NASASpaceFlight.com Forum

Commercial and US Government Launch Vehicles => NGIS (Formerly Orbital ATK) - Antares/Cygnus Section => Topic started by: jacqmans on 03/12/2009 03:24 PM

Title: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2009 03:24 PM
RELEASE: 09-24

NASA’S NEXT CLIMATE-RESEARCH SATELLITE ONE STEP CLOSER TO ORBIT

Greenbelt, Md. – The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an advanced scientific instrument that will be launched on the Glory satellite, has successfully completed environmental testing and was officially turned over to NASA on March 11 by the Raytheon Company, Waltham, Mass., which built the instrument. APS was delivered on March 9 to the Orbital Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Va., for integration with the Glory spacecraft.

The milestone comes after four months of testing at a Raytheon facility in El Segundo, Calif., during which the APS underwent a series of vibration, electromagnetic compatibility, calibration, and thermal vacuum tests.

"APS is on track and ready to go," said Jeff Hein, the APS instrument manager for Glory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "It was a very robust set of tests, and the instrument performed well."

With this round of environmental tests complete, engineers and technicians at Orbital Sciences, the spacecraft and launch vehicle provider, can now install APS on the spacecraft. After APS is integrated, the entire spacecraft will undergo additional system-level environmental tests in preparation for launch.

"The APS performance was excellent at the beginning of the test program and has been essentially unchanged throughout all of the testing," said APS instrument scientist Brian Cairns of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. "The instrument should provide extremely precise measurements that will allow us to provide the highest-quality aerosol observations ever retrieved from space."

Once in orbit, APS will study tiny airborne aerosol particles to better understand their influence on climate. The instrument will view aerosols through polarizing filters that screen out certain orientations of light waves. The technique will allow scientists to measure and characterize aerosols that would otherwise be obscured by background glare from the Earth’s surface and from atmospheric gases.

Aerosols are of great interest to climatologists. Some types, including black carbon from traffic exhaust, promote warming by absorbing sunlight. Others, such as sulfates from coal power plants, exert a cooling effect by reflecting incoming solar radiation back into space. For some types of aerosols — including naturally occurring mineral dust particles — it isn’t clear how they might affect climate. Overall, aerosols represent one of the greatest areas of uncertainty in understanding the climate system.

In addition to APS, Glory will carry a second instrument — the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) — that will measure the sun’s energy output. The TIM instrument recently completed calibration at a first-of-its-kind radiometer facility — the TSI Radiometer Facility — at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

Related Links:

Glory APS Science

http://glory.giss.nasa.gov/aps/

Glory Mission Page

http://glory.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.html
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2009 03:24 PM
Mission Overview
 
The Earth's energy balance and the effect on climate requires measuring black carbon soot and other aerosols, and the total solar irradiance. Glory is a low Earth orbit (LEO) scientific research satellite designed to achieve two major goals:

+ Collect data on the properties of aerosols, including black carbon, in the Earth's atmosphere and climate system. It will enable a greater understanding of the seasonal variability of aerosol properties.

+ Collect data on solar irradiance for the long-term effects on the Earth climate record. Understanding whether the temperature increase and climate changes are by-products of natural events or whether the changes are caused by man-made sources is of primary importance.
   
Glory: Explaining the Earth's Energy Budget

An accurate description of Earth's energy budget is important for scientists in order to anticipate changes to our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather patterns impact life by altering landscapes and changing the availability of natural resources. Scientists are working to better understand exactly how and why this energy budget changes. The Glory mission will provide significant contributions toward this critical endeavor. 


LAUNCH INFORMATION
+ Launch Date: June 2009
+ Launch Site: Vandenberg AFB, California
+ Vehicle: Taurus XL

ORBIT

+ Altitude: 705km
+ Inclination: 98.2 degrees
+ Circular, Sun-synchronous (A-Train)

DESIGN LIFE

+ 3 years; 5 year goal

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 03/12/2009 03:26 PM
Does this mean they've figured out the issue on OCO?
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: faustod on 03/12/2009 05:35 PM
Launch date: June 2009?
In the http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=8184.285 thread it's in January 2010.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 03/12/2009 06:00 PM
Last I heard was NET 26 January 2010, but that was before OCO.

The June date slipped several months ago.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: punkboi on 03/12/2009 06:47 PM
Last I heard was NET 26 January 2010, but that was before OCO.

The June date slipped several months ago.

Really?  That's news to me
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - June 15, 2009 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 03/12/2009 07:23 PM
Last I heard was NET 26 January 2010, but that was before OCO.

The June date slipped several months ago.

Really?  That's news to me

News to me, too. We were carrying it on our schedule as early fall.

I got that date from MSDB
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/26/2010 07:47 PM
RELEASE: 10-023

NASA CUES UP UNIVERSITY CUBESATS FOR GLORY LAUNCH THIS FALL

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA will launch small research satellites for
several universities as part of the agency's Educational Launch of
Nanosatellite, or ELaNA, mission. The satellites are manifested as an
auxiliary payload on the Taurus XL launch vehicle for NASA's Glory
mission, planned for liftoff in late November.

The satellites, called CubeSats because of their shape, come from
Montana State University, the University of Colorado and Kentucky
Space, a consortium of state universities. The University of Florida
was selected as an alternate in case one of the three primary
spacecraft cannot fly.

CubeSats are in a class of small research spacecraft called
picosatellites. They have a size of approximately four inches, a
volume of about one quart, and weigh no more than 2.2 pounds.

To place these satellites into orbit by an agency expendable launch
vehicle, NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is adapting the
Poly-Picosatellite Orbital Deployer, or PPOD. This deployment system,
designed and manufactured by the California Polytechnic State
University in partnership with Stanford University, has flown
previously on Department of Defense and commercial launch vehicles.

Montana State designated its satellite as Explorer 1 Prime, or E1P.
The name honors the launch and scientific discoveries of the
Explorer-1 mission, which detected the Van Allen radiation belts more
than 50 years ago. E1P will carry a miniature Geiger tube to measure
the intensity and variability of the electrons in the Van Allen
belts.

Colorado's satellite is named Hermes. Its mission is to improve
CubeSat communications through the on-orbit testing of a high
data-rate communication system that will allow the downlink of large
quantities of data.

The Kentucky vehicle is called KySat-1. It includes a camera to
support a scientific outreach program intended for, but not limited
to, Kentucky students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The
satellite also has a 2.4-gigahertz industrial, scientific and medical
band radio, which will be used to test high-bandwidth communications
in the license-free portion of the S-band.

The satellites will hitch a ride to space with the Taurus rocket's
primary payload, NASA's Glory spacecraft. The Glory climate mission,
developed by NASA's Science Mission Directorate, will extend the
nearly 30-year record of precise measurements of the sun's energy
output. It also will obtain first-ever, global measurements of the
distribution of tiny airborne aerosol particles. Aerosols represent
one of the greatest areas of uncertainty in understanding Earth's
climate system.

The ELaNA project is managed by NASA's Launch Services Program at
Kennedy. For more information about the program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy 
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 06/15/2010 02:58 PM
June 14, 2010

STATUS REPORT: ELV-061410

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  November 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus XL "0" stage, which serves as the initial booster for
liftoff of the rocket, arrived on June 7 at Orbital Sciences Hangar
1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to begin processing.
Receiving inspections are now under way. No anomalies have been noted
so far.

The 0 stage joins the other three stages of the Taurus XL vehicle in
the hangar which are derivatives of the Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL
rocket. Those stages are undergoing electrical buildup and testing.
The UHF communications antenna arrived early last week and is being
attached now. Ordnance installation on the second stage is also under
way.

The Glory spacecraft is currently scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
Oct. 7 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources. The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor
instrument will measure aerosols (human-caused and naturally
occurring) to determine their relative influence on the global
climate. The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun
to understand short- term solar mechanisms causing energy budget
changes and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 06/17/2010 10:00 AM
Has Orbital given any indication of what they have done to mitigate the fault that caused the failure of the OCO launch?
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 06/17/2010 04:48 PM
Has Orbital given any indication of what they have done to mitigate the fault that caused the failure of the OCO launch?

Redesigned the fairing deployment system.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 06/21/2010 08:46 PM
June 21, 2010

STATUS REPORT: ELV-062110

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  November 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base. Since its arrival last week, the Taurus XL
"0" stage solid rocket motor receiving inspections have been
completed and processing is under way.

Range Safety System equipment installation and interface checkout on
the vehicle is under way today. Installation of the UHF
communications antenna continues. On Stage 1, thrust vector control
system installation is scheduled for next week. Work to finish
ordnance installation on the second stage will be done the week of
June 28.

At the pad, initial checkout of the launch pad power system is
complete.

The Glory spacecraft is currently scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
Oct. 12 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources. The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor
instrument will measure aerosols (human-caused and naturally
occurring) to determine their relative influence on the global
climate. The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun
to understand short- term solar mechanisms causing energy budget
changes and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 06/29/2010 03:13 AM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-062810

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base. Cable installation is being done on stages
1 and 3. On stage 1, thrust vector actuator installation also is
under way.

On stage 2, installation of the UHF communications antenna continues,
a cable harness installation is being done, and the work to finish
ordnance installation is scheduled to be done this week.

Cable connections with the launch vehicle ground support equipment are
occurring as necessary. The vehicle's avionics system was to have
arrived at Vandenberg on June 25.

The Glory spacecraft is currently scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
Oct. 12 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 07/14/2010 09:54 PM
STATUS REPORT : ELV-071410 

Expendable Launch Vehicle Status Report   

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site: Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date: Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north Vandenberg Air Force Base. Prelaunch processing of the vehicle is going well.

On stage 0, ordnance installation is beginning. On stage 1, thrust vector actuator installation continues. Cable installation on stages 1 and 3 has been completed. On stage 2, installation and connection of the first UHF communications antenna are finished. The second of the two antennas is being installed this week and then will be mated to the associated electrical cable harness. The next phase of second stage ordnance installation work began this week.

Range Safety equipment installation and associated interface verification checks are continuing. Cable connections with the launch vehicle ground support equipment are scheduled to be completed this week.

The Glory spacecraft is currently scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on Oct. 12 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols (human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 07/21/2010 08:49 PM
"At Vandenberg AFB, the Taurus XL rocket for the Glory launch Nov. 22 was powered on for the first time July 20 to begin electrical testing."

http://twitter.com/NASAKennedy/status/19093951297
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 07/23/2010 05:32 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-072310

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration of the vehicle's flight
hardware components continues.

The launch vehicle was powered on for the first time July 20 to begin
electrical tests. Initial testing of the guidance system and
calibration of the vehicle's power bus telemetry system are planned.

The Range Safety C-band transponder installation was completed this
week, and vehicle receiver testing with the Western Range is planned
for next week.

On stage 1, thrust vector actuator installation continues. On stage 2,
the next significant work will be installation of additional cable
harnesses during the first week of August.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
Oct. 12 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 07/30/2010 04:31 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-073010

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration of the vehicle's flight
hardware components continues.

Electrical testing is under way. Testing of the Taurus XL guidance
system has been successfully completed. The flight computer was
installed this week on July 26. Testing of the second stage telemetry
system is under way. Testing of the vehicle's stage 0 and first stage
power bus telemetry system is expected to be performed in mid-August,
and vehicle receiver testing with the Western Range is also planned
in that time frame.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
or about Oct. 13 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources. The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor
instrument will measure aerosols (human-caused and naturally
occurring) to determine their relative influence on the global
climate. The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun
to understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget
changes and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 08/08/2010 06:43 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-080610

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration of the vehicle's flight
hardware components continues.

This week installation of the vehicle's avionics platform and the
second stage electrical cable harness is under way, and testing of
the second stage telemetry system is occurring. Other associated
cabling is being performed on both the first and second stages. Some
vehicle safe and arm devices are also beginning to be attached.
Testing of the flight computer is scheduled for next week. Testing of
the vehicle's first stage and 0-stage power bus telemetry system is
expected to be performed in mid-August, and vehicle receiver testing
with the Western Range is also planned in that time frame.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
or about Oct. 13 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: Space Pete on 08/11/2010 02:31 PM
GLORY image section is now up at the KSC Media Gallery.

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=198
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 08/16/2010 02:28 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-080616

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration of the vehicle's flight
hardware components continues.

Launch vehicle receiver testing with the Western Range in under way.
Flight computer testing began Friday and will wrap up early this
week. The Vehicle Verification Test, an electrical systems test, is
scheduled to begin this week.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
or about Oct. 13 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 08/20/2010 06:41 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-082010

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue.

The first half of the payload fairing arrived at Vandenberg on Aug.
17. Cleaning is under way with testing to follow in preparation for
launch. Cable harness installation is also under way on stages 1 and
2. Stage 2 telemetry testing continues. Work to install the vehicle's
avionics section was completed this week. Thermal blanket
installation is under way on stage 0. The Vehicle Verification Test,
an electrical systems test, is scheduled to start on Aug. 25.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
or about Oct. 13 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - November 2010 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 08/27/2010 09:16 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-082710

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Nov. 22, 2010
Launch Time: 2:09 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 located on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue.

The Vehicle Verification Test, a test milestone in Taurus processing,
was conducted on Aug. 25 and was fully successful. Testing is under
way on the first half of the payload fairing that arrived at
Vandenberg on Aug. 17. Stage 2 telemetry testing continues and is
expected to conclude today. Testing of the Taurus flight computer has
been completed. Stages 1, 2 and 3 are currently scheduled to be mated
together during the second week of September. On Stage 0, mechanical
work and thermal blanket installation are continuing.

The Glory spacecraft currently is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on
or about Oct. 13 to begin processing for launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 10/01/2010 04:38 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-100110

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011 (tentative)
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The launch of the Glory spacecraft aboard a Taurus XL rocket has been
tentatively rescheduled from Nov. 22, 2010 to Feb. 23, 2011, subject
to confirmation by the Western Range. The new launch date provides
the necessary additional time required to complete preparations for
the rocket and the spacecraft.

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Flight Simulation No.
1 has recently been completed and was fully successful. Thermal
blanket installation begins on Friday. The second half of the payload
fairing is scheduled to arrive on Oct. 6 to begin processing.
Avionics sub-system installation also is scheduled to begin at that
time. Stages 1 and 2 are scheduled to be attached in mid-October.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Space Pete on 10/02/2010 02:13 PM
A funny, film-trailer style NASA TV video about Glory.

"Glory and the Curse of the Black Carbon".
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7ssZ-Lnaeg
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 10/08/2010 10:55 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-100810

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle' flight hardware components continue. Avionics subsystem
installation is in work and application of thermal blankets to the
launch vehicle is under way. The second half of the payload fairing
is scheduled to arrive at Vandenberg on Oct. 13 to begin processing.
Work to mate Stage 1 to Stage 2 is planned to begin Oct. 14.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth' energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2010 07:23 AM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-101510

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. The second half of the
payload fairing arrived at Vandenberg on Oct. 13 to begin processing.
Avionics subsystem installation and application of thermal blankets
to the launch vehicle will continue next week. Work to mate Stage 1
to Stage 2 is scheduled to start Oct. 26.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth' energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate. The Total Irradiance Monitor
instrument will monitor the Sun to understand short-term solar
mechanisms causing energy budget changes and will contribute to the
vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 10/22/2010 06:32 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-102210

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Avionics subsystem
installation and application of thermal blankets to the launch
vehicle are in work this week. Work to mate Stage 1 to Stage 2 is
scheduled to start Oct. 26. New flight software is planned to be
loaded aboard the vehicle during the first week of November in
preparation for a flight simulation planned to occur by mid-November.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth' energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 10/29/2010 10:31 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-102910

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Avionics sub-system
component installation continues. Application of the avionics system
thermal blankets is nearing completion. Acoustic blankets are now
being applied to the forward end of the rocket's first stage solid
propellant motor. The initial testing on the vehicle fairing's
pyrotechnic system has been finished.

Work to mate Stage 1 to Stage 2 is tentatively planned to start during
the first week of November. New flight software is also planned to be
loaded aboard the Taurus vehicle next week in preparation for a
flight simulation planned to occur during the third week of November.

NASA has completed the work specified by the Taurus XL return to
flight corrective action plan. This work was reviewed and approved by
the NASA Flight Planning Board and concludes the return to flight
effort for NASA missions flying on the Taurus XL. This milestone
leads to the Launch Vehicle Launch Readiness Review scheduled to be
held at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 6.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth' energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 11/10/2010 02:31 PM
TATUS REPORT: ELV-111010

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Work to mate Stage 1
to Stage 2 currently is planned for the week of Nov. 15. New flight
software then will be loaded aboard the Taurus vehicle in preparation
for a flight simulation that will follow.

Installation of the acoustic blankets to the forward end of the
rocket's first stage solid propellant motor is finished. Application
of the avionics system thermal blankets also is complete.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 11/24/2010 07:09 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-112410

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:10 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Work to mate Stage 1
to Stage 2 was completed Nov. 15. New flight software was then loaded
aboard the Taurus launch vehicle, and a flight simulation is now
under way.

The avionics system batteries are being charged, and the vehicle's
reaction control system tanks are undergoing initial pressurization.
Installation of the acoustic blankets to the forward end of the
rocket's first stage solid propellant motor is finished. Application
of the avionics system thermal blankets is also complete.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 11/25/2010 06:13 PM
Hm.  I wonder when the Glory spacecraft itself will be transported to Vandenberg AFB and processed...
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 12/02/2010 07:58 AM
Glory Team Overcomes Engineering Obstacles

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Glory/news/engineering-obstacles.html
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2010 08:49 AM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-120310

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. The C-band transponder
is being installed. Installation of the Stage 2 communications system
also is under way. Stage 0 ordnance installation is complete and the
associated thermal protection insulation is being put into place.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 12/10/2010 06:20 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-121010

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Installation and
testing of the rocket's C-band transponder systems are in work.
Application of thermal insulation around the UHF communications
system on the second stage continues. The Stage 0 thermal protection
insulation is also being installed.

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Taurus XL Launch
Vehicle Readiness Review was held on Dec. 6. The review was very
successful and keeps NASA and Orbital Sciences on track for a Feb. 23
launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 12/17/2010 07:24 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-121710

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components is in work. Installation and
testing of the vehicle's C-band transponder systems continue. The
Ground Operations Review was held at Vandenberg on Dec. 9. This
meeting evaluated the readiness of the spacecraft processing
facilities to receive the Glory spacecraft next month and to begin
the prelaunch processing activities.

After the holidays, Pad 576-E on North Vandenberg will be opened to
prepare it for the arrival of Stage 0 that will be transported from
Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555. It is currently planned to be hoisted
into place at the pad on Jan. 18.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 12/23/2010 02:17 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-122310

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus XL rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components are in work. This week, the aft
end cone was attached to the Stage 1 solid rocket motor and was
followed by mating Stage 1 with Stage 2. Associated thermal blanket
installation is now under way. Stage 0 electrical and mechanical
closeouts are beginning, and the final thermal protection system
insulation is being applied.

