utilizing the satellite to its maximum.”
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:43 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:47 PM
Arabsat 1-B left the payload bay at 8:56 am CDT.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:50 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:54 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 04:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:10 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:15 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:18 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:20 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:22 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:26 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:30 PM
June 19, 1985 - Success, snafu... and cake
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:42 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:45 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:47 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 05:51 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:02 PM
It was 6:20 am CDT, and the third and Telstar 3-D left its cradle enroute to geostationary orbit.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:06 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:12 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:17 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:19 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:24 PM
Fabian: Houston, Discovery, with your post-deploy report.

CapCom (Robert Springer): Roger, we’re ready to copy, John. Sounds to me like it is three up and three away – site’s retired.

Fabian: Oh, we are not ready for retirement quite yet, Bob. But we’re glad to be three for three. We were off on time, attitude 195.85, 67.76 and 21.10… The rates negative .001, negative .002 and positive .003… and for anomalies, we will say nominal, nominal, nominal.

CapCom: That’s sounds good, like good work to me, John. Well done.

Fabian: Well, we appreciate all the good work at Houston and KSC to make these three satellites ready for deploy.

CapCom: Roger, I’m sure everybody who had a hand in it enjoys the success you have seen and enjoys hearing your reports that everything went well.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:28 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:31 PM
At 1:43 pm CDT that afternoon, on her 37th orbit, Discovery came into range of a U.S. Air Force test facility located on a 9,994 feet peak on the Hawaiian Island of Maui. The shuttle was supposed to act as a passive target for a low-powered 4-watt laser beam fired from a canon on the ground. For this “High-Precision Tracking Experiment” (HPTE), first in a row of SDI-related experiments planned for upcoming shuttle flights, an 8-inch mirror had been attached to the orbiter’s side hatch window.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:34 PM
But the target was pointing precisely… in the wrong direction! Due to human error Discovery’s onboard computers were searching for a nonexistent 9,994 mile high mountain. The hatch window wasn’t facing the Earth, but some indefinite point in space. The astronauts of course noticed the error, but due to a short nine-minute window for the experiment no time was left for a correction maneuver.   

NASA spokesman Charles Redmond explained the problem later: “The numbers entered into the crew activity plan were provided in units of feet. The onboard guidance was respecting them in units of nautical miles.” Flight Director Milt Heflin concluded: “We slipped up.” :-[
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:38 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:40 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:45 PM
Brandenstein: Greetings, Houston, here we are in the middeck and we got a pretty good flight so far. As you know, a most momentous event… we are having a ceremony. We had on launch day quite a momentous event: the 100th American to reach space as a result of our manned spaceflight program was onboard. And we are gonna let the world know who that person was right now. Shannon Lucid was the first runner up; she was the 99th as she got to space three inches ahead of Steve Nagel, who was the 100th individual to reach space in the manned space program, at least the 100th American. And for having that we have a cake which Steve will have to cut, and I’m sure as he is doing that he has probably some words he would like to say.

CapCom: Okay.

Nagel: Thank you very much. I am not sure if that’s true, although I sat three inches behind Shannon my nose is about 3 1/2 inches longer than hers is. So it still is a debatable point, in my mind anyway. But I thank you very much for this great honor and especially the cake, which I’ll gladly eat.

CapCom: Ah, roger copy. Do you have METs on those entries into space?

 :D
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:49 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:53 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:56 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 06:59 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/24/2012 07:00 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:03 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:12 PM
June 20, 1985 - Spartan goes solo

Spartan 1 is the first in a series of Shuttle launched, short duration free-flyers designed to extend the capabilities of sounding rocket class experiments. The primary mission of Spartan 1 is to perform medium resolution mapping of the X-Ray emission from extended sources and regions, specifically the hot (10,000 degrees C) gas pervading a large cluster of galaxies in the constellation Perseus and in the galactic center and Sco-X-2. in addition the X-Ray emission from the nuclear region of our own Milky way galaxy will be mapped.

Spartan 1 is a rectangular structure, 126 by 42 by 48 in.; weight 2,223 lb. including 300 lb. of experiments. It will be deployed and retrieved using the Canadian-built robot arm. Total deployed time will be approximately 45 hours. The satellite is designed to accommodate experiments that require stellar or solar pointing and establishes its inertial reference using gyros and a cold gas Attitude Control System (ACS). The ACS, controlled by an internal micro-computer, will obtain an initial fix from the sun and two guide stars, Vega and Deneb, and  then point the detectors at the desired celestial targets.

