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International Space Flight (ESA, Russia, China and others) => Suborbital Missions => Topic started by: Satori on 12/26/2007 12:27 pm

Title: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/26/2007 12:27 pm
Hi!

We could talk here about the suborbital launches that reach the edge of space or space itself without orbital velocity.

In the last days we had a RS-24 missile launch from GIK-1 Plesetsk and also a missile launch from the Tula submarine (was this a R-29RM missile?).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/26/2007 04:09 pm
If I´ve read all correctly, there were two launches from submarine Tula in the last days.
The first was on Dec, 17 and the second on Dec, 25. The rocket was called Sinewa or RSM-54.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/26/2007 04:19 pm
Quote
Olaf - 26/12/2007  5:09 PM

If I´ve read all correctly, there were two launches from submarine Tula in the last days.
The first was on Dec, 17 and the second on Dec, 25. The rocket was called Sinewa or RSM-54.

That's what I thought as well.

Does anyone know the times at which either of these launches were conducted?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/27/2007 11:06 am
Quote
GW_Simulations - 26/12/2007  11:19 AM

Does anyone know the times at which either of these launches were conducted?

I didn't managed to get the launch times.

Does any of you have the complete list of all the suborbital launches of 2007? I only have listed the launches made by missiles.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/27/2007 11:42 am
Quote
Satori - 27/12/2007  12:06 PM

Quote
GW_Simulations - 26/12/2007  11:19 AM

Does anyone know the times at which either of these launches were conducted?

I didn't managed to get the launch times.

Does any of you have the complete list of all the suborbital launches of 2007? I only have listed the launches made by missiles.

Jonathan listed quite a few back in August, see http://host.planet4589.org/space/jsr/back/news.585

The Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_in_spaceflight has quite an extensive listing as well, but a complete list is virtually impossible since a lot of these launches are never announced.



Incase anyone is interested, here is an (incomplete) list of planned sub-orbital launches for 2008. Most of the launches are US, because I'd already listed them for the US launch schedule. I'll try to add more launches for other countries later:

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission
2-15 January - Black Brant XII - Andøya - 04:00-10:00 - SCIFER-2
January - Black Brant IX - White Sands -01:00-08:00
January - Black Brant IX - White Sands -01:00-08:00
January - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - HotPay-2
January - RH-200 - Sriharikota - ??
1 February - Terrier - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - or March - SubTec-II
February - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-44
February - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-45
February (NET) - Minotaur II - Vandenberg - NFIRE-1B
March - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 13:00-21:00
March - Orion - Esrange - Rexus 5/6
1 April - FalconLAUNCH - Wallops - 00:00 - FL-VI
15 April (NET) - Black Brant IX - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - NGSP
25 April - Polaris/STARS - Kodiak - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 Target
25 April - GBI (THAAD??) - Vandenberg - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 ABM
April - VSB-30 - Esrange - Maser-11
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands
May - Black Brant IX - White Sands
23 June? - ALV - MARS - 00:00 - SOAREX-VI
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
1 July - Peregrine - Wallops
July - Black Brant IX - White Sands
September - Black Brant IX - White Sands
November - Nike/Orion - Esrange - MAPHEUS
November - Minuteman III - Vandenberg - GT-194GM
December - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - JCI-2
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/27/2007 02:00 pm
Here is my list for 2007 to date.  
 - Ed Kyle  
 
YEAR TO DATE MAJOR SUBORBITAL LAUNCH LOG 
      Suborbital Launches Using Booster Hardware Also Used
      for Orbital Launches
==================================================================================

DATE     VEHICLE            ID    PAYLOAD                MASS(t) SITE*    ORBIT**
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
01/11/07 DF-21/KT-1?              ASAT Test              0.4?    XC       SUB (1)
02/07/07 Minuteman 3              Glory Trip 193GM               VA LF10  SUB (2)
03/21/07 Minotaur 2 (MM2)   TLV5  SBX Target                     VA LF06  SUB (3)
05/29/07 RS-24 (Topol-M/MIRV)     ICBM Test                      PL       SUB (4)
06/28/07 R-30 (Bulava)            SLBM Test                      WH       SUB (5)
08/07/07 R-29R                    SLBM Test                      PO       SUB (6)
08/23/07 Minotaur 2 (MM2)   TLV7  MDA Test                       VA LF06  SUB (7)
09/28/07 OBV/GBI            OBV6  FT-3a MDA/GMD Intercept Test   VA LF23  SUB (8)
10/18/07 RS-12M (Topol)           ICBM Test                      PL       SUB (8.1)
10/29/07 UR-100NUTTH (SS-19)      ICBM Test                      TB Silo  SUB (9)
11/10/07 R-30 (Bulava)            SLBM Test                      WH      [FSO](9.1)
12/08/07 RS-12M (Topol)           ICBM Test                      KY       SUB (10)
12/17/07 R-29RM(RSM-54)(Sineva)   SLBM Test                      BA       SUB (11)
12/25/07 R-29RM(RSM-54)(Sineva)   SLBM Test                      BA       SUB (11)
12/25/07 RS-24 (Topol-M/MIRV)     ICBM Test                      PL       SUB (4)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(1)  Suborbital ASAT launch test destroyed China's FY-1C weathersat in
    843 x 862km x 98.8 deg orbit.  First China ASAT success after four
    reported failures.
(2)  ICBM test to Kwajalein Atoll.  Missile pulled from active duty in silo at
    Minot AFB, ND.
(3)  Midcourse Defense sensor target boosted by sixth "Minotaur 2", a 3-stage
    Minuteman 2 ICBM re-equipped with Pegasus avionics.
(4)  Warheads landed on Kamchatka range.  Announced to be first flights of new
    MIRV ICBM missile type from a mobile launcher at Plesetsk.  Believed to be a
    MIRV Topol-M variant.
(5)  First Bulava success after consecutive failures.  Launched from Dmitry
    Donsko nuclear submarine toward Kura test site on Kamchatka Peninsula.
(6)  R-29R SLBM test launched from submarine in Pacific Ocean to Barents Sea
    range (one report said to Kanin Peninsula, another said to Novaya Zemlya
    island).  Launched from K-211 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy.
(7)  Minotaur 2 (Modified Minuteman 2) launched to serve as sensor target for
    NFIRE satellite.  $25 million Missile Defense Agency test.
(8)  Intercepted Polaris/Stars target missile launched from Kodiak, Alaska.
(8.1) Test launch from Plestesk mobile launcher to Kura Test Range, Kamchatka.
(9)  Test launch from Baikonur silo toward Kura Test Range on Kamchatka Peninsula.
(9.1) FAILED SLBM test launch.  Failure during 1st stage shortly after launch.
(10) Test from Kapustin Yar mobile launcher to Sary Shagan test range, Kazakhstan.
(11) SLBM tests from submarine Tula in Barents Sea to Kura/Kamchatka.
=================================================================================
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/27/2007 09:12 pm
Cool! Thanks Ed!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/27/2007 10:12 pm
Here http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/ap-071217-brazil-launch.html is an information about a Brazilian launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/28/2007 08:07 am
Quote
GW_Simulations - 26/12/2007  11:19 AM

Does anyone know the times at which either of these launches were conducted?

According to http://russianforces.org/blog/2007/12/second_launch_of_r29rm_sineva.shtml the launch on Dec, 25 was on 10.00 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/28/2007 08:20 am
Quote
Olaf - 28/12/2007  9:07 AM

Quote
GW_Simulations - 26/12/2007  11:19 AM

Does anyone know the times at which either of these launches were conducted?

According to http://russianforces.org/blog/2007/12/second_launch_of_r29rm_sineva.shtml the launch on Dec, 25 was on 10.00 UTC.
Thanks
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/01/2008 03:44 pm
BB-XII/SCIFER launch from Andøya is scheduled for early tomorrow morning. Window opens at 04:00 and closes at 10:00 GMT.

Two BB-IX launches from White Sands are also imminent, however the exact dates for these are TBD.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/01/2008 03:57 pm
SCIFER-2 on launch ramp (imagem is from here (http://www.rocketrange.no/news/scifer-2-campaign-started))...

The campaign status are available here (http://www.rocketrange.no/campaigns/scifer-2/).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/02/2008 09:32 am
Launch window has closed for today. Still no news on whether a launch has occurred or not.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/02/2008 08:16 pm
Launch on 2 January was scrubbed due to lack of science, high winds, and telemetry problems. Next attempt will be 3 January.

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~aurora/scifer2.html

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/03/2008 09:22 pm
No news, so I'm assuming it was been scrubbed again. If anyone knows differently, please correct me.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/04/2008 12:11 am
For the record, there is some confusion over the launch window. NASA WFF published 04:00 - 10:00 GMT, however according to LRL, the window is 06:00 - 11:00. I would be inclined to go with the LRL figures.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/04/2008 08:29 pm
Launch was scrubbed again this morning. Next attempt will be 5 January, 06:00 - 11:00 GMT.
http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/05/2008 07:55 pm
Launch delayed again due to bad weather, science conditions have improved though, according to http://scifer2.blogspot.com/2008/01/ill-try-to-be-better-about-updates.html .

