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International Space Flight (ESA, Russia, China and others) => Indian Launchers => Topic started by: johnxx9 on 02/04/2010 04:57 PM

Title: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: johnxx9 on 02/04/2010 04:57 PM
India's second mission to the moon.

Chandrayaan-2 Program updates (http://indianspaceweb.blogspot.com/2010/02/chandrayaan-2-program-updates.html)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Danderman on 02/04/2010 09:05 PM
For anyone not following this closely, its a Russian lander, modeled after the Phobos Grunt lander, which is a miniaturized version of the Luna landers.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 03/16/2010 08:52 PM
I'd read that ISRO wants to add an additional smaller rover, specifically in connection with investigation of lunar water that's recently been found.
They say they'll simply trade off mass against other parts of the payload, perhaps making the orbiter smaller.

Was there an orbiter planned as part of this mission? If so, then what was its purpose?

I'm sure ISRO wishes that its GSLV-Mk3 rocket was available for this mission, given the heightened mission demands and compelling interest from the lunar water discovery.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 07/28/2010 05:04 PM
Space Travel: "Chandrayaan-2 Payloads To Be Decided Next Month".
www.space-travel.com/reports/Chandrayaan_2_Payloads_To_Be_Decided_Next_Month_999.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 08/04/2010 02:26 PM
CY-2:

http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=64123

LRO builds on CY-1 data:

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=space&id=news/asd/2010/07/28/05.xml&headline=Images%20Appear%20To%20Show%20Water%20Ice%20On%20Moon

http://www.universetoday.com/70174/radar-images-reveal-tons-of-water-likely-at-the-lunar-poles/
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 08/16/2010 03:23 PM
BBC News: "Race to launch Moon landing probe".
www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-10960409

RussianSpaceWeb: "Luna-Glob/Luna-Resurs".
www.russianspaceweb.com/luna_glob.html


Moon mission on track: ISRO chief.
www.deccanchronicle.com/hyderabad/moon-mission-track-isro-chief-978
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 08/30/2010 06:46 PM
Payloads for Chandrayaan-2 Mission Finalised.

Chandrayaan-2, India's second mission to moon, is being targeted for launch during 2013. Chandrayaan-2 will have an orbiter (satellite), a lander and a rover. Chandrayaan-2 is planned to be launched onboard Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota. While the lander will be provided by Russia, the orbiter and the rover are being built by ISRO.

The payloads to be flown onboard Chandrayaan-2 (orbiter and rover) have been finalised by a National committee of experts drawn from ISRO centres, academic institutions and R & D laboratories and Chaired by Prof U R Rao, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Space Sciences (ADCOS) and former Chairman of ISRO.

The committee, after detailed deliberations and considering the mission requirements, weight and power available for scientific payloads, has recommended five payloads to be flown on the orbiter of which three are new and two are improved versions of the payloads flown earlier on Chandrayaan-1 orbiter. The committee has also recommended two scientific payloads on the rover of Chandrayaan-2. Inclusion of additional payloads, if possible within the mission constraints, will be considered at a later date following a detailed review.
The five recommended payloads of Chandrayaan-2 orbiter are as follows:

1. Large Area Soft X-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) from ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC),
    Bangalore and Solar X-ray Monitor (XSM) from Physical Research Laboratory (PRL),
    Ahmedabad for mapping the major elements present on the lunar surface.
2. L and S band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from Space Applications Centre (SAC),
    Ahmedabad for probing the first few tens of meters of the lunar surface for the
    presence of different constituents including water ice. SAR is expected to provide
    further evidence confirming the presence of water ice below the shadowed regions of
    the moon.
3. Imaging IR Spectrometer (IIRS) from SAC, Ahmedabad for the mapping of lunar
    surface over a wide wavelength range for the study of minerals, water molecules and
    hydroxyl present.
4. Neutral Mass Spectrometer (ChACE2) from Space Physics Laboratory (SPL),
    Thiruvananthapuram to carry out a detailed study of the lunar exosphere.
5. Terrain Mapping Camera2 (TMC2) from SAC, Ahmedabad for preparing a
    three-dimensional map essential for studying the lunar mineralogy and geology.

The two scientific payloads on Chandrayaan-2 rover are:

1. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS) from Laboratory for Electro Optic
   Systems (LEOS), Bangalore.
2. Alpha Particle Induced X ray Spectroscope (APIXS) from PRL, Ahmedabad.

Both the instruments are expected to carry out elemental analysis of the lunar surface near the landing site.

Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft weighs about 2,650 kg at lift-off of which the orbiter weight is about 1,400 kg and lander weight is about 1,250 kg. Development of the subsystems of the orbiter and the rover is in progress at ISRO centres in Bangalore, Thiruvananthapuram and Ahmedabad.

Source. (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Aug30_2010)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: neilh on 08/31/2010 02:31 AM
It'll be quite interesting to see what lands on the Moon first: Chandrayaan-2 or one of the Google Lunar X Prize contestants.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 08/31/2010 03:49 PM
Aviation Week: "Russia To Test Chandrayaan-2 Lander Next Year". (http://www.aviationnow.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=space&id=news/asd/2010/08/31/10.xml&headline=Russia%20To%20Test%20Chandrayaan-2%20Lander%20Next%20Year)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 09/02/2010 06:45 PM
Chandrayaan-2 to get closer to moon. (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics/nation/Chandrayaan-2-to-get-closer-to-moon/articleshow/6478360.cms)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 09/05/2010 03:50 PM
The Times of India: "'We're launching Chandrayaan-2 for a total coverage of the moon'". (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/opinion/interviews/Were-launching-Chandrayaan-2-for-a-total-coverage-of-the-moon/articleshow/6501413.cms)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Space Pete on 09/07/2010 12:12 PM
Chandrayaan-2 will try out new ideas, technologies: ISRO. (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_chandrayaan-2-will-try-out-new-ideas-technologies-isro_1434644)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: savuporo on 10/09/2010 08:25 PM
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/indian-chandrayaan2-moon-mission-101009.html

Quote
The probe is slated to launch in 2013, long after China's current Chang'e 2 moon mission ends.
China launched the Chang'e 2 probe on Oct. 1. It reached the moon Wednesday (Oct. 5).
India, meanwhile, approved plans for its Chandrayaan 2 mission in August. But unlike China's new probe, which is an orbiter, Chandrayaan 2 actually includes three vehicles: an orbiter, lander and rover, the Indian Space Research Organisation said.

Race back to the lunar surface is on. Change'3 is scheduled to land around late 2012.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Salo on 07/13/2011 12:48 PM
http://www.livemint.com/2011/07/08213841/K-Radhakrishnan--Flight-stage.html?h=B
Quote
Does it mean all major missions till Chandrayaan-2 will only use indigenous engines? Since the Russian engine has to be examined, will Chandrayaan-2 be delayed?

Yes, it has to be tested on indigenous cryogenic engines, and we’ll only use our engines for future launches, but that is not why there will be a delay. Historically, the Chandrayaan missions are a joint Indo-Soviet mission. The agreement was that the lander [that will descend on the moon] and the (lunar) rover (a robot vehicle) would be provided by the Russians. We wanted to put a smaller rover; it’s something new that we are developing. However, in Russia there was a rethink. They decided they’ll only develop the lander and some instruments related to it. That means India would have to make a bigger rover, a decision taken almost a year ago. There are also preliminary design reviews to be undertaken this year to select which instruments are to be carried onboard the mission. So it’s not only GSLV (engines); there are other reasons for the delay.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Salo on 09/09/2012 11:43 AM
Russian sources say that the failure of the Phobos-Grunt mission will impact the Chandrayaan-2 mission, delaying it by 3 years:

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/article2854134.ece

This is because technologies and systems used in Phobos-Grunt are also present in the Russian lander which is to be used for the Chandrayaan-2 mission, and these will have to be subjected to review.

The Chandrayaan-2 mission was originally scheduled for launch in 2013, but was facing delays due to the 2 consecutive failures of the GSLV. The mission is now expected to be delayed until 2016, due to the failure of Phobos-Grunt.

Here's an image of the prototype Chandrayaan-2 lunar rover being developed at IIT-Kanpur:

http://lunarnetworks.blogspot.com/2010/08/chandrayaan-2-rover-prototype.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Salo on 09/09/2012 11:44 AM
 On Chandrayaan 2, K. Radhakrishnan said the Indo-Russian Joint Venture on a GSLV launch vehicle would be on an Indian rover and Russian landing station. But there could be some delay in the latter as there was a ‘major’ review of Russian space programme following a recent failed mission.

“The orbiter is in very good shape (and the launch could be) possibly by 2014. When exactly the landing module is made available is to be seen but we are ready for 2014,” K. Radhakrishnan, flanked by ISRO’s top scientists said at a press conference here.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/science/article3877463.ece
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/10/2013 07:09 PM
Chandrayaan-2 delayed to 2017 as per this presentation, Moon Exploration Lunar polar sample return, ESA thematic information day, BELSPO, 3 July 2012.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 01/11/2013 12:04 AM
IIRC Luna-Resurs (Lander/Rover) and Chandrayaan 2 (Orbiter) are now separate missions.  ISRO can launch Chandrayaan 2 whenever they are ready to.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/11/2013 03:00 AM
Initially,the mission consisted of indian orbiter and russian lander + rover. Later, it was indian orbiter + mini-rover and russian lander. I think this is still the case. The slides that I provided is from july 2012 and  L-R clearly mentions India in the bracket. This slide is fron Jan 2011



Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 01/11/2013 09:02 AM
According to Anatoly Zak, Luna-Resurs was split up during the post-Fobos-Grunt re-evaluations.  AIUI, the current plan is to launch Luna-Resurs sometime in 2017 (depending on how well Luna-Glob 1 & 2 do) on a Soyuz 2-1b w/Fregat.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 01/20/2013 01:02 AM
I am writing an article about this and am trying to get it right.

Is the Indian orbiter and lander scheduled for Luna Resource, now in 2017? Is India involved in Luna Glob in any way?

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 01/20/2013 05:54 AM
AIUI and drawing heavily from Anatoly Zak, the current plan is for Luna-Resurs to be an enlarged version of the Luna-Glob lander.  It will carry the ISRO rover and be launched on a Soyuz 2.1B-Fregat in 2017, assuming there are no problems with the Luna-Glob lander in 2015 (or so).

I don't recall any involvement by ISRO in the Luna-Glob lander or orbiter.

Chandrayaan 2 can be launched whenever ISRO feels like it.  IIRC ISRO have said they want two successful launches of the GSLV Mk.2 first, so 2014 sometime?

Feel free to correct me here...
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/22/2013 03:40 AM
Chandrayaan-2: India to go it alone

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/chandrayaan2-india-to-go-it-alone/article4329844.ece

following the failure in December 2011 of Roskosmos’ Phobos-Grunt mission, there was a delay in the construction of the Russian lander. Due to this, as well as financial problems, the Russian agency apparently expressed its inability provide the lander to meet even the revised time frame of 2015 for the Chandrayaan-2 launch.

Dr. Murty stated that the cancellation of the Russian lander also meant that mission profile had to be marginally changed. The design of the indigenous lander and the preliminary configuration study was completed by the Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad, he said.

Chandrayaan-2 will have five primary payloads on the orbiter. In addition, the rover too will carry two additional instruments. Chandrayaan-2 will be launched by a GSLV powered by an indigenous cryogenic engine.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 01/22/2013 03:45 AM
Thank you. That's the kind of information I was looking for.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/22/2013 05:16 PM
Well, waitasec - here's something else:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/india-to-go-solo-on-second-lunar-mission/articleshow/18127272.cms

Quote
AHMEDABAD: India has decided on its second journey to the moon—Chandrayaan-2—without Russian participation. The tentative date for lift-off is 2015 from the Sriharikota facility. This was announced by space scientist S V S Murty of the Ahmedabad-based Physical Research Laboratory's (PRL) planetary exploration group during a conference on Monday.

The original mission envisaged the nearly Rs 425-crore Chandrayaan-2 having an indigenous rocket and a rover with a Russian lander. But Murty said, "The Russian lander is being replaced by an indigenous lunar lander." The decision comes after the failure of a Russian space mission, Phobos-Grunt in January 2012, which was supposed to test the lander.

Murthy said that the replacement of the Russian lander with an indigenous one would call for a change in the mission profile as well. The lander is being designed and developed by the Space Applications Centre (SAC) in Ahmedabad. Its preliminary configuration study has been completed.

The orbiter will have five payloads, while the six-wheeled rover has two. The orbiter will operate from an altitude of 200 km above the moon's surface. "Chandrayaan-2 will carry out an intensive investigation of a localized area of the moon having high scientific value," he said.

The rocket will be the three-stage Geo Synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle powered by an indigenous cryogenic engine. All the payloads of Chandrayaan-2 are indigenous in contrast to Chandrayaan-1 which had six foreign payloads and five from India.

Now this seems quite interesting. I'd really like to see what an Indian-designed lunar lander would look like. And could this become the basis for any concept designs for a larger manned lander?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 01/22/2013 06:03 PM
I get a dead link.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/22/2013 06:13 PM
Okay, try this one instead:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-to-go-solo-on-second-lunar-mission/articleshow/18124826.cms


Here's also another link from Nature.com:

http://blogs.nature.com/news/2013/01/india-may-go-to-the-moon-alone.html

Quote
Designing and building the lander and the rover will surely take time, admits Goswami. Moreover, ISRO has yet to certify the rocket to be used in this mission, which is expected to make its first test flight next month after two successive failures in 2010. The vehicle must make at least two successful flights before it can be trusted for launching Chandrayaan-2, says Goswami.

Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Kryten on 01/22/2013 06:17 PM
 While trying to find a working link for that article, I found this;

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/chandrayaan-2-will-be-indo-russia-mission-isro-lab-director/articleshow/18136814.cms

Quote
AHMEDABAD: India's second lunar mission will be undertaken with Russian participation though it has got delayed, a top official of an ISRO lab said today amidst reports that 'Chandrayaan 2' will be a solo mission.

Chandrayaan 2, an Indo-Russian joint project, is going ahead but it has got delayed, Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) Director J N Goswami said here.

Ahmedabad-based PRL is part of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

"The Indo-Russian mission is going ahead. The project has got delayed. Currently, we are whole-heartedly working for the Mars project scheduled for November. The moon mission, for the time being, has got delayed," Goswami told PTI.

Roskomos, Russia's space agency, and ISRO had signed an agreement on November 12, 2007. Under the pact, Roskomos had assumed the vital responsibility of providing both the orbiter and the rover, while its Indian counterpart was to design and build the lander for the ambitious mission.

"The failure of Roskosmos Phobos-Grunt mission (in December 2011) has, for the time-being, delayed the moon mission," he said, adding the construction of lander for the combined mission has been delayed.

Chandrayaan 2 will have five primary payloads on the orbiter, two of which will be improvements on instruments that were onboard Chandrayaan 1, launched in October, 2008.

Also, the rover will carry two additional instruments. Chandrayaan 2, originally scheduled in 2015, will be launched by a GSLV-powered by an indigenous cryogenic engine.

Reports had appeared in a section of media quoting a scientist of PRL S V S Murty as saying India will go it alone in the Chandrayaan 2 mission. Despite repeated efforts, he was not available for comments on the issue.

PRL is involved in designing indigenous payloads for Chandrayaan 2.
So it looks like there's some indecision at ISRO with regards to this.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/22/2013 07:57 PM
Okay, try this one instead:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-to-go-solo-on-second-lunar-mission/articleshow/18124826.cms


Here's also another link from Nature.com:

http://blogs.nature.com/news/2013/01/india-may-go-to-the-moon-alone.html

Quote
Designing and building the lander and the rover will surely take time, admits Goswami. Moreover, ISRO has yet to certify the rocket to be used in this mission, which is expected to make its first test flight next month after two successive failures in 2010. The vehicle must make at least two successful flights before it can be trusted for launching Chandrayaan-2, says Goswami.

Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

We will have to wait for that as the design work on lunar soft lander just started in 2012. I thought that it was for future missions and not meant for Chandrayaan-2, but it seems they are considering chandrayaan-2 also.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 01/22/2013 08:14 PM
Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

Probably a little too early for that. But try to imagine something with legs...
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Stan Black on 01/22/2013 08:35 PM
Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

Probably a little too early for that. But try to imagine something with legs...

Not airbags then?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 01/23/2013 03:28 AM


Not airbags then?

Would you want to use airbags in such low gravity?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/23/2013 03:41 AM
Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

Probably a little too early for that. But try to imagine something with legs...

Not airbags then?

For Indian lander, it would be a powered decent using one of the following strategies that are under study

Soft landing on Moon
1) by initiating the powered braking from the lunar parking orbit itself and directly landing.
2) by initiating powered braking from an intermediate orbit and directly landing.
3) by splitting the powered braking into two phases:
(a) powered horizontal braking phase that ends at a low altitude with a small vertical velocity and a zero horizontal velocity (b) a vertical descent phase ensuring the required touchdown velocity.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 01/23/2013 04:33 AM


Not airbags then?

Would you want to use airbags in such low gravity?

Surely you're not forgetting the E-6 landers?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: seshagirib on 01/23/2013 05:19 PM
Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

Probably a little too early for that. But try to imagine something with legs...

Not airbags then?

For Indian lander, it would be a powered decent using one of the following strategies that are under study

Soft landing on Moon
1) by initiating the powered braking from the lunar parking orbit itself and directly landing.
2) by initiating powered braking from an intermediate orbit and directly landing.
3) by splitting the powered braking into two phases:
(a) powered horizontal braking phase that ends at a low altitude with a small vertical velocity and a zero horizontal velocity (b) a vertical descent phase ensuring the required touchdown velocity.



Is it possible to soft land direct on the moon ( without entering any lunar orbit) ?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: plutogno on 01/23/2013 05:51 PM
Is it possible to soft land direct on the moon ( without entering any lunar orbit) ?

yes. the early Soviet probes as well as the Surveyors did so
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/23/2013 07:02 PM
Hey Antriksh, any way you can get a pic of the ISRO lander design? I'd really love to know what it looks like.

Probably a little too early for that. But try to imagine something with legs...

Not airbags then?

For Indian lander, it would be a powered decent using one of the following strategies that are under study

Soft landing on Moon
1) by initiating the powered braking from the lunar parking orbit itself and directly landing.
2) by initiating powered braking from an intermediate orbit and directly landing.
3) by splitting the powered braking into two phases:
(a) powered horizontal braking phase that ends at a low altitude with a small vertical velocity and a zero horizontal velocity (b) a vertical descent phase ensuring the required touchdown velocity.



Is it possible to soft land direct on the moon ( without entering any lunar orbit) ?

Yes its called direct descent and involves midcourse correction in the trans lunar trajectory to follow a direct impact trajectory.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: seshagirib on 01/25/2013 05:13 PM
^ Then, why is "direct descent" not an option, under consideration for the Indian Mission?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: seshagirib on 01/25/2013 05:16 PM


Not airbags then?

Would you want to use airbags in such low gravity?

Did not follow, what is the worry here? Bounce back into space?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/25/2013 10:43 PM
^ Then, why is "direct descent" not an option, under consideration for the Indian Mission?

because mission involves orbiter and lander.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/12/2013 12:58 AM
So to clarify - originally the plan was to launch an orbiter, lander (Russian built) and a small rover on the same Indian rocket. Now the Moon surface part is delayed to at least 2017-8 (will it switch to a Russian rocket) and the orbiter now is still planned in 2015-6. Is that correct? Would the payloads (http://www.russianspaceweb.com/luna_resurs.html (http://www.russianspaceweb.com/luna_resurs.html)) be changed (even added to both spacecrafts)?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Blackstar on 03/12/2013 01:11 AM
I don't think the Russian lander was ever supposed to be launched on an Indian rocket.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/12/2013 01:25 AM
I don't think the Russian lander was ever supposed to be launched on an Indian rocket.

Check out the article by Anatoly Zak at the link I gave.  There's another all-Russian lander and orbiter mission before it (Luna-Glob, now also split up into two missions (http://www.russianspaceweb.com/luna_glob.html)), perhaps you have confused with it (earlier reports were rather confusing).

Apparently the plan now looks like this:

2015 - Luna-Glob-Lander
2016 - Luna-Glob-Orbiter
2016 - Chandrayaan-2-Orbiter
2017 - Luna-Resurs / Chandrayaan-2-Rover

Maybe others here can confirm it?

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 03/12/2013 05:01 AM
I may be totally off-base here, but I have received the impression from Mr Zaks' site and some presentations made by Russian sources recently that the Indian rover is no longer part of Luna-Resurs at all.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/12/2013 05:20 AM
I may be totally off-base here, but I have received the impression from Mr Zaks' site and some presentations made by Russian sources recently that the Indian rover is no longer part of Luna-Resurs at all.


This was the response from Lavochkin general director Viktor Khartov back in February in an interview: (http://www.militarynews.ru/excl.asp?ex=158)

Quote
- The project "Luna-Resurs" was planned to implement jointly with India. Has anything changed recently?

- We sent several requests to the Indian side that we have to change the concept of the lunar program, but the response from them has not yet been received. When they have some kind of response to our proposals, then our cooperation will continue.

So the ball is in the Indian's hands, and from the conflicting Indian news reports it looks like that they have yet to decide whether or not to leave the mission and do the whole landing mission by their own (I think the orbiter part has already been separated from the Russian side).
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 03/30/2013 04:44 AM
update:

Completed sub-system level PDRs for Chandrayaan-2 and the rover proto model is under realization. Six wheel rover configuration is being worked out. The Indigenous lander development proposal is finalized;
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 06/28/2013 07:24 PM
Chandrayaan-2 Rover prototype design

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/02/2013 12:23 AM
I'm confused, if the rover design was finalized, wouldn't it mean that prototyping has already been done?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 07/02/2013 02:03 AM
Bleh, I think antriksh meant that the rover design is still being worked out.

The proposed Chandrayaan-2 mission has gone through all sorts of changes and twists and turns since it was first conceived. Originally, it was going to be landed on a Russian lander, but now it looks like ISRO will have to make the lander too. Oh well, should be a good learning exercise.

I really wonder why all rovers have 6 wheels, though. It's always seemed like overkill to me, since they never get pushed to their limits. I feel like it should always just be 4 wheels, but with extra motors for redundancy.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 07/02/2013 02:41 AM
I'm confused, if the rover design was finalized, wouldn't it mean that prototyping has already been done?

Rover design is more or less finalized now, bread board design done, different sub-systems under development.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 07/02/2013 02:43 AM
Bleh, I think antriksh meant that the rover design is still being worked out.

The proposed Chandrayaan-2 mission has gone through all sorts of changes and twists and turns since it was first conceived. Originally, it was going to be landed on a Russian lander, but now it looks like ISRO will have to make the lander too. Oh well, should be a good learning exercise.

I really wonder why all rovers have 6 wheels, though. It's always seemed like overkill to me, since they never get pushed to their limits. I feel like it should always just be 4 wheels, but with extra motors for redundancy.

ISRO had chosen two wheel rover, but now they have included 2 extra wheels. Initial rover design
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 07/02/2013 02:48 AM
CH-2 Orbiter + Lander + Rover
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/02/2013 03:17 AM
Bleh, I think antriksh meant that the rover design is still being worked out.

The proposed Chandrayaan-2 mission has gone through all sorts of changes and twists and turns since it was first conceived. Originally, it was going to be landed on a Russian lander, but now it looks like ISRO will have to make the lander too. Oh well, should be a good learning exercise.

I really wonder why all rovers have 6 wheels, though. It's always seemed like overkill to me, since they never get pushed to their limits. I feel like it should always just be 4 wheels, but with extra motors for redundancy.