All scientific and engineering data is recorded by an on-board tape recorder. No telemetry or command link is provided. Power is provided by internal batteries. When -Spartan is retrieved and the Shuttle returns, the recording tape will be removed and sent to the Goddard Space Flight Center where scientific data tapes will be generated. The Spartan 'family" of short duration satellites are designed to minimize operational interfaces with the orbiter and crew. The only interfaces are latching, release and berthing support, deployment and retrieval, and turn-on and checkout by the crew prior to deployment. By keeping the interfaces to a minimum, it is possible to operate the Spartan autonomously and minimize both demands on the orbiter timeline and impact on other experiments. Spartan 1 is built by the Attached Shuttle Payloads Project (ASP) at the Goddard Space Flight Center at a cost of approximately $3.5 million.

(Source: STS 51-G Press Kit)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:16 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:26 PM
The main task that morning was performed by Shannon Lucid. She grabbed the  fridge-sized Spartan 1 with the RMS. As Discovery flew north of Hawaii on orbit 52, the astronomy platform was sent on its way - release came at 11:03 am CDT.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:27 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:32 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:33 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:36 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:43 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:45 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:48 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:50 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:52 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 04:55 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:00 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:04 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:08 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:10 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:12 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:21 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:24 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:27 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:29 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:32 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:37 PM
Prince Sultan will photograph Saudi Arabia during Discovery's 49 daylight passes over its southwestern region with a 70 mm camera from orbit. The photographs will be studied by Saudi scientists at the research institute, the University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. They also will be compared with previous data from multispectral scanner, thematic mapper and radar images (SIR-A and SIR-B). Analysis will cover geological features, sand dune morphology, hydrogeological features, turbidity in the
Red Sea, urban areas and forestry.

(Source: STS 51-G Press Kit)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:41 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:45 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:48 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:55 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 05:59 PM
June 21, 1985 - Gotcha!

Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 06:05 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 06:07 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 06:12 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 06:15 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:25 PM
The second “Star Wars” attempt came at 6:50 am CDT – and this time Discovery, passing over Hawaii on orbit 64, was pointing in the right direction. The blue-green laser beam maintained a lock on the reflecting mirror for about 2 1/2 minutes.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:28 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:33 PM
The astronauts were able to observe the beam and recorded the multi-colored psychedelic light show on video tape. Much to the pleasure of flight controllers at Mission Control they later broadcasted the pictures, accompanied by the booming strains of Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:40 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:43 PM
CapCom (Robert Springer): And Discovery, Houston, thank you very much for the show. We all really appreciated it. And particular thanks from the flight director. He’s gonna make good use of that…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:48 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:49 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 07:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:08 PM
In another experiment, two liquids which do not mix on Earth will be studied in microgravity. They are referred to as "phases." Using Phase Separation Experiment hardware developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Al-Saud will place various concentrations of Saudi, Kuwaiti and Algerian oils mixed with water in a hand-held, transparent Plexiglas container with 15 chambers, each having a small metal mixing ball. He will shake the container and mount it in front of a fluorescent light, then photograph the separation and record his observations.

(Source: STS 51-G Press Kit)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:13 PM
June 22, 1985 - "We've got a Spartan on the hook!"
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:17 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:20 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:28 PM
After a solo trip of 13 orbits the Spartan 1 satellite came back into sight that morning. The astronauts reported that it appeared stable, but slightly out of position. But John Fabian had no trouble grappling it with the RMS, while Discovery was flying across the Indian Ocean. At 8:38 am CDT Commander Dan Brandenstein reported to the ground: "We've got a Spartan on the hook!"
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:30 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:36 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:40 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:43 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:47 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:50 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:54 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 08:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:01 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:03 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:11 PM
Success, success, success, success... and success! :) :) :) :)...  :)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:14 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:16 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:21 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:28 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:29 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:34 PM
June 23, 1985 - Sultan, your uncle is on the phone...

CapCom (Jim Wetherbee): Discovery, Houston.

Lucid: Go ahead, Houston.

CapCom: Roger, Discovery, request all crew members temporarily drop what they are doing and float at attention. I have an important announcement to make and request also that Steve Nagel makes his way to the front of the bus please.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:41 PM
The famous “2001: A Space Odyssey” opening theme by Richard Strauss - Also Sprach Zarathustra (Thus Spoke Zarathustra) – was booming through the control room, while the large monitor walls started blinking and then displayed funny cartoons.