Next attempt will presumably be on 6 January in the same window.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/07/2008 06:39 pm
Scrubbed again on both Sunday and Monday. Next attempt will be Tuesday (8th), same window.

http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/07/2008 08:43 pm
Quote
GW_Simulations - 1/1/2008  10:44 AM

(...)
Two BB-IX launches from White Sands are also imminent, however the exact dates for these are TBD.

Any news about this launches??
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/08/2008 08:10 pm
SCIFER scrubbed again, but they are hopeful of a launch tomorrow, same window.
http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html

As for the two launches from WSMR, nothing yet. Usually there isn't much to go on with these until after they launch. I'm keeping an eye on the C810 homepage, and WFF ops schedule for any movement, but nothing yet, so we can assume the are still on the ground. I'm looking for more information. I do have daily launch windows, which are 01:00-08:00 GMT. The serial numbers for the rockets being used are 36.223 and 36.243. One (223) appears to be an astrophysics mission for the University of Wisconsin, the other (243) is for John Hopkin University. Not sure about content.


NASA has just released a sounding rockets programme newsletter, which is available from http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Rocket_Report_4th_quarter_07.pdf, which lists two further launches this month. These are both Terrier-Orions, believed to be NASA test flights, and are to launch from Wallops. They, however, are not listed on the Wallops launch schedule for this month, I am looking into it. Serial numbers are 12.065 and 12.066.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf is quite interesting.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/09/2008 08:30 pm
Scrubbed again. Now scheduled for 10 January. Same window.

Interestingly, they extended the window during this morning's attempt, I don't know if we can expect to see this again.

http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/10/2008 07:27 pm
Scrubbed again, weather forecast for the next couple of days doesn't look promising.
http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/11/2008 10:40 pm
Another scrub, but it looks good for tomorrow.

http://mirl.sr.unh.edu/scifer2_launch.html

One of the WSMR BBs has launched. I'll post more info when I have it. I think it was 243. Launch occurred at 05:32 GMT this morning.

http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/




Known sub-orbital launches in 2008:
Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - TBC
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/12/2008 11:22 am
Another scrub for SCIFER.
http://scifer2.blogspot.com/2008/01/update-for-saturday-jan-12-2008.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/13/2008 05:53 pm
No news yet on SCIFER for today, so I'm assuming it's been scrubbed again

Here's the current log and schedule for 2008.

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - 36.223

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
14? January - Black Brant XII - Andøya - 06:00-11:00 - SCIFER-2 - 40.021
January - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 01:00-08:00 - 36.223
January - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - HotPay-2
January - RH-200 - Sriharikota - ??
26 February - Mesquito - 13:00  - 21:30 - MLRS - 12.065
26 February - Mesquito - 13:00  - 21:30 - MLRS - 12.066
February - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-44
February - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-45
February (NET) - Minotaur II - Vandenberg - NFIRE-1B
17 March - Terrier - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - SubTec-II - 41.075
March - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 13:00-21:00 - 36.225
March - Orion - Esrange - Rexus 5/6
15 April - FalconLAUNCH - Wallops - 12:00-20:30 - FL-VI
25 April - Polaris/STARS - Kodiak - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 Target
25 April - GBI (THAAD??) - Vandenberg - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 ABM
April - VSB-30 - Esrange - Maser-11
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.221
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.240
May - Black Brant IX - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - NGSP - 39.008
May - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.226
23 June? - ALV - MARS - 00:00 - SOAREX-VI
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.213
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.219
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
1 July - Peregrine - Wallops
July - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.235
September - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.239
November - Nike/Orion - Esrange - MAPHEUS
November - Minuteman III - Vandenberg - GT-194GM
December - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - JCI-2
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/17/2008 01:43 pm
The following is a quote from the Jonathan's Space Report n. 590 issued on January 16th, and is about the launch of a a Black Brant IX Mod 2 sounding rocket from White Sands on January 11th. The Jonathan's Space Report is available here (http://www.planet4589.org/space/jsr/jsr.html) and the Jonathan's Space Pages are available here (http://www.planet4589.org/space/)

From JSR n. 590:

NASA 36.243UG
-------------

Stephan McCandliss reports that his far UV telescope and LIDOS UV
spectrograph have flown again, on sounding rocket NASA 36.243UG launched
at 0523:00 UTC on 2008 Jan 11. This was the first flight of a Black
Brant IX Mod 2 from White Sands. The Mod 2 uses a Mk 70 Terrier booster
and the new Black Brant Mk1 sustainer. The igniter for the Mk1 was recently
redesigned following the failure of NASA 40.17UE in 2006 Mar. This third
flight of LIDOS was targeted on the Orion Nebula, and the orbit was
around -6370 x 315 km.

End quote
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/17/2008 08:59 pm
Apparently there will be a Japanese sounding rocket launch on January 28th. The vehicle is the S-310-38 and I think the launch will take place from the Uchinoura Space Center at Kagoshima. I will try to get more information about this.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/17/2008 10:09 pm
SCIFER still hasn't launched, and they are running out of attempts.
http://scifer2.blogspot.com/


As for the BB-IX, NASA have finally published information on the launch. http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story80.html

Still no news on the other BB-IX.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/18/2008 07:05 am
Israel tested a ballistic missile yesterday.
http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Israel_test-fires_ballistic_missile_after_Iran_warning_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/18/2008 10:15 am
SCIFER-2 was launched on January 18th. More details soon!!!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/18/2008 12:14 pm
Images of SCIFER-2 launch from Andoya... Images available here (http://www.rocketrange.no/).... Info about the SCIFER-2 launch here (http://www.rocketrange.no/news/scifer-2-launched)!



Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/18/2008 04:20 pm
Known launches so far this year:

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - 36.223
17 January - Jericho - Palmachim - ?? - Missile
18 January - BB XII - Andøya - SCIFER-2/40.021
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: meiza on 01/18/2008 05:25 pm
That's one damn cool location for a launch site. The mountains are lighted by the rocket's glare.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/21/2008 12:51 pm
The HotPay2 launch campaign is about to start in Andoya. More information in here (http://www.rocketrange.no/news/hotpay2-campaign-about-to-start).

Launch will take place between January 29th and February 9th!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/28/2008 01:11 pm
The HotPay2 launch campaign has started in Andoya!!!!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 01/28/2008 04:18 pm
Here http://www.dlr.de/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-1/86_read-11365/ are information about the coming TEXUS launches.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/28/2008 04:56 pm
Any news on that S-310?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/28/2008 05:18 pm
Quote
GW_Simulations - 28/1/2008  11:56 AM

Any news on that S-310?

I think it was launched. See here (http://www.isas.ac.jp/j/topics/topics/2008/0124.shtml) (in japanese).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 01/28/2008 05:22 pm
Here http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html is an information in English.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/28/2008 07:52 pm
Quote
I think it was launched. See here (http://www.isas.ac.jp/j/topics/topics/2008/0124.shtml) (in japanese).
That still says "scheduled".

Quote
Here http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html is an information in English.
That launch was last year.

Still nothing concrete.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/28/2008 08:15 pm
Quote
GW_Simulations - 28/1/2008  2:52 PM

Quote
I think it was launched. See here (http://www.isas.ac.jp/j/topics/topics/2008/0124.shtml) (in japanese).
That still says "scheduled".

Still nothing concrete.

I can now confirm that the launch was delayed to January 31st at 0909:40UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 01/29/2008 05:16 am
Quote
That launch was last year.

Still nothing concrete.

Sorry, I don´t see the year.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/30/2008 06:51 pm
Quote
Olaf - 29/1/2008  6:16 AM
Sorry, I don´t see the year.

The first line of the article, just above the title, is "January 16, 2007 Updated".




No news on HotPay-2, so it has probably been delayed.

Tomorrow is the last day in the window for the second WSMR BB. Still no news on whether it has launched, so I am assuming that it has not.

According to http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=11680&posts=1&mid=236498#M236498 TEXUS launches are scheduled for 31 January, and 7 February.