Thanks. Yeah, 4 wheels would seem easier and better for a few reasons, no?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/02/2013 03:17 AM
ISRO had chosen two wheel rover, but now they have included 2 extra wheels. Initial rover design

Two wheels!? Haha seems a little less than what sanman was suggesting haha:). Is there a picture for the two wheel rover?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 07/02/2013 03:28 AM
ISRO had chosen two wheel rover, but now they have included 2 extra wheels. Initial rover design

Two wheels!? Haha seems a little less than what sanman was suggesting haha:). Is there a picture for the two wheel rover?


sorry I meant two pairs of wheels  ;D
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/02/2013 03:37 AM
sorry I meant two pairs of wheels  ;D

Haha I couldn't understand how that would work haha:D.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 07/02/2013 03:42 AM
Note that in the rover slide post by antriksh the mention of the LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope). So basically that's supposed to be an Indian-made version of the LIBS system used on Curiosity.

Back when Chandrayaan-2 mission was first being proposed, I went and spammed email boxes and web forums with posts about the Curiosity ChemCam, including some Youtube vids posted here on NSF. Clearly the same advantages provided by this instrumentation on a Mars rover would also benefit a lunar rover. If anything, the even stronger lunar vacuum would further reduce laser attenuation and improve range as compared to Mars.

I like to think maybe somebody somewhere read what I had to say.   ;D
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/02/2013 03:59 AM
Note that in the rover slide post by antriksh the mention of the LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope). So basically that's supposed to be an Indian-made version of the LIBS system used on Curiosity.

Back when Chandrayaan-2 mission was first being proposed, I went and spammed email boxes and web forums with posts about the Curiosity ChemCam, including some Youtube vids posted here on NSF. Clearly the same advantages provided by this instrumentation on a Mars rover would also benefit a lunar rover. If anything, the even stronger lunar vacuum would further reduce laser attenuation and improve range as compared to Mars.

I like to think maybe somebody somewhere read what I had to say.   ;D

Seems like somebody did! It's a great payload to be flying...
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 07/02/2013 12:12 PM
I think Antriksh mentioned that the LANDER design was finalised.

Also, Sanman, I found this MS thesis which digs around the question of number of wheels. Page 29. http://c3p0.ou.edu/IRL/Theses/Roman-MS.pdf
But here's my question: if the benefit is simpler design, why not three wheels? 4 wheels seem intuitively more stable because we think in terms of boxes. But, given the same ortho-centre vertex distance, and CG height off the ground - how about a tetrahedral rover? Solar panels on all slanted surfaces that don't accumulate as much dust, reduced surface area/volume contributing to better thermal management... :P In any case I think the wheel walking mode offered by the rocker bogie suspension, and the reduction of surface pressure wins 6-wheelers the contest.[1]

I know LIBS at locally reduced pressures is also more sensitive, allowing faster, and greater expansion of the plasma - hastening the transition from a continuous thermal spectrum to an atomic one, and increasing spatial resolution. But won't global lack of pressure, i.e. no retarding force of an atmosphere, allow this plasma to continue expanding for a much longer time? That'd mean you need a larger aperture, and a longer delay between continuum and elemental emission, or worse: a confounding overlap. The lack of "contaminant" species in the atmosphere which are also emitting, may improve S/N, but I think it'll still be challenging doing it on the moon.[1]


[1] In other words, lots of trade-offs - for all things :D

As an aside, what e-mail inboxes did you spam? I'll join you the next time round.. I didn't know ISRO replies to e-mails lol
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 08/04/2013 04:31 AM
The Chandrayaan-2 mission seems to be languishing due to the non-availability of the Russian lander:

http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/1868557/report-india-s-second-moon-mission-chandrayaan-2-stuck-in-limbo
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 08/14/2013 01:50 PM
Looks like the lander will now be Indian design

"..an integrated programmatic review on Chandrayaan-2 (chaired by Prof U R Rao) was carried out to critically assess our capability to design and deploy a landing craft in a short time frame. The integrated review of Chandrayaan-2, recommended that India could realize the Lander module in the next few years. Currently the spacecraft is being reconfigured for the proposed Indian Rover and Lander modules.."

http://netindian.in/news/2013/08/14/00025558/lunar-mission-chandrayaan-2-be-solo-indian-effort-govt

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 08/14/2013 02:24 PM
Chandraayan-2 is going to be a full indian built mission, source: http://netindian.in/news/2013/08/14/00025558/lunar-mission-chandrayaan-2-be-solo-indian-effort-govt
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 08/14/2013 09:49 PM
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/india-to-go-alone-with-chandrayaan-2/article5022717.ece

Personally, I feel that with the inevitable delays, it would be better for India to instead use GSLV-Mk3 for the next mission to the Moon. This will increase the payload envelope, and allow for a more substantive payload to be sent, with appropriately increased mission scope.

Let the Mars Orbiter Mission be the last PSLV to send a payload beyond Earth orbit for ISRO. All further missions beyond the Earth should at least use GSLV-Mk3, or whatever more powerful successors show up.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 08/18/2013 06:46 AM
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/india-to-go-alone-with-chandrayaan-2/article5022717.ece

Personally, I feel that with the inevitable delays, it would be better for India to instead use GSLV-Mk3 for the next mission to the Moon. This will increase the payload envelope, and allow for a more substantive payload to be sent, with appropriately increased mission scope.

Let the Mars Orbiter Mission be the last PSLV to send a payload beyond Earth orbit for ISRO. All further missions beyond the Earth should at least use GSLV-Mk3, or whatever more powerful successors show up.

I dont think its a good idea to start using GSLV-3 for such ambitious missions right off the bat, the true nature of a rocket isn't revealed until it has had a couple of launches. The GSLV's first couple of launches were successful but after that it's performance went down the drain. If the test flight of GSLV-2 is successful on monday it would make it the ideal choice to ferry a follow on mars mission.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: docmordrid on 08/18/2013 02:49 PM
Space News story -

http://www.spacenews.com/article/civil-space/36795india-drops-russia-from-chandrayaan-2-lunar-mission
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 08/18/2013 05:41 PM
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/india-to-go-alone-with-chandrayaan-2/article5022717.ece

Personally, I feel that with the inevitable delays, it would be better for India to instead use GSLV-Mk3 for the next mission to the Moon. This will increase the payload envelope, and allow for a more substantive payload to be sent, with appropriately increased mission scope.

Let the Mars Orbiter Mission be the last PSLV to send a payload beyond Earth orbit for ISRO. All further missions beyond the Earth should at least use GSLV-Mk3, or whatever more powerful successors show up.

I dont think its a good idea to start using GSLV-3 for such ambitious missions right off the bat, the true nature of a rocket isn't revealed until it has had a couple of launches. The GSLV's first couple of launches were successful but after that it's performance went down the drain. If the test flight of GSLV-2 is successful on monday it would make it the ideal choice to ferry a follow on mars mission.

Well, my point is that by the time the rest of Chandrayaan-2 hardware is developed and ready, the GSLV-Mk3 would have already had adequate number of flights by then.

IMHO, the development of a lander will be no small trivial task, and that will delay a Chandrayaan-2 mission significantly, during which time GSLV-Mk3 would be proving itself on other flights.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 08/19/2013 03:17 AM
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/india-to-go-alone-with-chandrayaan-2/article5022717.ece

Personally, I feel that with the inevitable delays, it would be better for India to instead use GSLV-Mk3 for the next mission to the Moon. This will increase the payload envelope, and allow for a more substantive payload to be sent, with appropriately increased mission scope.

Let the Mars Orbiter Mission be the last PSLV to send a payload beyond Earth orbit for ISRO. All further missions beyond the Earth should at least use GSLV-Mk3, or whatever more powerful successors show up.

I dont think its a good idea to start using GSLV-3 for such ambitious missions right off the bat, the true nature of a rocket isn't revealed until it has had a couple of launches. The GSLV's first couple of launches were successful but after that it's performance went down the drain. If the test flight of GSLV-2 is successful on monday it would make it the ideal choice to ferry a follow on mars mission.

Well, my point is that by the time the rest of Chandrayaan-2 hardware is developed and ready, the GSLV-Mk3 would have already had adequate number of flights by then.

IMHO, the development of a lander will be no small trivial task, and that will delay a Chandrayaan-2 mission significantly, during which time GSLV-Mk3 would be proving itself on other flights.


Yes but waiting for GSLV MK-3 would delay Chandraayan-2 to at least 2019-2020, if GSLV MK-2 is used the mission could be launched in 2016-2017.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ss1_3 on 10/30/2013 04:08 PM
Looks like Chandrayaan-2 is falling short of funds:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/isro-awaiting-government-nod-for-more-funds-for-chandrayaan-2/articleshow/24946130.cms

Guess a lot will depend on how Mars mission fares in coming time.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Star One on 10/30/2013 05:31 PM

Looks like Chandrayaan-2 is falling short of funds:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/isro-awaiting-government-nod-for-more-funds-for-chandrayaan-2/articleshow/24946130.cms

Guess a lot will depend on how Mars mission fares in coming time.

I thought maybe that the second ISRO Mars mission had taken precedence over this? 
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 10/31/2013 03:36 AM

Looks like Chandrayaan-2 is falling short of funds:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/isro-awaiting-government-nod-for-more-funds-for-chandrayaan-2/articleshow/24946130.cms

Guess a lot will depend on how Mars mission fares in coming time.

I thought maybe that the second ISRO Mars mission had taken precedence over this? 

This is the first I'm hearing of a second ISRO Mars mission. It's not there on the Indian launch schedule sticky thread - which goes so far as to manifest a manned spaceflight for sometime after 2020 - so I don't think ISRO's ever mentioned it. Secondly, the linked article offers more probable proximate causes for the fence straddling, regarding the budget - viz. the change of mission architecture, due to problems with the Russian lander, with ISRO now deciding to develop their own; and the need for a functioning GSLV - whose development has been pushed back by its own problems.

So, I wouldn't say this request is going anywhere for some time. I have to make a hand-waving prognostication, I'm going with status quo ante petitio, for close to another year from now....

Given that we're going to have parliamentary elections - latest by (almost certainly NET) mid-2014 (the expiry of the nominal term of five years for the current government), and that Chandrayaan-2 will probably happen during the tenure of the next government (anti-incumbency being the current national pastime), you can probably also make the cynics' argument that no major funding decisions will be taken until next year: a successful mission will be claimed by the government of the time, but a failure will be attributed to hasty decisions of the previous government as ill prioritised spending.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ss1_3 on 10/31/2013 03:23 PM
This is the first I'm hearing of a second ISRO Mars mission. It's not there on the Indian launch schedule sticky thread - which goes so far as to manifest a manned spaceflight for sometime after 2020 - so I don't think ISRO's ever mentioned it.
There seems to be a followup mission on the cards (2018!!). Here (towards the end):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60JKhlqy5Bg
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: akula2 on 11/07/2013 09:58 AM
The Chandrayaan-2 mission seems to be languishing due to the non-availability of the Russian lander:

http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/1868557/report-india-s-second-moon-mission-chandrayaan-2-stuck-in-limbo (http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/1868557/report-india-s-second-moon-mission-chandrayaan-2-stuck-in-limbo)
Non-availability? I really doubt that. I suspect it got more to do with:

a) Design clash
b) Cost-sharing %
c) Too many changes to the initially agreed Lander design?

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Star One on 11/07/2013 01:29 PM

This is the first I'm hearing of a second ISRO Mars mission. It's not there on the Indian launch schedule sticky thread - which goes so far as to manifest a manned spaceflight for sometime after 2020 - so I don't think ISRO's ever mentioned it.
There seems to be a followup mission on the cards (2018!!). Here (towards the end):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60JKhlqy5Bg

Thanks for that glad I didn't imagine hearing about that.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 11/22/2013 02:16 PM
An update about Chandrayaan-2:
Quote
"In the meanwhile, we found that it was feasible to develop a lander indigenously too, within three years, so Chandrayaan-2 is possible by 2016. The rover is already developed, the lander can be readied in time. All we need is the green signal from the government and at least two successful GSLV flights,'' the chairman said. “It was not planned as a completely indigenous mission, but it may turn out that way. Chandrayaan-2 will therefore be much more ambitious than its original aim.''

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?programId=1073754900&contentId=15507698
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Star One on 11/22/2013 06:55 PM

An update about Chandrayaan-2:
Quote
"In the meanwhile, we found that it was feasible to develop a lander indigenously too, within three years, so Chandrayaan-2 is possible by 2016. The rover is already developed, the lander can be readied in time. All we need is the green signal from the government and at least two successful GSLV flights,'' the chairman said. “It was not planned as a completely indigenous mission, but it may turn out that way. Chandrayaan-2 will therefore be much more ambitious than its original aim.''

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?programId=1073754900&contentId=15507698

Hope they do get the green light on this on the timescale their hoping for.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: johnxx9 on 12/01/2013 07:04 AM
An update about Chandrayaan-2:
Quote
"In the meanwhile, we found that it was feasible to develop a lander indigenously too, within three years, so Chandrayaan-2 is possible by 2016. The rover is already developed, the lander can be readied in time. All we need is the green signal from the government and at least two successful GSLV flights,'' the chairman said. “It was not planned as a completely indigenous mission, but it may turn out that way. Chandrayaan-2 will therefore be much more ambitious than its original aim.''

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?programId=1073754900&contentId=15507698

I'm pretty certain the required funds would be provided in the next years budget.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Star One on 12/01/2013 09:01 AM

An update about Chandrayaan-2:
Quote
"In the meanwhile, we found that it was feasible to develop a lander indigenously too, within three years, so Chandrayaan-2 is possible by 2016. The rover is already developed, the lander can be readied in time. All we need is the green signal from the government and at least two successful GSLV flights,'' the chairman said. “It was not planned as a completely indigenous mission, but it may turn out that way. Chandrayaan-2 will therefore be much more ambitious than its original aim.''

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?programId=1073754900&contentId=15507698

I'm pretty certain the required funds would be provided in the next years budget.

If that's the case they should then be able to hit the 2016 target, providing the GSLV is proven by then?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: johnxx9 on 12/01/2013 02:53 PM

An update about Chandrayaan-2:
Quote
"In the meanwhile, we found that it was feasible to develop a lander indigenously too, within three years, so Chandrayaan-2 is possible by 2016. The rover is already developed, the lander can be readied in time. All we need is the green signal from the government and at least two successful GSLV flights,'' the chairman said. “It was not planned as a completely indigenous mission, but it may turn out that way. Chandrayaan-2 will therefore be much more ambitious than its original aim.''

http://week.manoramaonline.com/cgi-bin/MMOnline.dll/portal/ep/theWeekContent.do?programId=1073754900&contentId=15507698

I'm pretty certain the required funds would be provided in the next years budget.

If that's the case they should then be able to hit the 2016 target, providing the GSLV is proven by then?

The 3 year timeline was also in part to ensure that GSLV has a had a couple of successful launches behind it before it launches something this valuable. Again, it depends..ISRO needs to really deliver wrt the GSLV program. And also the lander design fabrication testing going well. The 2016 target indicates the shortest possible time for the launch of Chandrayaan-2 if everything goes as planned.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 01/10/2014 08:15 AM
Chandrayaan-2 with orbiter, lander and rover by 2016:
Quote
The Indian Space Research Organization (Isro) is planning to launch India’s mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-2, by 2016, which would include an orbiter, lander and rover, an Isro spokesperson said on Friday.

Quote
“Chandrayaan-2 would be launched by a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) powered by an indigenously developed cryogenic engine,” said the Isro spokesperson.

http://www.livemint.com/Politics/H4xVWokiuokVqSQ4GUTzUN/Isro-to-send-orbiter-lander-and-rover-to-Moon-by-2016.html

Another article about the same press conference:
http://post.jagran.com/india-to-launch-chandrayaanii-by-2017-isro-1389340915
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/10/2014 04:06 PM
The 3 year timeline was also in part to ensure that GSLV has a had a couple of successful launches behind it before it launches something this valuable. Again, it depends..ISRO needs to really deliver wrt the GSLV program. And also the lander design fabrication testing going well. The 2016 target indicates the shortest possible time for the launch of Chandrayaan-2 if everything goes as planned.

From the latest pronouncements by ISRO, it seems more like the development of the lander is what's the main hurdle, rather than waiting for GSLV to be qualified.

Does anybody have any idea of what the Indian lander will be based on? Will it borrow from the Russian lander design, or will it be an all-original independent design? I'm assuming the former, since it's best to go with what works, but it's not clear how much Russian technology ISRO can get for this, or whether it's even seen as reliable following the Phobos-Grunt malfunction. What have the Chinese used?


Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 01/14/2014 02:13 PM
This is strange and strangely funny!
http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/isro-yet-to-pick-up-rover-built-by-iit-k-114011400882_1.html
Quote
ISRO had given a project to IIT Kanpur to develop a rover to be launched with Chandrayaan-II, which the university's scientists completed in 2010, but the space agency was yet to pick it up and make part payment to the institute, according to its professor.

Quote
When asked about the possible reasons for ISRO not accepting the rover, Venkatesh [Prof at IIT Kanpur] said Chandrayaan-II was set to be launched in 2017, which could be why ISRO was not showing any haste in acquiring it.

Quote
According to him, IIT-K spent Rs 29 lakh on the project.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/14/2014 03:00 PM
The 3 year timeline was also in part to ensure that GSLV has a had a couple of successful launches behind it before it launches something this valuable. Again, it depends..ISRO needs to really deliver wrt the GSLV program. And also the lander design fabrication testing going well. The 2016 target indicates the shortest possible time for the launch of Chandrayaan-2 if everything goes as planned.

From the latest pronouncements by ISRO, it seems more like the development of the lander is what's the main hurdle, rather than waiting for GSLV to be qualified.

Does anybody have any idea of what the Indian lander will be based on? Will it borrow from the Russian lander design, or will it be an all-original independent design? I'm assuming the former, since it's best to go with what works, but it's not clear how much Russian technology ISRO can get for this, or whether it's even seen as reliable following the Phobos-Grunt malfunction. What have the Chinese used?

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Star One on 01/14/2014 03:35 PM

This is strange and strangely funny!
http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/isro-yet-to-pick-up-rover-built-by-iit-k-114011400882_1.html
Quote
ISRO had given a project to IIT Kanpur to develop a rover to be launched with Chandrayaan-II, which the university's scientists completed in 2010, but the space agency was yet to pick it up and make part payment to the institute, according to its professor.

Quote
When asked about the possible reasons for ISRO not accepting the rover, Venkatesh [Prof at IIT Kanpur] said Chandrayaan-II was set to be launched in 2017, which could be why ISRO was not showing any haste in acquiring it.

Quote
According to him, IIT-K spent Rs 29 lakh on the project.

How odd. So just have an unused Mars Rover lying about the place then?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/14/2014 04:17 PM
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/-cg4cI5Q195A/SyKdyzFrXKI/AAAAAAAAADc/bJVLZPzuEPE/s640/Chan2.png)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/14/2014 07:03 PM

http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/isro-yet-to-pick-up-rover-built-by-iit-k-114011400882_1.html (http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/isro-yet-to-pick-up-rover-built-by-iit-k-114011400882_1.html)
How odd. So just have an unused Mars Rover lying about the place then?

Firstly, lunar, not Mars rover.
Secondly, some basic googling, sheds light.

1. The PI's Webpage at the IIT-K website.
I got this: http://home.iitk.ac.in/~adutta/4.htm (http://home.iitk.ac.in/~adutta/4.htm)

Quote from: Dr. Ashish Dutta
Traction control algorithm development and testing for Lunar Rover mobility system.
Funding: Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Amount: 8 Lakhs  (2009 - 2010)
 
Lunar Rover development for testing of vision based navigation and traction control algorithms.
Funding: IIT Kanpur, Amount : Rs 30 Lakhs  (2009-2010)

2.  An IIT-K student magazine article detailing the work  (http://issuu.com/nerd_iitk/docs/v2n2/26)
The imaging and mapping system test setup uses a Logitech Webcam! :D I don't think they're flight qualified. The way they're going about mapping the terrain is interesting. Laser mapping, but not LIDAR. Wonder if they simply wanted to develop such a system, or if they did a trade-off analysis and found that the processing work required for this would've been lesser; perhaps this system's more autonomous and more robust; than one that performs image processing (and is perhaps trained on a limited data set)? Also wondering whether such a mapping system is envisioned with a dual purpose instrument in mind: could a LIBS laser (a la Curiosity) operate in a low power mapping mode, as well as a high-power science mode? Saving mass?

3. A post from this very thread showing a 6 wheeled prototype (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=20324.msg951703#msg951703)

4. An Indian Express article, that also offers some more details (http://archive.indianexpress.com/news/three-iitkanpur-professors-chip-in-for-india-s-lunar-rover/522364/0)
Quote
Once the project is completed, we will test it on a prototype lunar rover at IIT-K and thereafter the technology will be forwarded to ISRO," added Venkatesh. The final testing and approval of all the components being developed by the IIT-K will be done by ISRO.
According to Potluri, of the six wheels of the rover, four can be driven and steered. The rest can only be driven.
"The six wheels will have 10 motors to manage the movement and steering of the lunar rover," he said, adding that the major challenge will be to bring a co-ordination between all the 10 motors.

--
So... there's no full-fledged rover gathering dust. But yeah, shizz like that does happen (http://www.reddit.com/r/india/comments/1ujcmo/we_are_three_isro_scientists_here_to_answer_your/ceip069). Does anyone understand the logic behind a 3 year hiatus, once ISRO had started development; especially given that there's still so much work to be done before getting even a baseline design finalised. (This shouldn't really have been/be affected by schedule uncertainty).

But then again, the same thing can be said of IIT-K
Quote from: Business Standard article
The professor said his colleagues at the institute had realised that the project to build the rover, which would pick up samples from the Moon's surface and bring them back to Earth, would cost much more than Rs 7.5 lakh and had initially refused to take it up.

"However, the then IIT-K Director Sanjay Govind Dhande had insisted that the project would get the institute international fame and that IIT-K would pitch in with the money," he said.
So what happened? IIT-K achieve its international fame with other projects? They don't want Chandrayaan-2, anymore? :P

And before anyone asks: I don't think Chandrayaan-2 is designed to return samples. Atleast, I don't find anyone else saying that.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/14/2014 08:09 PM
Nah, sample return is Chandrayaan-3 -- not sure if they're waiting for that.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 01/18/2014 09:50 AM
Rover Prototype
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/18/2014 01:17 PM
Yeah, I remember they even built some kind of lunar terrain chamber to test it in, too.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 01/25/2014 08:19 AM
News just in today from China says its lunar rover 'Yutu' has experienced an 'abnormality'. As usual, it doesn't say much about what exactly is wrong, but mentions it has got something to do with the 'complicated lunar surface environment'.

http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/article_xinhua.aspx?id=196205 (http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/article_xinhua.aspx?id=196205)

Maybe something for ISRO to watch out for in Chandrayaan-2 mission, considering that they had an unforseen heating problem for Chandrayaan-1due to reflected radiation from lunar surface?

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/25/2014 10:56 PM
How sad - the article says "mechanical control abnormality" - so I'm wondering if it's that pesky lunar sand. I hope that sand didn't get wedged into crevices someplace, or cause the rover to get stuck like NASA's Spirit (MER-A).
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/26/2014 09:23 AM
IITK Lunar Rover Proto. IITK was awarded to develop Lunar Rover development for testing of vision based navigation and traction control algorithms.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/28/2014 01:06 AM
Very nice vids of the IIT-K rover.


---
Note: for those who can't play the FLV format, here's a page which tells you how:

http://atube-catcher.dsnetwb.com/video/How-Play-FLV-files-with-Windows-Media-Player.html

I followed the instructions, and everything worked fine. You could probably also just download VLC player, since that has every codec known to man.
---


Anyway, why are all those wires hanging off the front of the rover? Are things going to be that way for the final version?