CapCom: It has been determined, that in about five seconds Steve Nagel will start the 100th orbit of this flight… 2… 1… mark!

Loud rooting and a round of applause erupted in the control room.

CapCom: The 100th American has just started the 100th orbit of this flight, which will be known officially as “Orbit Nagel”… And Steve, if you are available you would do us a great honor by giving us a few words on this occasion.

Nagel: Oh, I am flabbergasted to say the least. I am very pleased about this. It is really something that everybody can get out every night and can look at my orbit in the sky.   

CapCom: Roger…

Lucid: You know how appropriate the starting point for the Steve Nagel Orbit was, because over a lot of Africa we are seeing nasty fires, which is what Steve is mostly into.   
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:47 PM
 ;D

CapCom: Roger, and be advised that was the 100th nose on the 100th node of this flight.

Lucid: Ah, could you repeat that so we can write it down? We didn’t get everything…

CapCom: I said that was the 100th nose on the 100th node of this flight.

Lucid: That’s extremely poetic. We will remember that forever. Steve is in tears.

CapCom: And as the confetti slowly falls to the floor and the ceremony has gradually come to a close, we wondered if Steve would do us the honor of performing the 100th flight note for us please. I have a switch on R12.

Nagel: Okay, go ahead.

CapCom: Roger, we would like the water tank bravo inlet to open please.

Nagel: Okay, you got it and I think that’s about the 100th cycle on that switch for this flight.

CapCom: And we have requested hardcopies of our scopes to give you on return.   

Nagel: Okay, thanks a lot, I really appreciate that.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:50 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:53 PM
CapCom: Discovery, Houston, with you through TDRS.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston, we are reading you loud and clear and Sultan is ready on the middeck.

CapCom: Okay, we have a good downlink. I hand you over at this time to the Washington commentator.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 09:56 PM
A commentator for Saudi TV, after a short introduction, gave way to King Fahd and Prince Sultan’s father, Prince Salman, speaking from Riyadh. At first the King read from a prepared message in English.

King Fahd: Dear Sultan, we are proud of your mission. It is a great achievement. I wish to send through you my best wishes to His Excellency President Reagan and the friendly American Nation. Thank you very much. I hope to see you soon. (…) I will give you your father, please speak to your father. Thank you very much.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:05 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:09 PM
The rest of the conversation was in Arabic. A similar TV connection between Patrick Baudry and French President Mitterrand that day had to be cancelled due to technical difficulties. When the on-orbit crew press conference came up, everything was working well again – and even the “shorts problem” was under control…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:11 PM
Mike Mullane “Riding Rockets” (p. 201): “While I was a CapCom for the ‘Frog and the Prince’ mission, Shannon Lucid’s bare legs were an issue that came to my desk. (…) Like most crews, the 51-G astronauts had changed into shorts and golf shirts for their orbit operations. There had been several TV downlinks in which Shannon had been seen working in her shorts. Prior to the orbit news conference, the public affairs officer sent the flight director a note requesting that the crew “dress in pants for the press conference” When the note came to me I understood its intent. Public affairs was concerned the Arab world might find it offensive for one of their princes to see hovering in midair with a woman’s naked legs prominently displayed next to him. I tossed the note in the garbage. HQ could fire me but I wasn’t going to tell an American woman to modify her dress to accommodate the values of a medieval, repressive society where woman couldn’t drive cars, much less fly space shuttles. I wanted to call Shannon and tell her to wear a thong for the press conference. The irony wasn’t lost to me. I was taking a stand for women’s rights! Feminist America owes Mike Mullane one. As it was, the framing of the camera for the press conference only captured a crew’s upper bodies. Shannon’s legs, covered or not, were not visible.”

To be fair, not only cultural differences between the Arabs and the West had brought up a woman’s legs as an issue in the American space program. One year earlier it had been Judy Resnik, posing with her male colleagues – including Mike Mullane – for their weightless crew photo. “While we didn’t intend it, the pose suggested a cheerleader’s pyramid”, explained Mike Mullane. Judy’s bare legs prompted protests from feminist activists who thought the picture was “disgusting” and “degrading to women”. “Part-time” feminist activist Mike Mullane commented:”Breaking barriers was a task fraught with all manner of perils.” 
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:19 PM
French News Agency: Patrick, what are the specific lessons you can draw from your trip in space for the project of a European Space Shuttle called Hermes?

Baudry: I think there is not an imminent profit for the future of the project Hermes, but you know, this flight is a spaceflight, and the condition of flight in space is very different from the condition of flight we know on the Earth, and even from the condition of flight we have aboard an aircraft. So any experience aboard a spacecraft is very important to the project Hermes. And I hope this flight will be very useful in this area.