So, that leaves us with the following schedule.
I think there is a good chance of something launching tomorrow:

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
31 January? - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 01:00-08:00 - 36.223
31 January - S-310 - Kagoshima - 09:09:40
31 January? - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - HotPay-2
31 January - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-44
7 February - VSB-30 - Esrange - Texus-45
26 February - Mesquito - 13:00  - 21:30 - MLRS - 12.065
26 February - Mesquito - 13:00  - 21:30 - MLRS - 12.066
February (NET) - Minotaur II - Vandenberg - NFIRE-1B
17 March - Terrier - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - SubTec-II - 41.075
March - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 13:00-21:00 - 36.225
March - Orion - Esrange - Rexus 5/6
15 April - FalconLAUNCH - Wallops - 12:00-20:30 - FL-VI
25 April - Polaris/STARS - Kodiak - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 Target
25 April - GBI (THAAD??) - Vandenberg - 20:00 - 00:00 - FTG-04 ABM
April - VSB-30 - Esrange - Maser-11
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.221
April - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.240
May - Black Brant IX - Wallops - 13:00-21:30 - NGSP - 39.008
May - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.226
23 June? - ALV - MARS - 00:00 - SOAREX-VI
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.213
June - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.219
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
June - Nike/Orion - Andøya - ECOMA
1 July - Peregrine - Wallops
July - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.235
September - Black Brant IX - White Sands - 36.239
November - Nike/Orion - Esrange - MAPHEUS
November - Minuteman III - Vandenberg - GT-194GM
December - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - JCI-2
TBD - RH-200 - Sriharikota - ??
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/30/2008 10:10 pm
From Boeing news release:

In a successful first test of its advanced fire control system, Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] Aegis Open Architecture Weapon System recently performed a successful missile firing from the U.S. Navy’s “USS Desert Ship” at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR).

This was the first test of upgrades to both the Aegis Fire Control System and the MK 41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) installed on the USS Desert Ship, the Navy’s land-based, live-fire test bed for surface-to-air weapons.  The platform is continually upgraded to meet the Navy’s live fire testing requirements.
.....



Are there any pictures of the "USS Desert Ship" and/or this firing? Any idea when the test took place?

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Jim on 01/31/2008 07:10 am
Weapon system tests are not really tracked on this.  The theme is Space launches
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/31/2008 02:43 pm
The launch of S-310-38 was delayed because the observation conditions were not good for launch. I will post more information when available.

Images from here (http://blog.livedoor.jp/h2a_f8/)...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/31/2008 04:19 pm
Quote
Jim - 31/1/2008  8:10 AM

Weapon system tests are not really tracked on this.  The theme is Space launches

In precident, spacegoing weapons tests (such as ICBMs, ABMs, ASATS, etc) are covered. The first post in the thread is a report of an RS-24 missile launch. I believe AEGIS is a spacegoing system.

We are currently in the launch window for HotPay-2, so hopefully we will get some information soon. No news on the Black Brant, so presumably that has been scrubbed.

Has anyone heard anything about TEXUS?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/31/2008 07:05 pm
Report from ARR that HotPay has launched. No information yet.
http://www.rocketrange.no/campaigns/hotpay2/index_html


Known launches so far this year:

Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - 36.223
17 January - Jericho - Palmachim - ?? - Missile
18 January - BB XII - Andøya - SCIFER-2/40.021
25 January - Shaheen-1 - Sonmiani - Missile
31 January - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - HotPay-2
?? January - SM-2 - WSMR - AEGIS


In other news, BB IX 36.223 has been delayed until March. Still nothing on TEXUS.

Further away, both Mesquito launches have slipped to 3 March,  and several BBs have been hit by knock-on delays from 223. I'll post a full schedule later or tomorrow, when we know what is going on with TEXUS.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/31/2008 08:58 pm
Quote
GW_Simulations - 31/1/2008  2:05 PM

Report from ARR that HotPay has launched. No information yet.
http://www.rocketrange.no/campaigns/hotpay2/index_html
(...)

Images of the HotPay-2 launch... Vehicle reached 380,6 km in altitude.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/31/2008 09:01 pm
Launch occurred at 19:14 GMT, apogee was 380.6 kilometres.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/01/2008 01:44 pm
TEXUS 44 was delayed due to weather http://www.dlr.de/rd/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4627/7628_read-11482/ (Sorry only in German).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/02/2008 09:46 am
I think TEXUS was delayed again.

http://www.nsd.se/artikel.aspx?artid=82996&cat=1&pageIndex=0&arkiv=False (in Sweedish).

I don't speak Sweedish, so can someone please check my translation.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/02/2008 12:53 pm
Yersterday it was delayed.
http://www.dlr.de/rd/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4627/7628_read-11484/

For today at the moment no information.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/03/2008 01:40 am
Scrubbed again, and TEXUS-45 has been delayed as well.

http://www.dlr.de/rd/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4627/7628_read-11485/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/03/2008 06:08 pm
The S-310-38 launch is now schedule for February 6th at 0914:40UTC...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/03/2008 10:35 pm
And TEXUS has been scrubbed again on weather.
http://www.dlr.de/rd/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4627/7628_read-11486
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/06/2008 04:25 pm
TEXUS scrubbed yesterday. They're probably counting down for today's attempt at the moment.

Iran launched a sounding rocket on 4 February, and Japan launched an S-310 at 09:14 this morning.

So far this year:
Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - 36.223
17 January - Jericho - Palmachim - ?? - Missile
18 January - BB XII - Andøya - SCIFER-2/40.021
25 January - Shaheen-1 - Sonmiani - Missile
31 January - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - HotPay-2
?? January - SM-2 - WSMR - AEGIS
04 February - Shahab-3? - Semnan - Kavoshgar-1
06 February - S-310 - Uchinoura - 09:14:40 Ionosphere
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/07/2008 02:14 pm
Any photos or description of the Japan S-310 launch? I didn't see anything on the JAXA web site.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/07/2008 02:36 pm
Quote
Yeknom-Ecaps - 7/2/2008  9:14 AM

Any photos or description of the Japan S-310 launch? I didn't see anything on the JAXA web site.

The only info I have is in japanese in this page (http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2008/02/20080206_s-310_j.html).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/07/2008 04:19 pm
TEXUS has launched.
http://www.dlr.de/rd/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4627/7628_read-11550

So far this year:
Date - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial
11 January - BB IX - WSMR - 05:32 - 36.223
17 January - Jericho - Palmachim - ?? - Missile
18 January - BB XII - Andøya - SCIFER-2/40.021
25 January - Shaheen-1 - Sonmiani - Missile
31 January - VS-30/Orion - Andøya - 19:14 - HotPay-2
?? January - SM-2 - WSMR - AEGIS
04 February - Shahab-3? - Semnan - Kavoshgar-1
06 February - S-310 - Uchinoura - 09:14:40 - Ionosphere
07 February - VSB-30 - Esrange - TEXUS-44
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/07/2008 06:13 pm
Nice work in this thread! Is it possible to identify the country or organization to which the payload belongs after it's designation and also the country from where the launches occur? the table could be:

Date - Launch Vehicle - Launch Site, Country - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial (Country)

...it's just an idea :)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/07/2008 06:38 pm
Quote
Yeknom-Ecaps - 7/2/2008  9:14 AM

Any photos or description of the Japan S-310 launch? I didn't see anything on the JAXA web site.

They don't show much, bet here are two images of the S-310-38 launch. Images credit: JAXA.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/07/2008 08:42 pm
Quote
Satori - 7/2/2008  7:13 PM

Nice work in this thread! Is it possible to identify the country or organization to which the payload belongs after it's designation and also the country from where the launches occur? the table could be:

Date - Launch Vehicle - Launch Site, Country - Time (GMT) - Mission/Serial (Country)

...it's just an idea :)

Something like this?

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.223 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/07/2008 09:14 pm
That looks very good! I think it will be a long list at the end of this year.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/07/2008 09:15 pm
Fantastic work!!!! Thank you very much!!!!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/10/2008 10:53 pm
Launch of VSB-30 / TEXUS-44 fom Esrange on 7 February was at 1130UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/11/2008 07:04 am
Are VS-30 and VSB-30 the same thing?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/11/2008 10:43 am
Quote
GW_Simulations - 11/2/2008  2:04 AM

Are VS-30 and VSB-30 the same thing?

No, the VS-30 is a single stage launch vehicle and VSB-30 is a two stage launch vehicle.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/11/2008 05:07 pm
TEXUS-45 was scheduled for launch today. Any news?

I've added the TEXUS-44 and SCIFER launch times to the log.
DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.223 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)


Has anyone heard anything about the Indian sounding launch that was scheduled for last month?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/15/2008 01:35 pm
Quote
GW_Simulations - 11/2/2008  12:07 PM

TEXUS-45 was scheduled for launch today. Any news?


According to http://www.dlr.de/rd/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4276/6859_read-9938/ the launch was scheduled on Feb, 12. But nothing heard.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Feramin on 02/15/2008 03:48 pm
Hello all together,

until now Texus 45 was not launched, due to bad weather condtions. The winds are to strong and blowing from the wrong direction.

The next try will be tomorrow morning, but the weather forecast indicates snowfall, so the payload couldn't be recovered.

It is more likely that the lauch will take place next week on wednesday or thursday.


Best regards
Miri (sitting at Esrange and waiting for her experiment to get weightlessness)

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/15/2008 04:20 pm
Quote
Feramin - 15/2/2008  4:48 PM

Hello all together,

until now Texus 45 was not launched, due to bad weather condtions. The winds are to strong and blowing from the wrong direction.

The next try will be tomorrow morning, but the weather forecast indicates snowfall, so the payload couldn't be recovered.

It is more likely that the lauch will take place next week on wednesday or thursday.


Best regards
Miri (sitting at Esrange and waiting for her experiment to get weightlessness)


Thanks. That is very useful information.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: s^3 on 02/16/2008 02:48 am
India to attempt suborbital missile launch next week.