How would this rover survive the cold temperatures of the lunar night? Is it supposed to have RTGs like China's does?

The Chinese rover seems to have suffered a problem with that infamously pesky lunar dust, which seems fine enough to get into every nook and cranny to gum up moving parts. How can this threat be addressed?

Maybe only Arthur C Clarke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Fall_of_Moondust) knows...
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/28/2014 02:08 AM
Anyway, why are all those wires hanging off the front of the rover? Are things going to be that way for the final version?

It's an engineering test bed! Cut them some slack for the aesthetics? :D

The Chinese rover seems to have suffered a problem with that infamously pesky lunar dust ...

Are you guessing, or d'you have a source that says the problem was because of the dust? AFAIK, they haven't told us what the issue was. I think the only information we have thus far is that the solar panels designed to fold back and prevent the rover from radiating away all its heat - isn't folding back. Check the Chang'E 3 thread.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 02:42 AM

Anyway, why are all those wires hanging off the front of the rover? Are things going to be that way for the final version?

How would this rover survive the cold temperatures of the lunar night? Is it supposed to have RTGs like China's does?

The Chinese rover seems to have suffered a problem with that infamously pesky lunar dust, which seems fine enough to get into every nook and cranny to gum up moving parts. How can this threat be addressed?

Maybe only Arthur C Clarke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Fall_of_Moondust) knows...

This is only an engineering prototype built by IITK to test the vision navigation and traction algorithms for lunar surface mobility. The R&D done by IITK will help ISRO in building the final versions of vision navigation and traction control subsystems of chandrayaan 2 lunar rover.

For thermal management of Lunar rover, I guess ISRO may use a system derived from the fluid circuits currently being developed for the crew module in the Human space program.

 

Basic info about IITK work on navigation and traction control algorithms:
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 04:16 AM
Some info on thermal management of Chandrayaan 2 Lunar Rover

Thermal design planned to be adopted for the rover includes:
1) thermal flap (TF),
2) radiator windows,
3) warm electronics box (WEB) inside which most of the subsystems will be housed and
4) two passive thermal management units (TMU).

Power system of the rover comprises of a double-sided deployable solar panel, special Li-ion battery and power electronics. Double-sided solar panel is populated with triple junction (TJ) solar cells, realized on a 10 mm thick Aluminium (Al) honeycomb substrate, with CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced plastic) and Kapton® face sheets on both sides. The Li-ion battery and power electronics cards are mounted inside the WEB whose temperatures are controlled.

The top side of the rover chassis is provided with a motorized thermal flap consisting of insulation blanket/structure, which is closed during lunar nights to conserve heat inside the WEB. The sides of the chassis is insulated using multilayer insulation (MLI) structure called WEB and two units of TMU (8 W each) are mounted on the rover chassis inside WEB. Inner side of rover chassis (25 mm thick Al honeycomb) is provided with a highly conductive and thin 0.3 mm Al face sheet for electrical grounding

http://www.discovery.org.in/PDF_Files/du_20130703.pdf (http://www.discovery.org.in/PDF_Files/du_20130703.pdf)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/28/2014 05:32 AM
http://www.discovery.org.in/PDF_Files/du_20130703.pdf (http://www.discovery.org.in/PDF_Files/du_20130703.pdf)
Thanks Antriksh.


So the planned landing site is near the South pole (88 degrees S)? Very very cool. Props to ISRO if they stick with it - they'll be aiming to touch down  farther from the lunar equator than any other mission, including all the impactors, except our own MIP from Chandrayaan-1! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_artificial_objects_on_the_Moon) For good reason too: the Aitken basin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Pole%E2%80%93Aitken_basin) is a prime target for lunar geology. It'd be awesome to have contact measurements (as opposed to remote sensing only).


Quote
Thus,
the Chandrayaan-2 Rover solar panel may be expected to see temperature of Teq = - 182.07374 degrees C during the long (20 days) lunar nights at the landing site. And the solar panel temperature saturates soon after ~ 17 hours of lunar nights entry.


Worst case temperature
Quote
The solar panel temperature during lunar night, in this case, can be shown as Teq = 84.85949 K = -188.14051 deg C


Unfortunately, the paper only does a basic radiative (conduction isolated from rest of rover) heat transfer analysis to calculate minimum temperature during lunar night, and doesn't say anything about what is expected to happen to the uninsulated solar panel materials at such temperatures. Anyone have any data on this? They mention that panels on GEO satellites reach -169.9 degrees C during the 72 minute eclipse. But this is way longer than that. They don't calculate the range of temperatures either (i.e max temperature the array's likely to see during lunar day) - but mention that the surface temperatures stay between -160 & -120 degrees C


Btw, don't know if it's been linked before, but here's the Chandrayaan-2 page on the VSSC website: http://isrohq.vssc.gov.in/isr0dem0v2/index.php/science/science-history/74-general/1010-chandrayaan-2 (http://isrohq.vssc.gov.in/isr0dem0v2/index.php/science/science-history/74-general/1010-chandrayaan-2)


Rover's carrying LIBS, and APXS; and orbiter will carry Large Area Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (CLASS) (How exactly did they arrive at the acronym? lol); Solar X-Ray monitor (XSM); L,S band SAR; IIRS, a Neutral Mass Spec.; and TMC-2.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 01/28/2014 06:25 AM
4 wheel Rover Bread Board Model  developed by ISRO (Final model will have 6 wheels)

> Semi-Autonomous navigation and hazard avoidance capability
> Elemental analysis of the lunar surface using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS) and Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) payloads
> Rover will be powered with a small solar panel
> Communicate to IDSN either through Lander Rover Communication System onboard the Lander or through the Orbiter Rover Communication System onboard the Orbiter

Photo Credit : ISRO
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 07:33 AM
CH2 LR 4 wheels design

Can any one guess the Antenna Type? I have never seen T shaped antenna on any planetary rovers
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/28/2014 08:01 AM
Anyway, why are all those wires hanging off the front of the rover? Are things going to be that way for the final version?

It's an engineering test bed! Cut them some slack for the aesthetics? :D

Ah, I guess I thought that was the final product, or something.

I really hope they put more thought into the lunar dust problem.

Oh, and how are they going to tackle the ultra-low nighttime temperatures? Are they going to use RTGs as well?

Quote
The Chinese rover seems to have suffered a problem with that infamously pesky lunar dust ...

Are you guessing, or d'you have a source that says the problem was because of the dust? AFAIK, they haven't told us what the issue was. I think the only information we have thus far is that the solar panels designed to fold back and prevent the rover from radiating away all its heat - isn't folding back. Check the Chang'E 3 thread.

Sorry, I guess I should have linked to the article that I was getting my info from:

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/2014/01/28/11/14/chinese-lunar-rover-cutely-broadcasts-own-death

Quote
Abrasive lunar dust is thought to be the cause of the rover's fatal breakdown.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: plutogno on 01/28/2014 08:15 AM
Quote
Thus,
the Chandrayaan-2 Rover solar panel may be expected to see temperature of Teq = - 182.07374 degrees C

really?!? to the fifth decimal???
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/28/2014 08:55 AM
Can any one guess the Antenna Type? I have never seen T shaped antenna on any planetary rovers

Maybe they want to let the Rover receive and watch the new digital HD Doordarshan :P

Quote
Thus,
the Chandrayaan-2 Rover solar panel may be expected to see temperature of Teq = - 182.07374 degrees C

really?!? to the fifth decimal???

Hold on, maybe the numbers they used as inputs for the calculation were known to the tenth decimal :D But yeah, doesn't surprise me though... almost all students sleep through the lesson on significant figures. Maybe if they start using them in school exam marking schemes...


Oh, and how are they going to tackle the ultra-low nighttime temperatures? Are they going to use RTGs as well?
Does anyone have enough Plutonium at the moment? I guess they could try with some other nuclide though.


[/font]
http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/2014/01/28/11/14/chinese-lunar-rover-cutely-broadcasts-own-death (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/2014/01/28/11/14/chinese-lunar-rover-cutely-broadcasts-own-death)


Ah. That sucks. If it is confirmed to be dust, then I guess the lander's UV telescope would be pretty vulnerable too. The rover does probably dredge up more by nature of its motion though.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 08:59 AM

Oh, and how are they going to tackle the ultra-low nighttime temperatures? Are they going to use RTGs as well?



Only If they can develop RTG on time, else they will use the old trusted active thermal management method of ISRO flex heater bank + rechargeable batteries + solar panels. 
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 09:03 AM
Can any one guess the Antenna Type? I have never seen T shaped antenna on any planetary rovers

Maybe they want to let the Rover receive and watch the new digital HD Doordarshan :P



That would be disaster for the rover health!  :'(

it seems to be a compact microstrip patch antenna not a T shaped antenna. Could be a dual/multi band patch antenna. Any rover which used microstrip patch antenna??
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 01/28/2014 09:28 AM

Oh, and how are they going to tackle the ultra-low nighttime temperatures? Are they going to use RTGs as well?



Only If they can develop RTG on time, else they will use the old trusted active thermal management method of ISRO flex heater bank + rechargeable batteries + solar panels.

What about some kind of phase change material, which could provide some "thermal mass" to buffer the temperature changes? Or would the amount of material required make it too heavy and mass-inefficient? You're only trying to heat the electronics to prevent them from being damaged, right? With nifty lightweight insulators like aerogel, maybe it could be done that way.




Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/28/2014 09:46 AM
Only If they can develop RTG on time, else they will use the old trusted active thermal management method of ISRO flex heater bank + rechargeable batteries + solar panels.

Running off a battery for 20 odd days is going to be a real challenge. So much so that I think lunar night operations demand a Radio-isotope heater unit. Doesn't have to be RTG, but something that provides the heat. You'd radiate the heat during day-time operations, and fold up the radiator for night time ops.

But that's a guess. Anyone know if any of the probes that've been to the moon endured a lunar night (or several), and used only batteries (+heaters)?

What about some kind of phase change material, which could provide some "thermal mass" to buffer the temperature changes? Or would the amount of material required make it too heavy and mass-inefficient? You're only trying to heat the electronics to prevent them from being damaged, right? With nifty lightweight insulators like aerogel, maybe it could be done that way.

Thermal mass is mass too. So yeah. Heavy. They'll almost certainly use lightweight insulators, but they'd want it to do double duty as a structural member. Again, to save mass. Which is why I don't think they'll use aerogel. You may as well have a evacuated space double-walled membrane with one or two support posts (aerogel probably doesn't have the structural strength) - eliminating conduction altogether - like a thermos flask.

EDIT: Time to look like an idiot. Spirit and Opportunity are insulated with aerogels. (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/sc_rover_temp_aerogel.html) As was Sojourner (http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/aerogel.html). So there's obviously something I'm not considering.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 11:27 AM

What about some kind of phase change material, which could provide some "thermal mass" to buffer the temperature changes? Or would the amount of material required make it too heavy and mass-inefficient?

Yes, ISRO will employ both passive and active thermal control management for the rover. Passive TCM involves use of thermal grease, thermal paint, multilayer insulation, thermal filler materials, Heat pipes, Thermal flap, optical solar reflectors (OSR), heat radiators etc.
 Active TCM uses flexible heater banks and thermistors. ISRO will have to manage the tradeoff between TCM requirements and weight requirements.


You're only trying to heat the electronics to prevent them from being damaged, right? With nifty lightweight insulators like aerogel, maybe it could be done that way.

Both multilayer insulation and heater banks will be used for designing the Warm electronics box (WEB) that will house all the electronics.

ISRO is also developing fluid circuits for TCM in the crew module, a derivative of which could be employed?

My guess is that ISRO will also move the rover inside the lander during lunar night for extra protection.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/28/2014 11:35 AM


Running off a battery for 20 odd days is going to be a real challenge. So much so that I think lunar night operations demand a Radio-isotope heater unit. Doesn't have to be RTG, but something that provides the heat. You'd radiate the heat during day-time operations, and fold up the radiator for night time ops.

But that's a guess. Anyone know if any of the probes that've been to the moon endured a lunar night (or several), and used only batteries (+heaters)?



Yes running 20 days on battery might be challenging, but perhaps that shouldn't be problematic when most of the electronics will be shut down barring critical monitoring system.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/28/2014 03:04 PM
My guess is that ISRO will also move the rover inside the lander during lunar night for extra protection.

I thought of that when Yutu started having issues. But that has its own attendant problems. First, as sanman's been saying: dust. You drive the rover back, and you'll bring whole heaps of dust into the lander.

Secondly, any deployment mechanism that will essentially have to be reversible will cost mass. (Letting something down onto the lunar surface can use frangible nuts/ cut wires etc. / exploit lunar gravity - but bringing something back up will require a motor. Sure You can simply open up a ramp and let the rover drive down and up along it as depicted in the picture, but then a) you need a ramp and b) folding that on top of the rover (presumably) to offer thermal protection would need a motor. If you didn't plan on getting the rover back into its place, then you could've simply had "drop down" MLI on top of the rover, which covers the vacant space once the rover leaves.

Thirdly, from a science perspective - you're going to limit the rover's range and traverses if it has to get back to the lander each time. This may be the case anyway if we have only a rover and lander (rover needs to stay within communication range)... but the diagram depicts an orbiter too. (Which would allow the rover a free rein).

But if they do decide to do this, then you can turn 1 & 3 into an advantage by getting the rover to sample dust and ejecta from different locations (assuming you put some sort of mini-lab on the lander that can do this analysis. Or shift the instrumentation from the rover to the lander; and make the rover more durable, and lighter.) As for 2 - maybe beef up one solar array structurally, and have it serve as the ramp. And cover it with Corning Gorilla Glass (TM) as a scratch-guard. That'll be a public outreach coup :D
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ss1_3 on 01/28/2014 05:22 PM


Oh, and how are they going to tackle the ultra-low nighttime temperatures? Are they going to use RTGs as well?

If they are going to South pole, temperature shouldn't be much of an issue. It remains largely illuminated over a "lunar day" with relatively stable temperature (around -50oC), which should be well within operating range of electronics onboard.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/29/2014 03:58 AM
My guess is that ISRO will also move the rover inside the lander during lunar night for extra protection.

I thought of that when Yutu started having issues. But that has its own attendant problems. First, as sanman's been saying: dust. You drive the rover back, and you'll bring whole heaps of dust into the lander.

Secondly, any deployment mechanism that will essentially have to be reversible will cost mass. (Letting something down onto the lunar surface can use frangible nuts/ cut wires etc. / exploit lunar gravity - but bringing something back up will require a motor. Sure You can simply open up a ramp and let the rover drive down and up along it as depicted in the picture, but then a) you need a ramp and b) folding that on top of the rover (presumably) to offer thermal protection would need a motor. If you didn't plan on getting the rover back into its place, then you could've simply had "drop down" MLI on top of the rover, which covers the vacant space once the rover leaves.

Thirdly, from a science perspective - you're going to limit the rover's range and traverses if it has to get back to the lander each time. This may be the case anyway if we have only a rover and lander (rover needs to stay within communication range)... but the diagram depicts an orbiter too. (Which would allow the rover a free rein).

But if they do decide to do this, then you can turn 1 & 3 into an advantage by getting the rover to sample dust and ejecta from different locations (assuming you put some sort of mini-lab on the lander that can do this analysis. Or shift the instrumentation from the rover to the lander; and make the rover more durable, and lighter.) As for 2 - maybe beef up one solar array structurally, and have it serve as the ramp. And cover it with Corning Gorilla Glass (TM) as a scratch-guard. That'll be a public outreach coup :D

In case of yutu, it wont be possible because yutu sits on top of the lander, so no mechanism to conceal it within the lander. I agree with your points regarding dust ,motorized ramp and restricted range. ISRO will have to take a call based on their.
feasibility studies.

Also, how effective will be the tiny rectangular/square microstrip patch antenna in communication with the orbiter?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/29/2014 04:49 AM

Yeah, probably wouldn't have helped Yutu much, apart from being in the proximity of a warmer "floor" (or even "ceiling" - if it went and sat under the lander - provided there was enough clearance) that offered a better thermal radiation environment. Mutual benefit too. But I think the deployment was one way, and that the engine bell wasn't that far off the ground.. ruling both out.


Also, how effective will be the tiny rectangular/square microstrip patch antenna in communication with the orbiter?


Isn't that the whole point of a patch antenna? That you can "print" it onto surfaces? It can cover the outside of the rover and enlarge the collecting area. You'd almost definitely have to phase delay some elements of the patch, and perhaps even do this dynamically, depending on orbiter-rover geometry... but still..


That is, if they're going to use one at all. Still in the early phases aren't they?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 01/29/2014 05:31 AM
EDIT: Time to look like an idiot. Spirit and Opportunity are insulated with aerogels. (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/sc_rover_temp_aerogel.html) As was Sojourner (http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/aerogel.html). So there's obviously something I'm not considering.

The Mars rovers used aerogel as the Martian atmosphere is thick enough so that multi layer insulation (MLI) is not effective. On the Moon, there is no atmosphere so using MLI is sufficient. There is no need to use aerogel on the Moon.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/29/2014 07:44 AM
The Mars rovers used aerogel as the Martian atmosphere is thick enough so that multi layer insulation (MLI) is not effective. On the Moon, there is no atmosphere so using MLI is sufficient. There is no need to use aerogel on the Moon.

Firstly, shouldn't aerogel take precedence over MLI? Given that it's lighter? If the aerogel didn't suffice, make it thicker, and if it still doesn't work, or the form factor is non-conducive...then maybe bolster the insulation with MLI. But surely you'd want to use aerogel first? Moreover, I don't think aerogel suffers from static charge build up, so there's that advantage as well?

Secondly, why use anything at all? If you need the conductive insulation, surely you add a thin shell around your existing rover body, and evacuate the space between the shell and the body. Mount this shell on a few non-conductive struts (perhaps the struts are made of aerogel), and you're done. A vacuum has lower thermal conductivity (zero) than aerogel.

Unless you're telling me that a slab of aerogel on all faces is actually lighter than that, and has the added benefit of offering some MMOD protection, and some structural stability for a very small tradeoff in mass/thermal conductivity.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 01/29/2014 01:31 PM
AJA, are you aware that you ended up describing MLI?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: AJA on 01/29/2014 02:46 PM
AJA, are you aware that you ended up describing MLI?

Had a hunch, and checked before I posted. But I found

Quote from: Wikipedia article on MLI
In its basic form, it does not appreciably insulate against other thermal losses such as heat conduction or convection.

Same article also said

Quote
Spacecraft also may use MLI as a first line of defense against dust impacts. This normally means spacing it a cm or so away from the surface it is insulating.

This would insulate from conductive heat losses (from spacecraft to MLI, and to whatever the MLI's in contact with. Conduction & convection, if the MLI's in contact with a fluid)

But I don't think I've ever come across a case where the MLI's been applied like this. They always seem to wrap up the thing they're insulating, while being in contact with it. Hence "blanket" as opposed to "tent" or "awning".
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/29/2014 03:28 PM
Probable payloads for the CH2 lander

1. An Electrostatic Potential and Dust Analyzer for a lunar lander mission, PRL
2. Chandra’s Surface Thermophysical Experiment (ChaSTE): A payload aboard Chandrayaan-2 Lander Experiment, SPL

CH2 EO payloads:
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 02/03/2014 05:54 AM
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Revelf on 02/03/2014 11:23 AM
something with legs?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 02/04/2014 01:35 AM
something with legs?

Like this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfiHOpv6HtI
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 02/19/2014 08:20 AM
Some tidbits:
http://www.newsonair.com/news.asp?cat=national&id=NN4455
Quote
The project is likely to be completed by 2016-17.
Quote
Also, a few landing sites have been shortlisted based on the images obtained from earlier Moon missions. A special team is constructing the Lander.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Gaganaut on 02/22/2014 02:52 PM
Potential Landing spots for Chandrayaan-2 identified

http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-landing-spots-for-chandrayaan-2-identified-1963786 (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-landing-spots-for-chandrayaan-2-identified-1963786)

Quote
Minister of state for PMO V Narayanaswamy recently announced in the Parliament that the mission, which is likely to take place in 2016-17, is progressing well with Isro having identified landing spots on the lunar surface. The two scientific payloads onboard the Chandrayaan-1 terrain mapping camera had captured a number of images of the lunar surface, which have been used for zeroing in on the designated spots.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 05/11/2014 04:19 AM
Chandrayaan’s rover and the moon rocks from Salem villages


Quote
Rocks from Sithampoondi, Kunnamalai are similar in properties to moon soil

Quote
As commands erupt into life, a 17-kg rover, akin to the rover of Chandrayaan-2, revs up. It turns right, then left, lurches forward and backs up.

Quote
We identified Sithampoondi, from where we excavated 60 tonnes of rocks which are geologically similar to the lunar composition. We made a special effort to pulverise the rocks to various sizes ranging from 30 to 200 microns and mix them in various proportions to match the chemical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil to study the rover’s movements on it in a simulated environment.

Quote
Since the gravity on the moon is one-sixth of the earth’s gravity, a helium-filled balloon which will lift five-sixths of the rover’s weight is being used in the lunar terrain facility.

Quote
We have realised a six-wheeled rover and it is being tested in the lunar terrain facility. The design work on the lander is in progress in ISRO.

Quote
Weighing 20 kg, it will move about on the moon for one lunar day, that is, 14 earth days, Dr. Annadurai said. It would be loaded with commands for turning to the left and right, for going forward and backing down.


http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/chandrayaans-rover-and-the-moon-rocks-from-salem-villages/article5996869.ece
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 05/12/2014 07:43 AM
That article also says the landing is in 2017. Maybe someone should update the thread title.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: input~2 on 05/12/2014 04:02 PM
That article also says the landing is in 2017. Maybe someone should update the thread title.
Done!
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/05/2014 02:24 PM
Chandrayaan 2

Chandrayaan 2, India’s second mission to the Moon, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission. It consists of an Orbiter, Lander and Rover configuration. It is planned to be launched as a composite stack into the Earth Parking Orbit (EPO) of 170 X 18,500 km by GSLV-Mk II. The Orbiter carries the combined stack up to moon till the Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI). The combined stack is then inserted into a lunar orbit of 100 km x 100 km. The Lander is separated from the Orbiter in this orbit.
The Orbiter with scientific payloads will orbit around the moon. The Lander will soft land on the Moon at a specified site and deploy the Rover. The scientific payloads onboard the Orbiter, Lander and Rover are expected to perform mineralogical and elemental studies of the lunar surface.

The payloads onboard Orbiter and Rover are finalised and the payload development is progressing at various ISRO centres/laboratories. A six wheeled Rover has been realised and initial tests on the Lunar terrain test facility has been carried out. Since the Lander development is a new technology for ISRO, Lander configuration and feasibility study has been carried out for Chandrayaan-2 mission in a GSLV-Mk II vehicle. The Lander payloads are shortlisted for further review. Landing site identification, soft landing strategy, hazard avoidance, preliminary design of lander subsystems, new technologies required for safe and soft landing are being worked out.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 08/05/2014 02:32 PM
Thanks for the updates, antriksh. Will the orbiter be based on an ISRO satellite bus (I-2K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-2K)/I-3K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-3K)/I-4K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-4K)?) or PAM-G (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tug#ISRO_PAM-G)?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/05/2014 02:36 PM
Thanks for the updates, antriksh. Will the orbiter be based on an ISRO satellite bus (I-2K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-2K)/I-3K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-3K)/I-4K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-4K)?) or PAM-G (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tug#ISRO_PAM-G)?

Orbiter will be from chandrayaan 1 with integration interface for the lander.