After the holidays, Pad 576-E on north Vandenberg will be opened to
prepare it for the arrival of Stage 0 which will be transported from
the Orbital Sciences processing hangar. It currently is planned to be
hoisted into place at the pad on Jan. 18.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/07/2011 08:17 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-010711

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Taurus XL rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg Air Force Base where integration and testing of the
vehicle's flight hardware components continue. Stages 1, 2 and 3 have
now been fully integrated. They were placed on the transportation
trailer this week in preparation for moving to Pad 576-E on north
Vandenberg later this month. Also this week, the launch pad was
opened to begin the work to prepare it for the arrival of Stage 0,
also currently in the Orbital Sciences processing hangar. It is set
to be hoisted into place on the pad Jan. 18.

In other work, the Fairing Deployment System was pressurized for
testing this week. At the completion of the work, the test was deemed
fully successful.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 01/11/2011 02:02 AM
Quote
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – In Orbital Sciences Corp. Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the first and second stage of the Taurus XL rocket is being loaded onto an Assembly Integration Trailer in preparation for moving to Pad 576-E on north Vandenberg later this month. The Orbital Sciences Taurus XL rocket, targeted to lift off Feb. 23, 2011, from Vandenberg's Space Launch Complex 576-E, will take NASA's Glory satellite into low Earth. Glory is scheduled to collect data on the properties of aerosols and black carbon. It also will help scientists understand how the sun's irradiance affects Earth's climate. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/11/2011 05:57 PM
ORBITAL-BUILT GLORY EARTH SCIENCE SATELLITE ARRIVES AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE
BASE LAUNCH SITE

-- Spacecraft Built for NASA to be Integrated With Company’s Taurus XL
Rocket for Launch in February --

(Dulles, VA 11 January 2011) -- Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB),
one of the world’s leading space technology companies, today announced that
the Glory satellite has arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA to be
integrated with the company’s Taurus® XL rocket that will launch the
satellite into low-Earth orbit in late February.  Built by Orbital for the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Glory satellite
is the latest in an extensive series of Earth science satellites that
Orbital has designed, developed, built and tested for NASA since the early
1980’s.

“Over the next month, Orbital’s spacecraft and launch vehicle teams will be
working together to prepare the Glory satellite and Taurus XL rocket for a
late February launch operation and satellite deployment,” said Mr. J.R.
Thompson, Orbital’s Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer.  “Following
its deployment and check-out, the Glory satellite will add to the
capabilities of NASA’s highly-productive ‘A-Train’ series of Earth sensing
spacecraft, which is an excellent example of how multiple distributed
satellites can provide valuable scientific returns at very reasonable
mission costs.”

Mr. Thompson added, “We look forward to contributing to NASA’s success in
gathering critical data on aerosols in the atmosphere and continuing to
provide spacecraft, launch vehicles and mission operations for solar
irradiance measurements.  The Glory mission builds on the heritage of our
ACRIMSAT and SORCE satellite programs, both of which were launched aboard
Orbital rockets, and could lead to our support of the future solar
monitoring mission as well.”

About the Glory Satellite

Orbital’s Space Systems Group designed, built and tested the Glory
satellite at its Dulles, VA satellite production facility.  It is based on
the company’s LeoStarTM small satellite bus that has served as the baseline
platform for several previous successful NASA science spacecraft programs,
including recent missions such as GALEX, SORCE and AIM.  The satellite
weighs approximately 1,160 lbs. (525 kg.) and features deployable solar
arrays, three-axis stabilization, and X-band and S-band communications
capabilities.

The Glory mission is being led by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center under
the direction of Project Manager Bryan Fafaul and Project Scientist Michael
Mishchenko.  The spacecraft carries two primary instruments, the Aerosol
Polarimetry Sensor (APS), which will measure aerosols in the atmosphere,
and the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), which will point toward the Sun and
continue a 32-year data record of the Sun’s brightness, or total solar
irradiance.

About Taurus XL

Orbital developed the ground-launched four-stage Taurus XL vehicle to
provide a reliable and cost-effective means of launching satellites
weighing up to approximately 3,000 pounds into low-Earth orbit. Taurus XL
incorporates advanced structural and avionics technology proven on the
company’s Pegasus® rocket and other operational launch systems.  It is also
designed for easy transportability and austere site operations, offering
customers rapid-response launches from a wide range of locations around the
globe.

The Glory mission will be the ninth flight of the Taurus rocket, with six
of the previous eight missions having been fully successful.  It also marks
the Taurus XL’s “return to flight” following a launch failure in 2009
during which the fairing encasing the satellite failed to properly separate
from the rocket, preventing the satellite from achieving orbital velocity.
Orbital has identified and corrected the root cause of the fairing
separation problem and has since carried out three fully successful space
launch missions using the updated fairing separation system.

The Taurus XL launch system maintains its launch vehicle reliability
certification from NASA, enabling the space agency to launch satellites of
high value and importance aboard the system.  It joins Orbital’s Pegasus
rocket, as well as the Delta II and Atlas V rockets, as the only launchers
to have earned that distinction.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 01/11/2011 06:07 PM
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Glory/news/launch-site-arrival.html

In the link above, the caption under the photo below states that Glory arrived at Vandenberg AFB around 12:00 PM, Pacific Time.  It's only 11:05 AM here in SoCal (that...and NASA Tweeted about the spacecraft's arrival around 10:30 AM).

Just nitpicking :)
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/11/2011 06:45 PM
RELEASE: 01-11

NASA'S GLORY SATELLITE ARRIVES AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE FOR LAUNCH

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The latest Earth-observing
satellite developed by NASA, called Glory, arrived Tuesday at
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., in preparation for a Feb. 23
launch. Glory was transported by truck from Orbital Sciences
Corporation's satellite design, production and testing facility in
Dulles, Va.

Glory is NASA's next Earth-observing research mission that will
improve our understanding of how the sun and airborne particles
called aerosols affect Earth's climate. It will join the Afternoon
Constellation or "A-train" of polar-orbiting satellites, a group that
includes the Aqua and Aura satellites. Glory will carry two primary
instruments, the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) and the Total
Irradiance Monitor (TIM). APS will measure aerosols in the Earth's
atmosphere and will take advantage of the A-train orbit by gathering
coincident data with other atmospheric science instruments. TIM will
point towards the sun and continue the 32-year data record of the
sun's brightness, or total solar irradiance.

"The scientific knowledge gained from Glory will have a significant
impact on our understanding of natural and human influences on
climate," said Hal Maring, Glory program scientist at NASA
Headquarters, Washington.

On Jan. 18, Stage 0 of Orbital's Taurus XL 3110 four-stage rocket will
be moved to the launch pad and hoisted into position. Stages 1, 2 and
3 will join stage 0 on the pad on Jan 25. The Glory spacecraft will
be enclosed in the Taurus XL payload fairing on Feb. 4-5 and
transported to the launch pad to be mated to the third stage of the
rocket the following day. Once the spacecraft is integrated with
stages 1, 2, and 3, the entire unit will be rotated to vertical and
hoisted atop stage 0 on Feb. 15.

On Feb. 23, Glory is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg's Space
Launch Complex 576-E at 2:09 a.m. PST (5:09 a.m. EST). After launch,
mission operators will conduct verification tests for 30 days and
then begin normal data collection for a period of at least three
years. Glory will fly in a low-Earth orbit of 438 miles (705 km)
altitude, which is about the distance between Boston and Washington.

Glory is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt,
Md., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Launch
management is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at
the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Orbital is responsible for the Glory satellite's design, manufacture,
payload integration and testing, as well as spacecraft operations
conducted from its Mission Operations Complex in Dulles, Va. Orbital
is also responsible for the mission's launch service with its Taurus
XL rocket. The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the
University of Colorado provided and will operate the TIM instrument.
Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems in El Segundo, Calif., provided
the APS instrument, which will be operated by NASA's Goddard
Institute for Space Studies in New York City.

For more information about NASA's Glory Mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/glory

For more information about NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/goddard


-end-

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/13/2011 06:55 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-003

NASA ANNOUNCES MEDIA BRIEFING ABOUT NEXT EARTH SCIENCE MISSION

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a media briefing on Thursday, Jan. 20, at
1 p.m. EST, about the agency's next Earth-observing satellite
mission, Glory, scheduled to launch on Feb. 23. During the briefing
at NASA Headquarters in Washington, panelists will discuss the
spacecraft's mission to study the impact of the sun and airborne
particles on Earth's climate.


The panelists are:
- Joy Bretthauer, Glory program executive, NASA Headquarters,
Washington
- Bryan Fafaul, Glory project manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight
Center, Greenbelt, Md.
- Michael Mishchenko, Glory project scientist, NASA Goddard Institute
for Space Studies, New York
- Greg Kopp, Total Irradiance Monitor instrument scientist, University
of Colorado at Boulder, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
- Brian Cairns, Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument scientist, NASA
Goddard Institute for Space Studies

The briefing will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA
Headquarters, 300 E St. SW, Washington. Media representatives unable
to attend in person may ask questions from participating NASA
locations or by telephone. To participate by phone, reporters must
contact Trent Perrotto at 202-358-0321 or at
[email protected] by 9 a.m. on Jan. 20.

The news conference will air live on NASA Television and the agency's
website. For NASA TV streaming video, downlink and scheduling
information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv


For more information about Glory, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/glory

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 01/17/2011 01:05 AM
Quote
Workers move one half of the fairing, wrapped in plastic protective covering, into a cargo container for transport from the Orbital Sciences Corp. Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to the Astrotech Payload Processing Facility. Once both halves of the fairing are delivered to Astrotech they will be installed around NASA's Glory satellite to protect it from the weather at the launch pad as well as from the atmosphere during flight.

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/17/2011 05:10 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-011711

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

The Glory spacecraft arrived Jan. 11 at the Astrotech payload
processing facility on north Vandenberg Air Force Base to begin
processing and prelaunch checkout. On Jan. 12, the spacecraft was
moved into the processing high bay, the shipping container was
removed from around the spacecraft, and it was placed on a work
stand. On Jan. 13, the protective covers were taken off the satellite
so that testing could begin, and the solar arrays were also
inspected. Limited Performance Tests to Glory are now under way.

Also Jan. 13, the two Taurus XL fairing halves were moved to
Astrotech. A successful test of the fairing separation system was
conducted last week.

The Taurus rocket is in Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north
Vandenberg where integration and testing of the vehicle's flight
hardware components continue. Work is under way at the launch pad to
prepare the elevated launch stand for the arrival and hoisting of
Stage 0, currently scheduled for Monday.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 01/18/2011 07:05 PM
GLORY unwrapped at the Astrotech facility, and stage 0 being raised to the pad:

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/18/2011 07:42 PM
GLORY unwrapped at the Astrotech facility, and stage 0 being raised to the pad:

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4

Picking my way through the images, I noted (I think) the following numbers stamped on the four stage motors.

Stage 0:  C120-19
Stage 1:  BF010
Stage 2:  BS009
Stage 3:  BT009

Not sure about the nomenclature, but these look like serial numbers.  Kind of a bummer that we're seeing such low numbers for a rocket that started flying 16 years ago.  Castor 120 has, of course, seen use on Athena too, explaining its higher numeration.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/20/2011 05:21 PM
RELEASE: 11-024

NASA PREPARES TO LAUNCH NEXT EARTH-OBSERVING SATELLITE MISSION

WASHINGTON -- NASA's newest Earth-observing research mission is
nearing launch. The Glory mission will improve our understanding of
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Glory also will extend a legacy of long-term solar
measurements needed to address key uncertainties about climate
change.

Glory is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in
California on Feb. 23 at 5:09 a.m. EST. It will join a fleet called
the Afternoon Constellation or "A-train" of satellites. This group of
other Earth-observing satellites, including NASA's Aqua and Aura
spacecraft, flies in tight formation.

"Glory is going to help scientists tackle one of the major
uncertainties in climate change predictions identified by the United
Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: the influence of
aerosols on the energy balance of our planet," said Michael Freilich,
director of NASA's Earth Science Division in the Science Mission
Directorate at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "This mission
also marks the first satellite launch under President Obama's climate
initiative that will advance the United States' contribution to
cutting-edge and policy-relevant climate change science."

Originally confirmed in 2005, Glory has been developed by a team of
engineers and scientists at several government, industry and academic
institutions across the country. The Glory spacecraft arrived at
Vandenberg on Jan. 11 after a cross-country road trip from Orbital
Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Va.

"The spacecraft is in place at the launch and all of the post-shipment
inspections and electrical tests have been completed," said Bryan
Fafaul, Glory project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
in Greenbelt, Md. The spacecraft will be mated to Orbital's Taurus XL
3110 rocket next month.

Glory will carry new technology designed to unravel some of the most
complex elements of the Earth system. The mission carries two primary
instruments, the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) and the Total
Irradiance Monitor (TIM). APS will improve measurement of aerosols,
the airborne particles that can influence climate by reflecting and
absorbing solar radiation and modifying clouds and precipitation.

TIM will extend a decades-long data record of the solar energy
striking the top of Earth's atmosphere, or total solar irradiance.
APS will collect data at nine different wavelengths, from the visible
to short-wave infrared, giving scientists a much-improved
understanding of aerosols. The instrument, NASA's first
Earth-orbiting polarimeter, will help scientists distinguish between
natural and human-produced aerosols. The information will be used to
refine global climate models and help scientists determine how our
planet is responding to human activities.

The TIM instrument will maintain and improve upon a 32-year record of
total solar irradiance, a value that fluctuates slightly as the sun
cycles through periods of varying intensity approximately every 11
years. While scientists have concluded that solar variability is not
the main cause of the warming observed on Earth in recent decades,
the sun has historically caused long-term climate changes. Having a
baseline of the solar energy that reaches Earth gives us a way to
evaluate future climate changes. Better measurements of total solar
irradiance give scientists another way to test their climate models
and understand the sun's longer cyclical changes and how they may
impact the climate.

Glory will fly in a low-Earth orbit at an altitude of 438 miles, about
the distance from Boston to Washington. After launch, mission
operators will conduct verification tests for 30 days and then begin
to collect data for at least three years.

Glory's Taurus launch rocket also will carry into orbit a secondary
payload: NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ELaNA,
mission. This mission will put three small research satellites, or
CubeSats, into orbit for Montana State University, the University of
Colorado and a consortium of state universities called Kentucky
Space.

Glory is managed by Goddard for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in
Washington. Launch management is provided by NASA's Launch Services
Program at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Orbital is responsible for Glory's design, manufacture, payload
integration, and testing, as well as spacecraft operations at its
Mission Operations Complex in Dulles, Va. The Laboratory for
Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at
Boulder provided and will operate the TIM instrument. Raytheon Space
and Airborne Systems in El Segundo, Calif., provided the APS
instrument, which will be operated by Goddard's Institute for Space
Studies in New York.

For more information about Glory, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/glory   

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/21/2011 09:26 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-012111

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

At the Astrotech payload processing facility on north Vandenberg Air
Force Base, pre-launch testing of Glory continues. The "limited
performance tests" and a solar array illumination test have been
completed. Fueling of the spacecraft with its attitude control
propellant is planned for early next week.

At the launch pad, Stage 0 of the Taurus XL rocket was hoisted atop
the elevated launch stand on Jan. 17. Stages 1, 2 and 3 are in
Orbital Sciences Hangar 1555 on north Vandenberg and are scheduled to
be moved to the launch pad next week on Jan. 25.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 01/22/2011 01:33 AM
Illumination tests were recently conducted on Glory's solar arrays

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=198
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 01/22/2011 11:58 PM
The spacecraft is now loaded with hydrazine, according to a status update on Glory's Facebook page (you need to have an account and be friends with Glory...if you want to view the update yourself)

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1368706679
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 01/27/2011 06:42 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-012711

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

At the Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force
Base, prelaunch processing of the Glory spacecraft continues. Fueling
of the spacecraft with its attitude control propellant is complete.
On Jan. 26, the Glory spacecraft was mated to the payload cone, which
is a vehicle interface payload attach fitting, in preparation for
encapsulation into the payload fairing at Astrotech on Feb. 3-4.

Taurus XL Stages 1, 2 and 3 were moved from Orbital Sciences Hangar
1555 to the launch pad on Jan. 25. Glory will be attached to the
Taurus XL third stage on Feb. 6 soon after the spacecraft arrives at
the launch pad. The fully integrated "stack" will later be hoisted
atop the Taurus XL Stage 0, currently planned to occur on Feb. 15.

The ELaNa CubeSat secondary payloads arrived at Vandenberg on Jan. 24.
Within their self-contained deployer, they will be taken to the pad
on Feb. 6 and integrated with the Taurus XL.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
the Earth's energy budget. An accurate description of the Earth's
energy budget is important in order to anticipate future changes to
our climate. Shifts in the global climate and the associated weather
patterns impact human life by altering landscapes and changing the
availability of natural resources.

The Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor instrument will measure aerosols
(human-caused and naturally occurring) to determine their relative
influence on the global climate.

The Total Irradiance Monitor instrument will monitor the Sun to
understand short-term solar mechanisms causing energy budget changes
and will contribute to the vital long-term solar record.

Project management for Glory is the responsibility of NASA's Goddard
Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The launch management for the
mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at
the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation of
Dulles, Va., is the launch service provider to Kennedy of the
four-stage Taurus XL rocket and is also builder of the Glory
satellite for Goddard.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 02/03/2011 08:33 PM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-020311

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

At the Astrotech payload processing facility on north Vandenberg Air
Force Base, prelaunch processing of the Glory spacecraft continues.
Activities to encapsulate the satellite into the payload fairing are
under way. Soon after Glory's arrival at the launch pad on Feb. 5, it
will be attached horizontally to the Taurus XL third stage. The fully
integrated "upper stack" consisting of the encapsulated Glory
spacecraft with stages 1, 2 and 3 will later be hoisted atop the
Taurus XL Stage 0, currently planned for Feb. 15.

The ELaNa CubeSat secondary payloads within their self-contained
deployer also will be taken to the pad this weekend and integrated
with the Taurus XL.

Flight Simulation No. 3 involving the upper stack is planned for Feb.
8. The Combined Systems Test on Feb. 17 will test the entire launch
vehicle once the upper stack has been integrated with Stage 0.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the
planet's energy budget -- the amount of energy entering and exiting
Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is
important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and
how they may affect human life.

Project management for Glory is the responsibility of NASA's Goddard
Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The launch management for the
mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at
the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Va., is the launch service
provider to Kennedy of the four-stage Taurus XL rocket and is also
builder of the Glory satellite for Goddard.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 02/04/2011 01:10 AM
Glory is now encapsulated in the Taurus XL fairing

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/profile.php?id=1368706679
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 02/05/2011 05:42 PM
More photos of Glory being encapsulated and then being moved to the launch pad

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/album.php?fbid=1790325042429&id=1368706679&aid=106047
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 02/08/2011 01:09 PM
Quote
-- At Space Launch Complex 576-E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, workers have moved NASA's Glory spacecraft into position where it will be joined with the Taurus XL rocket's third stage already delivered to a temporary processing tent near the pad. The Orbital Sciences Corp. Taurus XL rocket will carry Glory into low Earth orbit. Once Glory reaches orbit, it will collect data on the properties of aerosols and black carbon. It also will help scientists understand how the sun's irradiance affects Earth's climate. Launch is scheduled for 5:09 a.m. EST Feb. 23. For information, visit www.nasa.gov/glory. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 02/10/2011 06:39 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-027

GLORY CLIMATE SATELLITE READY FOR CALIFORNIA LAUNCH ON FEB. 23

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Glory mission is scheduled to launch Wednesday,
Feb. 23, from Space Launch Complex 576-E at Vandenberg Air Force Base
in California. Liftoff is targeted for 5:09 a.m. EST (2:09 a.m. PST)
in the middle of a 48-second launch window.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the
planet's energy budget - the amount of energy entering and exiting
Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is
important to anticipate future changes to our climate.