From: Times of India:

Balasore: After successfully test-firing anti-ballistic missiles and the land version of the Agni series, Indian defence scientists are preparing to launch a ballistic missile from under water.
   The ballistic missile (SLBM) K-15 is to be test-fired from an underwater launcher, a replica of a submarine, next week.
   “The missile will be fired on February 24 or 25 from INS Kalinga, about 13 km from Vishakhapatnam,’’ a source at the integrated test range (ITR) at Chandipur-on-sea told TOI.
   “The missile will be fired from an underwater launcher 50 metres deep and about eight km from the coastline. Called Pontoon, the launcher has been designed by Electronics Corporation of India,’’ said the source, adding that a strategic missile with a strike range of up to 750 km will be used for the purpose.
   Developed by Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), K-15 is 8.5 metres tall and one metre wide. It has a launch weight of about 4.5 tonnes and uses solid propellant. Its payload is about 500 kg and it can be fitted with a nuclear warhead or conventional payload.
   “This missile is a Dhanush variant but launched from a submarine. It has both the versions — SLBM and SLCM (submarine-launched cruise missile). While cruise missile is a loose trajectory missile guided to its destination by an onboard computer, a ballistic missile has a high-trajectory and transcends the atmosphere to re-enter from above the targeted site,’’ said a defence scientist.
   The K-15 is in fact an advanced clone of the naval version of Prithvi and designed to be launched from a submarine and can be compared with the American Tomahawk. Although the missile has been tested twice earlier, it has only been “partially successful’’ because it reported trajectory deviation during its flight. “That’s all the more reason scientists are being cautious about its successful launch,’’ he said.  
 
============
S^3
 
 
 
   
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Feramin on 02/21/2008 05:16 am
Hello all together,

Texus 45 has finally launched this morning

21 February VSB-30 (BRA) Esrange (SWE)   06:15  TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)

Best regards
Miri
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/21/2008 09:13 am
Quote
Feramin - 21/2/2008  6:16 AM

Hello all together,

Texus 45 has finally launched this morning

21 February VSB-30 (BRA) Esrange (SWE)   06:15  TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)

Best regards
Miri

Congratulations.


DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.223 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)


I'll try and post an updated schedule later.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/21/2008 10:21 am
Okay, here are the updated list and schedule.

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
24-5 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)Missile (IND)
17 MarchMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.065 (USA)
17 MarchMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.066 (USA)
MarchBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.223 (USA)
MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
12 AprilVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
15 AprilFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
21 AprilTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
25 AprilPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)20:00-00:00FTG-04 Target
25 AprilGBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)20:00-00:00FTG-04 ABM
AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.240 (USA)
AprilNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
MayBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
MayBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
23 JuneALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
1 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
JulyBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
JulyBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-194GM
SeptemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
SeptemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
October/NovemberNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/21/2008 10:34 pm
Texus-45 launch image...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/26/2008 07:13 am
This morning, India successully launched a K-15 missile.
http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14610814

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)Missile (IND)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/28/2008 06:47 am
According to http://de.rian.ru/safety/20080227/100183336.html (sorry only in German) there will be two test launches of the RS-24 in 2008.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/29/2008 05:36 am
Here another article of this topic http://gzt.ru/politics/2008/02/27/175855.html.

According to this the Russian Strategic Rocket Forces will do eight sub-orbital launches in 2008.
The above mentioned two RS-24 (SS-X-29), even 1 RS-12M (SS-25), RS-18 (SS-19) and RS-20 (SS-18) and three not named missiles.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2008 01:25 pm
Student teams selected to take part in sounding rocket and balloon campaigns
 
12 March 2008
Following a workshop held 5-6 March at the European Space Technology and Research Centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands, 8 student teams from various ESA Member States and Co-operating States have been selected to fly their experiments on future sounding rocket and balloon campaigns.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM13AM5NDF_index_0.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/14/2008 06:25 am
According to the Vandenberg AFB website, a Minuteman III launch is scheduled for 2 April. http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/

I think "Space Launch Complex-3" is probably a mistake, perhaps LF-03 would be more likely.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/23/2008 05:58 pm
Here http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India_test-fires_Agni-1_missile/articleshow/2890590.cms is an information about an Indian launch today.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/28/2008 09:01 pm
An RH-200 was scheduled to launch from Andøya this morning. Does anyone have any news?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 03/31/2008 08:34 pm
With permission of Brian Webb ( http://www.spacearchive.info/ )

WEDNESDAY VANDENBERG LAUNCH

A Minuteman III missile is scheduled for launch from Vandenberg AFB early Wednesday morning, April 2nd. The ICBM is set to lift-off from its silo at northwest Vandenberg at, or shortly after, 01:00 PDT, the start of a six-hour launch window.

Following lift-off, the Minuteman will head west and fly an arc-shaped trajectory. Thirty minutes later the missile's payload, an unarmed reentry vehicle (warhead), will plunge back into the atmosphere and arrive at its target at Kwajalein, some 4,800 statute miles downrange.

If the weather is clear, the launch should be visible to the unaided eye as far away San Francisco, Sacramento, Reno, Las Vegas, and San Diego.

Because the launch is a military weapon system test, launch status and countdown audio probably will not be available to the general public.

For information about launch viewing and photography, please refer to the following pages:

http://www.spacearchive.info/vafbview.htm and http://www.spacearchive.info/vafbphoto.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 04/02/2008 11:42 am
The Minuteman III was successfully launched at 08:01 GMT. Launch was conducted from LF-09 at VAFB.

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123092616

Still no news on Mini-Dusty 15 (Scheduled for 26-28 March), so I'm assuming it has been delayed.

I'll endeavour to post a schedule update later
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 04/02/2008 02:09 pm
Here is an update to the suborbital launch log and schedule.

I suspect the UR-100 and R-36 launches are orbital, but I've added them anyway untill we know differently.

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
2 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
14 April (NET)Mesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.065 (USA)
14 April (NET)Mesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.066 (USA)
15 AprilFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
20-30 AprilAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)Missile (IND)
AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.240 (USA)
AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.223 (USA)
5 MayTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
16 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
1 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-194GM??
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/NovemberNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)20:00-00:00FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)20:00-00:00FTG-05 ABM
TBD?RH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 04/16/2008 03:36 pm
Two launches. Firstly, due to the complete lack of updates, I e-mailed somebody from Andøya's sounding rockets department. They confirmed that Mini-DUSTY was launched on 28 March. Secondly, BB-IX 36.240 was launched from White Sands on Monday.


DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
18 AprilFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
20-30 AprilAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)Missile (IND)
AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.223 (USA)
6 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.065 (USA)
6 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.066 (USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
10 JuneTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
16 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
1 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/
November
Nike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 04/19/2008 11:49 am
According to http://de.rian.ru/safety/20080419/105453205.html (only in German) today was a launch of a rocket in Pakistan.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: VB94 on 04/19/2008 12:03 pm
Quote
Olaf - 19/4/2008  1:49 PM

According to http://de.rian.ru/safety/20080419/105453205.html (only in German) today was a launch of a rocket in Pakistan.

AP report:
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5inHe314GwI26zqeqDrI2wlrhnjswD904Q7380
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 04/23/2008 05:14 am
Here http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Pakistan_tests_nuclear_capable_missile_again_army_999.html a report about a second launch in Pakistan.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 04/23/2008 11:06 am
Images of the April 21 test of a Hatf-VI (Shaheen-II) missile by Pakistan.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 04/23/2008 05:42 pm
DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)
15 AprilBlue Sparrow (ISR)F-15 (ISR)Test (ISR)
19 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
21 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
20-30 AprilAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)Missile (IND)
AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.223 (USA)
5 MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
6 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.065 (USA)
6 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.066 (USA)
22 MayMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)10:00-16:00GT-19XGM
10 JuneTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
16 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
1 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 JulyALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/
November
Nike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/01/2008 05:21 pm
A Black Brant was launched this morning from White Sands. No news on the Agni, so it has probably been delayed. I've attached a copy of NASA's Sounding Rocket programme newsletter.

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)
15 AprilBlue Sparrow (ISR)F-15 (ISR)Test (ISR)
19 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
21 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
01 MayBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3036.223 (USA)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
05 MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
06 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.065 (USA)
06 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)12.066 (USA)
20 MayFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
22 MayMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)10:00-16:00GT-19XGM
10 JuneTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
16 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
01 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 JulyALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/
November
Nike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBD?Agni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)Missile (IND)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/06/2008 05:22 pm
The Mesquito sounding rocket is scheduled to make its maiden flight today. Launch from WFF is scheduled for 18:00-20:00 GMT. Two rockets will be launched. I don't know whether there will be any video or text coverage on the Wallops Launch Events page - http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/ .