Unknown: For Commander Brandenstein and John Fabian. You both flew just about two years ago. Do you see any difference on the Earth? Are there any differences from your observations two years ago?

Brandenstein: Well, the best thing about this flight is that I’ve got to command it, which means that I’ll get to land it when we come home. But obviously with a crew of seven conditions are a little more crowded and we have to be a little more conscious to where we move an how we plan our program. We feel very proud of the four satellites that we deployed, also went back and retrieved one. And the whole crew has done a tremendous job and we are looking forward to wrapping it up today and coming home tomorrow morning.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:22 PM
Well, nice words, Dan, but not an answer to the question asked. Prince Sultan did not dodge a much more difficult question by another reporter, who was hinting at the bad news coming from the Middle East. In Beirut Shiite terrorists were still holding 40 American hostages from the TWA 847 airliner, which had been hijacked shortly before Discovery embarked on her mission. The journalist was referring to the ironic circumstance that the U.S. had just launched a satellite owned by a consortium of Arab nations, which included Lebanon, Syria, and the PLO.

Prince Sultan: From space we can see no boundaries on Earth. These people fighting down there should be aware of that fact.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TWA_Flight_847
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:25 PM
Later Prince Sultan put it very nicely: “Those of us who ventured into space and returned safely know that our reward is not only the contribution we make to space science, but also the special insight we gain into the world, which we must impart to those who have not shared the experience.

At first you are inclined to seek out your home town, state or country. (…) Then you are transformed by this magical view. A special feeling evolves. You lose the urge to find boundaries between states and countries. The world becomes a globe of seven continents and seas. Soon, even the continents and great oceans of the world seem to meld into a large kaleidoscope of color and beauty. No longer do you think in terms of ‘my city’ or ‘my country’, rather you begin to sense that you are a part of something much larger. It is at this moment that astronauts gain the wisdom that could change the way people treat each other.

The insight I gained in space confirms my deep conviction that we are all part of a much larger whole, one that demands we stalwartly work toward understanding relationships between individuals and nations, compelling us to live and work together toward making our planet a better place.”
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:31 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:38 PM
June 24, 1985 - Return to the desert at sunrise
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:43 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:55 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 10:58 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:02 PM
PAO: Eight miles from touchdown, 267 nautical miles per hour is the current speed, altitude 10,000 feet… sink rate now 126 feet per second… FIDO says the Commander is correcting the glide slope and is…

CapCom: Discovery, Houston, show you correcting the glide slope, slightly right of centerline, surface winds 135 at 10, that’s 10 knots from the left.
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:08 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:14 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:20 PM
PAO: We expect touchdown in a minute… four miles from the end of the runway, 6,300 feet altitude, sink rate 192 feet per second, airspeed 290 knots… 3000 feet altitude, 2,000 feet even…  two miles from the end of the runway… 1,000 feet altitude, sink rate is now 70 feet per second… gear down… one mile from the runway… ah, 86 feet… now gear down and locked… and we have touchdown at Mission Elapsed Time 7 days, one hour, 38 minutes and 50 seconds…  and we expect the rollout margin to be 4,500 feet and 15 percent braking… and wheel stop at 7 days, one hour, 39 minutes, 30 seconds…
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:26 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:30 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:36 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:39 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:43 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:49 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:51 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/25/2012 11:56 PM
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/26/2012 12:00 AM
Discovery landed in a crosswind at Edwards Air Force Base at 9:12 a.m. Pacific time, burying its left wheel six inches into the soft desert runway. That landing was similar to April's shuttle landing at KSC when the brake locked. NASA associate administrator Jesse Moore said the wheel dragging may have been due to the soft, wet conditions of the desert lake bed, but he conceded that the brake may have locked up as it did during the previous Kennedy landing. Pending a new series of brake tests conducted at the B. F. Goodrich facility in Troy, Ohio, the next KSC landing is expected to occur in November. Concerning the just completed Discovery mission (51-G), Moore said, "I would have to say that this is one of the most successful missions of the shuttle program. This was particularly rewarding from the standpoint that essentially 100 percent of our objectives were accomplished and we had a number of very significant operations on board." (TODAY, Jun. 25, 1985)