The first of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ELaNa,
missions also will be launched on the Taurus XL rocket. These
auxiliary payloads are three small satellites called CubeSats, each
designed and created by university and college students.

NASA Television will carry prelaunch media briefings on the Glory and
ELaNa missions on Monday, Feb. 21 starting at 4 p.m. EST (1 p.m. PST)
from Vandenberg. Reporters who cannot attend the briefings can ask
questions from NASA field centers.

On Feb. 23, NASA TV coverage of the countdown will begin at 3:30 a.m.
EST (12:30 a.m. PST). Liftoff is targeted for 5:09:43 a.m. EST
(2:09:43 a.m. PST). Spacecraft separation from the Taurus occurs 13
minutes after launch. The briefings and launch coverage also will be
streamed online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv


Launch coverage of Glory countdown activities will appear on NASA's
launch blog starting at 3:30 a.m. EST (12:30 a.m. PST). Real-time
updates of countdown milestones as well as streaming video clips
highlighting launch preparations and liftoff will be available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/glory


The launch news center at the NASA Vandenberg Resident Office will be
staffed beginning Feb. 15. To speak with a NASA Public Affairs
Officer, call 805-605-3051. A recorded status report will also be
available starting at that time by dialing 805-734-2693.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., manages the
Glory project. Mission launch management is the responsibility of
NASA's Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center in
Florida. Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va., which built the Glory
satellite, also is the launch service provider of the four-stage
Taurus XL rocket.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 02/11/2011 07:21 AM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-021011

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Pad:  SLC 576E
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

On Feb. 5, the encapsulated Glory spacecraft was transported from the
Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base to
the launch pad and electrically mated horizontally with the Taurus XL
third stage. On Feb. 6, the ELaNa CubeSat secondary payloads within
their self-contained deployer also were taken to the pad and
integrated with the Taurus XL rocket.

Flight Simulation No. 3 involving the upper stack occurred as planned
Feb. 8. The fully integrated "upper stack," consisting of the
encapsulated Glory spacecraft with Stages 1, 2 and 3, will be hoisted
atop the Taurus XL Stage 0 on Feb. 15. The Combined Systems Test on
Feb. 17 will test the entire launch vehicle once the upper stack has
been integrated with Stage 0.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the
planet's energy budget -- the amount of energy entering and exiting
Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is
important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and
how they may affect human life.

Project management for Glory is the responsibility of NASA's Goddard
Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The launch management for the
mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at
the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orbital Sciences Corp. of
Dulles, Va., is the launch service provider to Kennedy of the
four-stage Taurus XL rocket and is also builder of the Glory
satellite for Goddard.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Shams on 02/11/2011 03:45 PM
Can you provide the technical details of Glory spacecraft including Mass?
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bolun on 02/11/2011 08:24 PM
Can you provide the technical details of Glory spacecraft including Mass?
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/15/2011 05:46 PM
If anyone's interested, the upper stack (s1,2,3 & P/L) of the vehicle is being lifted and integrated to S0. There's video on http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/. Hopefully, the weather will hold off for the rest of the day so we can get this done.

So far, everything's stuck pretty much to schedule. Fingers crossed! I wanna go home next week!
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: sdsds on 02/15/2011 08:15 PM
Vandenberg Video Feed 2 looks like a still image.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/15/2011 08:54 PM
Upper stack has been bolted and torqued to S0.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 02/16/2011 07:52 AM
Taurus-XL is a strange looking beast really.  It reminds me somewhat of the configuration of the Starchaser rocket.  I think it is the effect of the narrow upper stages with the wider core and fairing.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/16/2011 04:40 PM
Taurus-XL is a strange looking beast really.  It reminds me somewhat of the configuration of the Starchaser rocket.  I think it is the effect of the narrow upper stages with the wider core and fairing.

and that's just the 63" fairing, not the 92" unit!
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 02/18/2011 04:32 AM
STATUS REPORT: ELV-021711

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Spacecraft: Glory
Launch Vehicle: Taurus XL 3110
Launch Site:  Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Pad:  SLC 576E
Launch Date:  Feb. 23, 2011
Launch Time: 2:09:43 a.m. PST
Altitude/Inclination: 440 miles/98.2 degrees

At Vandenberg Air Force Base, the fully integrated "upper stack,"
consisting of the encapsulated Glory spacecraft with Stages 1, 2 and
3, was hoisted atop the Taurus XL Stage 0 on the launch pad Feb. 15.
The Combined Systems Test on Feb. 17 will test the entire fully
integrated launch vehicle including the spacecraft.

The Flight Readiness Review was completed on Feb. 11 with no
significant issues or concerns. A countdown dress rehearsal is
planned for Feb. 18. The Launch Readiness Review, the final review
before launch, will be conducted on Feb. 21.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the
planet's energy budget -- the amount of energy entering and exiting
Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is
important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and
how they may affect human life.

Project management for Glory is the responsibility of NASA's Goddard
Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The launch management for the
mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at
the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orbital Sciences Corp. of
Dulles, Va., is the launch service provider to Kennedy of the
four-stage Taurus XL rocket and is also builder of the Glory
satellite for Goddard.

Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Art LeBrun on 02/22/2011 01:09 AM
What is the meaning of Hong on the GLORY Taurus? Far right.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: sdsds on 02/22/2011 02:02 AM
NASA'S GLORY CLIMATE SATELLITE READY FOR LAUNCH FEB. 23
                 Vandenberg AFB Notice to Editors
                        2011 February 10

VANDENBERG AFB, Calif. - The launch of NASA's Glory spacecraft aboard
an Orbital Sciences Taurus XL rocket is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb.
23. Liftoff will be from Space Launch Complex 576-E at Vandenberg Air
Force Base (VAFB), Calif. Liftoff is targeted for 2:09:43 a.m. PST
(5:09:43 a.m. EST) in the middle of a 48-second launch window. The
spacecraft's final polar orbit will be 438 nautical miles (508 miles)
at an inclination of 98.2 degrees.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the planet's
energy budget, which is the amount of energy entering and exiting
Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is
important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and how
they may affect human life.

The first of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ELaNa,
missions also will be launched on the Taurus XL. These auxiliary
payloads are small satellites called CubeSats.  Each is designed and
created by university and college students. Three satellites will be
deployed on ELaNa-1.

Also available from Brian Webb is his launch visibility analysis:
http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/launch-alert/2011-February/000657.html
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Spacefan01 on 02/22/2011 02:36 AM
GLORY unwrapped at the Astrotech facility, and stage 0 being raised to the pad:

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4

Picking my way through the images, I noted (I think) the following numbers stamped on the four stage motors.

Stage 0:  C120-19
Stage 1:  BF010
Stage 2:  BS009
Stage 3:  BT009

Not sure about the nomenclature, but these look like serial numbers.  Kind of a bummer that we're seeing such low numbers for a rocket that started flying 16 years ago.  Castor 120 has, of course, seen use on Athena too, explaining its higher numeration.

 - Ed Kyle
Could it be related to the number of Taurus launches (this is the 9th)?  While the Pegasus and Minotaur vehicles share the same basic Orion Motor designs, I believe that they are unique enough to be on separate drawings, and therefore separate from a serial numbering perspective. 
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 02/22/2011 05:33 AM
Glory poised for launch

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=198
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: dsmillman on 02/22/2011 11:48 AM
Is there a timeline of launch events available?
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 02/22/2011 05:28 PM
ORBITAL SET TO LAUNCH GLORY EARTH SCIENCE SATELLITE ABOARD TAURUS ROCKET
FOR NASA
-- Company Providing Both Satellite and Launch Vehicle For Important
Mission to Study How the Sun and Aerosols in the Atmosphere Affect Earth's
Climate --

(Dulles, VA 22 February 2011) -- Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB)
today announced that it is in final preparations to launch the
company-built Glory satellite for the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA).  The Glory satellite will be launched into low-Earth
orbit by Orbital's Taurus XL space launch vehicle.  The Glory launch is
currently scheduled to take place on Wednesday, February 23, 2011 from
Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA (VAFB) at 2:09 a.m. (PST).  This operational
schedule is subject to the completion of final pre-launch activities, as
well as acceptable weather conditions at VAFB at the time of the launch.

The powered flight sequence for the Glory mission will take approximately
13 minutes, from the time the Taurus XL rocket lifts off from the 576-E
launch pad at VAFB to the time that the satellite is deployed into orbit.
Orbital will launch the 1,164-pound Glory spacecraft into a circular polar
orbit approximately 340 nautical miles above the Earth, inclined at 98.2
degrees to the equator.  Over the next several weeks, following the initial
in-orbit spacecraft check-out procedures, Glory will employ its onboard
propulsion system to raise its orbit to 438 nautical miles, where it will
join a constellation of other NASA Earth-observing satellites known as the
"A-Train" that fly in formation and cross the Equator every afternoon.
Glory will be the sixth satellite in the A-Train, joining five other NASA
satellites: Aqua, Cloudsat, Calipso, Parasol and Aura.

The Taurus XL rocket will also carry three Cubesats that will be deployed
by a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deployer (P-POD) mechanism.  The Cubesat
and P-POD project was developed by California Polytechnic State University
to enable the development and deployment of tiny satellites that measure
four inches cubed and weigh less than 2.2 pounds.  The three Cubesats to be
launched aboard the Taurus XL rocket were developed by college students
from Montana State University, the University of Colorado and a consortium
of several Kentucky universities.

About the Taurus Launch Vehicle
Orbital developed the ground-launched Taurus XL vehicle to provide a
reliable and cost-effective means of launching satellites weighing up to
approximately 3,000 pounds into low-Earth orbit.  The Glory mission will be
the ninth flight of the Taurus rocket program.

The Taurus rocket incorporates advanced structural and avionics technology
proven on the company's Pegasus rocket and other operational launch
systems.  It is also designed for easy transportability and austere site
operations, offering customers rapid-response launches from a wide range of
locations.

Orbital's Taurus rocket has also earned NASA's launch vehicle reliability
certification, enabling the space agency to launch satellites of high value
and importance aboard the launch vehicle.  Taurus joins Orbital's other
rocket that supports NASA missions, the air-launched Pegasus space launch
vehicle, along with the Delta II and Atlas 5 rockets, as the only launchers
to have earned that distinction.

About the Glory Satellite
Orbital's Space Systems Group designed, built and tested the Glory
satellite at its Dulles, VA satellite production facility.  It is based on
the company's LeoStarTM small satellite bus that has served as the baseline
platform for several previous successful NASA science spacecraft programs,
including recent missions such as GALEX, SORCE and AIM.  The Glory
satellite features deployable solar arrays, three-axis stabilization, and
X-band and S-band communications capabilities.

The Glory mission is being led by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center under
the direction of Project Manager Bryan Fafaul and Project Scientist Michael
Mishchenko. The spacecraft carries two primary instruments, the Aerosol
Polarimetry Sensor (APS), which will measure aerosols in the atmosphere,
and the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), which will point toward the Sun and
continue a 32-year data record of the Sun's brightness, or total solar
irradiance.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/22/2011 06:51 PM
What is the meaning of Hong on the GLORY Taurus? Far right.

That is the name of the NASA Mission Integration Manager's wife. The MIM is allowed to name "their" rocket, since they put so much time and effort into bringing the mission elements together.
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/22/2011 06:57 PM
Is there a timeline of launch events available?

http://spaceflightnow.com/taurus/glory/timeline.html

I've got my own timeline: I have to be on console at 2200 PT. Not real happy with these sun-synch launches that go in the middle of the night....
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/22/2011 11:51 PM
Moved for live coverage
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 03:34 AM
Launch preview, mission overview - by William Graham:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/02/live-orbital-taurus-glory-with-nasa-satellite/
Title: Re: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 03:39 AM
Is there a timeline of launch events available?

William always has a good overview of the ascent milestones in his articles:

Launch preview, mission overview - by William Graham:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/02/live-orbital-taurus-glory-with-nasa-satellite/
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 02/23/2011 04:54 AM
Launch and tasks up to it can be followed here:

http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/index-vafb.html
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mwfair on 02/23/2011 05:36 AM
I find myself in Huntington Beach tonight,  can the launch be seen from here?
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: sdsds on 02/23/2011 06:14 AM
I find myself in Huntington Beach tonight,  can the launch be seen from here?

From a usually reliable source:
Quote
Observers within 150 miles of the vehicle's flight path should see a
bright, moving orange object. For observers further away, the Taurus
may resemble a faint, moving orange or red star.
http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/launch-alert/2011-February/000657.html
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 07:57 AM
Everything is going well. All the power buses have just been tested on internal power.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 08:27 AM
Boat in the box.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:29 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:32 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 08:36 AM
Upper level winds are green.

As for the boat in the box, range thinks it'll be clear at L-3 min.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:36 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:40 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:46 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:48 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 08:50 AM
T-15 minutes

Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 08:54 AM
BIH for five minutes.

PAO notes the boat will be clear in time for the T-0.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 08:58 AM
Out of the hold. T-12 minutes and counting.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 08:59 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:01 AM
Glory on internal power
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:02 AM
No go on moving to internal power on the LV? "Have another minute before we have to call it here"
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 09:02 AM
working a ground computer problem. We're done.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:03 AM
HOLD!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ugordan on 02/23/2011 09:04 AM
Scrub in other words.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:04 AM
working a ground computer problem. We're done.

Damn, sorry to hear that, especially when they've got you pulling an all nighter.

Appreciate the updates!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 09:05 AM
24 hour recycle...
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 02/23/2011 09:05 AM
Launch rescheduled for tomorrow, two years to the day after the last Taurus launch.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:06 AM
Ok, so that means Thursday is officially crazy, with this, ATV-2 docking and STS-133.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 02/23/2011 09:07 AM
Ok, so that means Thursday is officially crazy, with this, ATV-2 docking and STS-133.
There's also a Soyuz launch in the early morning.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 09:08 AM
Ok, so that means Thursday is officially crazy, with this, ATV-2 docking and STS-133.

...and a GLONASS-K launch, but no live coverage of that :(
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 02/23/2011 09:17 AM
Tomorrow we will have the same launch time.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:23 AM
Oh dear, guy in the blue shirt looks like he wants to go home now :)
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:27 AM
Chuck says there's the vehicle interface control console which provides status of the vehicle and a hold fire condition - a safe condition - was set. The vehicle was already safe so it was an external signal they couldn't understand...a signal to go in the safe mode. (So wouldn't go to arm, is what I think he's saying).

Adjusted to the back up system, but got the same indication, pointing to an issue with the GOC. Ran out of time for troubleshooting in the window.

Don't understand the problem at the moment. Posture is for 24 hour turnaround.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: cd-slam on 02/23/2011 10:35 AM
Oh dear, guy in the blue shirt looks like he wants to go home now :)
I think I can hear the "D'oh!" from here.  ;D
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 11:58 AM
RELEASE: 11-050

NASA POSTPONES LAUNCH OF GLORY MISSION

WASHINGTON -- The launch of NASA's Glory spacecraft from Vandenberg
Air Force Base in California has been postponed at least 24 hours.

During the final 15 minutes before Wednesday's scheduled launch of
5:09 a.m. EST, the vehicle interface control console, a ground
interface with Orbital Sciences' Taurus XL rocket, gave an unexpected
reading. The cause and potential effect of the reading was not fully
understood. With a 48-second available launch window, there was
insufficient time to analyze the issue causing the launch to be
postponed. Members of the Taurus team are troubleshooting the issue.

The next launch attempt is no earlier than Thursday, Feb. 24, at 5:09
a.m. EST. NASA Television's coverage of the launch will begin at 3:30
a.m. EST.

Data to be collected by Glory will help scientists improve our ability
to predict Earth's future environment and to distinguish
human-induced climate change from natural climate variability.

The Glory mission is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Md., for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in
Washington. Launch management is provided by NASA's Launch Services
Program at Kennedy. Orbital Sciences Corp., which provided the Taurus
XL rocket, is responsible for Glory's spacecraft design, manufacture,
payload integration and testing, as well as spacecraft operations.

For more information about NASA's Glory mission, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/glory


Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 02/23/2011 04:50 PM
30th Space Wing FB page says the problem is FTS-related:

http://www.facebook.com/30thSpaceWing/posts/10150123618494897

Sounds like either a failure to arm the FTS, or a faulty FTS status talkback, or something like that.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 02/23/2011 05:01 PM
Oh dear, guy in the blue shirt looks like he wants to go home now :)

Can't tell because of the hidden face, but looks like it could be John Brunschwyler, the Taurus XL program manager. He was in that seat 2 years ago for the last (failed) Taurus launch, and I imagine it's been a long 2 years for him.

Got my fingers crossed for him and the whole team.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 06:14 PM
30th Space Wing FB page says the problem is FTS-related:

http://www.facebook.com/30thSpaceWing/posts/10150123618494897

Sounds like either a failure to arm the FTS, or a faulty FTS status talkback, or something like that.

No, that statement from 30th is incorrect. There was a conflict in holdfire status & commands within one of the ground computers. Nothing to do with FTS.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 02/23/2011 08:04 PM
30th Space Wing FB page says the problem is FTS-related:

http://www.facebook.com/30thSpaceWing/posts/10150123618494897

Sounds like either a failure to arm the FTS, or a faulty FTS status talkback, or something like that.

No, that statement from 30th is incorrect. There was a conflict in holdfire status & commands within one of the ground computers. Nothing to do with FTS.

Good to hear it's not FTS-related. That would be a can of worms...
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 08:24 PM
Good to hear it's not FTS-related. That would be a can of worms...

So's this one.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 02/23/2011 09:01 PM
No attempt tonight; re-posturing for a Friday morning attempt.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 09:08 PM
No attempt tonight; re-posturing for a Friday morning attempt.

Thanks!
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/23/2011 10:48 PM
And there's the official release :)


MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-037

NASA SCHEDULES NEXT GLORY MISSION LAUNCH ATTEMPT

WASHINGTON -- The launch of NASA's Glory spacecraft from Vandenberg
Air Force Base in California is currently planned for no earlier than
Friday, Feb. 25, at 5:09 a.m. EST. Engineers from NASA and Orbital
Sciences Corp. continue to troubleshoot a technical issue that arose
during Wednesday's initial launch attempt. The target launch date
also will ensure personnel get the required rest before entering
another countdown.

The Glory satellite is being launched aboard an Orbital Sciences
Taurus XL rocket on a mission to improve our understanding of how the
sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's
climate.

For more information about NASA's Glory mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/glory
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 02/23/2011 11:07 PM
Good to hear it's not FTS-related. That would be a can of worms...

So's this one.

Oh boy. Good luck.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ginahoy on 02/24/2011 03:36 AM
Novice question...
Do launches to orbit from Vandy follow easterly trajectories, over the US?

As I understand it, there's significant benefit launching to the east in the direction of the earth's rotation. On the other hand, this would put the trajectory over land, and for some inclinations, over populated areas in the near range.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/24/2011 04:07 AM
Glory now slipped to March 3, tentatively. Not yet official.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TitanFan on 02/24/2011 04:11 AM
Glory now slipped to March 3, tentatively. Not yet official.