In other news, the VSB has been delayed to 9 May, according to discussion in the thread about the next VLS launch, and the Agni-III is now scheduled to launch tomorrow.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/06/2008 08:55 pm
No news yet, but the WFF ops schedule seems to suggest that one launch (065) was scrubbed, but the other (066) occurred.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 05/07/2008 09:02 am
The Agni-III was launched today.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7387082.stm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/07/2008 05:59 pm
Today's launch window for the Mesquito is about to open. No news on what happened with the 066 launch, but 065 is the only one scheduled for today. I suspect that 066 was launched yesterday, but NASA are waiting for 065 to go before publishing this.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/07/2008 07:55 pm
Still nothing official, but the WFF schedule now suggests that the second Mesquito has launched. I checked the schedule at about 19:45 GMT, so launch must have occurred prior to that time. No confirmation of this yet, and no news as to whether either launch was successful.

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)
15 AprilBlue Sparrow (ISR)F-15 (ISR)Test (ISR)
19 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
21 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
01 MayBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3036.223 (USA)
06 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-20:0012.066 (USA)
07 MayAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:26Missile (IND)
07 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-19:4512.065 (USA)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
09 MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
20 MayFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
22 MayMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)10:00-16:00GT-19XGM
10 JuneTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
16 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
01 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 JulyALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/
November
Nike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Mighty-T on 05/09/2008 08:24 am
The launch of VSB-30 on the MASER-11 Mission is delayed due to wind. New launch date has not yet been decided since weather predictions are bad over the weekend.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/12/2008 09:02 pm
Quote
Mighty-T - 9/5/2008  8:24 AM

The launch of VSB-30 on the MASER-11 Mission is delayed due to wind. New launch date has not yet been decided since weather predictions are bad over the weekend.

According to http://www.ssc.se/?id=10127 launch is now scheduled for 14 May. I think the launch window is from 01:00-13:00 GMT (could be an hour or two off)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/14/2008 01:26 pm
From NASA WFF - Mesquito Launches. Mesospheric Sounding Rocket Development (Mesquito)12.065 and 12.066 test flights were launched from Wallops Island on May 6 and May 7, respectively. Wallops Flight Facility radars and Navy SPY radars were used to provide performance data. WFF radars tracked the booster motor for the 12.065 flight (left). The Navy radar did not acquire. The WFF radar obtained data at about T+3 seconds for the 12.066 flight. The bore site camera shows an unstable booster after burnout. The video also indicates the booster did not have fins during the descent. The vehicle accelerated at 120 G’s and reached Mach 4.8 in 3.2 seconds. The flight tests provided data for the development of a new vehicle. The next flights will include instrumentation.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/14/2008 06:00 pm
MASER has been delayed again. Launch is now scheduled for 04:00 on 15 May. Not sure about time zone, but it might be GMT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/14/2008 07:51 pm
Quote
Yeknom-Ecaps - 14/5/2008  1:26 PM

From NASA WFF - Mesquito Launches. Mesospheric Sounding Rocket Development (Mesquito)12.065 and 12.066 test flights were launched from Wallops Island on May 6 and May 7, respectively. Wallops Flight Facility radars and Navy SPY radars were used to provide performance data. WFF radars tracked the booster motor for the 12.065 flight (left). The Navy radar did not acquire. The WFF radar obtained data at about T+3 seconds for the 12.066 flight. The bore site camera shows an unstable booster after burnout. The video also indicates the booster did not have fins during the descent. The vehicle accelerated at 120 G’s and reached Mach 4.8 in 3.2 seconds. The flight tests provided data for the development of a new vehicle. The next flights will include instrumentation.

Do you have a URL for that release? I can't find it on WFF or C810.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/14/2008 09:24 pm
This is in the 5/12 newsletter on the WFF site.
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/newsletters.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/15/2008 05:44 pm
The launch of MASER occurred at the start of the window this morning, 04:00 GMT. The flight was successful, and reached an apogee of 252 kilometres. I'll try to post an update on the schedule and log at some point later this evening.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/16/2008 07:12 pm
DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2 (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)
15 AprilBlue Sparrow (ISR)F-15 (ISR)Test (ISR)
19 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
21 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
01 MayBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3036.223 (USA)
06 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-20:0012.065 (USA)
07 MayAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:26Missile (IND)
07 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-19:4512.066 (USA)
15 MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)04:00MASER-11 (GER/SWE)

DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
20 MayFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
22 MayMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)10:00-16:00GT-19XGM
24 JuneTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
28 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
JuneNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
JuneBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
01 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
10 JulyALV (USA)WFF (USA) SOAREX-VI (USA)
18 JulyPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTX-03 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Vandenberg (USA)FTX-03 ABM -???
10 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
October/
November
Nike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
01 DecemberPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
GBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
Failures in italics
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/21/2008 07:14 pm
Two Trident launches earlier this month in the Pacific from the USS Nebraska ..... anyone know the actual launch date(s)/have photos?
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2008/5-21-FBM.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/21/2008 08:54 pm
Quote
Yeknom-Ecaps - 21/5/2008  7:14 PM

Two Trident launches earlier this month in the Pacific from the USS Nebraska ..... anyone know the actual launch date(s)/have photos?
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2008/5-21-FBM.html

Trident launches usually happen in pairs on the same day, so they were probably both launched on the same day, but it is unclear exactly when.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/22/2008 08:59 am
Today's launch window for Minuteman III test GT-197GM starts at 09:01 GMT. Launch will be from silo LF-10 at Vandenberg. It is an extended range test, with the target being Guam, rather than Kwajelien. The window will close at 16:01, but Minuteman launches usually happen right at the start of the window.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/22/2008 09:32 am
Sorry, window start time is 10:01 GMT. Error converting between GMT and BST.

The FalconLaunch scheduled for 20 May seems to have been delayed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/22/2008 05:25 pm
Minuteman launch confirmed. Launch occurred at 10:04 GMT. Flight was successful.

Does anyone know what the designation means? I know the GT stands for "Glory Trip", and the number is to do with the number of the test, but what about the two letters afterwards? (I've seen GM, GB, and several others) What do they mean?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 05/22/2008 05:41 pm
Images of the Minuteman-III launch on May 22nd. Images from here (http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story_media.asp?id=123099783).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 05/22/2008 06:04 pm
That second image is an eye opener.  You can see that the missile is on fire as it leaves the silo!

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 05/23/2008 02:38 pm
Are there any other news about this? Indonesia launches rocket into space (http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/programguide/stories/200805/s2253542.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 05/23/2008 02:47 pm
Quote
edkyle99 - 22/5/2008  8:04 PM

That second image is an eye opener.  You can see that the missile is on fire as it leaves the silo!

 - Ed Kyle

Not unusual for a silo launched missile. This effect can also be observed on OBV launches:
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/images/ft1_56.jpg
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/23/2008 02:58 pm
Quote
Satori - 23/5/2008  2:38 PM

Are there any other news about this? Indonesia launches rocket into space (http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/programguide/stories/200805/s2253542.htm).

According to http://www.adnkronos.com/AKI/English/Security/?id=1.0.2189289240 it was last Monday.

Indonesia launched four LAPAN sounding rockets at the end of September 2004, which reached space. It is unclear whether these are related to this launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/24/2008 08:57 pm
According to the Indonesian space agency (http://www.lapan.go.id (http://www.lapan.go.id)), the launch was on 19 May, used an RX-320 rocket, and reached an apogee of 42 kilometres. Therefore it was not a spaceflight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/30/2008 10:49 pm
Trident launches in the Pacific Ocean from the USS Nebraska took place on May 8.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/30/2008 11:28 pm
Trident launches in the Pacific Ocean from the USS Nebraska took place on May 8.

Thanks.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/01/2008 03:31 pm
Trident launches in the Pacific Ocean from the USS Nebraska took place on May 8.

Thanks... can you give some indication of the source of this information?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/01/2008 10:46 pm
Lockheed-Martin was the source of the launch date - as was the original press release that said "earlier this month (May)."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/02/2008 04:53 am
Lockheed-Martin was the source of the launch date - as was the original press release that said "earlier this month (May)."

Thank, I feel happier at citing it in my logs given that detail.
Don't suppose you have details on the Trident tests in the Pacific in 2005 and 2006?
  Jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/04/2008 09:57 pm
Sorry but no info on 2005 and 2006 launches.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/04/2008 10:34 pm
From the web site:

A Japanese newspaper with sources in the intelligence directorate in the Japanese Ministry of Defense, “Sankei” reported on the test launch of the “Tszyuylan-2” missile from the Yellow Sea
that took place on 29 May.

http://redbannernorthernfleet.blogspot.com/

The Russian TV Zvezda has a clip on the site purporting to be the launch of the new missile. Despite the Russian report noting that the launch took place from a submerged modified Golf SSB, the TV clip appears to depict a surface launch from a test barge.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/06/2008 06:15 pm
From the web site:

A Japanese newspaper with sources in the intelligence directorate in the Japanese Ministry of Defense, “Sankei” reported on the test launch of the “Tszyuylan-2” missile from the Yellow Sea
 

This is normally referred to in English as  JuLian (JL-2), and translated as "Big Wave". It's the SLBM version of the DF-31, apparently.