Updates are from  ISRO annual report 2014.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 08/05/2014 03:09 PM
Thanks for the updates, antriksh. Will the orbiter be based on an ISRO satellite bus (I-2K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-2K)/I-3K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-3K)/I-4K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-4K)?) or PAM-G (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tug#ISRO_PAM-G)?

Orbiter will be from chandrayaan 1 with integration interface for the lander.

Updates are from  ISRO annual report 2014.

Thanks. I think Chandryaan 1 was based on ISRO IRS (I-1K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-1K)) bus.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 08/05/2014 08:41 PM
Thanks for the updates, antriksh. Will the orbiter be based on an ISRO satellite bus (I-2K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-2K)/I-3K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-3K)/I-4K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-4K)?) or PAM-G (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tug#ISRO_PAM-G)?

Orbiter will be from chandrayaan 1 with integration interface for the lander.

Updates are from  ISRO annual report 2014.

Thanks. I think Chandryaan 1 was based on ISRO IRS (I-1K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-1K)) bus.

ISTR reading in multiple sources that the Chandrayaan 2 orbiter will use the I-3K bus.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/06/2014 02:07 AM
Thanks for the updates, antriksh. Will the orbiter be based on an ISRO satellite bus (I-2K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-2K)/I-3K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-3K)/I-4K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-4K)?) or PAM-G (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_tug#ISRO_PAM-G)?

Orbiter will be from chandrayaan 1 with integration interface for the lander.

Updates are from  ISRO annual report 2014.

Thanks. I think Chandryaan 1 was based on ISRO IRS (I-1K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I-1K)) bus.

ISTR reading in multiple sources that the Chandrayaan 2 orbiter will use the I-3K bus.

if I am not mistaken, GSLV mk2 cannot handle I3k + lander + rover
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/06/2014 03:06 AM
Looks like lander will have 3 clustered engines as main engine. It would probably be derived from PAM-G.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 08/10/2014 08:00 PM
Chandrayaan-2 mission slated for 2016-2017:

http://www.ibtimes.co.in/chandrayaan-2-indo-russian-moon-mission-be-launched-by-2017-606383
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/11/2014 07:59 AM
Simulating reduced weight and traction under lunar gravity using Helium balloon for CHandrayan 2 rover prototype.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: johnxx9 on 09/24/2014 05:04 PM
K Radhakrishnan interview: Success due to tireless efforts of Isro team (http://www.hindustantimes.com/specials/coverage/marsorbitermission/marsorbitermission/k-radhakrishnan-interview-success-due-to-tireless-efforts-of-isro-team/sp-article10-1267767.aspx)

Quote
7. When will Chandrayaan-2 be launched?
Chandrayaan-2 mission will be totally an Indian mission, configured with an Orbiter, Lander and Rover for in-situ investigation of the lunar surface. A six wheel Rover has been realised and initial tests have been conducted in the lunar terrain test facility. Besides, the development of Indian Lander involves many new technologies in the areas of navigation, control and guidance, sensors, soft landing and so on. Based on the present assessment of the progress, we may be in a position to launch it in 2016-2017 timeframe.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 10/17/2014 10:04 AM
Source (http://www.wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/08NEWDELHI2295_a.html)  ???

(U) During a recent visit to Indian Space Research Organization
(ISRO) in Bangalore, SciCouns met with Mr. Annadurai, Project
Director for 'Chandrayaan I' and observed the integration process of
the two US instruments on the spacecraft.  Discussions were also
 
NEW DELHI 00002295  002.2 OF 005
 
 
held regarding possible collaboration on 'Chandrayaan II'. NASA is
considering sending an advanced RTG (Radioisotope Thermoelectric
Generator) power source (generates power from a 238 Plutonium heat
source) aboard 'Chandrayaan II'.
  This could be mission
enabling/enhancing for 'Chandrayaan II'.  Because the advanced RTG
has moving parts, NASA is seeking a flight opportunity to qualify it
prior to its use on long duration outer planetary missions.  India
has also recently joined eight nations (US, Canada, Germany, Italy,
Japan, South Korea, France and England) to develop new technologies
for exploratory robotic manned missions to the moon.
 
6.  (U) NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Director Dr. Charles
Elachi visited ISRO on August 20 with the objective of exploring
collaborations on planetary missions.  Mission will forward the
readout from this meeting.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 10/17/2014 03:10 PM
That should be the Advanced Stirling radioisotope generator, but that project was put on hold last year. Besides, it would require to nuclear rate the GSLV-MkII. May be they decided that no NASA missions wanted the risk (and certification cost) of the ASRG, and the project was ballooning in cost. But if the Indians are willing to take the risk, and the hourly cost of Indian analysts (for the certification) is cheap (or payed by ISRO), then they could retire risk for very cheap.
And, if you consider the problems with the pellet pressing bed, the reduced Pu238 requirement of the ASRG gets very interesting. In fact, they might be trading pushing the new bed now against finishing and certifying the ASRG. Pure uninformed speculation.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 10/17/2014 05:42 PM
I'll add some uninformed speculation of my own.

Perhaps they have confused RHUs and ASRGs/MMRTGs?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 10/17/2014 06:16 PM
I'll add some uninformed speculation of my own.

Perhaps they have confused RHUs and ASRGs/MMRTGs?
If that where the case, where did they get this part?

[...]Because the advanced RTG has moving parts, NASA is seeking a flight opportunity to qualify it prior to its use on long duration outer planetary missions. [...]
That's the only reason I speculated about the ASRG, specifically. I don't see use of an RHU on a Mars orbiter. Besides, to my knowledge, there's nothing else nuclear that actually needs to be qualified.
Of course that an RHU has some uses for a rover, and an MMRTG would be invaluable for the polar exploration of Mars. I simply don't see NASA tapping its scarce stash of Pu238 on a technological demonstrator of another nation unless they get a lot in return. I can only think of qualifying the ASRG. Nothing else comes to mind of what's probably the scarcest resource for NASA right now.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 10/18/2014 06:37 AM
Oh, I agree with you there.  The description certainly sounds like an ASRG.

I also agree re: PU-238.  I just don't see NASA re-starting ASRG for this without an infusion of $$ and I really don't see it being flown on someone else' vehicle/rover.

Not sure where you got a Mars orbiter from.  I thought this was about the Chandrayaan 2 lunar rover?  I can see an RHU or ASRG for that use.

I wonder what/who is the source and what was really written/said.  I try to keep in mind what others have posted about Indian media.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 10/18/2014 12:56 PM
You are absolutely right its (apparently) for Chandrayaan-2. I'm not a good multitasker :-)
Clearly anything on the surface can take advantage of Pu238. AIUI, even Chang'e 3 and Yutu have RHU. An advantage of going to the Moon is that there are not the costs associated with planetary protection regulations. Just "don't hit Apollo 11 landing site".
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 10/18/2014 01:01 PM
Ok, the source appears to be a diplomatic cable that's on WikiLeaks. And its from 2008. At that time NASA was trying to get ASRG qualified. Or at least the division in charge of development. The divisions actually selecting missions kept selecting the ones that didn't use Pu238. Among other issues, restart of Pu238 production was still a distant hope.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 10/18/2014 03:50 PM
I'm curious  -- when these radiothermal generators are used on rovers, are they merely meant to keep delicate electronics from freezing and breaking at night?

If so, then it seems like an awful lot of complexity would be removed by inventing electronics that can withstand extreme temperature swings.


However, a Stirling engine component sounds like its meant to generate electrical power, if not locomotive.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 10/22/2014 09:23 AM
There are military grade electronics parts that work at -55 C, but Lunar night can go down to -150 C. I'm not sure of parts that can work that low. There are also reliability aspects as high temperature swings cause thermal contraction and expansion, which can break wires, parts and boards. RTGs can provide both heat and electrical power for the rover.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: baldusi on 10/22/2014 10:43 AM
To expand on what Steven said. Lunar night goes to -150C, while day might go to 400C. That's a 550C variance. That's quite a problem mechanically. Even the solders have to be special. And when you have features measured in nanometers, any differential in thermal expansion can disrupt an electronic contact. NVidia had a notebook chipset that simply broke due to this problem a few years back. The root cause was a selection of a pin bonding method that was too sensitive to thermal swings. And those are usually 10C to 75C parts.
Btw, a new chip factory is around 5B. But I believe that bonding (i.e putting the actual chip in the square support and connecting it to the pins) is done separately. Thus, developing such a chip would be mighty expensive. It is actually cheaper to put a cooling system and an RHU.
Incidentally, electronics that worked at around 800K would enable Venus surface missions for very cheap.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: abhishek on 10/29/2014 05:47 PM
BREAKING NEWS  ;D

GSLV MK3 instead of MK2 will be used for chandrayaan 2 mission

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/india-plans-second-mars-mission-in-2018/509390-11.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 10/30/2014 01:03 PM
BREAKING NEWS  ;D

GSLV MK3 instead of MK2 will be used for chandrayaan 2 mission

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/india-plans-second-mars-mission-in-2018/509390-11.html

Seems to me more like a case of misreporting here and there.
Quote
"We will be able to take the Mars-2 mission after launching the second mission to the moon (Chandrayaan-2) in 2016 with our own lander and rover, which will help us develop a separate lander and rover for the red planet," Kumar said
Quote
The space agency has developed the geo-synchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV-Mark I-III) with indigenous cryogenic engine to launch heavier satellites weighing more than two tonnes and three tonnes into the geo-orbit at 36,000 km above Earth.
Quote
"GSLV-Mark I-III will be used for Chandrayaan-2, which will have heavier payload than its predecessor (Chandrayaan-1) and later for Mars-2 mission, as both will have a lander and rover in addition to scientific experiments," he said.

What does he mean by GSLV-Mark I-III? Either the reporter was referring to both GSLV-II & GSLV-III in general, or he was confused between the two. If ISRO plans to launch Mangalyaan-2 with lander/rover after Chandrayaan-2, they will have to stick with a 2017 launch schedule for the latter. It is highly unlikely GSLV-III will be ready for operational flights by then.

I would put my bets on ISRO sticking to GSLV-II as the launcher.  ;)


Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ss1_3 on 10/30/2014 06:24 PM
Going by the timelines for operationalization, Mk-III launch can be ruled out.

Quote
The first development flight (GSLV Mk-III D1) with an operational cryogenic stage is planned between 2016 to 2017. The second development flight (GSLV Mk-III D2) is planned after one year of GSLV Mk-III D1 flight in 2017 to 2018.

http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/report-gslv-mk-iii-expected-to-be-launched-in-first-half-of-december-2030711
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 10/31/2014 12:58 AM
Note that good payloads have been launched on developmental flights for GSLV-Mk2. Some have been successful, some have been lost, but there were no dummy payloads. The same may be possible for GSLV-Mk3.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 10/31/2014 10:26 AM
I feel Chandrayaan-II would be too prestigious a payload to risk in a development flight. If the launch were to fail, it will be a PR disaster for ISRO and the agency would be bashed left and right for using an untested launcher. The case of Mangalyaan-II might be a bit different though, as GSLV-II may not be able to launch a good orbiter, lander and rover to Mars on a single flight.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/11/2014 11:45 PM
After Mars, ISRO chief Radhakrishnan aims for the moon


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/after-mars-isro-chief-radhakrishnan-aims-for-the-moon/articleshow/45112373.cms

Quote
Buoyed by the success, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman K.S Radhakrishnan said the agency was forging ahead with plans to land an unnamed craft on the moon, along with a satellite to study the sun.

"The aim is three years from now, an Indian lander and Indian rover will land on the moon," he told AFP.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 11/19/2014 03:03 AM
Landing Stages

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/24/2014 10:17 PM
Preparations for the unmanned crew module are on track for a December launch:

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/all-set-to-put-unmanned-crew-module-into-orbit/article6631187.ece
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 11/25/2014 04:35 AM
Preparations for the unmanned crew module are on track for a December launch:

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/all-set-to-put-unmanned-crew-module-into-orbit/article6631187.ece

@sanman, just wondering.. does this news item have relevance in the Chandrayaan-II thread? Maybe you meant to post in a different thread?  ;)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/27/2014 07:37 PM
Yeah, sorry, meant to post it in the GSLV-Mk3 thread -- but Antriksh has done that anyway
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: JH on 11/28/2014 05:10 AM
Can anyone comment on why they aren't pushing the mission back a year rather than flying on the GSLV Mk II? I had thought that MOM was crammed onto a PSLV because the GSLV Mk III wasn't ready yet and planetary missions are considered too important to entrust to the (as I understand it) unreliable GSLV Mk II. Surely the same logic would preclude launching Chandrayaan 2 on a GSLV Mk II.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: abhishek on 11/28/2014 09:15 AM
Can anyone comment on why they aren't pushing the mission back a year rather than flying on the GSLV Mk II? I had thought that MOM was crammed onto a PSLV because the GSLV Mk III wasn't ready yet and planetary missions are considered too important to entrust to the (as I understand it) unreliable GSLV Mk II. Surely the same logic would preclude launching Chandrayaan 2 on a GSLV Mk II.

The Chandrayaan 2 cannot fly on GSLV MK 3 because GSLV 3 would still be in developmental stage and a mission like Chandrayaan2 is just too critical to be sent on a rocket thats still on developmental flight.

Where as GSLV 2 needs just one more developmental flight to get commissioned into regular service.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: JH on 11/29/2014 03:04 AM
I understand that the GSLV Mk III is under development. I was asking why the mission isn't delayed until the Mk III is finished with development. The GSLV Mk II is just a Mk I with an indigenous CE-7.5 cryogenic engine rather than a Russian KVD-1 cryogenic engine for the third stage. The GSLV Mk I has a bad launch record, therefore most of the components of the Mk II have a bad launch record. Why is an important mission being placed on a launcher with questionable heritage? Is it that they believe all of the issues with the Mk II have been resolved?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: abhishek on 11/29/2014 04:04 AM
I understand that the GSLV Mk III is under development. I was asking why the mission isn't delayed until the Mk III is finished with development. The GSLV Mk II is just a Mk I with an indigenous CE-7.5 cryogenic engine rather than a Russian KVD-1 cryogenic engine for the third stage. The GSLV Mk I has a bad launch record, therefore most of the components of the Mk II have a bad launch record. Why is an important mission being placed on a launcher with questionable heritage? Is it that they believe all of the issues with the Mk II have been resolved?

The project has already been delayed by 3 years,any further delay would adversely affect other critical programs.

The project is already gone beyond design board and is under fabrication stage.So for sending it on GSLV 3 would require redesigning and incur additional cost and time.

The issue with GSLV  largely lies with it's Upper stage which seems to have been resolved.We need just one more successful launch to press it into regular service.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: savuporo on 11/29/2014 04:50 AM
Landing Stages

That pic seems to indicate as the lander is now planned have autonomous hazard avoidance and final landing site selection ( retargeting ) , just like Change-3 did ? Earlier graphics did not seem to indicate that.

BTW, relatively comprehensive tracking page on all C-2 developments:
http://isp.justthe80.com/moon-exploration/chandrayaan---2
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: JH on 11/29/2014 06:26 AM
Gotcha. Thanks!
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: abhishek on 12/11/2014 04:01 AM
Sorry, couldn't find a thread on this program,So i am posting it on chandrayaan 2 topic

Moon Mission: Giant leap for startup

Quote
The Indian startup attempting to soft-land a craft on the Moon has just won funding from a host of bigwigs in the venture capital, technology and startup ecosystem, and accolades from some of India's leading space scientists.
The new investors in the venture include Subrata Mitra & Shekhar Kirani of Accel Partners (they have invested in their individual capacities), Sharad Sharma, former Yahoo India R&D head, Vivek Raghavan, chief product manager of UIDAI (the Aadhaar project), Pallaw Sharma, director of analytics at Microsoft based in Redmond, Bala Parthasarthy, serial entrepreneur and part of the AngelPrime angel investor group, Sunil Kalra, entrepreneur & investor, Paras Chopra and Pallav Nadhani, both founders of successful startups.

Quote
If Team Indus succeeds in its venture, it would be the first time India would be soft-landing a craft on the Moon. ISRO's Chandrayaan-1 orbited the Moon and then hard-landed, crashing itself on the Moon's surface. The Google Lunar XPrize, which carries $40 million in prize money, also requires that a rover will dismount from the landing craft and travel 500 metres on the lunar surface, and take high quality images. "The audacity of the plan was what attracted me to Team Indus. It's such a big and complex project," said Raghavan, who has been with the UIDAI project since its inception.

Quote
Going by the latest reviews of the project by top space scientists, Team Indus could well achieve its mission. V Adimurthy, a senior ISRO advisor and designer of the Mars orbiter mission, said about two years ago, when he first met Team Indus, there were many loose ends. "Three months ago there was another review, and what I saw made very good sense. It has become a very feasible project, and I think they can do it," he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/Moon-Mission-Giant-leap-for-startup/articleshow/45466298.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 01/12/2015 07:43 AM
http://www.asianage.com/india/chandrayaan-ii-full-progress-isro-ex-chief-159 (http://www.asianage.com/india/chandrayaan-ii-full-progress-isro-ex-chief-159)

Quote
K. Radhakrishnan, former chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro), said on Saturday that work on Chandrayaan-II was in full progress and the nation can expect it to land an indigenously-built spacecraft with a rover on the surface of the Moon within three to five years.

Signs of Chandrayaan-II getting delayed to 2019-2020? The development of the lander should be pretty challenging, but any idea whether they are facing some major hiccups necessitating a delay? I remember reading a similar news report that quoted ISRO sources (maybe Radhakrishnan himself) saying the lander would be developed within 3 years and the launch can be expected within 5 years. Couldn't find it now.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: GClark on 01/12/2015 08:29 AM
Perhaps bumped in favor of the next Mars mission, rather?

ISRO generally works on one science mission at a time.  With four currently in development (AstroSat, Chandrayaan 2, Aditya, next Mars), if Chandrayaan 2 has indeed run into some development difficulties - say, mass growth(?) -  I would not be surprised by it being bumped.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Gabbar on 01/21/2015 12:28 PM
Kiran Kumar: Medicine’s loss, Isro’s gain (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/Kiran-Kumar-Medicines-loss-Isros-gain/articleshow/45946473.cms)

Quote
"Isro is busy working on Chandrayan-2, which will be taken up in 2016-17," he said adding that Isro has been working for the people and will continue doing so.

Chandrayaan-2 might get launched sometime by 2017 after all, well, hopefully.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 02/26/2015 01:51 AM
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: input~2 on 04/16/2015 07:21 AM
Chandrayan-2 will be completely indigenous: ISRO chief (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/science/chandrayan-2-will-be-completely-indigenous-isro-chief/articleshow/46937776.cms)
Launch expected in FY 2017
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 04/18/2015 05:43 AM
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Indias-second-moon-mission-to-be-launched-in-2017/articleshow/46964764.cms

Quote
THRISSUR: Chandrayaan 2, India's second satellite mission to moon, will be launched in 2017, said M C Dathan, director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thiruvananthapuram.

Speaking after inaugurating the pavilion of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) at the Thrissur pooram exhibition the other day, Dathan said preparations are in full swing for the launch of Chandrayaan 2 at the various ISRO units including at the VSSC.

The launch will happen in the fifth sojourn of Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark II rocket.

Quote
As per the present plan, GSLV Mark II rocket will carry Chandrayaan 2 satellite in its proposed launch in 2017.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 04/22/2015 11:01 PM
AvWeek:

http://aviationweek.com/space/india-s-second-moon-mission-be-fully-homegrown
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 05/10/2015 03:25 PM
Study of Potential Landing Sites on Lunar South Polar area for Chandrayaan-2 Lander (http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2015/pdf/1351.pdf)

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 05/10/2015 07:13 PM
What is ISRO doing to mitigate any potential problems of the kind that the Chinese rover mission experienced?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 05/10/2015 08:07 PM
Here's a youtube clip from a few years ago, which mentions the Laser Ablation Instrument as the primary investigative instrument onboard the Chandrayaan-2 rover:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkI5NBLR59Y

The instrument will be used to zap rocks with a laser and analyze their surface composition via spectrometry. It will work on the same principles as the ChemCam on NASA's Mars Curiosity rover.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan-2#Payload

Quote
Rover payload
Laser induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS) from Laboratory for Electro Optic Systems (LEOS), Bangalore.[15]
Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Spectroscope (APIXS) from PRL, Ahmedabad.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 05/28/2015 03:12 AM
http://indianexpress.com/article/technology/science/sac-to-deliver-eyes-and-ears-of-chandrayaan-2-by-2015-end/

Quote
The ISRO’s Space Applications Centre (SAC) at Ahmedabad, which is designing the “eyes and ears” of Chandrayaan-2, has targeted to deliver all the payloads for the lunar mission by the end of 2015, official sources said. This includes three major payloads and a crucial set of sensors and communication equipment that will be fitted on to the orbiter, lander and the rover.

Quote
“The preliminary design review is over and the flight models are under fabrication. We will be delivering the payload by the end of this year or at the beginning of next year,” Misra added. SAC is developing three major payloads namely the Terrain Mapping Camera-2 (TMC-2), Imaging Infra-Red Spectrometer (IIRS) and L&S Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (L&S-band SAR). All these three payloads will be part of the orbiter that will encircle the moon.

Quote
The most challenging part of the Chandrayaan-2 mission will be the soft landing of the lander on the lunar surface. “SAC is developing all the sensors to provide the lander with real-time information for navigation need for a safe descent on the moon’s surface,” Misra remarked.
The sensors being developed are Orbiter High Resolution Camera (OHRC), Ka-band Altimeter, Lander Position Detection Camera (LPDC) and Lander Hazard Detection and Avoidance Cameras (LHDAC). While the OHRC onboard the orbiter will image the landing site and determine the exact descent point before the lander is ejected from the composite spacecraft, the other three sensors will guide the lander to the descent point.

Quote
SAC is also developing a HD video camera for both the lander and the rover. “The equipment on board the lander and the rover will have a mission life of just 14-15 days. The extreme temperatures on the moon will eventually destroy them,” Misra said adding that the equipment developed by SAC for the lander and the rover can withstand temperatures ranging between a freezing minus 30 degrees to a high of 70 degrees.

Quote
Apart from SAC, the Ahmedabad-based Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) will is also developing two payloads of Chandrayaan-2. This includes a X-Ray Solar monitor that will part of the orbiter and will observe the x-rays emitted from the Sun. PRL is also developing a rover payload called the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer that will determine the elemental composition (Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, TiFe) of lunar soil and rocks around the lunar landing site.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 06/01/2015 02:15 PM
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 06/22/2015 01:43 PM
HAL delivers Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft body (http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/hal-delivers-chandrayaan2-spacecraft-body/article7342479.ece)

Quote
The Orbiter Craft Module structure is a three-tonne category bus made out of a central composite cylinder, shear webs and deck panels
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Ohsin on 07/17/2015 04:27 PM
Quote
For the landing of Chandrayaan-2 mission, a throttle engine is being developed, he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/RSLV-tech-demo-flight-by-October-Isro-chief/articleshow/48116645.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: abhishek on 07/19/2015 10:14 AM
India already has a second visit to the Moon planned for 2018 through Chandrayaan-2 that will include an orbiter, lander and a rover on the lunar surface. This Rs 500 crore mission is already being put together in Bengaluru and it will be launched using the GSLV Mk-II.

According to ISRO it would `further our understanding of origin and evolution of the Moon with improved versions of Chandrayaan-1 instruments for imaging, mineralogy and chemistry; addition of alpha and neutron spectromet ..
Beyond Chandrayaan-2 ISRO seeks to plan for `lunar sample return missions from the polar region of moon and a possible establishment of lunar observatory'.