Well, that works for me...it'll give me time to get over this sore throat/cold.  I should've never even ventured out to the viewing site this morning...LOL.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/24/2011 05:20 AM
Novice question...
Do launches to orbit from Vandy follow easterly trajectories, over the US?

As I understand it, there's significant benefit launching to the east in the direction of the earth's rotation. On the other hand, this would put the trajectory over land, and for some inclinations, over populated areas in the near range.

Launching east is only beneficial if the target is a posigrade (0-90* degrees) orbit, inclination wrt the equator.  Most VAFB science launches follow a sun-synchronous orbit, which is slightly retrograde.

* actually <90 degrees, where the limit is the inclination where the eastward speed of the launch site equals the eastward speed of the target orbit.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Bubbinski on 02/24/2011 05:44 AM
As you alluded to, if you launch easterly from Vandenberg, you'll be flying over Las Vegas and other populated areas, and the booster stages would impact land.  China and Russia do launch their boosters over land but I don't see that happening here.

Also launches like Glory require full coverage of the entire earth.  Easterly launches wouldn't cover the polar regions.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ginahoy on 02/24/2011 06:22 AM
Most VAFB science launches follow a sun-synchronous orbit, which is slightly retrograde.

Thanks! Oh course! I see from earlier in this thread that Glory's orbit will have an inclination of 98 degrees. I assume that means 98 degrees north of east, which would be a compass direction of 352. But that trajectory would also be over land. I guess I don't understand how to interpret inclination. Please explain.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 02/24/2011 06:37 AM
Most VAFB science launches follow a sun-synchronous orbit, which is slightly retrograde.

Thanks! Oh course! I see from earlier in this thread that Glory's orbit will have an inclination of 98 degrees. I assume that means 98 degrees north of east, which would be a compass direction of 352. But that trajectory would also be over land. I guess I don't understand how to interpret inclination. Please explain.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclination (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclination)
Try to think like this: an orbit with 0 inclination would lay a ground track directly above the equator. An orbit with 90 degrees inclination would pass through the North and South poles. Anything that orbits the star/planet with an inclination of 0 to 90 degrees revolves in the same direction as the rotation of the star or planet. For an object with an orbit with inclination between 90 and 180 degrees, it is exactly the opposite. Thus, if you look at a California map, you can see that the only safe direction rockets can launch from Vandenberg is towards the south (and west too, although not many satellites need such a retrograde orbit), which would lead to a high-inclination orbit. Payloads which need a low inclination would use (at least in the US) somewhere on the east coast for launch, for example Cape Canaveral.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: notsorandom on 02/24/2011 06:42 AM
Most VAFB science launches follow a sun-synchronous orbit, which is slightly retrograde.

Thanks! Oh course! I see from earlier in this thread that Glory's orbit will have an inclination of 98 degrees. I assume that means 98 degrees north of east, which would be a compass direction of 352. But that trajectory would also be over land. I guess I don't understand how to interpret inclination. Please explain.
You are pretty much correct. A sun synchronous orbit is slightly retrograde. In the case of Vandenberg rockets are launched south. Due to the shape of the US west coast flying north out of Vandenberg would mean flying over populated land. Here is a graphic that might be of some help. Its was made for the Space Shuttle but any rocket flying out of those bases to those inclinations would take those paths.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ginahoy on 02/24/2011 07:44 AM
You are pretty much correct. A sun synchronous orbit is slightly retrograde. In the case of Vandenberg rockets are launched south. Due to the shape of the US west coast flying north out of Vandenberg would mean flying over populated land. Here is a graphic that might be of some help.

So 98 degrees inclination apparently can mean 98 south of east? If so, that's confusing, especially for someone with some knowledge of land surveys. That would be like saying Washington DC has longitude of 77 degrees without specifying -77 or 77 West.

Thanks for engaging me on this. It's something I've wondered about for a while. I'll be back on the boards tomorrow for shuttle launch.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: notsorandom on 02/24/2011 08:31 AM
So 98 degrees inclination apparently can mean 98 south of east?
It can mean north or south of east. Think about it like this. Glory will launch out of Vandenberg heading south and will be heading south when it crosses the equator. When it crosses the equator there its orbital track will be inclined at 98 degrees south of east. Then on the other side of the planet it is now heading north so when it crosses the equator the orbit is 98 degrees north of east.
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ginahoy on 02/24/2011 04:07 PM
When it crosses the equator there its orbital track will be inclined at 98 degrees south of east. Then on the other side of the planet it is now heading north so when it crosses the equator the orbit is 98 degrees north of east.

Thanks, that helps. I guess it's like the argument about whether a ceiling fan is rotating clockwise or counterclockwise. It depends on your perspective!
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 02/24/2011 05:59 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-056

NASA ASSESSING NEW LAUNCH DATES FOR THE GLORY MISSION

WASHINGTON -- Preparations for the launch of NASA's Glory mission from
Vandenberg Air Force Base in California have been suspended
temporarily. Engineers continue to troubleshoot a malfunction in
ground support equipment associated with the Taurus XL rocket.

On Feb. 23, a false indication was received about the rocket's status
after commands were sent approximately 15 minutes before launch to
activate the Taurus.

"We had an indication that a 'hold-fire' command was sent when indeed
it had not," said Omar Baez, NASA launch director.

The commands originated from the Vehicle Interface Control Console in
the mobile launch support van stationed a few miles from the launch
pad. The problem has not yet been isolated, and troubleshooting
continues. Managers are evaluating possible Glory launch
opportunities in early to mid-March.

"The Glory spacecraft is doing fine," reported Bryan Fafaul, Glory
project manager from NASA's Goddard Space Flight in Greenbelt, Md.
"We are continuing to slow charge the battery until we have a new
launch date."

The Glory satellite will be launched aboard a Taurus on a mission to
improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmospheric
particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. Glory launch
management is provided by NASA's Launch Service Program at the
agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orbital Sciences Corp. is
providing the Taurus XL launch vehicle and is responsible for
spacecraft operations.

For status updates on the Glory launch, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/glory   

Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: robertross on 02/25/2011 01:23 PM
30th Space Wing FB page says the problem is FTS-related:

http://www.facebook.com/30thSpaceWing/posts/10150123618494897

Sounds like either a failure to arm the FTS, or a faulty FTS status talkback, or something like that.

No, that statement from 30th is incorrect. There was a conflict in holdfire status & commands within one of the ground computers. Nothing to do with FTS.

As a follow-on to the NASA release I appreciate the correction & updates you are providing us. Thanks!
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Salo on 03/01/2011 05:15 AM
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/tracking/index.html
Quote
NET March 4     Taurus  •  Glory
Launch time: 1009 GMT (5:09 a.m. EST; 2:09 a.m. PST)
Title: Re: SCRUB: Taurus XL, GLORY - February 23, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/01/2011 06:21 PM
As we ran with last week - they've gone with March 4:

MEDIA ADVISORY: M11-11

NASA'S GLORY SATELLITE RESCHEDULED FOR LAUNCH MARCH 4

VANDENBERG AFB, Calif. -- The launch of NASA's Glory spacecraft aboard
an Orbital Sciences Taurus XL rocket has been rescheduled for Friday,
March 4. Technical issues with ground support equipment associated
with the Taurus XL that scrubbed the Feb. 23 launch attempt have been
resolved.

Liftoff will be from Space Launch Complex 576E at Vandenberg Air Force
Base (VAFB), Calif. Launch is targeted for 5:09:43 a.m. EST (2:09:43
a.m. PST) in the middle of a 48-second launch window. The
spacecraft's final polar orbit will be 438 nautical miles (508
statute miles) at an inclination of 98.2 degrees.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand
how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect
Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the
planet's energy budget, which is the amount of energy entering and
exiting Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts
is important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and
how they may affect human life.

The first of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ELaNa,
missions also will be launched on the Taurus XL. These auxiliary
payloads are small satellites called CubeSats. Each is designed and
created by university and college students. Three satellites will be
deployed on ELaNa-1.

Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:55 AM
Bumpty bump for the next attempt.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TheFallen on 03/04/2011 01:33 AM
The Taurus XL poised for launch on the morning of March 3
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TitanFan on 03/04/2011 04:23 AM
Viewing not looking so hot as of now.  It's typical Vandenberg pea soup fog out here.  According to Weather Channel website, it's supposed to be clearing up by 2300 hrs. or so...we'll see, but I'm having my doubts. Still planning on photographs...got my camera equipment ready to roll, but as I write this, I can barely see the house across the street from me it's so thick out there :(.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/04/2011 06:32 AM
Excellent weather outlook tonight - 0% POV.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/04/2011 07:07 AM
Rocket's just been turned on and all looks okay.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 07:14 AM
Goin' to be a busy day, what with Glory from VAFB and OTV2 from CCAFS.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/04/2011 08:00 AM
All power bus checks and FTS checks okay.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:18 AM
Morning :)

Thanks for the updates Kim. Much appreciated!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:20 AM
Out of the BIH. T-45 minutes and counting.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/04/2011 08:36 AM
Good wx brief, range area is clear, upper level winds are go.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:40 AM
L-30 minutes.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:42 AM
FTS power on and config verified.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:46 AM
Readiness Poll for FTS internal power - from external - all go.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 08:49 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 08:51 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:52 AM
We're past the point of the previous scrub!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 08:52 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:53 AM
T-12 minutes and holding. Five minute BIH.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:54 AM
Aiming for a T-0 of 10:09:43 GMT.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 08:56 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:57 AM
Polling for internal power. All Go.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 08:59 AM
Out of the final BIH.

T-12 minutes and counting.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 08:59 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:01 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:04 AM
Polling for avionics internal power. All Go.

Glory configured for launch.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:04 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:04 AM
T-6 minutes.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:06 AM
Final Launch Readiness Poll - All GO.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:07 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:07 AM
Vehicle armed. Ignition enabled.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:07 AM
Range is green.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:08 AM
T-120 seconds.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:09 AM
Commence countdown - launch computers in command.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:10 AM
T-60 seconds. Green board.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:10 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 09:10 AM
Quite an image that ignition!  :o
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:11 AM
LAUNCH!!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:11 AM
First stage.

Vehicle bus is nominal
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:12 AM
Max Q.

2,000 mph - 10 miles altitude (not hanging around!)
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:12 AM
Staging.

0-1 sep. Stage 1 ignition.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:13 AM
T+120 seconds. Nominal flight.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:13 AM
9,500 mph. 100 miles.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:14 AM
Staging. 1-2.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:14 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:15 AM
T+240 seconds.

Stage 2 burnout shortly. Did not actually hear fairing sep yet.
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 09:15 AM
Been a contingency..  :(
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Skyrocket on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
apparently a failure to seperate the fairing - again
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
Anomaly! :o It's the fairing not separating again!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
ups!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
NO FAIRING SEP!
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
FAILED
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:16 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 09:17 AM
Oh dear. Not again!  :(
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:17 AM
"Do not talk to anyone to speculate on the contingency" (We already know).

Underspeed caused by lack of fairing sep.

Failed mission :(
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 09:19 AM
What a shame :(
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:19 AM
What was the cause of the OCO launch failure? Wasn't the same failure?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:19 AM
OCO all over again.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:20 AM
Taurus still flying in vain.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:22 AM
OCO all over again.

Yeap! The same problem...
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 09:22 AM
What was the cause of the OCO launch failure? Wasn't the same failure?

Well, it was a failure to separate the fairing but, from what little has been announced so far, it seems to have a different root cause.  IIRC, the OCO failure was caused by an electrical fault that caused the separation system to fail to pressurise.  This time, the system did pressurise (as far as the telemetry told them) but the fairing still didn't separate.

This could be bad news for Taurus-XL (although not for Orbital, as Minotaur continues to perform adequately).
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:23 AM
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Satori on 03/04/2011 09:24 AM
What was the cause of the OCO launch failure? Wasn't the same failure?

Well, it was a failure to separate the fairing but, from what little has been announced so far, it seems to have a different root cause.  IIRC, the OCO failure was caused by an electrical fault that caused the separation system to fail to pressurise.  This time, the system did pressurise (as far as the telemetry told them) but the fairing still didn't separate.

This could be bad news for Taurus-XL (although not for Orbital, as Minotaur continues to perform adequately).

Thanks!
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 09:24 AM
GLORY off to join OCO-1 at the bottom of the Southern Ocean :(
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:27 AM
Goerge Diller confirming the fairing issue - and resulting underspeed.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 09:29 AM
Rocket failure isn't the best way to start your day. :(

Totally gutting for everyone involved with the satellite.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: hektor on 03/04/2011 09:29 AM
Are there common features between the Taurus XL and the Taurus II fairings ? who designs them ? produces them ?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 09:31 AM
Webcast ending.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bolun on 03/04/2011 09:32 AM
Sad news. :(
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: MikeMi. on 03/04/2011 09:41 AM
Yep.. shame..

Conference from Vandenberg should take place in nearest hours.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 09:44 AM
NASA Blog at 10:30 UTC posted: "A news briefing will be held in about 2 1/2 hours to talk about the launch."

So 1pm UTC
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: butters on 03/04/2011 09:51 AM
Are there common features between the Taurus XL and the Taurus II fairings ? who designs them ? produces them ?

My understanding is that this new post-OCO faring separation system has been flown successfully on Minotaur IV, but I'm not sure if the faring itself is common.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 10:00 AM
Launch Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpj5Ufw2Cvs

George explaining the failure:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFnGDI1YgpE
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Skyrocket on 03/04/2011 10:13 AM
Are there common features between the Taurus XL and the Taurus II fairings ? who designs them ? produces them ?

My understanding is that this new post-OCO faring separation system has been flown successfully on Minotaur IV, but I'm not sure if the faring itself is common.

Different fairings on Taurus-3110 and Minotaur-IV
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bkellysky on 03/04/2011 10:15 AM
Sad news to wake up to (6am now on the east coast of the US).
However, thanks for covering the launch.
Looking forward to the press briefing.
bob
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 10:16 AM
Launch Video:

Does anyone know why the VAFB imaging infrared tracking camera feed was bouncing about like that? A loose cable or something?
Title: Re: LIVE: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/04/2011 10:41 AM
Well, it was a failure to separate the fairing but, from what little has been announced so far, it seems to have a different root cause.  IIRC, the OCO failure was caused by an electrical fault that caused the separation system to fail to pressurise.  This time, the system did pressurise (as far as the telemetry told them) but the fairing still didn't separate.

OCO failure was not electrical in nature.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 10:42 AM
7am Central for the contingency presser.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Integrator on 03/04/2011 10:47 AM
http://www.spacenews.com/civil/110303-lawmakers-question-nasa-budget-request.html
Quote
Bolden said he is confident that commercial space firms can deliver.

Quote
“At least one has been doing it for more than 20 years,” Bolden said, citing Orbital Sciences, one of several references made during the hearing to the well-established Dulles, Va.-based company.

“I’m not concerned about their ability to deliver,” he said.

Mishaps happen.  Launching things through the atmosphere and out of the gravity well is not easy. Murphy is never on our side, but we also owe it to all of our customers and stakeholders to fully understand the known-unknowns, the unknown-unknowns, and the difference between them.

Condolances to the Glory payload team and OSC Taurus.
INTEGRATOR
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: SAWDIS on 03/04/2011 10:56 AM
Obviously secondary payload of three small research satellites, or CubeSats also lost.  Very disappointing as I looked forward to monitor the cubesats via amateur radio.

A really sad day for the #Glory team and also for earth solar science and research in general, but I hope The Team will be back.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 03/04/2011 11:13 AM
RELEASE: 11-050

NASA'S GLORY SATELLITE FAILS TO REACH ORBIT

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Glory mission launched from Vandenberg Air Force
Base in California Friday at 5:09:45 a.m. EST failed to reach orbit.

Telemetry indicated the fairing, the protective shell atop the Taurus
XL rocket, did not separate as expected about three minutes after
launch.

A press briefing to discuss the Glory launch failure is planned at
Vandenberg for approximately 8:00 a.m. EST. NASA Television will
carry the press conference live at:



http://www.nasa.gov/ntv


The new Earth-observing satellite was intended to improve our
understanding of how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called
aerosols affect Earth's climate.

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsavian on 03/04/2011 11:41 AM
I remember thinking at the time when the solutions were proposed that they were just making educated assumptions about root cause without real proof of concept of the failure mode which I suppose was real hard/impossible to do when the evidence was buried in the ocean. Commiserations to all involved.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 11:48 AM
Just over 10 minutes to the failure presser.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 11:57 AM
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Mapperuo on 03/04/2011 12:00 PM
This is like a funeral.. They all look like hell. :(
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:04 PM
This is going to be heartbreaking.

"It's a very difficult situation."

Outlined the countdown. No anomalies.

Stage 0 was nominal.
Stage 1 ignited, sep.
2:45 seconds - burnout of Stage 1.
Ignition Stage 2.
Six seconds later, expected fairing sep. We didn't see the indication.
Performance loss later on.
Failed to make orbit.
All indications are the satellite and rocket are in the southern Pacific.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:07 PM
"This is a pretty tough night for use. We had a fairing sep failure on OCO.

Conducted an extensive investigation. Fairing sep system root cause. Spent a lot of time redesigning the system. Changed out the initiation system we use on a vehicle we've successfully flown three times.

We thought we had it solved and then we came up against this.

There's a lot of emotion, but doubly so on a return to flight mission like this one.


It's not an understatement to say we're all pretty devestated. Orbital will bounch back with the Taurus vehicle.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:09 PM
Uses a cam shell fairing. Frangible joints. Seps and pistons push the two halves off.

We've used a hot gas system to push the pistons. In the investigation of the OCO failure was the failure to start that hot gas system.

So we redesigned to use a cold gas system. Completely different methord and thought we had that system nailed with three successes.

Right now we're crunching the data, but not enough to tell anymore that the fairing didn't deploy.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:10 PM
Had worked this risk with all levels and thought we had an acceptable level of risk. Clearly we missed something.

We've lost the Glory mission. SMD will continue to contribute to the understanding of the Earth with its 13 missions.

We'll continue to plan the path forward.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 12:16 PM
Questions.

On performance?

A) Didn't shed the weight of the fairing and we can't get into orbit with that weight.

How similar to the OCO failure?

A) Don't have any data processed yet. Too early to tell if it's the same thing as we had with OCO. However, there is more instrumentation on this flight.

On where the satellite ended up?

A) We'll get a pinpoint later. Physics say its in the same spot as OCO.

On the hardware.

A) The fairings are similar (to Minotaur). Same basic mechanisms. Differences in fairing size.

How do you rebound?

A) These missions are developed over many years by lots of people who become a family. They respond to disapointments as a family. If you can imagine how any family responds to a loss, they'll overcome this one, although it is quite painful.

On OCO-2.

A) We'll have to evaluate this investigation.

Over. Poor guys, that was very painful :(
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 03/04/2011 12:17 PM
This reminds me of the ECO sensor problem on Shuttle.  They worked like crazy, thought they had the root cause, made changes, it worked fine a few times, and then failed again.  And then they found the *real* root cause, which had nothing to do with the previous determination.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Martin FL on 03/04/2011 12:20 PM
Thanks for the coverage Chris for those of us waking up to this.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/04/2011 12:34 PM
Condolences to the Glory team, and especially to the Taurus folks. I can only imagine the anguish of the Taurus team that suffered through OCO, then worked their butts off 2 years to fix the problem.