On Jun 5 at 1813 UTC the Missile Defense Agency launched a target missile from the Mobile
Launch Platform (former USS Tripoli) off Kauai. Apogee was probably in the 100-200 km range;
the picture looks like a Castor 4 vehicle. It was intercepted just before impact
by two SM-2-IV launches which flew within the atmosphere.
  jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/06/2008 11:38 pm
Check out the video of the MDA intercept on 6/5

http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/videos/ftm14.wmv
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/07/2008 08:53 pm
DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
11 JanuaryBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3236.243 (USA)
17 JanuaryJericho (ISR)Palmachim (ISR)Missile (ISR)
18 JanuaryBB XII (CAN)Andøya (NOR)07:30SCIFER-2/40.021 (USA)
25 JanuaryShaheen-1 (PAK)Sonmiani (PAK)Missile (PAK)
31 JanuaryVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Andøya (NOR)19:14HotPay-2 (UK/NOR)
?? JanuarySM-2? (USA)WSMR (USA)AEGIS (USA)
04 FebruaryShahab-3 (IRN)Semnan (IRN)Kavoshgar-1 (IRN)
06 FebruaryS-310 (JPN)Uchinoura (JPN)09:14:40Ionosphere (JPN)
07 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)11:30TEXUS-44 (GER/SWE)
21 FebruarySM-3 (USA)USS Lake Erie (USA)03:26ASAT (USA)
21 FebruaryVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)06:15TEXUS-45 (GER/SWE)
26 FebruaryK-15 (IND)INS Kalinga (IND)07:28Missile (IND)
23 MarchAgni-1 (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:45Missile (IND)
28 MarchRH-200 (IND)Andøya (NOR)Mini-DUSTY-14 (NOR)
02 AprilMinuteman III (USA)VAFB (USA)08:01GT-196GM (USA)
14 AprilBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)16:5836.240 (USA)
15 AprilBlue Sparrow (ISR)F-15 (ISR)Test (ISR)
19 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
21 AprilShaheen-II (PAK)Sonmiani? (PAK)Missile (PAK)
01 MayBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)05:3036.223 (USA)
06 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-20:0012.065 (USA)
07 MayAgni-III (IND)Wheeler Island (IND)04:26Missile (IND)
07 MayMesquito (USA)WFF (USA)18:00-19:4512.066 (USA)
08 MayTrident II (USA)USS Nebraska, Pacific (USA)SLBM test (USA)
08 MayTrident II (USA)USS Nebraska, Pacific (USA)SLBM test (USA)
15 MayVSB-30 (BRA)Esrange (SWE)04:00MASER-11 (GER/SWE)
22 MayMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)10:04GT-197GM
29 MayJu Lian-2 (PRC)Yellow Sea (PRC)SLBM test (PRC)
05 JuneCastor 4 (USA)MPL, Kauai (USA)18:13Target (USA)
 
DateRocketLaunch SiteTimeMission/Serial
24 JuneBB XI (CAN)WFF (USA)39.008 (USA)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
June/JulyNike-Orion (USA)Andøya (NOR)ECOMA (NOR/GER)
01 JulyPerigrine (USA)WFF (USA)(USA)
09 JulyTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)10:00-13:00SubTec-II/41.075 (USA)
15 JulyALV (USA)WFF (USA)13:00-16:00 SOAREX-VI (USA)
18 JulyPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTX-03 Target
18 JulyGBI (THAAD?) (USA)Vandenberg (USA)FTX-03 ABM -??? - not an intercept test
JulyBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.226 (USA)
13 AugustMinuteman III (USA)Vandenberg (USA)GT-19XGM
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.213 (USA)
AugustBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.221 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.173 (USA)
OctoberBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.207 (USA)
OctoberNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)REXUS-4 (SWE)
October/NovemberNike-Orion (USA)Esrange (SWE)MAPHEUS (SWE)
NovemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.081 (USA)
01 DecemberPolaris/STARS (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 Target
01 DecemberGBI (THAAD?) (USA)Kodiak (USA)FTG-05 ABM
DecemberVS-30/Orion (BRA/USA)Svalbard (NOR)JCI-2 (NOR)
DecemberTerrier-Orion (USA)WFF (USA)41.082 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.225 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.235 (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.239 (USA)
TBDMinotaur II (USA)Vandenberg (USA)NFIRE-1B
TBDRH-200 (IND)Sriharikota (IND)(IND)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-24 (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-12M Topol (RUS)Plesetsk? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-18 UR-100N?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDRS-20 R-36?? (RUS)Baikonur? (RUS)Missile (RUS)
TBDFalconLAUNCH (USA)WFF (USA)FL-VI (USA)
TBDBB IX (CAN)WSMR (USA)36.219 (USA)
Failures in italics
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/12/2008 11:40 am
05 JuneCastor 4 (USA)MPL, Kauai (USA)18:13Target (USA)

This launch was certainly not a Castor-4 based vehicle. The following video shows a liquid fueled rocket (possibly a Scud?) launching from the MPL (ex USS Tripoli) (see Video at 1:33):
http://video.aol.com/video-detail/aegis-bmd-ftm-14-stellar-scorpion/1987943442

here is also a still photo from the target launch:
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/html/nmdimg.html#sbased.ANC
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/12/2008 09:14 pm
05 JuneCastor 4 (USA)MPL, Kauai (USA)18:13Target (USA)

This launch was certainly not a Castor-4 based vehicle. The following video shows a liquid fueled rocket (possibly a Scud?) launching from the MPL (ex USS Tripoli) (see Video at 1:33):
http://video.aol.com/video-detail/aegis-bmd-ftm-14-stellar-scorpion/1987943442

here is also a still photo from the target launch:
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/html/nmdimg.html#sbased.ANC


Yes, that's fairly convincing. I think you're right and this is an actual Scud (Makeev R-11
or R-17, or third party clone thereof).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/12/2008 09:23 pm
05 JuneCastor 4 (USA)MPL, Kauai (USA)18:13Target (USA)

This launch was certainly not a Castor-4 based vehicle. The following video shows a liquid fueled rocket (possibly a Scud?) launching from the MPL (ex USS Tripoli) (see Video at 1:33):
http://video.aol.com/video-detail/aegis-bmd-ftm-14-stellar-scorpion/1987943442

here is also a still photo from the target launch:
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/html/nmdimg.html#sbased.ANC


So what other US Scud launches have there been? And what other vehicles have been
Aegis targets?

I have:

Scud from Aur Atoll (project Willow Dune): 1997 Feb 7, Mar 19
Scud from Point Mugu as target for Israeli Arrow - 2004 Jul 29
Scud B from Vandenberg, 2002 Nov 14 and 25
Scud from Mobile Launch Platform off Kauai: 2007 Jan 27, 2007 Apr 26, and this latest one.

Aegis targets:
Terrier Oriole - 2004 Jul 16, 2005 Mar 3, 2005 Nov 2
 the first of these had a Star 20 third stage.
Terrier Orion - 2006 Jun 23, Nov 16, 2007 Apr 26, 2007 Jun 15 (two), 2007 Nov 7 (two).
All of these were ARAV-A with non-separating nosecones, except for the 2006 Nov 16 launch which was an ARAV-B with a separating reentry vehicle.
Castor 4B  or Scud, to be discussed:
2005 Nov 18, 2006 Jun 22, 2007 Jun 23, 2007 Nov 15, 2007 Dec 17
comments on these welcome.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 06/13/2008 04:42 am
It would be interesting to find out who is "doing" these U.S. Scud launches.  A mini version of Project Paperclip, perhaps?

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/13/2008 08:42 am
The MDA article says "Scud-like", so it may not actually be a Scud. The video calls it a "threat-representative short range ballistic missile", do we know if this is a description or a designation?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 06/13/2008 11:18 am
Castor 4B  or Scud, to be discussed:
2005 Nov 18, 2006 Jun 22, 2007 Jun 23, 2007 Nov 15, 2007 Dec 17
comments on these welcome.

At least these two are not Scuds:

2005 Nov 18 was an OSC built MRT-1 target (http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=534)

2006 Jun 22 was am OSC built MRT-2 target (http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=563)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/13/2008 12:37 pm
There was an Agni-I launch at 04:45 GMT this morning on 4 May.
http://www.odishatoday.com/India_conducts_user_trial_of_nuclear_capable_missile.html

EDIT: This appears to be an old report that has been published by mistake, however I was not previously aware of the launch, which presumably occurred on Sunday 4 May.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/13/2008 08:48 pm
There was an Agni-I launch at 04:45 GMT this morning on 4 May.
http://www.odishatoday.com/India_conducts_user_trial_of_nuclear_capable_missile.html

EDIT: This appears to be an old report that has been published by mistake, however I was not previously aware of the launch, which presumably occurred on Sunday 4 May.