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/48131695.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 07/19/2015 04:14 PM
India already has a second visit to the Moon planned for 2018 through Chandrayaan-2 that will include an orbiter, lander and a rover on the lunar surface. This Rs 500 crore mission is already being put together in Bengaluru and it will be launched using the GSLV Mk-II.

According to ISRO it would `further our understanding of origin and evolution of the Moon with improved versions of Chandrayaan-1 instruments for imaging, mineralogy and chemistry; addition of alpha and neutron spectromet ..
Beyond Chandrayaan-2 ISRO seeks to plan for `lunar sample return missions from the polar region of moon and a possible establishment of lunar observatory'.


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/48131695.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst




Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 07/19/2015 10:11 PM
Quote

India already has a second visit to the Moon planned for 2018 through Chandrayaan-2 that will include an orbiter, Lander and a rover on the lunar surface. This Rs 500 crore mission is already being put together in Bengaluru and it will be launched using the GSLV-MkII.


GSLV-MkII is not yet operationalized. After the second successive successful launch with indigenous cryogenic engine probably in August this year, GSLV-MkII will be declared operational. Then it has to be launched another 4 times to scale up its higher payload capacity that is critical for launching Chandrayaan-2 which is likely to have a launch mass of 2650 KG ( Lander and Rover Mass : 1,250 kg, Orbiter : 1,400 KG ). GSLV-MkII has so fare launched the highest payload of 1980 KG. Its payload capacity has to be increased further up to 2650 KG. According to wikipedia, the mission strategy has been revised to inject Chandrayaan-2 in a lower initial orbit (170 X 16980 km) with a higher lift-off mass of 3200 kg. so, GSLV-MkII needs to be launched more frequently to scale up its payload capacity. Can someone verify what would be the launch mass of Chandrayaan 2 ( 2650 KG or 3200 KG )  ??

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 08/21/2015 03:17 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TzL1UTELgc
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: savuporo on 08/21/2015 04:13 PM
Wait what, Chandrayaan II is going to be doing optical terrain relative navigation on landing as well ? ( Chang'e-3 appears to have been the first ) Whoa, i like how things are developing
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 08/22/2015 07:09 AM
Wait what, Chandrayaan II is going to be doing optical terrain relative navigation on landing as well ?

Where did you hear that? I listened to the video again, but did not hear that.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: seshagirib on 08/22/2015 08:29 AM
Wait what, Chandrayaan II is going to be doing optical terrain relative navigation on landing as well ?

Where did you hear that? I listened to the video again, but did not hear that.
o
I too did not hear this, however an earlier post of antriksh talks about vision based landing system:
(http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=20324.0;attach=837122;image)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 08/23/2015 04:54 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TzL1UTELgc

Interesting!! At 3250 Kg. will it be GSLV-MkII's heaviest payload

Heaviest lofted by MkII is 2310 kg GSAT-5P on GSLV-F06

May be its the separation orbit. GSLV-MkII's  LEO capability is 5 tonnes
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 09/08/2015 02:34 AM
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/499707/indias-second-moon-mission-gains.html (http://www.deccanherald.com/content/499707/indias-second-moon-mission-gains.html)

Quote
The design of the indigenous lander and the configuration study has been completed by the Space Applications Centre (SAC) and the integration work will be done in Bengaluru

Quote
Isro will design the orbiter, which will orbit the Moon at an altitude of 100 km. The mission will carry five instruments on the orbiter. Three of them are new, while two others are improved versions of those flown on Chandrayaan-1 orbiter.

Quote
The rover's mass will be about 30–100 kg and will operate on solar power. The rover will move on wheels on the lunar surface, pick up samples of soil or rocks, perform on-site chemical analysis and send the data to the orbiter above, which will relay it to the Earth station
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 09/11/2015 10:46 PM
Chandrayaan-2 may get a nuclear / RTG power source

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Isro-may-give-N-boost-to-Chandrayaan-2/articleshow/48928966.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 09/12/2015 07:10 AM
It wasn't entirely clear, but they could be RHU (radioisotope heater units) to keep the lander and rover warm during the cold Lunar night.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 09/12/2015 04:35 PM
There were some speculations (Wikileaks Cables) earlier about NASA supplying a similar device for Chandrayaan 2 mission:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=20324.msg1272303#msg1272303
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 09/16/2015 04:29 PM
http://www.frontline.in/the-nation/cryogenic-success/article7655369.ece?homepage=true (http://www.frontline.in/the-nation/cryogenic-success/article7655369.ece?homepage=true)

As per above article Chandrayaan-II weighs 2,018 kg !!
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 11/18/2015 04:11 PM
Quote
India's second lunar mission, Chandrayaan-2, which is expected to be launched between 2017 and 2018, will have a rover which will operate on the moon's surface for 14 days. "It will function only for 14 days because its instruments are solar powered and the moon will have 14 days of sunlight," he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/Now-Isro-to-launch-6-to-12-satellites-a-year/articleshow/49823834.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 12/16/2015 08:44 PM

Quote

India’s second lunar probe Chandrayaan II will land on moon in 2017 and the country’s first solar mission Aditya L1 is likely to be launched in 2019, Lok Sabha was informed on Wednesday.

Chandrayaan II will land on the surface of moon in 2017 and this second lunar mission will help explore the possibilities of signs of extra-terrestrial life, Minister of State in Prime Minister’s Office Jitendra Singh said during Question Hour responding to supplementaries.



Chandrayaan-II in 2017; India to launch solar mission (http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/indias-second-lunar-probe-chandrayaanii-will-land-on-mooon-in-2017-india-to-launch-solar-mission-in-2019/article7996066.ece)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Moe Grills on 12/17/2015 02:49 AM
It wasn't entirely clear, but they could be RHU (radioisotope heater units) to keep the lander and rover warm during the cold Lunar night.
RHU's can be modified to generate some electricity as well.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Moe Grills on 12/17/2015 02:51 AM

Quote

India’s second lunar probe Chandrayaan II will land on moon in 2017 and the country’s first solar mission Aditya L1 is likely to be launched in 2019, Lok Sabha was informed on Wednesday.

Chandrayaan II will land on the surface of moon in 2017 and this second lunar mission will help explore the possibilities of signs of extra-terrestrial life, Minister of State in Prime Minister’s Office Jitendra Singh said during Question Hour responding to supplementaries.



Signs of.....extra-terrestrial life??????....on the Moon??????     Did I miss something???????
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 12/17/2015 04:18 AM

Quote

India’s second lunar probe Chandrayaan II will land on moon in 2017 and the country’s first solar mission Aditya L1 is likely to be launched in 2019, Lok Sabha was informed on Wednesday.

Chandrayaan II will land on the surface of moon in 2017 and this second lunar mission will help explore the possibilities of signs of extra-terrestrial life, Minister of State in Prime Minister’s Office Jitendra Singh said during Question Hour responding to supplementaries.



Signs of.....extra-terrestrial life??????....on the Moon??????     Did I miss something???????

Cybertronians  ;D
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 01/05/2016 02:08 PM
No nuclear power for CH-2

Quote
We plan to take Chandrayaan 3 and 4 in near future and we may use nuclear power in those missions. By that time we will be completely ready with the materials and other things

Source (http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/ISRO-Puts-Off-Nuclear-Powered-Space-Mission/2016/01/05/article3213005.ece)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: A.K. on 01/06/2016 06:31 AM
ISRO puts off nuclear powered space mission (http://'http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/ISRO-Puts-Off-Nuclear-Powered-Space-Mission/2016/01/05/article3213005.ece')
Quote from:
NEW DELHI: Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has decided to put off for time being its plans to use nuclear power to increase lifespan of India's second lunar mission Chandrayaan 2 as there has been delay in getting the required nuclear material from Russia.
Quote from:
The nuclear power is expected expected to increase the lifespan of the mission as life of Chandrayaan 1, launched in 2008, was cut short by two months due to technical problems. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been also working to make the nuclear material for the mission.
Quote from:
"We had plans to give nuclear power to
Chandrayaan 2 but now we have decided to put it off for time being as we don't want further delay in launch which is scheduled for 2017-18," said ISRO satellite centre director M Annadurai.
Quote from:
The second lunar mission was l scheduled for launch in 2013 as joint operation between India and Russia. But after failure of Russia’s Phobos-Grunt, mission to probe Maritian moon, it decided to do an internal assessment of its programme.
Quote from:
India then decided to make Chandryaan 2 as a completely indigenous mission with all three components of the mission orbiter, lander and rover made in the country.
Quote from:
"Once we get the material we have to do necessary experiments which will further delay the mission. There has been some delay in getting material from Russia," he said.
Quote from:
Quote
ISRO is now looking forward to use the nuclear powered mission in future projects.
"We plan to take Chandrayaan 3 and 4 in near future and we may use nuclear power in those missions. By that time we will be completely ready with the materials and other things," he added.
Quote from:
India plans to have a high altitude polar landing of Chandrayaan 2 and it will have a capability to soft land and carry in-situ chemical analysis of the lunar surface. A new throttled engine is being developed that will reduce the thrust for landing on the surface of the moon.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Ohsin on 02/04/2016 09:20 PM
Here is a slide on OHRC camera (Orbiter High Resolution Camera) that would image landing site at 0.25 m resolution from 100 km orbit taken from presentation at NRSC UIM 2016

http://livestream.nrsc.gov.in/CartoSession-4.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ss1_3 on 02/16/2016 03:47 PM
Not sure if this official VSSC payload info has been posted before:

http://spl.gov.in/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=99&Itemid=679&lang=en

Quote

 Chandrayaan-2 is the second Indian Lunar Mission which will be launched in near future. Chandrayaan-2 consist of an Orbiter, a Lander and a Rover. SPL, VSSC, has the following experiments onboard Chandryaan-2 orbiter and Lander.

•CHACE-2 (CHandra's Altitudinal Composition Explorer) onboard Chandrayaan-2 Orbiter
•ChaSTE (Chandra’s Surface Thermophysical Experiment) on Chandrayaan-2 Lander
•RAMBHA (Radio Anatomy of Moon Bound Hypersensitive ionosphere and Atmosphere) on Chandrayaan-2 Lander, which consisting Langmuir Probe (LP), Dual Frequency Radio Science(DFRS) experiment and radio sounder.



Quote

CHACE-2 (CHandra's Atmospheric Composition Explorer-2) on Chandrayaan-2 Orbiter

The CHACE-2 experiment aboard the Chandrayaan-2 orbiter will study the neutral composition of the Lunar exosphere from a circular polar orbit of ~100 km. The CHACE-2 instrument will be similar to MENCA. Apart from obtaining mass spectra of the tenuous Lunar exosphere, the instrument will have capability of tracking the distribution of a pre-selected set of species with higher temporal resolution.

Quote

ChaSTE (Chandra’s Surface Thermophysical Experiment)

 ChaSTE is one of the scientific experiment on the Lander of the Chandrayaan-2 mission. ChaSTE is a thermal probe with the  objective of making in-situ measurements of temperature profile on the lunar surface up to a depth of 100 mm near the polar region, and the measurements of thermal conductivity of lunar regolith. ChaSTE would be the first-ever in-situ thermal measurements on lunar surface near the polar region.

Quote
RAMBHA (Radio Anatomy of Moon Bound Hypersensitive ionosphere and Atmosphere)

The RAMBHA experiment onboard the forthcoming Chandrayaan-2 Lander mission is a unique payload package that would provide a comprehensive exploration of Lunar plasma environment. RAMBHA is conceived as a suite of three experiments, viz. (i) a Langmuir Probe and (iii) a dual frequency radio science (DFRS) experiment.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 02/29/2016 05:50 AM
ISRO chief signals India's readiness for Chandrayaan II mission

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mangaluru/ISRO-chief-signals-Indias-readiness-for-Chandrayaan-II-mission/articleshow/51178528.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Ohsin on 03/12/2016 10:55 AM
Quote
Chandrayaan-1 finds signatures of recent shallow moonquakes‏
<snip>
The moonquakes may also provide new insights about mechanism of earthquakes, Kumar said adding that ISRO's Moon rover in the Chandrayaan-II mission slated for 2017 should, therefore, carry a seismometer to study these activities in the Schrödinger basin.

http://www.natureasia.com/en/nindia/article/10.1038/nindia.2016.34

Could it be pulled without any delay?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: antriksh on 03/28/2016 03:09 AM
Lunar rover for Chandrayan II Lunar Mission: 3D Map Generation using Structured Light, Kinematics, and Path Planning (http://www.iitk.ac.in/directions/Directions_2015_01/lunarrover_chandrayanIIlunarmission_profduttavenkatesh.pdf)

Quote
we have described the development of the rover and a map generation system for 3D terrain using structured light
for a six wheel rover navigation problem. A structured light system enables the detection and estimation of
both positive and negative obstacles. The structured light system is capable of working even in high lux
environments to deliver highly accurate maps that can reach sub millimetre accuracies

Quote
As specified by ISRO, the design of the rover is based on the well proven space rover “Sojourner” that has been
deployed for the exploration of Mars since July, 1997. It has 6 wheels, all of which are driven by DC brushless
servo motors. The front and the rear wheels also have steering motors. The rover has two rocker arms connected
to the rover body through a differential. Each
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 03/28/2016 10:04 AM
Thanks antriksh! Good to see CY2 shaping up well...
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Ohsin on 03/28/2016 11:17 AM
There were some misunderstandings between IIT-K and ISRO about this job. Only software is relevant not hardware.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: plutogno on 04/07/2016 09:58 AM
from Aviation Week:
The Payloads Of India’s Upcoming Moon Mission

http://aviationweek.com/space/payloads-india-s-upcoming-moon-mission?NL=AW-05&Issue=AW-05_20160407_AW-05_460
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 05/28/2016 12:18 AM
Quote
Chandrayaan-2, India’s second mission to the Moon, consists of an Orbiter, Lander and Rover configuration. It is totally an indigenous mission, planned to be launched by GSLV-MkII during the first quarter of 2018. A major milestone of the spacecraft level Preliminary Design Review (PDR) has been completed in the month of May 2015.

Orbiter Craft: The primary structure has been realised and delivered to the integration team for the integration with other subsystems which will begin from Dec 2015. Some of the mainframe systems are realised and some are in the Test and Evaluation phase. The Payloads are being realised at various centres and few are in an advanced stage of development. The equipment panel layouts are in the final stage of release. Interfaces between Orbiter and GSLV-Mk II has been finalised.

Lander Craft: The Lander Craft configuration has been finalised for a safe and soft landing at the identified site. The mission critical elements of sensors and actuators for a safe and soft landing are being developed at various centres. The development/qualification models are expected to be delivered in the middle of 2016. The special tests to verify the integral performance of all sensors, actuators and software in a closed loop are planned in the middle of 2016. Accommodation study of all elements has been completed. The 800 N Liquid Engines have undergone High Altitude Test (HAT) for a duration of 513 sec successfully. A Standing Technical Review committee (STRC) met and is overseeing the overall progress of the new Advanced technologies present in the lander.

Rover: The Engineering model of six wheeled rover is being realised. Navigation Camera, Inclinometer, Rover imager and mechanism hardware are ready for integration. The other systems are in the final stages of fabrication. The illumination setup for the lunar terrain test facility has been commissioned.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 06/26/2016 06:43 PM
(http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/chandrayaan2-will-be-indias-second-lunar-exploration-mission-after-picture-id526309620)

(http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/chandrayaan2-will-be-indias-second-lunar-exploration-mission-after-picture-id526309624)

(http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/chandrayaan2-will-be-indias-second-lunar-exploration-mission-after-picture-id526309958)

(http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/chandrayaan2-will-be-indias-second-lunar-exploration-mission-after-picture-id526309626)

(http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/chandrayaan2-will-be-indias-second-lunar-exploration-mission-after-picture-id526309612)

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 08/09/2016 06:09 PM
Hat tip: Antariksh at r/isro (https://www.reddit.com/r/ISRO/comments/4wfkry/chandrayaan_2_updates/)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 08/10/2016 08:56 PM
 8)

From above, its now clear what will be the specific shape and outline of the Orbiter, Lander and Rover.

The rover size shown in "Open field test between lander and rover at HAL airport" image is misleading. On closer observation, looks like Rover is a cropped up image. It might be half the height of that chair.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 08/14/2016 07:44 PM
CHACE-2 payload info from ISRO SPL 2014-25 annual report (http://spl.gov.in/annreport/SPL-AR-2015.pdf).
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 08/14/2016 07:47 PM
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 09/10/2016 04:09 AM
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/road-clear-for-chandrayaan2/article9091414.ece

Quote
The interfaces between GSLV-Mk II and Chandrayaan-2 have already been finalised, according to officials in the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

A GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 with a lander and a rover into orbit in the first quarter of 2018. It will be a totally indigenous mission — the vehicle, the spacecraft, the lander and the rover are all made in India. The orbiter (that is, the spacecraft), the lander and rover together will weigh 3,280 kg. After the spacecraft is inserted into the lunar orbit, the lander with the rover inside it will separate and land softly on the moon’s surface.

The lander will have a throttleable engine for performing a soft landing and four sites have been short-listed for this. After it touches down on a flat surface on the moon, the 25-kg rover — which is a kind of a toy car — will emerge from it. It will have six wheels, made of aluminium, to move about on the lunar soil. The wheels will interact in such a way that the rover does not sink. The rover will move at a speed of two cm a second. Its lifetime on the moon is 14 earth days; it will have two payloads for analysing the soil’s chemical properties.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ZachS09 on 09/10/2016 10:44 AM
Let me guess:

The reason why the GSLV Mk.2 is being used to launch Chandrayaan 2 instead of the PSLV-XL is because the orbiter, lander and rover are heavier than Chandrayaan 1?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 09/10/2016 03:56 PM
Let me guess:

The reason why the GSLV Mk.2 is being used to launch Chandrayaan 2 instead of the PSLV-XL is because the orbiter, lander and rover are heavier than Chandrayaan 1?
Yes.

Since the total weight of the spacecraft is specified as 3.2 tonnes, I wonder what kind of orbit GSLV would initially deploy it to. Can it deploy that kind of weight to a sub-GTO, as was the case in  Chandrayaan-1?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: savuporo on 09/10/2016 05:33 PM
A GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 with a lander and a rover into orbit in the first quarter of 2018. It will be a totally indigenous mission — the vehicle, the spacecraft, the lander and the rover are all made in India.
This is super encouraging. Had they gone with this approach from the get go, it likely would have been done by now.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 09/10/2016 08:54 PM
I thought GSLV Mk-II was always the launcher envisioned for Chandrayaan-2 -- again, as you say, because of the heavier payload weight of orbiter and lander. I'd hoped that LVM3 might eventually become the launcher for that mission, but I guess it offered no advantage. (They could have made the rover bigger and included more instruments, but I guess they didn't see a need to upscale the mission)

Are they still going to do those multiple loops around the Earth with Oberth effect, or can they try for trans-lunar injection more directly?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 09/28/2016 09:12 PM
Cross posting @worldtimedate's post in GSLV cryo discussion thread

As I expected, since GSLV MK-II's Cryogenic Upper Stage does NOT have multiple restartable capability, it will launch the Chandrayaan-2 into a parking orbit similar to GTO.

Here is the report from Frontline Magazine Science Section

Quote
G. Nagesh, Project Director, Chandrayaan-2, said the orbiter, the lander and the rover were together called the composite module. The GSLV-Mk II will first place this composite module in an orbit of 170 km by 19,500 km, called earth-parking orbit. From there, with the help of the liquid engines in the orbiter, we will take Chandrayaan-2 to the moon’s orbit of 100 km, he said. It is exactly the same as Chandrayaan-1's orbit. Once Chandrayaan-2 (that is, the composite module) is in the lunar orbit, ISRO will beam commands to it for the lander to fly out of the orbiter.


Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV (http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/cryogenic-gains-for-gslv/article9153824.ece)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 09/29/2016 05:37 AM
Quote
Asked how a GSLV-Mk II vehicle could take the 3,280-kg Chandrayaan-2 into orbit when even future GSLV-Mk II rockets could carry only satellites weighing around 2,800 kg into orbit, Umamaheswaran replied that since Chandrayaan-2 would be first parked in its initial orbit of 180 km by 20,000 km, it would indeed be possible. It would be different from the GSLV-F05 mission, where the 2,211-kg INSAT-3DR had to be put into a geosynchronous transfer orbit of 170 km by 35,000 km.

Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV (http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/cryogenic-gains-for-gslv/article9153824.ece)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 09/29/2016 06:20 AM
Recent Frontline Magazine Science Section has valueable information on Chandrayaan-2 Mission.

Quote
Ready for Chandrayaan-2

The mission's success signalled two things. One, the GSLV-Mk II with an indigenous cryogenic upper stage is "more than qualified", as M. Annadurai, Director, ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bengaluru, described it, to put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit. The other, the GSLV-Mk II rocket has become a candidate in the launch market to put the two-tonne class of satellites into orbit. It is all set to complement ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), which, with its string of 35 consecutive successes, has consolidated itself as a robust, reliable vehicle for putting small satellites into orbit.

The real significance of the GSLV-F05 mission's success is that it has cleared the road for the Chandrayaan-2 mission and boosted the morale of the Chandrayaan-2 project team at ISAC, Bengaluru. Chandrayaan-2 will be a totally indigenous mission, with the launch vehicle (GSLV-Mk II), the spacecraft, the lander and the rover, all made by ISRO.

While the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) will build the GSLV-Mk II that will put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit, teams in ISAC are busy building the orbiter, the lander and the rover.

Annadurai said: "Basically, Chandrayaan-2 calls for a GSLV. The latest [GSLV-F05] success indicates that the GSLV is also in the category of the PSLV, which has had a string of successes. It was the PSLV, its XL version, which put both Chandrayaan-1 and our spacecraft to Mars into orbit. Thus, the PSLV played a major role in the successes of both Chandrayaan-1 and our Mars spacecraft missions. Similarly, the GSLV-F05 mission's success gives us the confidence that a GSLV-Mk II vehicle will put Chandrayaan-2 into orbit. The GSLV-F05's triumph will galvanise us to realise the Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft, the lander and rover at the earliest so that we can aim for a lift-off by 2017-end from Sriharikota."

Teams are working in full swing at ISAC to realise the orbiter, lander and rover. The interfaces between the orbiter and the GSLV-Mk II have been finalised and the rover's engineering model is ready. The rover will have six wheels made of aluminium, a navigation camera and an inclinometer. The orbiter, the lander and the rover together weigh 3,280 kg; the rover weighs 25 kg and the lander 935 kg.

G. Nagesh, Project Director, Chandrayaan-2, said the orbiter, the lander and the rover were together called the composite module. The GSLV-Mk II will first place this composite module in an orbit of 170 km by 19,500 km, called earth-parking orbit. "From there, with the help of the liquid engines in the orbiter, we will take Chandrayaan-2 to the moon's orbit of 100 km," he said. It is exactly the same as Chandrayaan-1's orbit. Once Chandrayaan-2 (that is, the composite module) is in the lunar orbit, ISRO will beam commands to it for the lander to fly out of the orbiter. This will happen at an identified time, depending on the Sun-Moon-Earth gravity. The lander has a pyramidal structure.

"The lander will land at an identified site on the moon. Once the lander touches down, a ramp will deploy and the rover will come out, rolling down the ramp. Both the lander and the rover will perform experiments on the moon," said Nagesh.

Annadurai said that for the lander to make a soft landing on the lunar soil, matching the lunar gravity, it needs to have throttle-able engines. "This is a major technology. Over and above that, the lander should do in-place navigation and [be able to] find hazards. In case of hazards, it should go around and land [in a suitable] place. These two things are new to us," he said.