Those are good, smart people who deserved a better fate. I am truly sorry.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: arikui999 on 03/04/2011 12:39 PM
Some ancient history from a former Orbital engineer....

Some of the early Pegasus flights had anomalies at fairing separation.  But the satellites were still inserted into "usable" orbits.  Then circa November 1992, Orbital performed a Pegaus fairing separation test in the White Sands/HELSTF vacuum chamber.  The main purpose was to measure contamination particles from the LSC due to the cleaniness requirements for upcoming payloads.  The first test produced an unexpected result in that only one of the two fairing halves separated.  The other half remained upright.  It was only then that we realized why the Pegasus flight anomalies had occurred.  The design problem was then solved, the separation charge was also changed to frangible joint for cleanliness reasons.  Then two additional Pegasus fairing separation tests were successfully performed at HELSTF.  Furthermore, a successful Taurus fairing separation test was also performed. 

The point is that testing rigor was used in 1992-1993 at HELSTF.

Questions: 

Was a full-scale fairing separation test performed for the redesigned Taurus cold gas system prior to the Glory mission?

Would another round of testing at HELSTF be useful for troubleshooting the failure?


Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: northanger on 03/04/2011 12:45 PM
Every time I checked NASA's launch schedule page there was Glory. It's great when scheduled events finally reach their launch dates. My condolences to Orbital Sciences and the Glory team. I watched the press conference and could see how painful this loss was. All the best moving forward.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bkellysky on 03/04/2011 12:51 PM
Condolences to the Glory team, and especially to the Taurus folks. I can only imagine the anguish of the Taurus team that suffered through OCO, then worked their butts off 2 years to fix the problem.

Those are good, smart people who deserved a better fate. I am truly sorry.
I can't say it any better than this. 
I haven't watched a post-failure press conference before.
To be able to meet the press and after such a bad outcome and be so professional must be incredibly hard, especially so soon after the failure.  I hope they find a way to the solution.
Thanks for the coverage.  I'm writing a brief article for my office.
       
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Cherokee43v6 on 03/04/2011 12:55 PM
There's not much point in commenting on the loss of the mission without knowing the root causes of the problem, but it doesn't help that the media has already latched onto the similarity between Glory and OCO.

There's an old saying about mistakes...  "Mistakes are fine so long as you learn from them, but never ever repeat one."

I am concerned that they are going to find that whatever mistake caused the OCO failure will be the same as the cause of the Glory failure.

Add to that the conspiracy nuts who will jump on the loss of two consecutive climate study missions to similar/identical problems and OSC could be looking at some PR trouble.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/04/2011 12:58 PM
AC-70 and -71 failed for the same cause (iced up turbopump, not rag-ed up turbopump), and we didn't pick the right cause after the first one.  So these things have happened before.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: rdale on 03/04/2011 01:13 PM
I am concerned that they are going to find that whatever mistake caused the OCO failure will be the same as the cause of the Glory failure.

I think that would be good actually... I'd rather it be one problem causing both, as opposed to two different issues and then you aren't sure what to fix.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jcm on 03/04/2011 01:21 PM
I looked again at the released version of the OCO failure report - they had 4 possible root causes of which the pressurization system was only one. Of course they said they were addressing all four...  (the other 3 were: frangible joint didn't fully separate,
electrical system failed to fire ordnance, and a cable hangup).

Condolences to Orbital team, this is gutwrenching.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bkellysky on 03/04/2011 01:24 PM
I am concerned that they are going to find that whatever mistake caused the OCO failure will be the same as the cause of the Glory failure.

I think that would be good actually... I'd rather it be one problem causing both, as opposed to two different issues and then you aren't sure what to fix.
Good point!
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 03/04/2011 01:26 PM
The most encouraging thing is that they said at the briefing that they had installed additional telemetry on this system after OCO.  Hopefully, that telemetry will find the smoking gun that was missing from the OCO investigation due to lack of telemetry and lack of hardware recovery.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: John44 on 03/04/2011 01:28 PM
Glory Launch
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6509

Glory News Conference
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6510
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ugordan on 03/04/2011 01:39 PM
AC-70 and -71 failed for the same cause (iced up turbopump, not rag-ed up turbopump), and we didn't pick the right cause after the first one. 

Is there any typical "strategy" for return to flight after back-to-back failures caused by similar issues like these? Demo flights with no real value or some low risk payload or would Taurus be eligible for another several hundred million $ mission?

Basically, would this cause NASA to think twice before flying again before the fairing problems have demonstrably been rectified?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Space Pete on 03/04/2011 01:43 PM
This is disappointing. I don't religiously follow uncrewed launches, but it's always a sad day when something that someone has worked on for years ends up in the drink. :(

Question: Does Taurus II use the same type of fairing as the Taurus XL?

If so, Orbital need to get it fixed pronto - they're supposed to be resupplying the ISS with Taurus II by the end of this year - and those flights can't fail.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/04/2011 02:08 PM
AC-70 and -71 failed for the same cause (iced up turbopump, not rag-ed up turbopump), and we didn't pick the right cause after the first one.
Is there any typical "strategy" for return to flight after back-to-back failures caused by similar issues like these? Demo flights with no real value or some low risk payload or would Taurus be eligible for another several hundred million $ mission?

Basically, would this cause NASA to think twice before flying again before the fairing problems have demonstrably been rectified?

70 chose the wrong bone of the fishbone analysis, discarding what was ultimately shown to be the right one after 71 and what some thought was right after 70.  Post-OCO, all 4 potential root causes were addressed, but clearly either this is a new cause or the correct bone in the OCO analysis was discarded in error.

Hard to say what the impact will be on future procurement of Taurus XL.  Procurements are judgment calls, and I don't try to get in the heads of the decisionmakers.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Danderman on 03/04/2011 03:07 PM
AC-70 and -71 failed for the same cause (iced up turbopump, not rag-ed up turbopump), and we didn't pick the right cause after the first one. 

Is there any typical "strategy" for return to flight after back-to-back failures caused by similar issues like these? Demo flights with no real value or some low risk payload or would Taurus be eligible for another several hundred million $ mission?

Basically, would this cause NASA to think twice before flying again before the fairing problems have demonstrably been rectified?

I would suggest a suborbital launch to demonstrate clean separation of the fairing - the jettison event doesn't happen very high, so suborbital would be sufficient.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/04/2011 03:22 PM
AC-70 and -71 failed for the same cause (iced up turbopump, not rag-ed up turbopump), and we didn't pick the right cause after the first one. 

Is there any typical "strategy" for return to flight after back-to-back failures caused by similar issues like these? Demo flights with no real value or some low risk payload or would Taurus be eligible for another several hundred million $ mission?

Basically, would this cause NASA to think twice before flying again before the fairing problems have demonstrably been rectified?

I would suggest a suborbital launch to demonstrate clean separation of the fairing - the jettison event doesn't happen very high, so suborbital would be sufficient.

I don't see this happening; in fact, I am wondering if this launch failure would mark the end of the Taurus program; after all, when:
a) Two back-to-back failures happening at the same place (not necessarily the same reasons though);
b) There's only one more flight left (OCO-2), which was a reflight of a payload lost on the very same LV;
c) There's a replacement LV that can be used (Minotaur-4/5) for the remaining customers of the Taurus LV today (the US military and NASA);
d) OSC is considering shutting down the Pegasus production line, which would impact Taurus production as well, since the two shared quite a few stages and components;
there's not much reason to continue offering this launch vehicle. In any case, I hope that the OSC engineers could pinpoint the mishap that doomed the last two missions, and that NASA could fund a replacement spacecraft and instruments for the Glory team.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: InvalidAttitude on 03/04/2011 03:38 PM
I hope there will be a GLORY 2 (but hopefully not on Taurus anymore).
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 03/04/2011 03:43 PM
Glory News Conference
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6510

When I try to download it, I get the STS-133 - ISS Flight Director Update FD 7-8 instead.  ???
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mr. mark on 03/04/2011 04:07 PM
I too have a question regarding the Taurus 2 and the Taurus XL fairings. Are they similar and could this cause a problem with the upcoming Taurus 2 launch this summer/fall?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/04/2011 04:09 PM
Glory News Conference
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6510

When I try to download it, I get the STS-133 - ISS Flight Director Update FD 7-8 instead.  ???

Yeah, he's got the wrong one up on that link, but the "play" version works:

http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/archive/nasa/replay74.php
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jacqmans on 03/04/2011 04:13 PM
RELEASE: 11-065

NASA CREATES GLORY SATELLITE MISHAP INVESTIGATION BOARD

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Glory mission ended Friday after the spacecraft
failed to reach orbit following its launch from Vandenberg Air Force
Base in California.

NASA has begun the process of creating a Mishap Investigation Board to
evaluate the cause of the failure. Telemetry indicated the fairing, a
protective shell atop the satellite's Taurus XL rocket, did not
separate as expected.

The launch proceeded as planned from its liftoff at 5:09 a.m. EST
through the ignition of the Taurus XL's second stage. However, the
fairing failure occurred during the second stage engine burn. It is
likely the spacecraft fell into the South Pacific, although the exact
location is not yet known.

NASA's previous launch attempt of an Earth science spacecraft, the
Orbiting Carbon Observatory onboard a Taurus XL on Feb. 24, 2009,
also failed to reach orbit when the fairing did not separate.

NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory Mishap Investigation Board reviewed
launch data and the fairing separation system design, and developed a
corrective action plan. The plan was implemented by Taurus XL
manufacturer Orbital Sciences Corporation. In October 2010, NASA's
Flight Planning Board confirmed the successful closure of the
corrective actions.

The Glory Earth-observing satellite was intended to improve our
understanding of how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called
aerosols affect Earth's climate.

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/04/2011 04:27 PM
Since 2001, inclusive, there have been nine U.S. launch vehicle failures.  Six of these were failures to reach orbit.  Those six included the first three Falcon 1 launches and three of the four Taurus launches performed during that period. 

One wonders what was different about the single Taurus that succeeded.  It was different.  It was only the Taurus with a 2.34 meter diameter fairing.  The others were 1.6 meter fairings, noting, of course, that the T6 failure in 2001 did not involve the fairing.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: rcroques on 03/04/2011 04:28 PM
I'm definitely thinking that this might be the end of the Taurus program.

I will say, however, it was a beautiful launch (as pretty much any night launch at Vandenberg is; living in Southern California we get to see most of them) but when I got a text from Spaceflightnow on Twitter that it was indeed a failure, my heart dropped.  And then after I heard it was a fairing issue again, I got the sincere feeling that NASA will probably forgo another Taurus launch and try to launch OCO2 with some other form of launch vehicle.  I know I would; the reliability of the Taurus XL platform is checkered.  Honestly, the Minotaur IV would look to be a more proven and more reliable option.

I'm sure we'll get more information as the investigation continues, but I think Taurus' days are numbered...
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mr. mark on 03/04/2011 04:44 PM
"Since 2001, inclusive, there have been nine U.S. launch vehicle failures.  Six of these were failures to reach orbit.  Those six included the first three Falcon 1 launches and three of the four Taurus launches performed during that period". 

The major difference being the first 3 Spacex Falcon 1 launches were test flights. Flight 4 was also a test flight which delivered a dummy payload to orbit. Only flight five was considered operational and delivered Raksat to orbit for Malaysia. As far as we know Falcon 1E has been discontinued in favor of payload deliveries aboard Falcon 9. That would bring an end to the Falcon 1 line. Falcon 9 so far has a 100% track record of achieving orbit. COTS 1/ Falcon 9 carried a small number of nanosatellites to orbit as well as Spacex's Dragon Spacecraft. Included were the first U.S. Army nanosatellite, Space and Missile Defense Command - Operational Nanosatellite Effect, or SMDC-ONE, for a 30-day mission, the CubeSat Experiment (QbX), provided by the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, also expected to remain in orbit for only 30 days.

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: kevin-rf on 03/04/2011 04:51 PM
Since 2001, inclusive, there have been nine U.S. launch vehicle failures.  Six of these were failures to reach orbit.  Those six included the first three Falcon 1 launches and three of the four Taurus launches performed during that period.

I assume of the three that made orbit you are counting the Delta IV Heavy Demo and Atlas NRO L-30 as two of the failures that made orbit.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/04/2011 05:00 PM
As far as we know Falcon 1E has been discontinued in favor of payload deliveries aboard Falcon 9. That would bring an end to the Falcon 1 line.

That decision may be reviewed after today's events.  A prolonged or even permanent stand-down of Taurus-XL would open up a crack in the small-sat market that F-1e can exploit.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Danderman on 03/04/2011 05:05 PM
As far as we know Falcon 1E has been discontinued in favor of payload deliveries aboard Falcon 9. That would bring an end to the Falcon 1 line.

That's a fairly spectacular claim, but the latest SpaceX manifest doesn't even show a Falcon IE test flight anymore.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 03/04/2011 05:05 PM
"Since 2001, inclusive, there have been nine U.S. launch vehicle failures.  Six of these were failures to reach orbit.  Those six included the first three Falcon 1 launches and three of the four Taurus launches performed during that period". 

In total, there have been 40 launch failures during that period, so the US accounts for 22.5% of those, and Taurus 7.5%.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mr. mark on 03/04/2011 05:09 PM
ORBCOMM satellites have been moved from Falcon 1E launches to Falcon 9 as reported last fall at spacenews.com. There are no planned flights for the Falcon 1E as far as anyone outside of Spacex knows.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/04/2011 05:11 PM
I assume of the three that made orbit you are counting the Delta IV Heavy Demo and Atlas NRO L-30 as two of the failures that made orbit.

Correct.  And Columbia, of course.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: RocketEconomist327 on 03/04/2011 05:11 PM
Sad day for Orbital, NASA, and all spaceflight fans.   :'(

VR
RE327
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: racshot65 on 03/04/2011 05:18 PM
Sad to see a vehicle fail reminds us how hard this really is

I assume it was insured ?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 03/04/2011 05:29 PM
Sad to see a vehicle fail reminds us how hard this really is

I assume it was insured ?

Nope, US Gov't self insures
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: TitanFan on 03/04/2011 05:30 PM
My shot of the launch taken from a church parking lot about 10 miles away.

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/04/2011 05:33 PM
Honestly, the Minotaur IV would look to be a more proven and more reliable option.

The Minotaur has government furnished equipment in it and is therefore not a commercial launch vehicle.  It requires a waiver any time it is used.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: pummuf on 03/04/2011 05:37 PM
The Orbital fairing has the nose cone on one fairing half and a receiving cut-out in the other. Is this typical for fairing design, or are most fairings a more symmetrical clam-shell design?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: William Graham on 03/04/2011 05:58 PM
ORBCOMM satellites have been moved from Falcon 1E launches to Falcon 9 as reported last fall at spacenews.com. There are no planned flights for the Falcon 1E as far as anyone outside of Spacex knows.

The SpaceX launch schedule still lists one flight, in 2014, carrying a payload for Astrium.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Danderman on 03/04/2011 06:00 PM
Honestly, the Minotaur IV would look to be a more proven and more reliable option.

The Minotaur has government furnished equipment in it and is therefore not a commercial launch vehicle.  It requires a waiver any time it is used.

I don't suppose that its difficult for NASA to obtain a waiver to fly on a DoD Minotaur, as opposed to their congressionally mandated requirement to fly commercial.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/04/2011 06:08 PM
There are also the Athena launch vehicles, which are set to return to service in 2012.

My condolences to the Orbital Sciences team. I like you guys.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/04/2011 06:17 PM
"Since 2001, inclusive, there have been nine U.S. launch vehicle failures.  Six of these were failures to reach orbit.  Those six included the first three Falcon 1 launches and three of the four Taurus launches performed during that period". 

In total, there have been 40 launch failures during that period, so the US accounts for 22.5% of those, and Taurus 7.5%.

Keeping in mind that the U.S. has only accounted for about 28% of world-wide orbital launches during that time.  In terms of launch reliability since 2000 inclusive, Europe is best at 0.97 (75 launches (2 failures)), followed by China (0.96) (79(3)), the U.S. (0.96) (212(9)), Russia/Ukraine (0.94) (328(21)), and Japan (0.92, but over only 25 launches).  India, Israel, and Iran combined for 6 successes in 13 launches.  Note that I placed both of South Korea's failed launches in the Russian-Angara category.

As a company, Orbital has 25 success in 27 orbital launch attempts since 2000 inclusive.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Statement from Kentucky Space on Failed Launch
Post by: Danderman on 03/04/2011 06:50 PM
http://uknow.uky.edu/content/statement-kentucky-space-failed-launch

"Statement from Kentucky Space: "Kentucky Satellite-1, developed by Kentucky Space (KS), did not achieve orbit this morning due to a failure with the NASA launch and satellite deployment vehicle. All systems on KySat-1 appeared to be operating perfectly. KS will be talking with NASA to further evaluate the mission and explore new launch options.

Kentucky Space successfully reached space on a NASA rocket with Frontier-1 in March 2010. KS, along with its strategic partner NanoRacks LLC, is designing and flying regular scientific research experiments to the International Space Station. A number of additional upcoming satellite missions are in the launch queue.
"
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: robertross on 03/04/2011 06:50 PM
Sad news, for Orbital, the science community, and those that worked to build the satellite & cubesats. I hope they can get another made and flown (successfully).

And thanks for the coverage folks.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bolun on 03/04/2011 07:12 PM
                                             Orbital's Launch of Taurus XL Rocket is Unsuccessful
                 
                                                 -- NASA's Glory Satellite Fails to Achieve Orbit --

(Dulles, VA 4 March 2011) -- Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB) today announced that the launch of its Taurus XL rocket, which lifted off earlier today at 2:09 a.m. (PST), from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California carrying the company-built Glory satellite for NASA, was unsuccessful. 

Preliminary indications are that the rocket’s payload fairing, a clamshell mechanism that encases the satellite as it travels through the atmosphere, failed to separate from the rocket. The previous time a Taurus XL rocket was launched was in 2009 for NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) mission. That launch also resulted in a failure due to a fairing separation problem. Since that time Orbital redesigned and tested the fairing separation system. 

Orbital will immediately convene a failure investigation board that will include representative from the company and NASA to determine the cause of today’s launch failure. Orbital believes that it is likely that sufficient data was gathered to be able to determine the cause of the fairing separation failure.
 
About Orbital

Orbital develops and manufactures small- and medium-class rockets and space systems for commercial, military and civil government customers. The company’s primary products are satellites and launch vehicles, including low-Earth orbit, geosynchronous-Earth orbit and planetary exploration spacecraft for communications, remote sensing, scientific and defense missions; human-rated space systems for Earth-orbit, lunar and other missions; ground- and air-launched rockets that deliver satellites into orbit; and missile defense systems that are used as interceptor and target vehicles. Orbital also provides satellite subsystems and space-related technical services to U.S. Government agencies and laboratories.

More information about Orbital can be found at http://www.orbital.com

http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=769
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/04/2011 07:21 PM
Quote from SFN:

"John Brunschwyler, Orbital's Taurus program manager, said last month that engineers not only revamped the fairing, but also made upgrades in the rocket's structures, electrical and guidance systems, and ordnance charges."