I am pretty skeptical of this report - even as a rehash of a putative 4 May launch
(really? Just before the Agni 3 launch on 7 May?).  Nothing on the DRDO site; it would be nice to get a second indepedent source before including this in all of our launch logs. It could have been a story that was written in anticipation of the May 7 launch and was canned when the real details emerged.

 
Jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/13/2008 08:54 pm
Same launch time as the 3/23 Agni-1 launch.

e-mail received from globalsecurity.org has no info for an Agni flight on this date either - they also noted info in this article matches 3/23 launch info.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/13/2008 08:58 pm
From MDA for June 13

"a tracking exercise conducted by MDA and the U.S. Navy today off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii by the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system aboard the USS Lake Erie (CG 70). The event follows the June 5, 2008 successful terminal interception of a threat-representative ballistic missile by the Aegis BMD system using a modified Standard Missile - 2 Block IV missile. During this exercise, two medium-range target missiles were launched near-simultaneously from the Pacific
Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Hawaii. Shortly after lift-off, the crew of the USS Lake Erie, utilizing the Aegis BMD weapon system and onboard AN-SPY-1 radar, acquired and tracked the targets. Using the tactically certified Aegis BMD system, the crew developed fire control solutions and simulated the launch of two Standard Missile – 3 (SM-3) Block IA interceptors. The equipment performed according to design, and simulated intercepts occurred minutes later. The target missiles fell harmlessly into the Pacific
Ocean."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/23/2008 06:14 pm
Hi!

This (http://www.lrn.cn/science/scienceNews/200806/t20080619_243796.htm) is about a  a suborbital chinese rocket launch that took place on June 11th from Jiuquan. Any help in translating this?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/23/2008 09:13 pm
Hi!

This (http://www.lrn.cn/science/scienceNews/200806/t20080619_243796.htm) is about a  a suborbital chinese rocket launch that took place on June 11th from Jiuquan. Any help in translating this?

Student launch, apogee 10 kilometres. Not a spaceflight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/25/2008 10:26 pm
Raytheon first launch of Standard Missile 6:

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/micro_stories.pl?ACCT=149999&TICK=RTN&STORY=/www/story/06-24-2008/0004838058&EDATE=Jun+24,+2008

Launch took place on 6/24. No "public" photos available.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2008 06:50 am
Raytheon first launch of Standard Missile 6:

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/micro_stories.pl?ACCT=149999&TICK=RTN&STORY=/www/story/06-24-2008/0004838058&EDATE=Jun+24,+2008

Launch took place on 6/24. No "public" photos available.

SM-6 is just an surface-to-air missile. I don't think it can even reach space.


There was a THAAD test yesterday, against an air-launched ballistic missile, dropped from a C-17.
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/29th-missile-defense-intercept-achieved,447634.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/26/2008 09:47 pm
Correct, SM-6 did not reach space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/27/2008 10:36 pm
From MDA

Missile Defense Data Collection Experiment Successfully Completed Lieutenant General Henry “Trey” Obering, Missile Defense Agency (MDA) director, announced today the successful completion of a technology-demonstration flight test from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Va. The launch occurred June 26, 2008 at 3:57 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This exercise, identified as the Next Generation Sensor Producibility flight test (NGSP-01), successfully demonstrated the performance of emerging sensor technologies, materials, and designs that offer improvements for next-generation missile defense interceptors. During the exercise, a Black Brant XI sounding rocket carried a payload consisting of multiple optical and infrared sensors, along with various objects. Upon reaching the desired altitude in the exo-atmosphere, the objects were ejected to present a viewing scene for the sensors under test. Data collected during NGSP-01 will undergo thorough analysis and be evaluated for use in the development of future missile defense interceptor kill vehicles. The NGSP-01 experiment was not a weapon system exercise.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/28/2008 02:33 am
Orion launch from Wallops Island 6/27 - NASA RockOn! mission. 20 payloads. It was supposed to reach 41 miles. Launch was at 6:36 am EDT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/28/2008 09:10 am
Orion launch from Wallops Island 6/27 - NASA RockOn! mission. 20 payloads. It was supposed to reach 41 miles. Launch was at 6:36 am EDT.

Only a spaceflight by the US designation, not by the international one.

When you say "supposed to", do you mean it failed?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/28/2008 12:10 pm
"supposed to" was in regard to what was published in a pre-flight web article I read about the RockOn! program. The NASA Wallops site only gave the launch time and no information on the height actually attained for the flight.

It was a successful flight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/28/2008 03:25 pm
Thanks. There was a Black Brant launch from Wallops the day before as well. That did reach space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/28/2008 06:50 pm
Details on successful MDA launch of 6/26 from Wallops are a couple of posts above.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/30/2008 07:06 pm
A Nike-Improved Orion was launched from Andøya earlier today.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/04/2008 03:36 am
Photo and report on 6/27 Orion launch from WFF is on the WFF site (Sounding Rockets)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/08/2008 05:49 pm
SubTec-II (Terrier) is scheduled to launch from Wallops tomorrow. This one has been delayed a lot, but I don't think they've got this close before. There might be a webcast on the WFF website (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/ (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/)). Launch window is either 10:00-13:00 GMT, or 09:30-11:00 GMT, depending on which source you go with. Not sure how high this one is going to go.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/08/2008 10:41 pm
There was another Nike-Orion launch from Andøya on Monday, and there will probably be another one in the next few days (based on average turnaround, I would say NET tomorrow evening). SubTec has been delayed to 14 July. FalconLaunch VI was cancelled due to a problem with the propellent.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/09/2008 11:24 pm
Iran tested nine missiles yesterday (09/07). At least one of them, a Shahab-3, would have reached space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: hop on 07/09/2008 11:30 pm
Video (via BBC) http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/7496875.stm

Anyone know where the impact zones are for Irans long range tests ?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/10/2008 12:57 am
Does anyone have details on a launch from last year: Taiwan's Sounding Rocket 6.?
All I have is some badly-Babelfished-translations indicating a launch in Sep 2007 which
may have used a new liquid rocket instead of the earlier solid variety.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/10/2008 01:07 am
Does anyone have details on a launch from last year: Taiwan's Sounding Rocket 6.?
All I have is some badly-Babelfished-translations indicating a launch in Sep 2007 which
may have used a new liquid rocket instead of the earlier solid variety.

Never mind, answered my own question: Sep 13 at 0550 GMT, seems like the same type of
rocket as the earlier launches. http://www.nspo.org.tw/2005c/news/news_content.php?id=000105
in Chinese, thank goodness for Babelfish.

Now if anyone knows the thrust and weight of the two stages....
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/10/2008 02:26 pm
There are reports that another Shahab-3 has been tested.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/14/2008 12:11 pm
ECOMA 3 was launched on Saturday, at 10:46 GMT.

SubTEC-II launched at 10:10 GMT this morning.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/15/2008 07:30 pm
41.075 GT Terrier Mk70 Improved-Orion was launched from Wallops Island, VA on July 14, 2008. The Sub-TEC II (Suborbital Technology Experiment Carrier) technology demonstration mission included the NASA/Wallops Beamformer system, KSC Command and Telemetry Processor and Rf Health Node, and multiple NSROC (NASA Sounding Rockets Operations Contract) systems.

--- from WFF web site
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/16/2008 07:33 pm
Any known photos of the Sub-TEC II launch?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 08/01/2008 02:05 pm
According to http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080801/115460006.html today was a launch of a ballistic missile from submarine Ryazan.
According to my information Ryazan carries R-29R / SS-N-18 Stingray.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/03/2008 09:54 am
According to http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/j/topics/topics/2008/0802.shtml there was an S-520 launch yesterday at 08:30 GMT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/13/2008 11:55 am
A Minuteman III was launched from Vandenberg at 08:01 GMT this morning.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: EE Scott on 08/22/2008 02:14 pm
ATK rocket explodes at Wallops:

http://hamptonroads.com/2008/08/rocket-explodes-shortly-after-launch-wallops-island

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/26/2008 12:49 am
ATK payloads: I was able to find a SOAREX mission emblem - does HyBoLT have one?

Launch video of the abort on the NASA Langley site:
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/index.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: NEWUSER on 08/27/2008 11:29 am
Lockheed Martin-Built Trident Ii D5 Missile Achieves 124 Successful Test Launches In A Row
SUNNYVALE, Calif., August 26th, 2008 -- The U.S. Navy conducted a successful test launch yesterday of two Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles (FBMs) built by Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT).  The Navy launched the unarmed missiles from the submerged submarine USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) in thePacific Ocean. 

The Trident II D5 missile now has achieved 124 consecutive successful test launches since 1989 – a record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile or space launch vehicle.

“In this recent test, Navy Strategic Systems Programs has again demonstrated the reliability and credibility of the Fleet Ballistic Missile,” said Melanie A. Sloane, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, the Navy’s Trident missile prime contractor.  “A long partnership combined with disciplined performance by the entire Navy and industry team in every aspect of this critical program has made each and every one of these 124 test launches a success.”