The rover will roll down a ramp from the lander on six aluminium wheels which should interact properly. "If they don't interact properly, there is a possibility that the rover will sink into the lunar soil," Annadurai said. The rover has batteries which are charged by solar panels. Each wheel will be driven by a motor. "This is what makes the rover move forward and backward. We use the principle of skid-steering to enable the rover to take turns, negotiate hazards, etc.," he said.

The rover will move at a speed of one to two cm a second. After it traverses a distance of say, five metres, the navigation cameras on board will take pictures of the lunar surface and the images will be sent to the ground. Annadurai said, "We will analyse the [best] path to follow and direct this command [to the rover] to move on that path." The rover will do all the operations during the lunar day. Its life is one lunar day, or 14 earth days. It has two payloads to analyse the chemical properties of the lunar soil.

The lander will perform three experiments: analyse seismic activity on the moon's surface; measure plasma and electron content on the lunar surface; and study temperatures below the moon's soil. The orbiter, from its perch in the lunar orbit, will do mineralogical mapping of the moon's soil.

Asked how a GSLV-Mk II vehicle could take the 3,280-kg Chandrayaan-2 into orbit when even future GSLV-Mk II rockets could carry only satellites weighing around 2,800 kg into orbit, Umamaheswaran replied that since Chandrayaan-2 would be first parked in its initial orbit of 180 km by 20,000 km, it would indeed be possible. It would be different from the GSLV-F05 mission, where the 2,211-kg INSAT-3DR had to be put into a geosynchronous transfer orbit of 170 km by 35,000 km.

Source : Cryogenic gains for GSLV (http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/cryogenic-gains-for-gslv/article9153824.ece)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 10/06/2016 09:07 PM
ISRO to pratice Moon Landing in ‘no-fly zone’ in Bengaluru for Chandrayaan-II mission (http://tecake.in/news/science/isro-pratice-moon-landing-no-fly-zone-bengaluru-chandrayaan-ii-mission-24337.html)
Quote
In order to help Indian space scientists overcome the challenges of landing on Moon and Mars, researchers will fly a small aircraft breaching the ‘no fly zone’ rules over Bengaluru. What’s striking is that the aircraft will carry a special payload of country’s second lunar mission — Chandrayaan-II. The aircraft will drop the payload over a scooped out area in order to mimic lunar surface with large craters and check whether the scientists can successfully touch down the surface.
Quote
“This is the first time we are going to attempt to land on the Moon, so we want to be meticulous with our computation and technology,” said officials from ISRO. The lunar rover will monitor surface of Moon and it will rely on the Orbiter High Resolution Camera (OHRC) for accurate inputs. The rover weighs 20kg and harnesses the power from Sun.
Quote
Space scientists said the orbiter would circle the Moon at an altitude of 100 km with five instruments onboard. Three of these would be new, while two others would be improved versions of ones flown onboard Chandrayaan-I. The orbiter would help beam scientific data garnered by the rover from the Moon’s soil.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 10/09/2016 01:11 AM
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Visakhapatnam/isro-bracing-to-deploy-rover-on-lunar-surface/article9203827.ece

Quote
India is getting ready to deploy an indigenously developed rover on the lunar surface for on-site analysis of various samples and relay them to the earth station.

Senior ISRO scientist and Deputy Director of Satish Dhawan Space Centre V. Ranganathan told The Hindu on Saturday that they were in advance stages of deploying the rover. The timing of its launch is not yet finalised.

Chandrayaan-II Mission includes launching of lunar explorations by geosynchronous launch vehicles (GSLV Mk-II) with clinical precision. The wheeled rover would be useful in using multiple applications by collecting soil and rock sediments for on-site analysis and transmitting the findings to the earth station.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 10/15/2016 05:15 AM
Quote
He added that various tests related to Chandrayan 2 mission is under progress and it is expected to take place by the end of next year, while another planetary mission Aditya to study Sun is expected in 2018.

For Chandrayan 2, tests on controls over the lander and rover while landing on moon are to be tested by the end of this year and the early next year. Many of the activities are supported by student groups.

Source : Isro looking at putting a telescope on moon, says A S Kiran Kumar (http://www.business-standard.com/article/current-affairs/isro-looking-at-putting-a-telescope-on-moon-says-a-s-kiran-kumar-116101401285_1.html)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 10/24/2016 10:21 PM
Quote
ISRO starts landing tests for Chandrayaan-2 mission

Simulated lunar craters created in Chitradurga to plan Lander’s descent

The Indian Space Research Organsiation started a series of ground and aerial tests linked to the critical Moon landing of Chandrayaan-2 on Friday, at its new site at Challakere in Chitradurga district, 400 km from Bengaluru.

ISRO Satellite Centre or ISAC, the lead centre for the second Moon mission, has artificially created close to ten craters to simulate the lunar terrain and test the Lander’s sensors.

A small ISRO aircraft has been carrying equipment with sensors over these craters to plan the tasks ahead.

ISRO, along with a host of other scientific and strategic agencies, owns vast land for its future missions at Challakere, in a ‘Science City.’

ISAC Director M.Annadurai told The Hindu, “The campaign for the Lander tests of Chandrayaan-2 has started. Tests are conducted over the simulated craters at Chitradurga. We are using an aircraft to assess whether the sensors on the Lander will do their job [later] of identifying the landing spot on the Moon.”

Chandrayaan-2 is tentatively set for late 2017 or early 2018 and includes soft-landing on Moon and moving a rover on its surface.

‘Complicated task’
Landing on an alien surface is very complicated, said Dr. Annadurai, who was also the Project Director for the successful Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission of 2008.

In the coming months up to March, ISAC would conduct many tests: on avionics and electronics; testing the Lander’s legs, followed by a combined full test, at Bengaluru and Chitradurga.

The mission includes an Orbiter, a Lander and a Rover, all being readied at ISAC in Bengaluru. The Orbiter spacecraft when launched from Sriharikota will travel to the Moon and release the Lander, which will in turn deploy a tiny Rover to roam the lunar surface — all three sending data and pictures to Earth.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/isro-starts-landing-tests-for-chandrayaan2-mission/article9262825.ece
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 10/25/2016 05:23 AM
Huh, I didn't notice until now that while the lander will probably be the 1st spacecraft to land on the lunar poles, the lander instruments are oriented towards the lunar interior (seismic instrument, thermal probe, Langmuir probe) with the only surface geology oriented instruments being the APXS and laser spectrometer on the rover, which isn't planned to survive the 1st lunar night. Isn't that a bit strange?  :-\

Also I don't see any scientific oriented cameras on the lander and rover - though I guess there must be some on the lander to monitor the rover deployment? I wonder what are their specifications and abilities to do detailed observations of the landing site? ???
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ZachS09 on 10/25/2016 03:17 PM
Has ISRO given a name for the rover? We already know that the orbiter will be "Chandrayaan 2".
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 10/25/2016 04:27 PM
Has ISRO given a name for the rover? We already know that the orbiter will be "Chandrayaan 2".
Not heard any. But considering the highly imaginative name they gave to the Mars mission, I hope it isn't 'Moon Rover'.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: ZachS09 on 10/25/2016 06:44 PM
What if they named the rover "Khojakarta"?

It means "Explorer" in Hindi.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 10/25/2016 11:49 PM
Keep it in mind!  They might have a competition to name it.  China has done and is doing that.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 10/26/2016 03:19 AM
How do they do these landing tests, anyway? And with what kind of aircraft? I'm picturing in my head a hexacopter drone, equipped with sensors that would be used on the lander - would that fill the bill? Could you simulate a lunar lander using a hexacopter-style of drone? What would be required for a reasonably accurate simulation?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 10/27/2016 11:19 AM
ISRO chief Dr S Kiran Kumar gave a presentation on Chandrayaan-1 at IUCCA (Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics) and the tail end of his talk included a little bit on Chandrayaan-2:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYUsCgLt19w
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 10/28/2016 07:22 AM
Slides from the presentation.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/15/2016 04:12 AM
ISRO approximates a lunar landscape to help simulate the Chandrayaan-2 landing:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/Isro-creates-a-Moon-in-Challakere-to-simulate-Chandrayaan-2-landing/articleshow/55419030.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 11/15/2016 12:17 PM
"The life expectancy of the lander and the orbiter as estimated now is one (Earth) day, which means 14 lunar days."

Let us hope the landing simulations are more accurate than the lunar calendar simulations.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/19/2016 07:14 AM
"The life expectancy of the lander and the orbiter as estimated now is one (Earth) day, which means 14 lunar days."

Let us hope the landing simulations are more accurate than the lunar calendar simulations.

Heh, I think that's just the Indian media again - they're often a poor intermediary for spreading accurate info to the public.  :-[
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 11/19/2016 11:46 PM
The launch date in the title is now listed as December 2018. Where did this information come from? I couldn't find it in any recent posts or in the launch manifest.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 02/09/2017 02:53 PM
http://pib.gov.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=158310

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has started a series of ground tests for testing the performance of sensors and actuators for soft landing of the Lander on the lunar surface.   

Special tests for new systems in Lander have been identified and a Lander Sensors Performance Test over artificial craters created in Chitradurga district in Karnataka, has been conducted. Lunar Terrain Test facility is ready for Lander drop test and Rover mobility tests.

ISRO is working towards the launch of Chandrayaan-2 during the first quarter of 2018. The Chandrayaan-2 comprises of indigenous Orbiter, Lander and Rover. After reaching the 100 km lunar orbit, the Lander housing the Rover will separate from the Orbiter. After a controlled descent, the Lander will soft land on the lunar surface at a specified site and deploy a Rover. The instruments on the rover will collect data for analysis of the lunar soil.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 02/16/2017 04:28 PM
Ok. We are getting closer..

Lunar lander ready to be tested (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/ISRO-gearing-up-forsecond-moon-mission/article17313134.ece)

Quote
The static test of the lander module of Chandrayaan- 2 will be held at the ISRO Propulsion Complex, Mahendragiri, by the end of February.

Director, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), S. Somanath, told The Hindu that the test would measure the performance of the propulsion system of the lander module.

Mr.Somanath said the soft landing involved in the Chandrayaan- 2 mission required special propulsion and control systems and complex electronics. The lander would have four engines to make a controlled descent from the orbiter.

For the static test, the craft would be mounted on a frame and the four engines fired at varying thrust.

A month later, another lander module, a replica of the first one, would be tested in a suspended state. The craft would be hung from a crane and the engines fired to move the module in different directions and simulate a soft landing.

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 02/16/2017 07:30 PM
Ok. We are getting closer..

Lunar lander ready to be tested (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/ISRO-gearing-up-forsecond-moon-mission/article17313134.ece)

Quote
The static test of the lander module of Chandrayaan- 2 will be held at the ISRO Propulsion Complex, Mahendragiri, by the end of February.

Director, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), S. Somanath, told The Hindu that the test would measure the performance of the propulsion system of the lander module.

Mr.Somanath said the soft landing involved in the Chandrayaan- 2 mission required special propulsion and control systems and complex electronics. The lander would have four engines to make a controlled descent from the orbiter.

For the static test, the craft would be mounted on a frame and the four engines fired at varying thrust.

A month later, another lander module, a replica of the first one, would be tested in a suspended state. The craft would be hung from a crane and the engines fired to move the module in different directions and simulate a soft landing.


I am concerned about the launcher GSLV MK-II. It has not yet attained higher capability yet. It needs to be launched 2 to 3 times more before it launches the Chandrayaan 2 which will have a lift off mass of 3250 Kg.

Launch mass :
Combined: 3,250 kg (7,170 lb)

Payload mass :
Orbiter: 1,400 kg (3,100 lb)
Rover: 20 kg (44 lb)

ISRO has to ramp up its Launcher Capability, otherwise the gain it made by launching Chandrayan 1 that discovered water in the Moon and sending Mangalyaan at the first attempt will lose its advantage. Because of the heavier launch capability Launcher China's moon mission has raced away faster than India's.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]

Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 02/16/2017 07:54 PM


I am concerned about the launcher GSLV MK-II. It has not yet attained higher capability yet. It needs to be launched 2 to 3 times more before it launches the Chandrayaan 2 which will have a lift off mass of 3250 Kg.

Launch mass :
Combined: 3,250 kg (7,170 lb)

Payload mass :
Orbiter: 1,400 kg (3,100 lb)
Rover: 20 kg (44 lb)

ISRO has to ramp up its Launcher Capability, otherwise the gain it made by launching Chandrayan 1 that discovered water in the Moon and sending Mangalyaan at the first attempt will lose its advantage. Because of the heavier launch capability Launcher China's moon mission has raced away faster than India's.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]

Chandrayaan-II will likely be launched only by the later half of 2018 after completion of all the tests, and GSLV is likely to make 2-3 flights more by then. And we need to bear in mind that GSLV would be deploying CY-II to a sub-GTO orbit like the PSLV does in case of IRNSS sats.

And why do we even need to worry about China in this? Its not as if ISRO is in a race with the Chinese to win a prize or anything, in any case.   Lets assume thay they do their missions at a pace that matches their requirements,  and we does as per ours.

Thats said, I do think ISRO needs to ramp up its launch capability fast (which they might be doing at the best of their abilities), but that is more in the context of meeting the requirements for heavy GEO sats.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 02/22/2017 07:33 AM
From the Annual Report 2016-17 (http://www.isro.gov.in/annual-report-2016-2017-english)
Quote
Orbiter Craft
Primary structure of Orbiter Craft has been realised. Fabrication of panels is in progress. Configuration of mainframe systems and payloads was completed. Integration of mainframe systems including propulsion elements was expected to commence from December 2016. Payloads from various centres are in advanced stages of realisation and expected to be delivered in first quarter of 2017 for integration.

Lander Craft
Lander configuration is finalised to meet the soft and safe landing at the identified site. Payload configuration and interfaces with lander are finalised. Engineering models of mission critical
sensors, namely, Ka-Band Radio Altimeter (KaRA) and Lander Pattern Detection Camera (LPDC) from SAC and Laser Inertial Reference & Accelerometer Package (LIRAP) from IISU have been realised and performance tested in Lander Sensor Performance Test (LSPT), Phase-1 over artificial craters created, at Chitradurga in Karnataka. System Demonstration Module (SDM) realisation for evaluating the performance of Lander propulsion system with throttlable engines, Lander
Actuator Performance Test (LAPT) configuration and Lander electrical packages required for LAPT are in advanced stage of completion. Engineering model of Lander Leg was realised and single leg drop tests were completed. A facility has been established at Lunar Terrain Test Facility for conducting lander leg drop tests.

Rover
All the rover flight systems are in advanced stage of realisation. Soil mixing exercise is completed and the mobility test to evaluate the Rover’s wheel – soil interaction is under progress.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 02/25/2017 11:49 PM
http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2017/feb/15/chandrayaan-2-gets-russian-technology-to-analyse-lunar-surface-1570722.html

Quote
The Russian firm, Joint Stock Company Isotope, which is part of the Russian Federation National Nuclear Corporation (ROSATOM) has supplied Radionuclide Curium (Cm-244) alpha emitter to the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad. It will help analyse lunar surface and rocks, according to ROSATOM South Asia spokesperson, Alexander Antipin.

He said the alpha emitter, manufactured by Russian State Scientific Centre-Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (JSC SSC RIAR), will be installed on Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer to help the ISRO’s lunar exploration mission.

Russia had supplied similar products to the US for the launching of three NASA expeditions -- Mars Pathfinder (1997), Opportunity (2004) and Curiosity (2012).
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 03/01/2017 07:07 PM
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/chandrayaan-2-to-measure-water-on-the-moon-misra/articleshow/57400214.cms

Quote
Ahmedabad: Work on some of the critical sensors of the Chandrayaan-2 mission is nearing completion at the Space Applications Centre (SAC) and the Physical Research Laboratory (PRL).

These include three major payloads — scientific probes, crucial sensors and communication equipment that will be present in the orbiter, Lander and the Rover of the Chandrayaan-2 mission.

The latest sensors will help Isro validate, confirm and even make more crucial in-depth discoveries of the moon's topography in continuation to Chandrayaan-1 discoveries. While Chandrayaan-1 found water on the moon, SAC has mounted a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) providing L and S band readings on the Chandrayaan-2 orbiter that will help calculate the amount of water on the moon.

"The SAR through differential readings can provide us an idea of the volume of water on moon surface," said SAC director Tapan Misra on the sidelines of the National Science Day celebrations at SAC. The orbiter will also carry three separate hyperspectral cameras that will map the terrain of the moon, including providing information on the mineralogy of the moon surface.

Besides the orbiter, SAC is providing the Rover with a high definition camera and a scientific probe, developed at Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) to conduct on-site mineral investigations of the moon soil and rocks.
SAC officials claim that a new innovation onboard the Chandrayaan-2 is special radar altimeter that will help the Lander to orient itself while it lands on the moon surface safely. The same altimeter will be used for a small test flight of the human space flight mission.

The hi-tech SAC payloads will now be sent to Ahmedabad to be installed on Chnadrayaan-2 mission to carry out tests.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 03/02/2017 05:37 AM
http://zeenews.india.com/space/chandrayaan-2-mission-india-may-launch-its-second-mission-to-moon-in-first-quarter-of-2018-says-isro-chief_1982630.html

Quote
The ISRO chief while delivering a speech at the seventh annual convocation of Vels University on Wednesday said that tests were underway for a controlled landing of the spacecraft on the surface of the moon.

"ISRO will develop an engine that will help in the controlled landing on the moon. The mission is currently planned for the first quarter of 2018," he said, adding that scientists had developed an artificial crater to simulate the surface of lunar conditions for the landing experiments.

He further revealed that a series of ground tests is also in progress at the ISRO facility in Mahendragiri, Tirunelveli district, and in Challakere, in Chitradurga district near Bengaluru. "The satellite is also getting ready," he added.

Quote
Chandrayaan 2, which consists of an Orbiter, Lander and Rover configuration, is an advanced version of the previous Chandrayaan-1 mission.

It is planned to be launched as a composite stack into the Earth Parking Orbit (EPO) of 170 X 18,500 km by GSLV-Mk II, as per the Indian Space Research Organisation.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 03/06/2017 08:24 PM
Some post on Quora.com gives the landing coordinates as the following:

https://www.quora.com/How-is-the-landing-site-selection-for-Chandrayaan-2-done

Quote
Main site: 87.2 deg S, 68 deg E
Backup site: 88.5 deg S, 297 deg E

Where exactly are these locations? What are the major features over there?
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 03/06/2017 11:45 PM
Sorry to disappoint you but those are very old locations from a site study done in 2010 when Chandrayaan 2 was still a joint Russian-Indian mission.  The most recent report on the site selection was this one in 2015:

http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2015/pdf/1351.pdf (http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2015/pdf/1351.pdf)

A 2016 presentation in Turkey was halted when the conference was cancelled, so there is no more recent update, as far as I know.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 03/07/2017 01:55 AM
Ah, thanks very much for that - I see that the proposed Cabeus Crater landing site is ~150km from the Shackleton Crater landing site where Bezos would like to set up a moonbase.

I guess ISRO has picked the same general vicinity because it means longer solar illumination that won't necessitate the use of nuclear RTGs to keep the rover from freezing at night? And of course it also has the permanently shadowed regions (cold traps) where water ice might still persist.

So is this region going to be the Lunar Mesopotamia, most friendly to potential colonization efforts?
(and thus eventually the most contested, down the road)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 05/02/2017 05:46 PM
Is that Chandrayaan-2

http://aviationweek.com/awinspace/india-makes-progress-chandrayaan-2-payloads

Photo Credits: Aviationweek/ Isro

(http://aviationweek.com/site-files/aviationweek.com/files/imagecache/medium_img/uploads/2016/04/chand.jpg)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Silmfeanor on 05/02/2017 06:23 PM
Is that Chandrayaan-2

http://aviationweek.com/awinspace/india-makes-progress-chandrayaan-2-payloads

Photo Credits: Aviationweek/ Isro


that seems to be a picture of NASAs LADEE -
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_Atmosphere_and_Dust_Environment_Explorer
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 05/02/2017 09:07 PM
Yes, it's LADEE.  This link to Youtube (you don't need to watch the video) shows the name LADEE in the caption under the image:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMhSWGTHtF4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMhSWGTHtF4)

In fact the 'video' is a single still shot of LADEE with a voice-over describing Chandrayaan.  Weird!  As for the image showing up in AW&ST, their quality control isn't what it was.   
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 05/24/2017 08:34 AM
ISRO to launch Chandrayaan 2 in first quarter of 2018:

http://wap.business-standard.com/article/current-affairs/aiming-for-the-moon-isro-to-launch-chandrayaan-2-in-first-quarter-of-2018-117052400315_1.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 05/26/2017 09:37 PM
All you need to know about Chandrayaan-2, ISRO’s second mission to the moon:

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/all-you-need-to-know-about-chandrayaan-2-isros-second-mission-to-the-moon-378453.html
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 05/27/2017 05:32 AM
The orbit, spacecraft and rover.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 07/30/2017 06:20 AM
ISRO chairman A. S. Kiran Kumar confirms that ISRO is to launch Chandrayaan-2 mission in early 2018.

Source : India to see launch of 2 moon missions in early 2018 (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/india-to-see-launch-of-2-moon-missions-in-early-2018/articleshow/59828341.cms)

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) will launch its Chandrayaan-2 mission, an advanced version of its previous 2018 mission with the objective of deeper lunar surface probe, and another mission by Team Indus, a group of space enthusiasts who want to unfurl the tricolour on the moon's surface as part of a global lunar competition.

Quote
While Team Indus is using the service of PSLV to take its 600-kg baby spacecraft to the lunar orbit, Isro will use its heavylift rocket GSLV Mk II for the mission. Dr K Sivan, director of Thiruvananthapuram-based Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, told TOI, "Unlike the 2008 Chandrayaan-1 mission when PSLV rocket was used for carrying the spacecraft, this time Isro is planning to take a heavier payload (combined launch mass: 3,250 kg) comprising orbiter, lander and rover to the moon. Therefore, GSLV Mk II is the preferred choice."

Highlights
    * Isro will use GSLV Mk II for Chandrayaan-2 as payload is heavier this time (combined launch mass 3,250 kg).
    * Orbiter will be deployed at an altitude of 100km above lunar surface.
    * Scientific payloads on board orbiter, lander and rover will perform mineralogical and elemental studies of lunar surface.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 08/16/2017 04:07 PM
Chandrayaan-2 launch targeted for March 2018 according to ISRO sources (http://www.deccanchronicle.com/science/science/160817/chandrayaan-2-launch-likely-next-march.html)
Quote
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is gearing up to launch the Chandrayaan-2 Mission in March next year, director of the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, SHAR, P. Kunhi Krishnan told media persons on the sidelines of the Independence Day celebrations at Sriharikota, on Tuesday.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 08/30/2017 01:55 AM
The new edition of ISRO Satellite Center (ISAC) newsletter - Upagrah (Apr-Jun 2017) has an article on Chandrayaan-2 lander sensor tests on pages 8-9.

Link to Upagrah newsletters (http://www.isac.gov.in/publications/upagrah/index.jsp)
Direct link to PDF (http://www.isac.gov.in/publications/upagrah/pdf/Upagraha-Apr-June-2017.pdf)
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vyoma on 09/29/2017 06:08 PM
http://www.hindustantimes.com/science/isro-to-launch-chandrayaan-ii-in-march-2018/story-ZfSfKT8aWLFeCSxMGSFArJ.html

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation’s second unmanned moon mission, Chandrayaan 2, will lift off in March 2018, a decade after Chandrayaan 1 was launched, Isro sources told Hindustan Times on Tuesday.
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 10/23/2017 01:26 PM
GSLV MK-2 F-10 rocket carrying chandraayan-2 stack weighing 3280 kg will be launch in march of 2018.