The irony is, after 2 years of review and redesign, the (other) subsystems of this latest Taurus were probably more reliable than ever.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: NotGncDude on 03/04/2011 10:56 PM
Sad to see a vehicle fail reminds us how hard this really is

I assume it was insured ?

Nope, US Gov't self insures

Was this a "process error"?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/04/2011 11:16 PM
Sad to see a vehicle fail reminds us how hard this really is

I assume it was insured ?

Nope, US Gov't self insures

Was this a "process error"?

Please, can we not play that pointless game again?

Clearly there was not enough known about the Taurus/OCO failure 2 years ago to allow anyone to pinpoint the root cause. So no one knows whether or not that was a design problem or a process problem.

And this time around, even if there's now enough telemetry to pinpoint the root cause, the horse (or his bullish relative) has already left the barn and died a painful death.

How about a few days of silence in respect for the loss before we start in again with the blame game, even if only in jest?

Seriously, some fine people just had their guts ripped out.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 03/04/2011 11:51 PM
Orbital believes that it is likely that sufficient data was gathered to be able to determine the cause of the fairing separation failure.

Oh, please let it be true!  Both Orbital and the community at large will be able to learn from this if it is.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Patchouli on 03/05/2011 07:00 AM
I'm surprised they did not put a camera on this rocket since it was a return to flight.

If they had video footage it may show details that may not be evident in the other telemetry data.

Maybe they need to switch contractors for the fairing separation hardware.

Hopefully they can get a replacement sat built if a spare has not already been built.

The good news the second sat supposedly is much cheaper then the first one.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: GClark on 03/05/2011 07:55 AM
I was under the impression that this was already a re-purposed spacecraft bus.  Wasn't it the former VCL?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: bobthemonkey on 03/05/2011 11:15 AM
Correct.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsavian on 03/05/2011 11:50 AM
Rereading the OCO report just reconfirms my feeling at the time that there was no certainty involved in finding root cause and the language of the report was fair in stating that. The question then arises why risk a $400m satellite on something you are not certain about without even a relatively cheap $30-$40m test launch to prove the modifications ?

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/369037main_OCOexecutivesummary_71609.pdf

The MIB was unable to determine which component or subcomponent was the direct cause for the fairing not to separate, but identified a number of hardware components whose failure modes could be potential causes: fairing base ring frangible joint, electrical subsystem and the pneumatic system hot gas generator (HGG) including its pressure cartridges. The potential causes with specific recommendations are summarized below.

It could not be determined if the frangible joint base ring fractured completely as designed. An incomplete fracture could have resulted in the fairing not separating.

It could not be determined if the transient bus supplied sufficient electrical current to initiate the required ordnance devices. Insufficient current could have resulted in an insufficient quantity of ordnance devices firing causing the fairing not to separate.

It could not be determined if the fairing pneumatic system supplied sufficient pressure to separate the fairing.

It could not be determined if the FCDC snagged on the frangible joint side rail nut plate preventing the fairing from separating.


The Shuttle guys take a lot of flak, even from their own Administrator recently !!, for taking their time in solving problems but you just know when they say they have found root cause they have with duplications of failure mode and demonstration of successful correction, so there are lessons to be learned from them about professionalism in space operations rather than just the sneering abuse they seem to get from the commercial crowd and their fans about how expensive/unproductive they supposedly are which I would dispute as well considering what the Shuttle gives you in its entire functionality.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 03/05/2011 12:13 PM

1.  a relatively cheap $30-$40m test launch to prove the modifications ?


2.  The Shuttle guys take a lot of flak, even from their own Administrator recently !!, for taking their time in solving problems but you just know when they say they have found root cause they have with duplications of failure mode and demonstration of successful correction, so there are lessons to be learned from them about professionalism in space operations rather than just the sneering abuse they seem to get from the commercial crowd and their fans about how expensive/unproductive they supposedly are which I would dispute as well considering what the Shuttle gives you in its entire functionality.

1.  test launch would not prove things

2.  They are not an example to follow.  Challenger and Columbia
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsavian on 03/05/2011 12:18 PM
A test launch wouldn't prove the fairing would open when requested ? As to Challenger/Columbia engineers were over ruled in both cases by management. Not sure if Columbia could have been saved but at least they could have tried if they had taken the data seriously.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 03/05/2011 12:30 PM
A test launch wouldn't prove the fairing would open when requested ? As to Challenger/Columbia engineers were over ruled in both cases by management. Not sure if Columbia could have been saved but at least they could have tried if they had taken the data seriously.

That can be done on the ground.  As for the shuttle, I was referring to flying with defects which caused the problems
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mrryndrsn on 03/05/2011 01:07 PM
Rereading the OCO report just reconfirms my feeling at the time that there was no certainty involved in finding root cause and the language of the report was fair in stating that. The question then arises why risk a $400m satellite on something you are not certain about without even a relatively cheap $30-$40m test launch to prove the modifications ?

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/369037main_OCOexecutivesummary_71609.pdf

The MIB was unable to determine which component or subcomponent was the direct cause for the fairing not to separate, but identified a number of hardware components whose failure modes could be potential causes: fairing base ring frangible joint, electrical subsystem and the pneumatic system hot gas generator (HGG) including its pressure cartridges. The potential causes with specific recommendations are summarized below.

It could not be determined if the frangible joint base ring fractured completely as designed. An incomplete fracture could have resulted in the fairing not separating.

It could not be determined if the transient bus supplied sufficient electrical current to initiate the required ordnance devices. Insufficient current could have resulted in an insufficient quantity of ordnance devices firing causing the fairing not to separate.

It could not be determined if the fairing pneumatic system supplied sufficient pressure to separate the fairing.

It could not be determined if the FCDC snagged on the frangible joint side rail nut plate preventing the fairing from separating.


The Shuttle guys take a lot of flak, even from their own Administrator recently !!, for taking their time in solving problems but you just know when they say they have found root cause they have with duplications of failure mode and demonstration of successful correction, so there are lessons to be learned from them about professionalism in space operations rather than just the sneering abuse they seem to get from the commercial crowd and their fans about how expensive/unproductive they supposedly are which I would dispute as well considering what the Shuttle gives you in its entire functionality.

They should edit their summary report better. It refers to two halves of the fairing shell, a 90 degree half, stretching from 0 to 180 degrees, and a 270 degree half, stretching from 180 to 360 degrees. That must take some doing.
I hope the 270 degree "half" didn't get hung up on the spacecraft.

Murray Anderson
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsavian on 03/05/2011 03:04 PM
A test launch wouldn't prove the fairing would open when requested ? As to Challenger/Columbia engineers were over ruled in both cases by management. Not sure if Columbia could have been saved but at least they could have tried if they had taken the data seriously.

That can be done on the ground.  As for the shuttle, I was referring to flying with defects which caused the problems

Exact flight fairing separation conditions may be a bit tough to mimic accurately on the ground.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 03/05/2011 03:13 PM


Exact flight fairing separation conditions may be a bit tough to mimic accurately on the ground.

They just have to separate.  The issue isn't separation dynamics.   Don't need to fly an airplane to see if the landing gear will deploy
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 03/05/2011 03:32 PM
They just have to separate.  The issue isn't separation dynamics.   Don't need to fly an airplane to see if the landing gear will deploy

I agree with you about the fairing, but this isn't a good analogy.  There have been many, many cases of airplane landing gear working perfectly on the ground while on jacks and then failing in flight due to vibration, aerodynamics or other causes.  In fact, just a few weeks ago the pilot of Rare Bear (John Penney) told us a story of just such a case on his airplane and showed us images of the gear failing in flight, in both directions (didn't go all the way up, and wouldn't go back out at first).

http://www.kbvp.com/Photo/rare-bear-right-landing-gear-failure-reno-national-championship-air-race-and-airshow-2008+
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 03/05/2011 03:40 PM
They just have to separate.  The issue isn't separation dynamics.   Don't need to fly an airplane to see if the landing gear will deploy

I agree with you about the fairing, but this isn't a good analogy.  There have been many, many cases of airplane landing gear working perfectly on the ground while on jacks and then failing in flight due to vibration, aerodynamics or other causes.  In fact, just a few weeks ago the pilot of Rare Bear (John Penney) told us a story of just such a case on his airplane and showed us images of the gear failing in flight, in both directions (didn't go all the way up, and wouldn't go back out at first).

http://www.kbvp.com/Photo/rare-bear-right-landing-gear-failure-reno-national-championship-air-race-and-airshow-2008+

I knew that would come up.  But the landing gear initially still moved.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Nittany Lion on 03/05/2011 03:51 PM
Rereading the OCO report just reconfirms my feeling at the time that there was no certainty involved in finding root cause and the language of the report was fair in stating that. The question then arises why risk a $400m satellite on something you are not certain about without even a relatively cheap $30-$40m test launch to prove the modifications ?

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/369037main_OCOexecutivesummary_71609.pdf

The MIB was unable to determine which component or subcomponent was the direct cause for the fairing not to separate, but identified a number of hardware components whose failure modes could be potential causes: fairing base ring frangible joint, electrical subsystem and the pneumatic system hot gas generator (HGG) including its pressure cartridges. The potential causes with specific recommendations are summarized below.

It could not be determined if the frangible joint base ring fractured completely as designed. An incomplete fracture could have resulted in the fairing not separating.

It could not be determined if the transient bus supplied sufficient electrical current to initiate the required ordnance devices. Insufficient current could have resulted in an insufficient quantity of ordnance devices firing causing the fairing not to separate.

It could not be determined if the fairing pneumatic system supplied sufficient pressure to separate the fairing.

It could not be determined if the FCDC snagged on the frangible joint side rail nut plate preventing the fairing from separating.


The Shuttle guys take a lot of flak, even from their own Administrator recently !!, for taking their time in solving problems but you just know when they say they have found root cause they have with duplications of failure mode and demonstration of successful correction, so there are lessons to be learned from them about professionalism in space operations rather than just the sneering abuse they seem to get from the commercial crowd and their fans about how expensive/unproductive they supposedly are which I would dispute as well considering what the Shuttle gives you in its entire functionality.

They should edit their summary report better. It refers to two halves of the fairing shell, a 90 degree half, stretching from 0 to 180 degrees, and a 270 degree half, stretching from 180 to 360 degrees. That must take some doing.
I hope the 270 degree "half" didn't get hung up on the spacecraft.

Murray Anderson

The "90" and "270" refer to the centerline of the two halves. 
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: jimvela on 03/05/2011 03:58 PM
They should edit their summary report better. It refers to two halves of the fairing shell, a 90 degree half, stretching from 0 to 180 degrees, and a 270 degree half, stretching from 180 to 360 degrees. That must take some doing.
I hope the 270 degree "half" didn't get hung up on the spacecraft.

[disclaimer:  I don't know the coordinate system used by OSC].

There isn't anything what you reference that is inconsistent.  If one half comes off along the 90° line, with the start of that half at 0° and the end at 180°.  The other, then, comes off along the 270° line and obviously would stretch from 180° to 360°.

In other words, one fairing half separates and falls away centered on 90°.  The other half separates and falls away centered on 270°.

I don't see any problem with that description.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/05/2011 04:09 PM


Exact flight fairing separation conditions may be a bit tough to mimic accurately on the ground.

They just have to separate.  The issue isn't separation dynamics.   Don't need to fly an airplane to see if the landing gear will deploy

A ground test is good only to the extent that it also applies all of the maximum flight shock and g-loads prior to fairing separation.  I'm also wondering about thermal and acoustic loading effects, not to mention vacuum.  The rocket must be doing something damaging to itself - to the separation hardware  - between T-0 and the fairing separation command.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mrryndrsn on 03/05/2011 09:59 PM
Rereading the OCO report just reconfirms my feeling at the time that there was no certainty involved in finding root cause and the language of the report was fair in stating that. The question then arises why risk a $400m satellite on something you are not certain about without even a relatively cheap $30-$40m test launch to prove the modifications ?

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/369037main_OCOexecutivesummary_71609.pdf

The MIB was unable to determine which component or subcomponent was the direct cause for the fairing not to separate, but identified a number of hardware components whose failure modes could be potential causes: fairing base ring frangible joint, electrical subsystem and the pneumatic system hot gas generator (HGG) including its pressure cartridges. The potential causes with specific recommendations are summarized below.

It could not be determined if the frangible joint base ring fractured completely as designed. An incomplete fracture could have resulted in the fairing not separating.

It could not be determined if the transient bus supplied sufficient electrical current to initiate the required ordnance devices. Insufficient current could have resulted in an insufficient quantity of ordnance devices firing causing the fairing not to separate.

It could not be determined if the fairing pneumatic system supplied sufficient pressure to separate the fairing.

It could not be determined if the FCDC snagged on the frangible joint side rail nut plate preventing the fairing from separating.


The Shuttle guys take a lot of flak, even from their own Administrator recently !!, for taking their time in solving problems but you just know when they say they have found root cause they have with duplications of failure mode and demonstration of successful correction, so there are lessons to be learned from them about professionalism in space operations rather than just the sneering abuse they seem to get from the commercial crowd and their fans about how expensive/unproductive they supposedly are which I would dispute as well considering what the Shuttle gives you in its entire functionality.

They should edit their summary report better. It refers to two halves of the fairing shell, a 90 degree half, stretching from 0 to 180 degrees, and a 270 degree half, stretching from 180 to 360 degrees. That must take some doing.
I hope the 270 degree "half" didn't get hung up on the spacecraft.

Murray Anderson

The "90" and "270" refer to the centerline of the two halves. 
Makes sense.

Murray Anderson
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/06/2011 05:25 PM
It could not be determined if the transient bus supplied sufficient electrical current to initiate the required ordnance devices. Insufficient current could have resulted in an insufficient quantity of ordnance devices firing causing the fairing not to separate.

Just back from VAFB and I must comment on this. The MIB is demonstrably wrong here. I *proved* to a NASA engineering review board that the transient bus did supply sufficient current to the EEDs, and the pyro driver unit did properly direct the necessary current (plus margin) to the EEDS.

OCO was not lost due to an electrical failure. Of that I am dead certain.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: FinalFrontier on 03/06/2011 05:39 PM
Well this is too bad. Was unaware of the failure until I checked the site today and found this thread. Looks like they still have problems to solve with this LV.

Guess its sort of like spacex going through growing pains with the F1 in the early days. Hopefully they don't have a third failure, however, and can now resolve this.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/06/2011 06:10 PM
This was the third Taurus failure.  T6, T8 and now T9.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: yinzer on 03/06/2011 08:12 PM
Over the last ten years, Taurus has flown four times and failed three of them.  I wonder if this flight rate is just too low to sustain reliable operations.  In retrospect we'd have come out ahead paying extra to fly these satellites on a Delta II that would almost certainly of worked.

The Minotaur IV is also looking appealing, although it would require some sort of waiver due to the use of surplus military components.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: robertross on 03/06/2011 08:32 PM
Over the last ten years, Taurus has flown four times and failed three of them.  I wonder if this flight rate is just too low to sustain reliable operations.  In retrospect we'd have come out ahead paying extra to fly these satellites on a Delta II that would almost certainly of worked.

The Minotaur IV is also looking appealing, although it would require some sort of waiver due to the use of surplus military components.

I'm sorry, but that's bogus. There's a problem with PLF deployment, nothing more. If we were seeing issues here and there, in different systems, then I *might* consider something like that, but this is just one of those disappointments that they will be able to come away with a more robust system.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/07/2011 02:49 AM
$700M+ in disappointments?  That's a lot of Delta II infrastructure that could've been paid for.  But, hindsight is 20-20.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Patchouli on 03/07/2011 03:00 AM
Over the last ten years, Taurus has flown four times and failed three of them.  I wonder if this flight rate is just too low to sustain reliable operations.  In retrospect we'd have come out ahead paying extra to fly these satellites on a Delta II that would almost certainly of worked.

The Minotaur IV is also looking appealing, although it would require some sort of waiver due to the use of surplus military components.

I'm sorry, but that's bogus. There's a problem with PLF deployment, nothing more. If we were seeing issues here and there, in different systems, then I *might* consider something like that, but this is just one of those disappointments that they will be able to come away with a more robust system.

I wonder the if the PLF deployment issues are related to the high Max Q on this vehicle or maybe due to vibration induced damage to the structure and or pyrotechnics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkqfO_dAh10
Look how it leaves the pad.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/07/2011 04:13 AM
The rocket must be doing something damaging to itself - to the separation hardware  - between T-0 and the fairing separation command.

Not necessarily. There is also the pedigree of the parts involved to consider. There still exists the potential to fly with components of insufficiently vetted pedigree. The rigor applied to tracking the history of production for a component on an ELV  is not the same as that applied to  a component used on a human rated vehicle.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/07/2011 04:38 AM


I wonder the if the PLF deployment issues are related to the high Max Q on this vehicle or maybe due to vibration induced damage to the structure and

Look how it leaves the pad.

That Castor 120 Stage 0 is a beast. I seem to recall that the Stage 0 guidance algorithm has to do active control of the stack's first bending mode (via. Stage 0 TVC) in order not to exceed structural limits.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 03/07/2011 05:10 AM
Does anybody know if a fairing separation test was performed as part of the OCO investigation?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/07/2011 02:54 PM
The rocket must be doing something damaging to itself - to the separation hardware  - between T-0 and the fairing separation command.

Not necessarily. There is also the pedigree of the parts involved to consider. There still exists the potential to fly with components of insufficiently vetted pedigree. The rigor applied to tracking the history of production for a component on an ELV  is not the same as that applied to  a component used on a human rated vehicle.

It could be both.  It could be that a good part can survive the flight shocks, but a borderline part, a part that passes all ground testing, does not survive the flight shocks.

Wouldn't the parts pedigree have been exhaustively reviewed after the OCO loss?  I suspect that the entire system was exhaustively reviewed. 

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kim Keller on 03/07/2011 06:41 PM
It could be both.  It could be that a good part can survive the flight shocks, but a borderline part, a part that passes all ground testing, does not survive the flight shocks.

That should only hold true if qual testing was not done to proper levels.

Quote
Wouldn't the parts pedigree have been exhaustively reviewed after the OCO loss?  I suspect that the entire system was exhaustively reviewed. 

It can only be reviewed to the extent that records were kept and still exist. That's why I mentioned the differentiation between the pedigree of HR components versus ELV components.

And I think at this point I'd better shut up and avoid further discussion of T9.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/07/2011 08:45 PM
It could be both.  It could be that a good part can survive the flight shocks, but a borderline part, a part that passes all ground testing, does not survive the flight shocks.

That should only hold true if qual testing was not done to proper levels.

Quote
Wouldn't the parts pedigree have been exhaustively reviewed after the OCO loss?  I suspect that the entire system was exhaustively reviewed. 

It can only be reviewed to the extent that records were kept and still exist. That's why I mentioned the differentiation between the pedigree of HR components versus ELV components.