Discovery's brakes worked fine when it landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California on June 24, NASA officials said; they further indicated that the shuttle was expected to return to Kennedy Space Center on June 29. "Officials reported that overall it was a very smooth mission," said Les Reinertsen, NASA spokesman. "The space shuttle main engines have been inspected and are in excellent condition. An inspection of the brakes revealed that they are in very good condition, as well as the tires. There were no brake anomalies reported for this landing." A softening of the desert runway by recent rains was the official explanation for Discovery's wheels having sunk into the runway. "Officials estimate that about 60 or 70 tiles will have to be replaced," Reinertsen said. "The areas with the most tile damage are the belly and the chine area near the main engine. The damage is believed to have occurred during ascent." (TODAY, Jun. 26,1985)

June 29: The shuttle Discovery which had arrived at KSC on the 28th was moved today from the runway to the Orbiter Processing Facility to be prepared for its August 24th flight. (TODAY, Jun. 30, 1985)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/26/2012 12:02 AM
Steve Nagel (JSC NASA Oral History Project): “They (the rest of the crew) went to France before my second flight, and I couldn’t go with them to France. So everybody but me went to France, and then to Saudi, we all went because that was in December of that year, and that was shortly after. My second flight (61-A) was in late October, early November. And December we went to Saudi Arabia. So it was quite a year. Nineteen eight-five was a benchmark year. I’ve never had a year before or since like that one. But the trip to Saudi Arabia to me, anyways, was more out of this world than going into orbit. Really, it was quite a trip.”
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: Ares67 on 01/26/2012 12:12 AM
And more pictures of Mission 51-G can be found at L2

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13166.0


Meanwhile I am preparing the next thread - and, hi TALsite, you will love that one, because never before and never again a Shuttle came that close to paying a visit to your hometown of Zaragoza... ;D ;)
Title: Re: Discovery STS 51-G / A Royal Effort in Space
Post by: catdlr on 04/24/2017 08:37 PM
bump.....

Space Shuttle STS-51-G Mission Highlights 1985 NASA; 18th Flight Post Flight Press Conference

Jeff Quitney

Published on Apr 24, 2017


"Commander: Daniel C. Brandenstein
Pilot: John O. Creighton
Mission Specialists: Shannon W. Lucid, John M. Fabian, Steven R. Nagel
Payload Specialists: Patrick Baudry (France), Prince Sultan Salman Al-Saud (Saudi Arabia)
Dates: June 17-24, 1985
Vehicle: Discovery OV-103
Payloads: MORELOS-A/PAM-D, ARABSAT-1B/PAM-D, TELSTAR/PAM-D 3-D, SPARTAN-1, ADSF, HPTE, FEE, FPE, ASE, and GAS (six experiments)
Landing site: Runway 23 dry lakebed at Edwards AFB, CA

Narrated by the Commander and crew, this program contains footage selected by the astronauts, as well as their comments on the mission. Footage includes launch, onboard crew activities, and landing."

NASA film JSC-874

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space...

Mission summary

Discovery lifted off from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 7:33 am EDT on 17 June 1985. The mission's crew members included Daniel C. Brandenstein, commander; John O. Creighton, pilot; Shannon W. Lucid, Steven R. Nagel, and John M. Fabian, mission specialists; and Patrick Baudry, of France, and Prince Sultan Salman Al Saud, of Saudi Arabia, both payload specialists.

STS-51-G carried three communications satellites as its primary cargo. These were Arabsat 1-B (Arab Satellite Communications Organization); Morelos I (Mexico); and Telstar 3-D (AT&T). All three successfully utilized PAM-D booster stages to achieve geosynchronous transfer orbits after being deployed from Discovery.

Also carried was the Spartan 1 carrier module, designed to be deployed from the orbiter and fly free in space before being retrieved. Spartan 1 included 300 pounds (140 kg) of astronomy experiments. It was deployed and operated successfully, independent of the orbiter, before being retrieved. Discovery furthermore carried an experimental materials-processing furnace, several French biomedical experiments, and six Getaway Special experiments, which were all successfully performed, although the GO34 Getaway Special shut down prematurely.

The mission's final payload element was a High Precision Tracking Experiment (HPTE) for the Strategic Defense Initiative (nicknamed "Star Wars"); the HTPE failed to deploy properly during its first try on the mission's 37th orbit, because the orbiter was not at the correct attitude. It was successfully deployed on orbit 64.

Discovery landed at Edwards Air Force Base at 9:12 am EDT on 24 June 1985, after a mission duration of 7 days, one hour, 38 minutes and 52 seconds...

------------------------------------------
Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhHdczNa63w?t=001

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhHdczNa63w