Source: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/isro-to-launch-cartosat-2-sat-with-30-nano-sats-in-mid-december/articleshow/61176190.cms
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 10/25/2017 05:35 AM
India gears up for second Moon mission:

https://www.nature.com/news/india-gears-up-for-second-moon-mission-1.22870
Title: Re: GSLV-MkII, Chandrayaan-2, NET 2018-Q1
Post by: chota on 11/22/2017 05:16 PM
C2 Orbiter and Lander with rover
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 11/30/2017 06:11 AM
From Emily Lakdawalla's blog:

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2017/1129-indias-chandrayaan-2-mission.html
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phillip Clark on 11/30/2017 12:28 PM
I wonder if the Indians will do as the Chinese did with Chang'E 3 and broadcast live pictures from the lander as it descends to the lunar surface ....... ?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 11/30/2017 10:21 PM
Were they transmitted live?  I thought they were recorded and transmitted later from the surface.  I could be wrong. 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 12/01/2017 01:46 AM
I remember it vividly. We got a snapshot every second or two, then the full video was uploaded back to Earth later.
Edit: Found the live broadcast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyg56VIKRNA
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: sanman on 12/01/2017 02:34 AM
Meh, given ISRO's track record, live coverage of the landing would be quite a departure from past practice. They'll probably post it quickly to Twitter, after it's happened.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 12/01/2017 04:28 AM
Thanks for that, Hungry!  I appreciate it.  I never did see that broadcast.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/01/2017 04:48 AM
I remember it vividly. We got a snapshot every second or two, then the full video was uploaded back to Earth later.
Edit: Found the live broadcast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyg56VIKRNA

I was in Thailand and watched it live on China TV.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: plutogno on 12/01/2017 05:34 AM
I remember they were streamed live
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 12/03/2017 05:31 AM
India's Chandrayaan-2 mission preparing for March 2018 launch (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2017/1129-indias-chandrayaan-2-mission.html)

Quote
The launch of the next Moon mission could be just four months away. India plans to return to the Moon in a big way with the ambitious Chandrayaan-2, which includes an orbiter, lander, and a small rover. If it all succeeds, it will be India's first soft landing on another world, and only the second such landing since the end of the Apollo and Luna era. For India, landing success would be "a stepping stone for future exploration missions to other planets," according to Indian Space Research Organisation Satellite Centre (ISAC) director M. Annadurai.

Quote
Chandrayaan-2 is planned to launch in March from ISRO's Sriharikota launch center aboard a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark 2 (GSLV Mk 2) rocket, making it ISRO's first deep-space launch on its newer, heavier launch vehicle. The combined mass of the three component spacecraft is 3250 kilograms, dramatically larger than the approximately 1300-kilogram mass of both Chandrayaan-1 and Mars Orbiter Mission, both of which launched on smaller Polar Satellite Launch Vehicles (PSLVs).

Quote
The GSLV will place Chandrayaan-2 into an elliptical Earth parking orbit, enlarging it over days or weeks with periapsis burns to raise the orbit apogee. Eventually, the apogee will be high enough that a burn can send the spacecraft on to a lunar transfer trajectory. A lunar orbit insertion burn will place Chandrayaan-2 into an elliptical orbit and the spacecraft will begin braking at periapsis to reduce its orbit to a 100-kilometer circle.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 12/09/2017 07:57 PM
K. Sivan, VSSC Director now confirms the Chandrayaan-2 mission launch in March, 2018,

Quote
Sivan said, "After the Cartosat mission, the subsequent launch will be of Gsat-6A that will be lifted off by a GSLV Mk II rocket". "The launch of navigation satellite IRNSS-1I, which will replace the first navigation satellite IRNSS-1A, whose three atomic clocks (meant to provide precise locational data) had stopped working last year, is planned in February or March," he said, adding, "Next in line will be the Chandrayaan-2 mission, scheduled for launch in March."

Source : Isro will resume sat launches only from first week of 2018 (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-will-resume-sat-launches-only-from-first-week-of-2018/articleshow/61994345.cms)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: worldtimedate on 01/13/2018 10:19 PM
Chandrayaan-2 set for bungee jump test in Mahendragiri hills of Tamil Nadu (http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil-nadu/2018/jan/13/chandrayaan-2-set-for-bungee-jump-test-in-mahendragiri-hills-of-tamil-nadu-1752404.html)

Quote
Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are set to conduct a breathtaking stunt at Mahendragiri hills in Tamil Nadu. A bungee jump is being planned for Chandrayaan-2 craft as part of soft landing tests using a 100-metre tall crane (as tall as a 10-storeyed building) specially built for the purpose.

Quote
Chandrayaan-2 is India’s most ambitious project as yet consisting of an orbiter, lander and a small rover. If it succeeds, it will be India’s first soft-landing on the Moon, and only the second such landing since the end of the Apollo and Luna missions.

Quote
He said the craft, weighing about half-a-tonne, will be lowered from 100 metres and ignited in a lower gravity condition like that of the Moon.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 01/14/2018 06:45 PM
Chandrayaan-2 set for bungee jump test in Mahendragiri hills of Tamil Nadu (http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil-nadu/2018/jan/13/chandrayaan-2-set-for-bungee-jump-test-in-mahendragiri-hills-of-tamil-nadu-1752404.html)

Quote
Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are set to conduct a breathtaking stunt at Mahendragiri hills in Tamil Nadu. A bungee jump is being planned for Chandrayaan-2 craft as part of soft landing tests using a 100-metre tall crane (as tall as a 10-storeyed building) specially built for the purpose.

Isn't it a little late to be preparing to test soft landing?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 01/15/2018 05:29 AM
Presumably not a test to figure out how to do it, but a test to check the final flight harware behaves as it should (like shake and bake).  One would hope so anyway!
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: zubenelgenubi on 01/21/2018 05:31 PM
Has anyone (outside ISRO and/or free to comment) computed and shared monthly lunar launch windows for Chandrayaan-2?

Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 01/22/2018 04:42 AM
Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?

Presumably, as it takes a certain of amount of time to reach the Moon, regardless of route chosen and that ISRO would like to land early in the Lunar day, this would mean the window would open for a few days each month.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 01/30/2018 04:40 PM
'Enhanced' GSLV MkII to launch Chandrayaan-II in April, says new ISRO Chief (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/isro-chief-on-a-mission-to-cut-expenses-on-launches/article22597896.ece)
Quote
Among the innovations and value additions being developed is the augmentation of the GSLV Mark II launch vehicle. Dr. Sivan said its lifting capability would soon be enhanced from 2.2 tonnes to 3.3 tonnes. The capability then would go up by 1.5 times and would reflect in its per-kilo cost, which could make it quite competitive to future commercial users in the launchers market.

The first launch of the enhanced GSLV, after necessary tests and confirmations, will be the 3.2-tonne Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft, scheduled to be launched in April.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 01/31/2018 06:21 AM
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 01/31/2018 10:43 AM
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Kosmos2001 on 01/31/2018 12:03 PM
Does this version have a new name designation or is it just a plain GSLV Mk.II?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: K210 on 01/31/2018 12:26 PM
Does this version have a new name designation or is it just a plain GSLV Mk.II?

It will have the same name. It is just a natural evolution of the GSLV MK-2 not a complete new rocket.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: vineethgk on 01/31/2018 03:25 PM
Where is the 1,100 kg or 50% payload increase (from 2.2 to 3.3 t) for GSLV Mk.II coming from?

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds
The last one about S-200 is perhaps unlikely as it would be a major change that will have an impact on the flight characteristics of the vehicle. Moreover, S-200 has a greater diameter than S-139 (3.2m vs 2.8m). What we have heard so far from ISRO sources are inert mass reduction, increased propellant load and increased thrust in CUS, and the thrust upgrade for Vikas engines.

However, the Chandrayaan-II flight may not necessarily require all of these upgrades despite its 3.2 tonne mass as the targeted parking orbit is lower than GTO (around 180x19500 km or so).
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Kosmos2001 on 01/31/2018 07:15 PM
It will have the same name. It is just a natural evolution of the GSLV MK-2 not a complete new rocket.

Well, according to:

Most likely from these upgrades:

- New high thrust vikas engine
- New C-15 cryogenic stage with increased thrust (95kn vs 75kn from old engine)
- Overall dry mass reduction
- Possible replacement of S139 with S200 to increase core burn time from 100 seconds to 130 seconds

The last one about S-200 is perhaps unlikely as it would be a major change that will have an impact on the flight characteristics of the vehicle. Moreover, S-200 has a greater diameter than S-139 (3.2m vs 2.8m). What we have heard so far from ISRO sources are inert mass reduction, increased propellant load and increased thrust in CUS, and the thrust upgrade for Vikas engines.

In my opinion, these are substantially enough modifications to change the name of the launcher a little bit. There are different variants of the GSLV already: Mk.I, Mk.I+, Mk.II and Mk.II+. Each one of those uses an S139 instead of a S200.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET 2018-Q1
Post by: Phil Stooke on 02/01/2018 04:05 AM
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/india-plans-tricky-and-unprecedented-landing-near-moon-s-south-pole (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/india-plans-tricky-and-unprecedented-landing-near-moon-s-south-pole)

An article about Chandrayaan 2 with a note about its landing site.  See this site:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=6862&st=0&gopid=238499&#entry238499 (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=6862&st=0&gopid=238499&#entry238499)

for a map of the location and some other comments.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII April 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 02/05/2018 01:20 AM
ISRO Chief hints that Chandrayaan-II could be delayed a bit, with GSLV MkIII D2 happening prior to that. The April launch quoted earlier may have been more of an optimistic target in any case..

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/isro-needs-4-years-to-catch-up-with-satellite-demand-dr-sivan/article22651083.ece

Quote
As a part of the three-year short-term action plan, immediate missions that we plan to do this year are the GSLV-F08 that will launch the GSAT-6A communication satellite [around February]. Then we will have a PSLV mission with navigation satellite IRNSS-1I. Then comes the second developmental flight D2 of GSLV-MkIII. It will launch the high throughput satellite GSAT-29. Later, GSAT-11, which will be our heaviest satellite as of now, will be launched from Kourou. The Chandrayaan-2 mission will be launched this year on another GSLV.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII April 2018
Post by: worldtimedate on 02/08/2018 07:01 AM
The following news report discusses many startling details of ISRO'S ambitious Chandrayaan II mission -  likely to be launched in April - carrying an orbiter, a lander and a rover. After being launched into an elliptical earth parking orbit by the GSLV II, it will be gradually sent to the Moon by the onboard thrusters of Chandrayaan II through the slingshot or the raising of the orbit of the spacecraft just the way Chadrayaan I was sent.

Chandrayaan-2 mission: Rover to spend 14 days on moon's surface, says Isro chief (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/chandrayaan-2-mission-rover-to-spend-14-days-on-moons-surface-says-isro-chief/articleshow/62782731.cms)

Quote
Unlike the first lunar mission when a PSLV rocket carried the spacecraft to the moon's orbit, this time heavy-payload lifter GSLV Mk II will launch the spacecraft weighing 3,290kg as the module will carry an orbiter, a rover and a lander to the moon.

Quote
Dr Sivan said, "After reaching the moon's orbit, the lander will get detached from the orbiter and do a soft-landing near the south pole of the moon. The 6-wheeled rover fixed within the lander will get detached and move on the lunar surface. The rover has been designed in such a way that it will have power to spend a lunar day or 14 Earth days on the moon's surface and walk up to 150-200 metres. It will do several experiments and on-site chemical analysis of the surface."

The Isro chairman said, "The rover will then send data and images of the lunar surface back to the Earth through the orbiter within 15 minutes.

Quote
After spending 14 earth days, the rover will go in a sleep mode. We are hoping the rover will again come alive whenever that part of the moon (where the rover will land) gets sunlight and recharges the rover's solar cells. Besides the rover, the orbiter will also capture images of the moon while orbiting it."

Quote
On testing of lunar components, Dr Sivan said, "All three components of the lunar module are almost ready. Currently, their integration is going on. Once the module is ready, it will have to go through rigorous tests." On fixing launch date, he said, "The launch date will depend on various factors like the moon's relative position with respect to the Earth.

Quote
Once the GSLV is launched, it will put the spacecraft in the 170 km x 20,000 km elliptical orbit. From the elliptical orbit, the craft will be manoeuvred towards the lunar orbit by firing thrusters. Therefore, we expect it to reach the lunar orbit in two months."

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 02/18/2018 07:35 AM
Quote
In the run-up to the most challenging space exploration programme undertaken ever by India, ISRO chairman K Sivan told Express that integration of all the three components of the spacecraft is nearing completion at ISRO Satellite Centre in Bengaluru. “The next 45-60 days will be crucial as the composite pack, comprising Orbiter, Lander and Rover will go through a series of rigorous tests in disassembled and assembled mode. The outcome of these test results will determine the launch date. If we succeed to achieve the desired results in the first attempt, then the launch would take place in April, but in case any technical problems are encountered, there would be a delay. Since this is the first such attempt being made, there is always an uncertainty,” he said.

The chairman said the launch window is fixed between April and October, within which the space agency hopes to accomplish the mission. “The launch date depends on multiple factors like the moon’s relative position with respect to Earth. After the lift-off from Sriharikota, it would take approximately two months to reach the designated moon’s orbit. Another important factor is that when the Lander makes the touchdown on the pre-determined site near south pole of lunar surface,  there should be sunlight. In a month, moon sees sunlight for only 14 days,” Sivan said.
Source (http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil-nadu/2018/feb/18/reaching-for-the-moon-desi-style-isro-is-set-to-script-new-chapter-with-chandrayaan-2-mission-1775023.html)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: kanaka on 02/19/2018 11:50 PM
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/chandrayaan-2-mission-cheaper-than-hollywood-film-interstellar/articleshow/62990361.cms
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: worldtimedate on 02/20/2018 05:17 AM
Quote

With the much-awaited Chandrayaan-2 mission, India's second flight to the moon, Isro is attempting to pull off a daredevil manoeuvre. It will be the first-ever mission to soft land near the moon's south pole, which poses a number of challenges.

"We have identified two locations and will be choosing one. No other moon mission has landed in this area," said former Isro chief AS Kiran Kumar on Saturday, who retired as Isro chairman last month.

Quote

In preparation for this touchdown, landing simulations are currently on at Isro's Liquid Propulsion System Centre at Mahendra Giri in Tamil Nadu. The exercise involves a prototype of the lander simulating a soft landing from a height of 70-80 metres.


Source : Isro plans landing near moon’s south pole with Chandrayaan-2 (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-plans-landing-near-moons-south-pole-with-chandrayaan-2/articleshow/62774990.cms)

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: K210 on 02/22/2018 02:06 PM
Very likely this will be delayed to June-July time frame given the fact that second launch pad has a backlog to clear before this can launch. GSLV MK-2 F-08/GSAT-6A and GSLV MK-3 D2/GSAT-29 are both set for launch before GSLV MK-2 F-10/Chandraayan-2. 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: K210 on 02/23/2018 04:33 AM
GSLV MK-2 F-08/GSAT-6A pushed to late march. Chandraayan-2 launch before may is impossible at this point.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-tamilnadu/gsat-11-launch-in-april-or-may-isro/article22830646.ece
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII mid-April 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 02/25/2018 12:47 PM
Further, are the launch window constraints more relaxed, as this is not a direct trans-lunar injection?

Presumably, as it takes a certain of amount of time to reach the Moon, regardless of route chosen and that ISRO would like to land early in the Lunar day, this would mean the window would open for a few days each month.
ISRO chief speaking on Chandrayaan-II launch window.

Quote
Therefore, just in case something needs an upgrade and we miss this clear visibility window in April, our next chance will be in October. But the activities are in full steam targeting April,” he said.

Source (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/isro-to-launch-anotherirnss-satellite-in-april/article22845347.ece)

I wonder why he says that if they miss April the next launch window is only in October? I had thought earlier they would have one every month or so considering the start of the lunar day. Is it the position of the moon relative to the apogee of the initial parking orbit (not sure what exactly is the technical term for it, sorry.. argument of perigee?) acting as an additional constraint?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: Phil Stooke on 02/26/2018 05:08 AM
You're right, of course, that the Moon's always there and we could launch towards it in any month.  But once the trajectory is defined - trans-lunar coast, lunar orbit injection, lunar orbit all in a specific geometry leading to periapsis over the landing site, the question is: when does that periapsis, when landing would occur, coincide with sunrise at the landing site?  To get the longest possible rover mission the landing needs to be shortly after sunrise, since it may die after sunset.  The trajectory can be flown any month but the combination of trajectory and illumination is more restrictive and repeats at 6 month intervals.  They could go in another month if they accept a different landing site, and they do have one alternative site.  This limitation is much less severe near the equator, so it applied far less to Surveyor and the early Apollo landings.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 02/27/2018 07:32 AM
The trajectory can be flown any month but the combination of trajectory and illumination is more restrictive and repeats at 6 month intervals.

That's right, but the Moon has the same illumination every month. However, the inclination of the launch site will change relative to the Moon and if you are performance limited, that restricts you to launch at the optimum month.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xYbkxM2xKw
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 03/02/2018 11:24 PM
Chandrayaan-II likely delayed to October

Quote
India’s second mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-2, is likely to be launched only in October. Further delays cannot be ruled out if systems are not yet in place by then.
Quote
An Isro official told TOIseveral tests have to be done and arrangements need to be made.
Quote
The original plan envisaged the launch between April and November with the real target focussed for April. Top Isro officials had expressed confidence that the takeoff will happen in April.
Quote
But on Friday, it was stated the lunar mission was not yet ready for an April lift-off and much still needs to be done.

Source (https://m.timesofindia.com/home/science/chandrayaan-2-launch-delayed-likely-to-take-off-only-after-oct/articleshow/63141718.cms)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: worldtimedate on 03/03/2018 05:16 AM
Chandrayaan-II likely delayed to October

Quote
India’s second mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-2, is likely to be launched only in October. Further delays cannot be ruled out if systems are not yet in place by then.
Quote
An Isro official told TOIseveral tests have to be done and arrangements need to be made.
Quote
The original plan envisaged the launch between April and November with the real target focussed for April. Top Isro officials had expressed confidence that the takeoff will happen in April.
Quote
But on Friday, it was stated the lunar mission was not yet ready for an April lift-off and much still needs to be done.

Source (https://m.timesofindia.com/home/science/chandrayaan-2-launch-delayed-likely-to-take-off-only-after-oct/articleshow/63141718.cms)

I expected the delay and waited without making comments so that I might prove wrong. But my assumption has come true. Who knows whether the lift-off can take place in October, because of one thing. ISRO's preoccupation with PSLV launch every month has put paid to the development of more powerful launch vehicles. ISRO seems to be content with the launch of PSLV only. GSLV MK-II needs to be uprated to launch at least 2.5 Ton payload to GTO. At least two GSLV MK-II launches need to take place before the launch of Chandrayaan-II. The performance of the uprated Cryogenic Engine which is supposed to generate 90 kN thrust needs to be verified with the launch of at least two GSLV MK-II. Then what to speak of the testing of the rover and landers. Frankly speaking, since former ISRO Chairman G. Madhavan Nair retired, Chandrayaan-II Mission faltered with his immediate successor busy in doing pilgrimage when ISRO was seriously working on the launch of GSLV MK-II with the indigeneous cryogenic engine. Then what happened is known to all of us. Two successive GSL MK-II launches failed, resulting in the GSLV MK-II getting the sobriquet of naughty boy. It was not until the former ISRO chairman A. S. Kiran Kumar that both GSLV MK-II and GSLV MK-III wer back into contention.

Can anyone tell me if the uprated cryogenic engine of GSLV MK-II is re-startable ? Any cryogenic engine propelled upper stage that is NOT RE-STARTABLE is simply of no vital use. This may sound harsh to many of us, but that is the reality. GSLV MK-II's cryogenic engine will not be able to do TLI maneuver. Can it do this ? Chandrayan-II has to reach the moon through the spacecraft's gradual orbit raising, thus taking it almost two months to get to the moon. ISRO seems to have its task cut out.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: K210 on 03/04/2018 07:19 AM
Quote
Can anyone tell me if the uprated cryogenic engine of GSLV MK-II is re-startable ? Any cryogenic engine propelled upper stage that is NOT RE-STARTABLE is simply of no vital use. This may sound harsh to many of us, but that is the reality. GSLV MK-II's cryogenic engine will not be able to do TLI maneuver. Can it do this ? Chandrayan-II has to reach the moon through the spacecraft's gradual orbit raising, thus taking it almost two months to get to the moon. ISRO seems to have its task cut out.

The answer is yes and no. The CE-7.5 is based on the RD-56 engine of the former soviet union. The RD-56 was a restartable engine and so by extension is the CE-7.5. However the CE-7.5 in its current iteration is NOT restartable as isro minimised extra features of the engine in order to get the basic functionality of the engine working. ISRO has said that at some point in the future they do intend to make the CE-7.5 restartable if the need arises.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: srikanthr124 on 03/13/2018 06:45 AM
I think April launch was not completely ruled out...so many conflicting statements by ISRO..

SOURCE:

https://www.apherald.com/Politics/ViewArticle/299657/ISRO-aiming-for-an-April-launch-of-the-Chandrayaan-2-satellite-to-the-moon/

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/science/isro-aims-to-launch-chandrayaan-2-by-april/articleshow/63258020.cms

http://en.brinkwire.com/204845/isro-aims-to-launch-chandrayaan-2-by-april/
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV-MkII NET April 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 03/23/2018 01:26 PM
Finally, official confirmation from ISRO that Chandrayaan-II has been delayed to October (though that was long expected)..

Quote
The launch of India's second lunar mission 'Chandrayaan-2', slated for next month, has been postponed to October as the experts have suggested some tests, the ISRO said today.

Source (https://m.economictimes.com/articleshow/63429955.cms)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 03/25/2018 02:14 AM
New targeted date for Chandrayaan-II launch is in the first week of October - ISRO Chairman (https://m.timesofindia.com/india/isro-will-launch-chandrayaan-2-in-oct-1st-week-after-tests-chief/articleshow/63448194.cms)
Quote
Dr Sivan said, “The original targeted date for the launch was kept on April 23. However, as the ongoing tests for the lunar mission will take 20 more days, the April 23rd date could not be met. Therefore the panel decided to defer the launch. Unlike, other satellite launches where Isro could easily defer the launch by a day or two to get a perfect mission, Isro can’t do the same in this mission. This is because the ideal date for the moon launch comes only once in a month. If we skip that date of the month, we have to plan the launch next month. After April, if Isro launches the mission from May to September, we won’t be able to utilise the full lunar day (14 Earth days) for experiments on the moon because of eclipses. Therefore, Isro will launch the mission in the first week of October.”
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 03/25/2018 04:20 AM
The article also mentions that they could launch every month, but the six month delay is caused by "eclipses" so as to get the required landing light condition. Not sure if the eclipses refer to that in LEO or in LLO.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: K210 on 03/26/2018 07:19 AM
I wish they has just said october from the start. Making all these unachievable targets and missing them is bad PR.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: vineethgk on 03/27/2018 11:58 PM
Planned vehicle upgrades for GSLV for the Chandrayaan-II mission

Quote
“All these new things are being done keeping lunar mission in the mind and ISRO’s bigger game plan to increase GSLV payload capability. For Chandrayaan-2, we are formulating a perfect combination. The four strap-ons and second stage will be boosted with high-thrust Vikas engines; cryogenic upper stage will be loaded with enhanced propellants of 15 tonnes instead of current 12.8 tonnes and will be operated with 9.5 tonne thrust compared to the present 7.5.”