Low launch numbers (only 9) divided by length of program (going on 17 years since first flight and 22 years since contract signing) must equal some number of interest here.   ;)

Consider that the Cold War was still on when Taurus was first devised.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: butters on 03/08/2011 01:42 AM
There are some unconfirmed reports that Glory reentered very close to the island of Rikitea in French Polynesia and alarmed quite a few inhabitants by lighting up the night sky and making loud noises. It's unlikely and yet to be proven that debris actually landed on the island, but apparently the French and Tahitian governments are a bit upset about this incident.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/09/2011 05:32 PM
There are some unconfirmed reports that Glory reentered very close to the island of Rikitea in French Polynesia and alarmed quite a few inhabitants by lighting up the night sky and making loud noises. It's unlikely and yet to be proven that debris actually landed on the island, but apparently the French and Tahitian governments are a bit upset about this incident.

Here's a report from www.tahiti-infos.com, dated March 4, translated from French by Google, with a little help from me to correct some obvious errors:

"According to numerous testimonies from the inhabitants of the island of Rikitea, in the Gambier archipelago, it is likely that the craft was crashed in the vicinity of the island .. Indeed, according to police, residents saw great beams of light in the sky, and heard a loud noise "like a huge clap of thunder!". Witnesses said they heard a heavy impact shake the ground, which suggests that a portion of the debris crashed on the island. An investigation is under way on the ground. . For the moment no damage was found."

According to Wikipedia, Rikitea is actually a village on the island of Mangareva in the Gambier Islands group in French Polynesia.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ugordan on 03/09/2011 05:34 PM
Witnesses said they heard a heavy impact shake the ground, which suggests that a portion of the debris crashed on the island.

More likely a sonic boom than something crashing into the ground and producing earth shaking noise.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Kabloona on 03/09/2011 06:03 PM
Witnesses said they heard a heavy impact shake the ground, which suggests that a portion of the debris crashed on the island.

More likely a sonic boom than something crashing into the ground and producing earth shaking noise.

Agreed. I remember the first time I heard a Shuttle land at Edwards, and the double sonic boom sure felt like a ground-shaker. I imagine that's the first sonic boom ever heard in Rikitea, so not surprising if they were a little freaked out.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/09/2011 09:28 PM
RELEASE: 11-071

NASA NAMES MISHAP BOARD FOR TAURUS XL LAUNCH FAILURE INVESTIGATION

WASHINGTON -- NASA has selected the members of the board that will
investigate the unsuccessful March 4 launch of the Glory spacecraft.
Bradley C. Flick, director of the Research and Engineering
Directorate at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards,
Calif., will lead the mishap investigation board.

Flick is responsible for the technical and administrative management
of the directorate's engineering workforce at Dryden. He also has
served as Dryden's chief engineer and was responsible for providing
independent technical guidance and oversight to flight projects.

The board has six other voting members:
-- LeRoy E. Cain, deputy manager, Space Shuttle Program, NASA's
Johnson Space Center, Houston
-- Daniel Dorney, supervisory aerospace engineer, NASA's Marshall
Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
-- Todd Hinkel, lead, Johnson Space Center Pyrotechnics Group
-- Stacey Nakamura, chair, Johnson Space Center Safety and Engineering
Review Panel
-- Air Force Capt. Benjamin Califf, deputy chief, Space Launch
Section, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, N.M.
-- Barbara Kanki, research psychologist, NASA's Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, Calif.

The ex-officio member is Christopher Nagy, safety and mission
assurance manager at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The
ex-officio member assures board activity conforms to NASA procedural
requirements.

The board began its investigation Wednesday. Members will gather
information, analyze the facts, identify the failure's cause or
causes and identify contributing factors. The board will make
recommendations to the NASA administrator to prevent similar
incidents.

The Glory spacecraft failed to reach orbit after liftoff aboard a
Taurus XL rocket on March 4 at 5:09 a.m. EST from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in southern California.

For more information about the Glory Taurus XL launch and
investigation, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/glory

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: robertross on 03/10/2011 01:01 AM
wow, LeRoy Cain is part of the team
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/10/2011 03:52 AM
Some interesting contrasts with the OCO MIB... No KSC people on the board itself (and Nagy spent more of his career at JSC and DFRC), one non-NASA.

Quote
Rick Obenschain, deputy director at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., will lead the mishap investigation board.

The board consists of four other voting members:
-- Jose Caraballo, safety manager at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
-- Patricia Jones, acting chief of the Human Systems Integration Division in the Exploration Technology Directorate at NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif.
-- Richard Lynch, Aerospace Systems Engineering, Goddard Space Flight Center
-- Dave Sollberger, deputy chief engineer of the NASA Launch Services Program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The ex officio member is Ruth Jones, Safety and Mission Assurance manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Freddie on 03/19/2011 02:47 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: mlorrey on 03/31/2011 05:48 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.


I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Downix on 03/31/2011 06:00 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.


I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.
SpaceX did, many times.  It's part of the business.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 03/31/2011 07:27 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.

I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.

It's probably because Orbital has a much longer track record compared to SpaceX.  Yes, there are these two Taurus-XL failures, and I remember that Pegasus was unreliable for quite a while.  However, this needs to be offset against the reliability of Minotaur, which is so reliable that NRO are using the type, which is the 'gold standard' of US space launch.

It will take a few years of routine ops before SpaceX are well-established enough to be able to shake off something like this without loud public criticism from the politicians and community.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 03/31/2011 06:59 PM
It's also a vast difference between Taurus XL and Falcon 1 to Taurus II and Falcon 9.  This failure is still being talked about quite a bit around the industry.  Silence in the interwebs doesn't imply a lack of attention.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Zed_Noir on 04/01/2011 12:03 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.

I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.

It's probably because Orbital has a much longer track record compared to SpaceX.  Yes, there are these two Taurus-XL failures, and I remember that Pegasus was unreliable for quite a while.  However, this needs to be offset against the reliability of Minotaur, which is so reliable that NRO are using the type, which is the 'gold standard' of US space launch....


It's my understanding the last Taurus XL launch used the payload fairing from the Minotaur IV.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Downix on 04/01/2011 12:25 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.

I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.

It's probably because Orbital has a much longer track record compared to SpaceX.  Yes, there are these two Taurus-XL failures, and I remember that Pegasus was unreliable for quite a while.  However, this needs to be offset against the reliability of Minotaur, which is so reliable that NRO are using the type, which is the 'gold standard' of US space launch....


It's my understanding the last Taurus XL launch used the payload fairing from the Minotaur IV.
Wouldn't fit.  Minotaur's fairing is the wrong size.  What they did do was use portions of the Minotaur's fairing separation system for the Taurus XL, on the calculation that the separation system is what failed.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Zed_Noir on 04/01/2011 01:12 AM
An article from Space News dated 3/18/2011 and titled "Taurus XL Failure Investigation Could Delay TacSat-4 Launch" can be read at http://www.spacenews.com/military/20110318-taurus-delay-tacsat-4-launch.html.

I am curious as to the utter lack of talk around here about Orbital Sciences "failure" and its impact on commercial manned space flight. If SpaceX had suffered a similar failure, the critics would be having a field day.

It's probably because Orbital has a much longer track record compared to SpaceX.  Yes, there are these two Taurus-XL failures, and I remember that Pegasus was unreliable for quite a while.  However, this needs to be offset against the reliability of Minotaur, which is so reliable that NRO are using the type, which is the 'gold standard' of US space launch....


It's my understanding the last Taurus XL launch used the payload fairing from the Minotaur IV.
Wouldn't fit.  Minotaur's fairing is the wrong size.  What they did do was use portions of the Minotaur's fairing separation system for the Taurus XL, on the calculation that the separation system is what failed.

You are correct for the last launch. But the Minotaur 92 inch fairing is available for the Taurus XL and used twice previously. The last time was for the launch of ROCSAT-2 in 2004.

Curious, all Taurus XL failed launches uses the 63 inch fairing.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: apollolanding on 04/04/2011 08:58 PM
I hate logging on and seeing a mission failure.  Having worked 15+ years in aviation, I know first hand the pain of seeing something that's not supposed to come down in an uncontrolled manner do so (worst non-fatal being V-22 June 1991)  Gut wrenching for all involved.  Looks to be a pedigreed MIB so hopefully they get to the root cause.  While dreams and hopes may have been dashed, no lives were lost and as such, "educated and informed" speculation on an internet message board isn't so inappropriate.  I learn a lot from the educated guesses by industry experts on this site.   
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ugordan on 04/21/2011 09:23 PM
Orbital’s Launch Failure Review Nears Conclusion (http://www.spacenews.com/launch/110421-orbital-launch-failure-review-nears-conclusion.html) - Space News

Quote
Orbital Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson said during the call that the company is nearing a conclusion of the investigation — NASA has a separate panel looking at what happened — and expects to be able to “focus on corrective actions and a go-forward plan by the end of this month. The fairing problem that occurred is one we think we have a pretty good understanding of. We need to complete some additional testing this week and next week to confirm we are on the right track.”
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 05/05/2011 03:53 PM
FWIW, I strongly recommend a no-payload dry run of the post-modification vehicle this time.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jose on 05/17/2011 08:08 PM
FWIW, I strongly recommend a no-payload dry run of the post-modification vehicle this time.

It looks like Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Sciences Division, agrees with you:

http://spacenews.com/civil/110516-nasa-add-delta2-list-launchers.html

Quote
Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Sciences Division, said NASA has lost nearly $700 million in Earth science payloads to Taurus XL over the past two years. In a May 11 interview Freilich said he would like to see the rocket fly successfully before putting another Earth-monitoring probe atop it.

“I would go more than recertified, personally,” he told Space News. “I would go demonstrated.”

Absent a demo flight, “I don’t know what anybody would say about how [we] were good stewards of the taxpayer money if we had a third consecutive launch vehicle failure; $693 million-worth of payload has gone down between the two,” Freilich said...

Bad news, this.

EDIT: Fixed it for Jim


Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: rdale on 05/17/2011 08:16 PM
Bad news, this.

Isn't it good news that they're keeping Taurus as an option?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jose on 05/17/2011 09:02 PM
How is Orbital going to pay for the demo flight? They're millions of dollars, no?

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: ugordan on 05/17/2011 09:09 PM
They don't have to pay for it. Absent of another customer willing to take its chances on that flight, they aren't obliged to do anything. In that case NASA will be most reluctant to fly anything on the vehicle again. And NASA at least seems to be putting this vehicle on ice, at least for the time being:

Quote
In April the agency stopped payments on a Taurus XL launch vehicle contract with Orbital Sciences for a February 2013 re-flight of the OCO satellite, dubbed OCO 2.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lee Jay on 05/17/2011 09:12 PM
FWIW, I strongly recommend a no-payload dry run of the post-modification vehicle this time.

Why is a dry run required of the second one and not the first one?  Is a full-up test flight required to test this or can a full-scale test on a vibration table, in a thermal vacuum chamber, or whatever is appropriate sufficient to test whatever failed?

How can these questions be answered without knowing the detailed results of the failure analysis?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Art LeBrun on 05/17/2011 09:14 PM
Bad news, this.

Isn't it good news that they're keeping Taurus as an option?
Yes but bad news that modern methods haven't prevented a second failure unless you are sure it was a QA or workmanship issue.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Rocket Science on 05/17/2011 09:17 PM
After two failures in a row, I was wondering since the CCDev-2 awards if it had any politcal impact consideration for Orbital's proposal. What would the public think NASA giving them cash, even though the two programs were not connected.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 05/17/2011 10:56 PM
For all of the second guessers out there, it's not like a test flight wasn't considered after T8/OCO.  The highest levels of NASA weighed the additional cost and schedule needed to do it and decided the cost-benefit wasn't there.  Obviously they were wrong, but risk management is what every executive team does.  Hindsight is always 20-20.  I'm not sure how the calculus is different because it's happened twice.  It's a dictum of Decision Analysis that sunk costs do not enter into the cost-benefit calculation.  To do otherwise is not rational.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 05/18/2011 12:30 AM


It looks like NASA agrees with you:

http://spacenews.com/civil/110516-nasa-add-delta2-list-launchers.html

Quote
Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Sciences Division, said NASA has lost nearly $700 million in Earth science payloads to Taurus XL over the past two years. In a May 11 interview Freilich said he would like to see the rocket fly successfully before putting another Earth-monitoring probe atop it.

“I would go more than recertified, personally,” he told Space News. “I would go demonstrated.”

Absent a demo flight, “I don’t know what anybody would say about how [we] were good stewards of the taxpayer money if we had a third consecutive launch vehicle failure; $693 million-worth of payload has gone down between the two,” Freilich said...

Bad news, this.




That is not "NASA" , it is one person's opinion.  NASA has yet to decide on this
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: FinalFrontier on 05/18/2011 12:40 AM
This whole affair has made me really unhappy with Orbital as a company. Thats two failures because of the same thing. In a row. At least spacex's early pains were separate issues but Orbital has been around for quite some time. I just hope the COTS rocket they are developing does not experience the same kinds of issues.


Frankly have alot more faith in Spacex at this point.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: robertross on 05/18/2011 12:56 AM
This whole affair has made me really unhappy with Orbital as a company. Thats two failures because of the same thing. In a row. At least spacex's early pains were separate issues but Orbital has been around for quite some time. I just hope the COTS rocket they are developing does not experience the same kinds of issues.


Frankly have alot more faith in Spacex at this point.

HAHA....That's too funny.

I actually put more faith in Orbital. This situation is the business: these things can (and have) happened. That's life, you fix it, and move on. As long as a company can weather these times, it only makes them stronger in the long run.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: FinalFrontier on 05/18/2011 01:00 AM
This whole affair has made me really unhappy with Orbital as a company. Thats two failures because of the same thing. In a row. At least spacex's early pains were separate issues but Orbital has been around for quite some time. I just hope the COTS rocket they are developing does not experience the same kinds of issues.


Frankly have alot more faith in Spacex at this point.

HAHA....That's too funny.

I actually put more faith in Orbital. This situation is the business: these things can (and have) happened. That's life, you fix it, and move on. As long as a company can weather these times, it only makes them stronger in the long run.

True enough. I do hope they get it this time. On a related note: I can't wait for the first T 2 launch. Its going to be very exciting.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 05/18/2011 01:31 AM
This whole affair has made me really unhappy with Orbital as a company. Thats two failures because of the same thing. In a row. At least spacex's early pains were separate issues but Orbital has been around for quite some time. I just hope the COTS rocket they are developing does not experience the same kinds of issues.

Frankly have alot more faith in Spacex at this point.

Orbital's experience is anything but unique.  Failure, sometimes in consecutive form, has visited all of the launch providers.  SpaceX, for example, had three of them in a row.  Two Centaurs failed in close order during the 1990s.  Two kick motors failed during the same Shuttle mission during the 1980s.  Three consecutive Cape Canaveral Titan IV missions failed during the 1990s.  Lockheed Martin suffered a very similar payload separation failure with Athena a few years back. 

It may very well turn out that both Taurus XL failures were not caused by the "same thing".  Remember that fairing separation system changes were made after the first failure.  The changes may have solved one problem but created another problem.  Or not.  We'll see. 

I would put my payload inside Orbital's next payload fairing without hesitation.  The next one won't fail (at least not the fairing separation part of the flight).  Heck, the odds of a restarted-production Delta 2 failure might be higher.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: yinzer on 05/18/2011 04:46 AM
For all of the second guessers out there, it's not like a test flight wasn't considered after T8/OCO.  The highest levels of NASA weighed the additional cost and schedule needed to do it and decided the cost-benefit wasn't there.  Obviously they were wrong, but risk management is what every executive team does.  Hindsight is always 20-20.  I'm not sure how the calculus is different because it's happened twice.  It's a dictum of Decision Analysis that sunk costs do not enter into the cost-benefit calculation.  To do otherwise is not rational.

Surely it's not the cost that has changed, but the perceived benefit of a test flight.  Which depends on how likely you think Orbital is right when they say "We found the fairing separation problem from the last flight, fixed it, and now have a design that works."

After T8 there was no real reason to doubt this statement.  After T9 we are in a "this time it's different" situation.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: baldusi on 05/18/2011 11:38 AM
How similar are the Taurus 2 fairing and the Taurus XL? Because they do have a Demo Flight for Taurus 2 without a payload.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Downix on 05/18/2011 03:32 PM
This whole affair has made me really unhappy with Orbital as a company. Thats two failures because of the same thing. In a row. At least spacex's early pains were separate issues but Orbital has been around for quite some time. I just hope the COTS rocket they are developing does not experience the same kinds of issues.


Frankly have alot more faith in Spacex at this point.
That is funny.

Orbital did not have enough data after the first one.  They guessed what the mistake was, and corrected that mistake.  They guessed wrong.  But, for this flight they included a lot more sensors so that, if something did happen, they'd have more data so as to implement a fix.

That is how a professional company does things.  They fix what they think is a problem, but they hedge their bet by making sure if it happens again, they will nail down the root cause.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: baldusi on 05/18/2011 04:00 PM
They had stated that the accident board had completed the findings and was about to disclose the failure cause. But nothing came of it. Any news?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 05/18/2011 06:40 PM
There were/are separate NASA and Orbital investigation boards for both of these failures, as well as many NASA and Orbital return to flight executive review meetings where both sides bought into the cause and corrective action.  It's not proper to leave NASA out of the blame process (cf. "Orbital did not have enough data after the first one," and "how likely you think Orbital is right when they say").  NASA was wrong too.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: yinzer on 05/18/2011 07:10 PM
There were/are separate NASA and Orbital investigation boards for both of these failures, as well as many NASA and Orbital return to flight executive review meetings where both sides bought into the cause and corrective action.  It's not proper to leave NASA out of the blame process (cf. "Orbital did not have enough data after the first one," and "how likely you think Orbital is right when they say").  NASA was wrong too.

OK.  NASA now has less confidence in their ability to judge the reliability of a Taurus launch following a failure than they did before T9 dropped Glory into the ocean.  Their newfound lack of confidence means that a test launch now offers more benefit, perhaps enough to outweigh the cost.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: A_M_Swallow on 05/18/2011 11:15 PM
Is there any way of testing a moving fairing without having to blast it into space?

Could a cheaper rocket, such as a sounding rocket, be used?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Rocket Science on 05/18/2011 11:21 PM
Is there any way of testing a moving fairing without having to blast it into space?

Could a cheaper rocket, such as a sounding rocket, be used?
Well, I got a few SRB's laying around here, I guess I could get you one for a good price... Let's talk money;)
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 05/19/2011 12:23 AM
Is there any way of testing a moving fairing without having to blast it into space?

Could a cheaper rocket, such as a sounding rocket, be used?

no, because
A.  It would cost just as much to engineer a stand in that provides the same aerodynamic pressure, loads, dynamics, etc
b.  it would fail the policy: test like you fly.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: dsmillman on 08/19/2011 04:40 PM
It has been nearly six months since the mishap board was appointed.  Has it issued a report?  Is there any additional information available on this failure?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsman2020 on 02/12/2012 11:54 PM
11 months and no MIB report or executive summary.

NASA is required under their own regulations for mishap investigations to release an executive summary and a version of the full report with ITAR/proprietary information removed (the latter was not done for OCO, in violation of NASAs policy). 
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/13/2012 01:02 AM
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/369037main_OCOexecutivesummary_71609.pdf

Here's your sign.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: rdale on 02/13/2012 01:33 AM
Antares - that looks like the OCO summary, not Glory. Link check?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/13/2012 03:49 PM
Right.  The previous poster said it wasn't done for OCO.  The link refutes that.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: rdale on 02/13/2012 04:29 PM
That looks like the executive summary, not the a version of the full report with ITAR/proprietary information removed that he was referring to with OCO.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsman2020 on 02/13/2012 04:48 PM
Right.  The previous poster said it wasn't done for OCO.  The link refutes that.