Source (http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil-nadu/2018/mar/28/with-eye-on-lunar-mission-isro-to-test-high-thrust-vikas-engine-1793608.html)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: K210 on 03/28/2018 05:35 AM
Planned vehicle upgrades for GSLV for the Chandrayaan-II mission

Quote
“All these new things are being done keeping lunar mission in the mind and ISRO’s bigger game plan to increase GSLV payload capability. For Chandrayaan-2, we are formulating a perfect combination. The four strap-ons and second stage will be boosted with high-thrust Vikas engines; cryogenic upper stage will be loaded with enhanced propellants of 15 tonnes instead of current 12.8 tonnes and will be operated with 9.5 tonne thrust compared to the present 7.5.”

Source (http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil-nadu/2018/mar/28/with-eye-on-lunar-mission-isro-to-test-high-thrust-vikas-engine-1793608.html)

So it's confirmed that GSLV F-10 will be the "upgraded GSLV" that isro has been hinting at
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: K210 on 05/08/2018 08:49 AM
IIRS payload has been dispatched from SAC to ISAC for integration onto chandraayan-2 spacecraft. Dispatch took place on 9th April 2018.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/ISRO/comments/8azu39/gsat29_payload_and_iirs_payload_for_chandrayaanii/
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: chota on 07/05/2018 06:06 PM
Some old tests conduction earlier as part of lander experiments
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6SrZ_pYHpM&feature=youtu.be&start=14&end=20
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 07/06/2018 04:06 AM
Man, I can't stand those YouTube videos with robot voices. This is where the news came from for that video.

https://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/ahead-of-launch-chandrayaan-2-to-undergo-bungee-jump-like-simulation-test-in-mahendragiri-337615.html
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: chota on 07/16/2018 04:14 PM
https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/with-several-rocket-launches-planned-a-busy-year-ahead-for-isro-1884266 (https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/with-several-rocket-launches-planned-a-busy-year-ahead-for-isro-1884266)

As per this link, there is no mention of Chandrayaan-2 in October
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: TheVarun on 07/16/2018 04:25 PM

^
 That can't be right, at least it shouldn't be!  ISRO has repeatedly stated that October would be an ideal month to launch Chandrayaan-2, because of the earth-moon distance at the time.   Must be a major oversight by NDTV-one is hoping anyway!
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: worldtimedate on 07/17/2018 11:23 PM

^
 That can't be right, at least it shouldn't be!  ISRO has repeatedly stated that October would be an ideal month to launch Chandrayaan-2, because of the earth-moon distance at the time.   Must be a major oversight by NDTV-one is hoping anyway!

According to this this Economic Times (https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/science/2018-end-to-be-busy-for-isro-with-several-rocket-launches/articleshow/65011210.cms) report also, the launch of Chandrayaan - 2 is not on cards this year. This makes me believe that Chandrayaan - 2 will NOT be launched until the launch of GSAT-7A by GSLV-II. I think, ISRO does NOT want to take risk without testing the capability of high thrust Vikas engine.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV October 2018
Post by: TheVarun on 07/18/2018 01:55 PM
[

According to this this Economic Times (https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/science/2018-end-to-be-busy-for-isro-with-several-rocket-launches/articleshow/65011210.cms) report also, the launch of Chandrayaan - 2 is not on cards this year. This makes me believe that Chandrayaan - 2 will NOT be launched until the launch of GSAT-7A by GSLV-II. I think, ISRO does NOT want to take risk without testing the capability of high thrust Vikas engine.

  Makes sense!  Any idea what would be the next most optimised launch date for a moon mission? One hopes its not Oct 2019!  True though, that caution is a sound policy. The Economic Times article does not emphatically say that "there will be no Chandrayaan mission in October". Perhaps what is happening is that they are conducting rigorous tests of a bunch of things, and if all those turn out well, they will launch Chandrayaan. But they don't want to build up hopes, considering the very high profile nature of the venture.

Being optimistic :)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV NET end 2018
Post by: abhishek on 08/04/2018 12:47 PM
Chandrayaan 2 Delayed, Israel Could Beat India In Race To Moon's Surface

Quote
Dr M Annadurai, Director of U R Rao Satellite Centre confirmed to NDTV  that the launch date for Chandryaan-2 "is slipping to 2019" from the initially planned launch in October this year.

Dr Annadurai said that India's moon mission now aims to land in February and the rocket launch will take place in January next year.

Moreover, since the weight of the Chandrayaan-2 satellite has increased, Dr Annadurai said that now instead of GSLV MK-II, GSLV MK-III will be used

https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/chandrayaan-2-delayed-israel-could-beat-india-in-race-to-moons-surface-1895221
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Dont want to indulge in a political debate but i find news articles of Mr Bagla to be quite irritating in nature as it's more on nationalism and jingoism rather than on science....3rd country to do this,4th country to do that,gslv the bahubali rocket etc etc....

Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: TheVarun on 08/04/2018 01:55 PM
 ^
Agree. There's a little too much of that nationalism and jingoism in Bagla's reports- and he's supposed to be a science writer!  It's okay to mention it, but it shouldn't be the centrepiece or the dominant theme. I don't like Frontline magazine( way too left politically!) but they have excellent science and technology articles by T.S Subramanian and R. Ramachandran, particularly in the area of aerospace. The first, second, 5th, 6th et al are certainly brought up, as they should be, but the accent is on the actual science and technology, and the challenges therein.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV NET end 2018
Post by: TheVarun on 08/04/2018 02:02 PM
Chandrayaan 2 Delayed, Israel Could Beat India In Race To Moon's Surface

Quote
Dr M Annadurai, Director of U R Rao Satellite Centre confirmed to NDTV  that the launch date for Chandryaan-2 "is slipping to 2019" from the initially planned launch in October this year.

Dr Annadurai said that India's moon mission now aims to land in February and the rocket launch will take place in January next year.

   
   A little disappointing, of course, but January 2019 isn't bad. For something as complex as a moon mission, better not to take chances.  But the news of GSLV Mark 3 being used for the launch, is startling. That was never spoken of before by ISRO, now it's pretty concrete!  All this time, only GSLV Mark 2 was spoken of.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/05/2018 12:23 AM
Dont want to indulge in a political debate but i find news articles of Mr Bagla to be quite irritating in nature as it's more on nationalism and jingoism rather than on science....3rd country to do this,4th country to do that,gslv the bahubali rocket etc etc....

^
Agree. There's a little too much of that nationalism and jingoism in Bagla's reports- and he's supposed to be a science writer!  It's okay to mention it, but it shouldn't be the centrepiece or the dominant theme. I don't like Frontline magazine( way too left politically!) but they have excellent science and technology articles by T.S Subramanian and R. Ramachandran, particularly in the area of aerospace. The first, second, 5th, 6th et al are certainly brought up, as they should be, but the accent is on the actual science and technology, and the challenges therein.

I don't feel that it's fair to single out Mr Bagla for that - to be fair, all members of the Indian media do that - he's a passionate science communicator. It's also about drumming up enthusiasm among the public for India's space program.

Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV NET end 2018
Post by: sanman on 08/05/2018 12:27 AM
Chandrayaan 2 Delayed, Israel Could Beat India In Race To Moon's Surface

Quote
Dr M Annadurai, Director of U R Rao Satellite Centre confirmed to NDTV  that the launch date for Chandryaan-2 "is slipping to 2019" from the initially planned launch in October this year.

Dr Annadurai said that India's moon mission now aims to land in February and the rocket launch will take place in January next year.
   
   A little disappointing, of course, but January 2019 isn't bad. For something as complex as a moon mission, better not to take chances.  But the news of GSLV Mark 3 being used for the launch, is startling. That was never spoken of before by ISRO, now it's pretty concrete!  All this time, only GSLV Mark 2 was spoken of.

With GSLV-Mk3 being used, it would have been nice if its higher payload margin could have allowed the use of a heavier and more robust rover & lander. The current lunar rover is looking a little minimalist and barebones - Oh well, can't revise things now.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: K210 on 08/05/2018 01:20 AM
Good move by isro. If they had launched on uprated MK-2 rocket any number of things could have gone wrong given how many new upgrades they are introducing all at once (high thrust vikas, C-15 upper stage etc.). Besides MK-3 with its 4 ton GTO capability is more better suited to a mission like this. Hopefully they increase the mass of Chandraayan-2 to fully utilise MK-3's capability.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: Phil Stooke on 08/05/2018 08:34 AM
"Hopefully they increase the mass of Chandraayan-2 to fully utilise MK-3's capability."

It's a bit too late to be making any changes, if they want to launch in January!  Change nothing at all would be my advice. 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: K210 on 08/05/2018 10:20 AM
Quote
It's a bit too late to be making any changes, if they want to launch in January!

Probably true. They could however use the MK3 to launch Chandraayan-2 into a higher initial orbit. This would cut the number of orbit raising manoeuvres required. It would also cut down the time from launch to entering lunar orbit.

If they had gone with MK3 sooner they could have built a more advanced rover with more science instruments. They might have even been able to test a prototype return capsule for a future sample return mission.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: TripleSeven on 08/05/2018 10:50 AM
^
Agree. There's a little too much of that nationalism and jingoism in Bagla's reports- and he's supposed to be a science writer!  It's okay to mention it, but it shouldn't be the centrepiece or the dominant theme. I don't like Frontline magazine( way too left politically!) but they have excellent science and technology articles by T.S Subramanian and R. Ramachandran, particularly in the area of aerospace. The first, second, 5th, 6th et al are certainly brought up, as they should be, but the accent is on the actual science and technology, and the challenges therein.

No buck no buck rogers.  To most in India the science means very little but the nationalism aspect of it means a lot 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: worldtimedate on 08/06/2018 12:59 AM
Now TimesofIndia is saying that Chandrayaan-2 Mission has been put off till December.

Source : Chandrayaan-2 launch put off: India, Israel in lunar race for 4th position (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/chandrayaan-2-launch-put-off-india-israel-in-lunar-race-for-4th-position/articleshow/65275012.cms)

Quote
India's most ambitious Chandrayaan-2 mission, which was earlier scheduled for October first week, has been postponed till December, according to an Isro source.

Unlike the Chandrayaan-1 programme in 2008 that involved only orbiting around the moon, Chandrayaan-2 is a much complicated mission as it involves an orbiter, a lander and a rover. The mission involves a soft-landing on the lunar surface and a rover that will walk and analysis the content on the moon's surface. Being India's most challenging mission, Isro doesn't want to take chances and taking time to fix all glitches in the lunar mission.

Quote
As the weight of the Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft has increased, according to the source, GSLV Mk III or Isro's 'fat boy' will now carry the spacecraft as it has the lifting capability of over four tonne. According to the earlier plan, GSLV Mk II which just three-tonne lifting capability was supposed to carry the payload.

Quote
Describing India's Chandrayaan-2 mission, the Isro chairman had earlier told TOI, "It is totally an indigenous programme. All components of the Chandrayaan-2 mission, including an orbiter, a lander and a rover, have been developed in the country. There integration is going on and they all are undergoing rigorous tests.

Quote
On reaching the moon's orbit, the lander will get detached from the orbiter and soft-land on the lunar surface. The six-wheeled rover fixed within the lander will get detached and move on the lunar surface for around 100 metres. It will spend 14 Earth days (one moon day) and analyse the content. It will also take photos of the moon's surface and relay the images back to the Earth via the orbiter within 15 minutes."

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: K210 on 08/06/2018 09:01 PM
Some details about mass increase of chandraayan-2. Lift off mass has gone up from 3,250kg to 3,850kg.

Quote
The national committee that reviewed Chandrayaan-2 in March this year felt soft-landing would be a tricky proposition unless some improvements are made to the lander.

“We decided to add another liquid engine to the lander, revisit the mission sequence and conduct more tests. We realized that the deadlines set earlier were impossible to meet,” said a senior scientist present at the review.

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The Chandrayaan-2 team also decided to have more electronic packages as standby. These additions increased the weight of the spacecraft.

“We could still carry this extra weight using an upgraded version of GSLV-MII, but we decided to go in for GSLV-MIII. And once this was decided, we could build in more redundancies for a safer flight as GSLV-MIII could take much more,”

In effect, the ground mass of Chandrayaan-2 went up from 3,250kg to 3,850kg.

The lander weight went up from 1,250kg to about 1,350, the six-wheeled rover’s weight from 20kg to 25kg. For every extra kilogram of the payload, the lift-off weight of the vehicle increases by 4kg, as more propellent is needed.

Before finalizing GSLV-MIII as the Chandrayaan-2 launcher, Isro had decided to ‘uprate’ GSLV-MII. “We had to uprate the cryogenic system and the liquid engine,” said the review panel member. “But then, we cannot afford to fly Chandrayaan as a test flight of the uprated GSLV-MII. Hence we have decided to use GSLV-MIII. There is a MIII launch scheduled in a couple of months. That launch will give us the confidence to go ahead with Chandrayaan-2.”

Source: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/soft-landing-challenges-keep-chandrayaan-2-grounded/articleshow/65293768.cms

Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: worldtimedate on 08/06/2018 09:55 PM
The following article from the Week is reporting the rethrottling problem with the lander. It appears to me that once ISRO crosses this hurdle related to the lander and the GSLV MK-III comes to fruition in its full payload capacity, this will open door for ISRO many such interplanetary missions.

Source : What caused delay in ISRO's Chandrayaan-2 launch (https://www.theweek.in/news/sci-tech/2018/08/06/What-caused-delay-in-ISRO-Chandrayaan-2-launch.html)

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Sources say that this time, the delay was caused because the indigenously developed lander was having trouble with rethrottling. The lander has now gone back to the design table for a design change. "The lander was developing vibrations at the time of rethrottling. The problem appears to be with the thrusters," said a senior level official at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

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Though the launch has been shifted by just three months but given that the vehicle taking the lander to the moon is also changing, a further delay may not be a surprise. Previously, the GSLV II was scheduled to ferry Chandrayaan 2, now it is reported that the heaviest vehicle in ISRO's stable, the Bahubali or GSLV III, is the vehicle of choice.

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The development has taken time, and given that it is the first time India is developing a lander, the programme has faced many glitches like the present one. While no date was announced for the mission for a long time, it was finally said the rocket would take off in April 2018. But the launch was shifted to the next window, October 2018 and now it has been shifted further.

Sources say that while postponements are disappointing, one cannot compromise accuracy just to stay ahead in the race. A GSLV Mk III launch costs around Rs 4 billion and it also entails years of research and development. Every component needs to be precise before such an ambitious mission can be launched.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: PonRam on 08/08/2018 03:10 AM
Good that they detect and eliminate all these issues here itself. It is an invaluable learning experience for ISRO on throttling of engines to soft land the lander and rover. Experience gained can be resued in returning stages of launch vehicles back to earth too.
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/12/2018 03:10 AM
Change to the mission - the lander will do some low orbital passes over the lunar surface before going for landing:


https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-wants-chandrayaan-2-lander-to-orbit-moon-first/articleshow/65370820.cms

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The decision on how many orbits the Lander will make has not yet been taken, but it will be a 100x30 (100km on one side and 30 on the other) elliptical orbit, which means that the entire configuration of the mission has now changed, in effect, causing the delay.

“Earlier, the plan was to gradually go down from 100km and reach 18km from the Moon’s surface. From there, the orientation would change, making the Lander go slightly horizontal for about 8.5km and then we were to change the orientation and velocity further to make the soft landing,” a senior member of the Chandrayaan-2 team said.

Now, as per the revised plans, the Lander has to go around the surface of the moon before entering the descent phase. Scientists working on the project say that this change in plan could have been avoided as the earlier configuration that was cleared would have achieved the main mission goals.

“This additional activity required by the Lander means a host of new hardware added. This is one method of achieving the landing, while the earlier one was another. Our job is to follow what the chairman and other seniors decide and develop things that can successfully complete the mission,” another scientist said.

This has also increased Chandrayaan-2 weight from 3,250kg to 3,850kg, which has prompted some changes, including moving to GSLV MK-III instead of the GSLV MK-II, which would have required an uprate to accommodate the additional weight.

New configuration & soft landing issue

As per the new configuration cleared after the fourth Comprehensive Technical Review (CTR) meeting held on June 19, among other things, the Lander would require a fifth liquid engine to manage the additional load of having to orbit, along with other hardware including a transponder which it earlier didn’t need.

“All these last-minute changes means that we have to test all the new hardware and then begin the fabrication process, which will delay the project. Also, the software algorithms need to change as the mission profile itself has been altered, and even this would need tests,” the scientist said.

“The fifth Centrally mounted 800N Steady State Liquid Engine with additional hardware has been included to mitigate upward draft of dust to craft while landing,” the Isro has found.

Also, the Lander will have a new Lander Leg configuration with increased base diameter (from 3.6m to 4.34m) which is to improve the stability margins.
Why the orbiting

According to the committee, the Lander is now required to orbit so that it can make “assessment of various system performances before the actual critical Powered,” and to do this, the descent phase requires the inclusion of four reaction wheel and its drive electronics as well as two micro Star Sensors (main & redundant) which will enable it to measure the moving velocity and help land.

It will also have transponders for ranging and doppler functions with the antenna configuration and a host of additional supporting systems—power, structure, thermal, etc, will also be added.

Besides, there will be two additional propellant tanks (390L capacity), additional pressurant tank (35.5L capacity) among other changes.


I don't mean to be a backbiter, but I worry that such major changes so near to the targeted launch date may cause rushed re-design and testing, thus increasing the chances of mission failure.

So is all of this being motivated by a desire to do some kind of systems validation ahead of the actual landing?

How do the current and former procedures for Chandrayaan-2 compare to other past attempts at landing on the Moon?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/12/2018 04:02 AM
So this is the previous landing procedure for Chandrayaan-2, as posted by user Ohsin

(https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vf3M3Dk_WeI/WVzeI1IOdnI/AAAAAAAABTw/UosY3_-VabA-2IUaC5gaMHPU3kCCqa8SwCLcBGAs/s1600/ch2lander.png)

In it, there's mention of terrain pattern-matching as part of the landing procedure. Could it be that they don't feel confident of their existing terrain maps, and want to take some fresh shots ("in operando") to match against before landing?

And so this resulting new sharper descent trajectory is why they need the extra hardware, including the extra 5th engine, in order to get the landing down pat?

(Google tells me that LIRAP stands for Laser Inertial Reference and Accelerometer Package)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: maint1234 on 08/12/2018 05:34 AM
I believe the spate of issues with the launches last year , including the multiple IRNSS satellite problems has resulted in these decisions to delay. Totally support this decision as the moon is going nowhere but a suboptimal mission will impact morale and make headlines for all the wrong reasons. I would support a further delay if they can somehow extend the rover life from the present 1 moon day, 14 earth days ?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/12/2018 06:07 AM
If there are going to be these low-altitude passes at 30km height over the lunar surface for terrain mapping, then will the effect of reflected solar heating become a more intense issue to deal with, as compared to what Chandrayaan-1 experienced at its relatively higher 100km altitude above the Moon?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: Phil Stooke on 08/12/2018 06:58 PM
"will the effect of reflected solar heating become a more intense issue to deal with"

No, because the low point will be at 70 degrees south where the surface is cooler, but also the designers will have taken that problem into account. 

" there's mention of terrain pattern-matching as part of the landing procedure. Could it be that they don't feel confident of their existing terrain maps, and want to take some fresh shots ... to match against before landing?"

No - this to help locate the lander.  Its images are compared with previous maps to identify its location, so it can be steered down to a precise landing.  This technology has been described before, e.g. by Astrobotic in the US for the Moon and for future Mars landings as well.  It will help ensure a safe landing by guiding the lander to the pre-selected safe location.

In other news...

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-s-second-lunar-mission-to-land-on-moon-with-lander-rover-isro/story-vqoGvAyk6hHuUL4SDa17GJ.html (https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-s-second-lunar-mission-to-land-on-moon-with-lander-rover-isro/story-vqoGvAyk6hHuUL4SDa17GJ.html)

Launch on or after 3 January 2019, and the lander named Vikram after V. Sarabhai. 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/12/2018 08:12 PM
Hi, thanks for the responses  :)


No - this to help locate the lander.  Its images are compared with previous maps to identify its location, so it can be steered down to a precise landing.  This technology has been described before, e.g. by Astrobotic in the US for the Moon and for future Mars landings as well.  It will help ensure a safe landing by guiding the lander to the pre-selected safe location.

Yes, I'm aware of what the terrain pattern-matching is meant for - but obviously it has to be done against pre-stored maps of the lunar terrain (presumably based on Chandrayaan-1 data?)

So what I meant was - could it be that ISRO's review team doesn't have enough confidence in the pattern-matching system, or else in the quality of the maps being matched against, so that they wanted to make some low-altitude passes first, to ensure that it all works correctly?
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: Phil Stooke on 08/12/2018 08:35 PM
Probably the LRO images would be used for the terrain map, as they would have 2 or 3 times better resolution.  My guess is that the low passes are intended to improve knowledge of the trajectory.  Drop to the final pre-descent orbit and make a couple more orbits while the trajectory is checked, then commit to the final descent.  Otherwise you are going from the higher orbit to the surface in one go.   
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/12/2018 08:47 PM
Probably the LRO images would be used for the terrain map, as they would have 2 or 3 times better resolution.  My guess is that the low passes are intended to improve knowledge of the trajectory.  Drop to the final pre-descent orbit and make a couple more orbits while the trajectory is checked, then commit to the final descent.  Otherwise you are going from the higher orbit to the surface in one go.   

I agree that LRO images would be unsurpassed in quality - but would ISRO even have access to that data for its mission purposes?

Also, given that the new descent trajectory requires the addition of a 5th engine, doesn't that make it sound more strenuous as compared to the original plan? (ie. higher loads, since you have less altitude in which to decelerate from orbital velocity)
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: Phil Stooke on 08/12/2018 09:30 PM
LRO images are freely available to anyone in the world via the LRO camera team website and NASA's Planetary Data System.  Chandrayaan 1 images are in principle, but they are much more difficult to access and some - the full set of Moon Impact Probe images - have never been released. 
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: worldtimedate on 08/12/2018 09:34 PM
ISRO hopes to launch Chandrayaan-2 between January 3 and Mid-March of 2019.

Source : Isro aims to launch 22 missions in 2019; 50 in 3 years (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-aims-to-launch-22-missions-in-2019-50-in-3-years/articleshow/65375131.cms)

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Among the key missions to look for in 2019 will be the Chandrayaan-2, Aditya-L1 (India's solar mission) and two demonstration flights of the SSLV (small satellite launch vehicle).

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Isro hopes to start the new year (2019) with the launch of Chandrayaan-2, which has already been delayed owing to multiple changes that were needed. Sivan said that they are looking at a launch window between January 3 and mid-March. "We hope to meet the January 3 date," he said, while confirming TOI's August 12 report that the entire configuration of the mission has changed.

worldtimedate [ http://www.world-timedate.com/ ]
Title: Re: Chandrayaan-2 GSLV MkIII NET January 2019
Post by: sanman on 08/16/2018 06:25 AM
from Nature:

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05973-6

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The launch of India’s second spacecraft to the Moon has been delayed for the second time this year. Chandrayaan-2 had been expected to lift off in October, after it was pushed back from its original launch date in April.

Kailasavadivoo Sivan, chair of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in Bangalore, told reporters on 12 August that the agency is aiming to launch the craft on 3 January next year — although the mission has a launch window of any time between January and March. Chandrayaan-2 will carry an orbiter that will travel around the Moon; a lander that will attempt India’s first controlled, or soft, landing; and a rover.

Sivan said that there were several reasons for the latest delay, including design changes to ensure a smooth touchdown for the lander. He said these changes have increased the weight of the spacecraft and therefore the amount of fuel needed to complete the mission, which has further added to delays.