OCO was a Class A mishap.  Per NPR 8621.1B (http://nodis3.gsfc.nasa.gov/displayDir.cfm?t=NPR&c=8621&s=1B), "NASA Procedural Requirements for Mishap and Close Call Reporting, Investigating, and Recordkeeping", the following products must be produced for a Class A Mishap investigation:

Quote
1.7.1 The investigating authority shall conduct an investigation and include the following products in the mishap report according to the requirements listed in Figure 5:

a Investigating authority and ex officio signatures per paragraph 6.1.9 and 6.1.10 (Requirement).

b Each advisor's signature per paragraph 6.1.11 (Requirement).

c. List of the investigating authority's consultants (Requirement 44310).

d. An executive summary that does not contain privileged or proprietary information, material subject to the Privacy Act, ITAR information, or EAR information (Requirement 44311).

e. The OSHA Final Mishap Summary (OSHA 301 Form: Injury and Illness Incident Report, or an equivalent form), if the mishap is an OSHA recordable incident (Requirement 44312).

f. Description of the type of data gathered and evaluated during the investigation (Requirement 44313).

g. Narrative description of the facts including what, when, and where (Requirement 44314).

h. Timeline (Requirement 44315).

i. Description of all structured analysis techniques used and how they contributed to determining the findings (Requirement 44316).

j. Event and causal factor tree or similar graphical representation of the mishap (Requirement 44317).

k. Description explaining why the mishap/close call occurred including all finding(s) such as proximate cause(s), root cause(s), contributing factor(s), failed barrier(s), observation(s), and the evidence upon which the findings are based (Requirement 44318).

l. Conclusions and recommendations (Requirement 44319).

m. Minority report, if there is one (Requirement 44320).

The report must be prepared in the following format:
Quote
6.1.3 The mishap report shall be technically accurate; properly documented; easily understood; have traceability between facts, findings, and recommendations; and include the products required in Figure 5 in this NPR, in the following order:

a. Section 1: Signature page(s), list of consultants, executive summary, and OSHA summary (when applicable) (Requirement 44631).

Note: The OSHA summary goes in Section 1. The OSHA 301 Form or equivalent should be placed in the Appendix rather than Section 1 with the summary.

b. Section 2: Narrative description and facts (what, when, where, how) (Requirement 44632).

c. Section 3: Type of data gathered and data analysis (level of detail and products dependent upon Figure 5 in this NPR) (Requirement 44633).

d. Section 4: Finding(s) (Requirement 44634).

e. Section 5: Recommendation(s) (Requirement 44635).

f. Section 6: Minority Report(s) (Requirement 44636).

The report must be reviewed for public release:
Quote
6.4.2 Within 10 workdays of the request, the Export Administrator, OPA, Office of Protective Services, Procurement, and legal counsel shall review the mishap report and specify in writing which sections of the mishap report are authorized for public release (Requirement 44684).

NASA states the following:
Quote
NASA has completed the agency’s assessment of the OCO MIB report.  The report is NASA-sensitive, but unclassified (SBU), because it contains company proprietary information; the report also contains information restricted by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR).  As a result, the OCO mishap investigation report was deemed
not releasable to the public.

How could items (a) - Investigating authority and ex officio signatures, (b) - adviser's signatures, (c) - list of consultants, (d) - executive summary with no proprietary/ITAR information*, (f) - f. Description of the type of data gathered and evaluated during the investigation contain any proprietary/ITAR information???

*The publicly released summary is not formatted or numbered as if it were an actual section of the MIB report.

The CONTOUR failure involved an ATK STAR30 motor which was embedded inside the CONTOUR spacecraft.  A large amount of ATK proprietary information was part of the investigation. Look at what they released compared to the OCO summary - http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/52352main_contour.pdf

There are no signatures, no names, nothing in that OCO summary.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 11/20/2012 11:15 AM
I'm surprised that they actually found the REAL cause of the failure!  :o

http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx?plckController=Blog&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&plckPostId=Blog%3a04ce340e-4b63-4d23-9695-d49ab661f385Post%3abcb6c326-46f0-44ef-a0ea-334de6a1e090 (http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx?plckController=Blog&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&plckPostId=Blog%3a04ce340e-4b63-4d23-9695-d49ab661f385Post%3abcb6c326-46f0-44ef-a0ea-334de6a1e090)
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: AnalogMan on 02/20/2013 09:58 PM
NASA Releases Glory Taurus XL Launch Failure Report Summary
RELEASE : 13-050   February 20, 2013

WASHINGTON -- NASA has released a summary report on findings from a panel that investigated the unsuccessful 2011 launch of the agency's Glory spacecraft.

The satellite, designed to improve our understanding of Earth's climate, was lost March 4, 2011, when it failed to reach orbit after launch aboard an Orbital Sciences Corp. Taurus XL rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

A mishap investigation board led by Bradley C. Flick, director of the Research and Engineering Directorate at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif., determined the Taurus launch vehicle's fairing system failed to open fully and caused the mishap. The fairing is a clamshell nosecone that encapsulates the satellite as it travels through the atmosphere.

The mishap investigation board was not able to identify the definitive cause for the fairing system failure, but it did recommend ways to prevent future problems associated with the joint system that makes up the fairing. NASA and Orbital are continuing to investigate the fairing system.

The summary report provides an overview of the mishap investigation board's findings. The board's complete report is not available for public release because it contains information restricted by U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations and information proprietary to the companies involved. The summary is available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/728836main_T9_MIB_Public_Release_Summary.pdf (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/728836main_T9_MIB_Public_Release_Summary.pdf)
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsman2020 on 02/21/2013 02:02 AM
The recommendations for corrective action in that MIB report are word-for-word almost identical to recommendations made by the NASA Engineering Safety Center *eleven months* *before* the Glory failure.

Technical recommendations of the NASA Engineering Safety Center in NESC-RP-10-00630, "Assess Qualification of the Taurus
Fairing Frangible Joint System", dated 05/27/2010 (I encourage anyone who is interested to file a FOIA request for the document, as I did.  It is very interesting.)

Quote
Recommendations
1. The team recommends that the Glory mission not fly until the frangible joint system is adequately qualified per existing project requirements for its intended-use environments (i.e., using flight-like test conditions and current flight-like hardware).  This recommendation is based on the following evidence:
a. The LSP considers this system as “not qualified.”
b. The multiple NASA SMA re-qualification recommendations from those involved in the Pegasus and Taurus systems over the years.
c. The MIB report that stated “complete separation of the base ring frangible joint could not be concluded” and “the base ring frangible joint cannot be eliminated as a potential intermediate cause for fairing separation failure” [ref. 2, p. 47].
d. The multiple issues associated with the 2002 test.
a. Differences in fracture separation widths between front and back.
b. The possibility of unfractured frangible joints.
c. The small sample size of the testing.
d. Shock environment.
e. Non-initiated end of the test segments and the “sleeve” were not flight-like.
e. The lack of documentation of adequate dual manifold shock/vibration testing.
f. The OSC analysis of unfractured joints (all locations not considered).
g. The Ensign-Bickford “Go Forward Plan” where they recommended further testing to understand the numerous issues of the 2002 test.

2.  Recommendations to adequately qualify the frangible joint system:
a. Develop finite element fracture stress model.
b. Update unfractured ligament analysis on top of the frangible joint rail.
c. Review the number of qualification tests to ensure adequate confidence levels in the test results.
d. Address the concerns related to shock environment testing documented in this white paper.
e. Ensure adequate ELAT testing to meet requirements of accepted standards.
g. Conduct qualification testing on the dual-input manifold.

3. Develop a system-level model of the fairing deployment system in order to systematically identify and evaluate additional risk factors and evaluate potential failure scenarios where multiple individual risks are coupled.  Candidate systems analysis tools include, but are
not limited to, FMEA, state transition diagrams, and PRA.



Technical recommendations of the Glory MIB, post-failure on 03/04/11:
Quote
1. Orbital should establish frangible joint system manufacturing process controls sufficient to assure that variability in materials properties and hardware component dimensions, within both maximum and minimum
tolerances, will not invalidate design performance requirements.

2.  An extensive failure analysis (for example, detailed fault tree or failure mode analysis) of the Taurus frangible joint design should be performed.

3.  Design and implement a qualification and test activity for the Taurus frangible joint system based on the results of an extensive failure analysis (for example, detailed fault tree or failure mode analysis) and with consideration for the environments in which the joint is operated.

“The MIB believes that if this recommendation were implemented, it could address all the possible frangible failure scenarios identified in the investigation.”
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/21/2013 04:25 AM
Why didn't you stop the Glory launch then?

Second guesses and $3.50 will get you a latte.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsman2020 on 02/21/2013 06:09 AM
Why didn't you stop the Glory launch then?

Second guesses and $3.50 will get you a latte.

Why didn't the NESC folks whose names are on the signature page of that report stop it?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: LouScheffer on 02/21/2013 02:22 PM
Why didn't you stop the Glory launch then?

Second guesses and $3.50 will get you a latte.
The more interesting question is why neither Orbital itself, nor the customer stopped the launch.  It's major egg on your face to lose two launches in a row to the same reason (as the saying goes, intelligence is not avoiding mistakes, it's avoiding making the same mistake twice).

So Orbital must have been absolutely convinced they knew what the problems was, or at least had it narrowed down to the point they could guarantee it would not recur.  Of course in this case they were wrong, but it would be very interesting to see the reasoning and presentations they used to convince both themselves and and the customer it was safe to launch.  This itself could form part of a safety analysis, as part of an overall flow could involve questions such as "Did the review board come to a conclusion?  Were the conclusions right?  Were the recommendations followed?" and so on.  Nonetheless, I expect because the personal and corporate embarrassment factors, these documents will never see the light of day.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 02/21/2013 02:32 PM
See AC-70 and AC-71
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: LouScheffer on 02/21/2013 03:13 PM
See AC-70 and AC-71
Here's a whole article on these two failures, and how the first review board got it wrong and they diligently fixed the wrong problem.  It places the blame squarely on private industry and says the best practice is have the government run the reviews:
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1321/1

Here the problem appears different - it's not that the review board identified the wrong problem, it's that the recommendations were not completely followed.  As the article states, normally the review board states a whole slew of fixes to make sure the problem will not recur.  Here, Orbital used a different set of fixes, which they presumably thought sufficient, but were not.  From an engineering view, this makes sense - there may be many ways to fix a problem in addition to the ones the review board outlined.  This may even make capitalist sense if the launch provider is on the hook if the failure re-occurs.  But from a customer point of view, it seems that if the manufacturer chooses a different set of fixes than those recommended by the review board, you would want to demand the review board re-convene and sign off on the new fixes.   It appears NASA didn't do that....
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Lar on 02/21/2013 03:52 PM
See AC-70 and AC-71
Here's a whole article on these two failures, and how the first review board got it wrong and they diligently fixed the wrong problem.  It places the blame squarely on private industry and says the best practice is have the government run the reviews:
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1321/1

Here the problem appears different - it's not that the review board identified the wrong problem, it's that the recommendations were not completely followed.  As the article states, normally the review board states a whole slew of fixes to make sure the problem will not recur.  Here, Orbital used a different set of fixes, which they presumably thought sufficient, but were not.  From an engineering view, this makes sense - there may be many ways to fix a problem in addition to the ones the review board outlined.  This may even make capitalist sense if the launch provider is on the hook if the failure re-occurs.  But from a customer point of view, it seems that if the manufacturer chooses a different set of fixes than those recommended by the review board, you would want to demand the review board re-convene and sign off on the new fixes.   It appears NASA didn't do that....

Fascinating article. Thanks for the link! I drew different conclusions than you did, though... I think that railroading through your view of the answer, ignoring test results, and then taking credit where it isn't due aren't necessarily things that happen only in private industry.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Jim on 02/21/2013 04:28 PM
See AC-70 and AC-71
Here's a whole article on these two failures, and how the first review board got it wrong and they diligently fixed the wrong problem.  It places the blame squarely on private industry and says the best practice is have the government run the reviews:
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1321/1


No, it says to run the reviews like the govt.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: edkyle99 on 02/21/2013 07:29 PM
Something to keep in mind here is that no one really knows, with absolute certainty, how the fairing failures actually occurred in detail.  Investigators may think they know, with a high degree of certainty even, but they cannot be sure.  No debris was recovered.  Even this recommended frangible joint certification business may have nothing to do with the real problem, or maybe it does.  Maybe they fixed the wrong problem, but that doesn't mean that they won't now go ahead and fix another wrong problem!

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/21/2013 07:35 PM
Everything is a cost-benefit.  Chicken Littles can demand all kinds of checks and tests, but:
Does the spacecraft want to stay on the ground that long?
How much will the tests cost?
Are the tests even possible?
Are the tests flight-like?
Will the test results be conclusive or will they raise more questions?

All of these things have to be weighed.  It's not like the managers making these decisions suddenly popped up as Program Managers, Associate Administrators and Chief Engineers.  Dozens of people make big decisions, fed with information from hundreds.  Once in a while they get the weights wrong.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: LouScheffer on 02/22/2013 03:42 AM
Everything is a cost-benefit.  Chicken Littles can demand all kinds of checks and tests, but:

Does the spacecraft want to stay on the ground that long?
How much will the tests cost?
Are the tests even possible?
Are the tests flight-like?
Will the test results be conclusive or will they raise more questions?

All of these things have to be weighed.[...]   Once in a while they get the weights wrong.
Note the results compared to the questions you asked:
Does the spacecraft want to stay on the ground that long?
 -No, but now it's on the bottom of the ocean, which is much worse
How much will the tests cost?
 -Much less than a new spacecraft
Are the tests even possible?
Are the tests flight-like?
 -Of course, you could launch a rocket with a dummy payload to check.  It's still (much) cheaper than a new satellite
Will the test results be conclusive or will they raise more questions?
  The actual results were certainly conclusive.

The point is there are procedures in place to help keep managers from using bad weights.  These procedures can work amazingly well when followed - despite strong weights for on-time service, profits, and so on, there have been no large airliner crashes in the US for a decade, despite the ever-present temptation to cut a few corners.  I personally find this amazing.

You can think of review boards, recommendations, and so on as a technology of their own, honed over many decades.  It is there is to prevent the same problem from happening again.  In this case it failed, in basically the same way a pump or other component can fail - it did not do the job it was tasked with.  The proper response, I think, would be to convene a failure board to investigate why the failure board did not work.  Failure boards often suggest managerial changes, and if the reason the first board did not work is that the suggestions were not followed, then the second board should make it more difficult for management to substitute their weights for the boards.

Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/22/2013 02:05 PM
You're implying that proper decision making procedures were not followed and doing so without evidence - other than a failed mission.  You state that the results were conclusive, when the MIB specifically says they weren't.

My point is that it is often cost prohibitive to know everything a priori, and people make the best decision with the information available, weighing all of the costs of that decision including the cost of a reflight times the estimated likelihood of failure.

As the initial press releases stated, there was a human factors expert on the MIB; yet there are no human factors recommendations made by the board.  One would infer that none of the human processes were broken.

There is no clear evidence of incompetence or pressure in what is public.  Some of the things appear that they could have been mitigated with greater government or prime contractor insight.  However, THAT IS A COST-BENEFIT DECISION that could drive recurring costs higher than losing 2% of your spacecraft.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: sdsds on 02/23/2013 08:07 PM
The proper response, I think, would be to convene a failure board to investigate why the failure board did not work.

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

How could one know that the failure mode that struck the first review board wouldn't also be present in the second board? Do you have any suspicions or assumptions about what caused the first board to fail?
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: LouScheffer on 02/24/2013 01:49 AM
The proper response, I think, would be to convene a failure board to investigate why the failure board did not work.

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

How could one know that the failure mode that struck the first review board wouldn't also be present in the second board? Do you have any suspicions or assumptions about what caused the first board to fail?
It's certainly theoretically possible that the second board could conclude they could not figure out why the first board did not work, or could come to wrong conclusion about what made it fail.

But I suspect, based only on human nature, that the cause might be pretty evident in retrospect.  In the Atlas case, one of the investigators had a particular theory they thought was responsible.  They fixed that possible cause, but missed another that turned out to be the real problem.  Likewise, I could easily imagine "cause A was deemed implausible, because of argument blah-blah-blah.  This argument was flawed because...", or "test B was difficult and expensive, and it was not clear that it would yield conclusive results, so instead they blah-blah-blah.  But this was not correct, because..."

So again, I have no personal knowledge of what happened.  But I know from a lifetime in engineering that if you have a problem, and it's *really* important that you fix it, and you are *certain* that you fixed it, and then it blows up again anyway, that it's worth taking a look back and see what you missed.  If nothing else, maybe it saves you from making the same mistake twice somewhere down the road.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: LouScheffer on 02/27/2013 12:12 PM
Aviation week has an article on the Glory failure.
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/asd_02_22_2013_p03-01-551139.xml
"Board Fails To Find Root Cause For Glory Loss"

The contents of the article are mainly that of the title, but it repeats the claim that NASA has not cleared the Antares shroud for flight to ISS.  I would assume, without knowing anything about it, that this was one of the main objectives of the first test flight of Antares.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: marsman2020 on 02/28/2013 02:05 AM
Aviation week has an article on the Glory failure.
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/asd_02_22_2013_p03-01-551139.xml
"Board Fails To Find Root Cause For Glory Loss"

The contents of the article are mainly that of the title, but it repeats the claim that NASA has not cleared the Antares shroud for flight to ISS.  I would assume, without knowing anything about it, that this was one of the main objectives of the first test flight of Antares.

The Taurus XL 63 inch fairing did fly successfully several times before the OCO and Glory failures.  One successful flight of an Antares fairing means diddly squat if it's declared "flightworthy" without actually being qualified for/to the relevant environments, either by test or a valid analysis with appropriate margins. 

Also all of the issues of manufacturing and assembly consistency and traceability have to be worked out, or again...one flight means diddly squat.  At least those should be easier with the flight rate on Antares compared to 9 flights in 17 years for Taurus XL...
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: docmordrid on 02/28/2013 02:21 AM
Space News sez the fairing separation system is being redesigned (headline only - paywall)

http://www.spacenews.com/article/orbital-redesigning-rocket-component-cited-in-failures
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: Antares on 02/28/2013 05:53 PM
The lack of comprehension of risk management is numbing.
Title: Re: FAILED: Taurus XL, GLORY - March 4, 2011 - VAFB
Post by: sdsds on 02/28/2013 06:11 PM
it's worth taking a look back and see what you missed.

Definitely! And not just what you missed, but why you missed it. The goal for a "review of the review" would be to gain some actionable intelligence. So for example, was there something sub-optimal in the way the board was initially constructed (i.e. how the members were chosen)? Was there something wrong with the statement of task they were given? Were they not provided with appropriate motivation? In short, the review of the review would need to answer the question, "How should someone construct, task, and motivate a board differently than was done for this one?"

If that discussion is taking place it would be interesting indeed to listen in on it!