The Navy launched the missiles as part of a Follow-on Commander’s Evaluation Test.  The Navy conducts a continuing series of operational system evaluation tests to assure the safety, reliability, readiness and performance of the Trident II D5 Strategic Weapon System, as required by the Department of Defense’s National Command Authority.  The tests are conducted under the testing guidelines of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

For the tests, operational missiles are converted into inert configurations using test missile kits produced by Lockheed Martin that contain range safety devices and flight telemetry instrumentation.

First deployed in 1990, the D5 missile is currently aboard OHIO-class submarines and British VANGUARD-class submarines.  The three-stage, solid-propellant, inertial-guided ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles and carries multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles.

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, Calif., is the prime contractor and program manager for the U.S. Navy’s Trident missile.  Lockheed Martin Space Systems employees, principally in California, Georgia, Florida, Washington and Utah, support the design, development, production, test and operation of the Trident Strategic Weapon System.  Lockheed Martin Space Systems has been the Navy’s prime strategic missile contractor since the inception of the program more than 50 years ago.

The test also involved the Lockheed Martin-integrated Navigation Subsystem that provides the highly-accurate and reliable navigation data required to support today’s stringent Trident Weapon System performance requirements.  Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems & Sensors Undersea Systems business unit, Mitchel Field, N.Y., has been the Navy’s prime contractor for the Navigation Subsystem aboard FBM submarines since 1955.

Altogether, nearly 3,000 employees throughout the Lockheed Martin Corporation support the Navy’s Fleet Ballistic Missile program.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2008/8-26-trident.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/27/2008 09:34 pm
I assume the Tridents land in the Reagan Test Range in the Marshall Islands similar to the Minuteman launches from Vandenberg AFB (true?). Are the Pacific Trident launches from the California coast near Pt. Mugu? I also assume a launch from near Barking Sands Hawaii would be too short a distance (true?).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 08/28/2008 01:38 pm
Today was a launch of a Topol (RS-12M) from Plesetsk.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080828/116349686.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 08/28/2008 02:28 pm

"The Trident II D5 missile now has achieved 124 consecutive successful test launches since 1989 – a record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile or space launch vehicle. "

This statement may be debatable.  On two occasions (1983-86 and 1990-96) R-7 based launchers recorded 133 consecutive mission successes. 

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/12/2008 11:11 am
Here http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/09/missile_test_plans_scaled_down.shtml are information on a modified plan of launches by the Russian Rocket Forces in 2008.

Here http://de.rian.ru/safety/20080912/116737323.html (only in German, I didn´t found a English version) are information on scheduled launches by the Russian Pacific fleet.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 09/12/2008 06:15 pm
Here http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/09/missile_test_plans_scaled_down.shtml are information on a modified plan of launches by the Russian Rocket Forces in 2008.

Interesting:
Finally, the fourth test may be another space launch - a Kosmos-3M launch from Baykonur

I think not.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 09/12/2008 08:31 pm
Here http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/09/missile_test_plans_scaled_down.shtml are information on a modified plan of launches by the Russian Rocket Forces in 2008.

Interesting:
Finally, the fourth test may be another space launch - a Kosmos-3M launch from Baykonur

I think not.

especially as there are no launch facilities for Kosmos-3M at Baikonur. Kosmos-3M can only be launched from Plesetsk or Kapustin Yar.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 09/12/2008 09:09 pm
Here http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/09/missile_test_plans_scaled_down.shtml are information on a modified plan of launches by the Russian Rocket Forces in 2008.

Interesting:
Finally, the fourth test may be another space launch - a Kosmos-3M launch from Baykonur

I think not.

especially as there are no launch facilities for Kosmos-3M at Baikonur. Kosmos-3M can only be launched from Plesetsk or Kapustin Yar.

Exactly
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 09/18/2008 06:49 am
There was a failed THAAD test this morning, target malfunction before interceptor launch. It was to have been intercepted by two missiles, neither was launched. I believe the launch occurred from Kauai at 02:05 GMT.


NFIRE-2B is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg on 23 September.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/18/2008 09:32 pm
Today was a test launch of the Bulava missile.
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080918/116942009.html

According to Novosti kosmonavtiki the launch was at 14.45 UTC from submarine Dmitry Donskoy.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: pm1823 on 09/18/2008 10:22 pm
mms://video.rfn.ru/rtr-vesti/151262.asf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 09/18/2008 10:40 pm
Does anyone know what sort of target was used for the THAAD test this morning?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/19/2008 02:48 am
Successful intercept by Japan PAC-3 firing at WSMR on Sep 17.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 09/19/2008 09:37 am
Today was a test launch of the Bulava missile.
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080918/116942009.html

According to Novosti kosmonavtiki the launch was at 14.45 UTC from submarine Dmitry Donskoy.

Today RIAN reported, the launch was carried out by the submarine Yuriy Dolgorukiy. We will see, what is correct.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080919/116955401.html

My understanding of the latter article is that it was referring to the Yuriy Dolgorukiy entering service soon. It was not involved the launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/24/2008 02:51 pm
VANDENBERG SUPPORTS MISSILE DEFENSE TRACKING TEST
                    Vandenberg AFB News Release

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - Vandenberg successfully launched a space launch vehicle, the Chimera target launch vehicle, which is a modified Minuteman booster vehicle with a simplified target payload at 11:57 p.m. today [September 24] from North Vandenberg.

The launch was part of an exercise involving the tracking of a
long-range target missile by the Near Field Infrared Experiment, or
NFIRE, research satellite.

"For the past 50 years Vandenberg has been at the forefront of advancing space power." said Col. David J. Buck, 30th Space Wing commander.  "This launch showcases Vandenberg Air Force Base's global impact and its critical role in advancing space and missile systems."

This exercise provided an opportunity for the NFIRE satellite to collect
high- and low-resolution images of a boosting rocket which will improve
understanding of missile exhaust plume observations and plume-to-rocket body discrimination. 

Program officials will continue to evaluate system performance based
upon telemetry and other data obtained during the exercise. The Missile Defense Agency, a joint service agency of the Department of Defense, will use this data to validate and update models and simulations that are fundamental to missile defense technologies.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/07/2008 08:24 pm
There will be a Topol-M launch from Plesetsk from 8 to 12 of October.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 10/11/2008 12:40 pm
Russia test fired an R-29RM from a submarine in the Barents Sea today. Still no news on the Topol.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 10/12/2008 11:03 am
The Topol was launched at 07:24 this morning. IIUC, it was a Topol, not a Topol-M.

Russia has also fired reportedly fired two unspecified SLBMs.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/12/2008 06:19 pm
The Topol was launched at 07:24 this morning. IIUC, it was a Topol, not a Topol-M.

Russia has also fired reportedly fired two unspecified SLBMs.

They did say which submarines did the launchings, so we can infer the SLBM types. Here's my analysis:


On Oct 12-13 as part of the Stabil'nost'-2008 military exercise,
Russia launched four long range ballistic missiles.

On Oct 11 (prior to 0905 UTC when the Russian media announced it)
the submarine K-114 Tula launched a Sineva missile from the Barents Sea
to an impact area in the equatorial region of the Pacific Ocean, with
a range of 11500 km. The Sineva usually carries four reentry
vehicles, although for this maximum range test there may only have been one. 
The Sineva is an improved version of the R-29RM Shtil' missile and
its designation may be R-29RGU or R-29RMU.

On Oct 12 at 0724 UTC an RT-2PM Topol' missile was launched from the
GIK-1 Plesetsk spaceport (or possibly the GNIIP military test range at
Plesetsk, if that is still a distinct entity - can my Russian friends
clarify?). It probably had a single reentry vehicle, and reached the
standard Kura impact zone in Kamchatka.
             
On Oct 12 prior to 0846 UTC, the submarine K-84 Ekaterinburg launched
a missile from the Barents Sea to the Kura range. This was probably
another Sineva missile.

On Oct 12 prior to 0846 UTC, the submarine K-506 Zelenograd launched
a missile, probably an R-29R Volna with 4 reentry vehicles, from the
Sea of Okhotsk to the Chizha range in the Kanin peninsula.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/13/2008 02:28 pm
The Topol was launched at 07:24 this morning. IIUC, it was a Topol, not a Topol-M.

Russia has also fired reportedly fired two unspecified SLBMs.

Topol launch news on portuguese PUBLICO on-line version http://www.publico.clix.pt/videos/?v=20081013111353&z=1
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 10/13/2008 08:40 pm
Reuters reports Topol was RS-12M version.

http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=5cddfdf1-35de-43b6-8539-a392c5303da9
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/14/2008 12:19 pm
Reuters reports Topol was RS-12M version.

http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=5cddfdf1-35de-43b6-8539-a392c5303da9

According to my information RS-12M is the designation of Topol, Topol-M is called RS-12M2.

Here links for the four launches.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/10/sineva_extended_range_launch.shtml
http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/10/more_slbm_launches.shtml
http://russianforces.org/blog/2008/10/test_launch_of_topol_missile.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 10/20/2008 01:08 pm
NASA launched a Black Brant IX from White Sands at 08:39 GMT this morning.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/20/2008 11:05 pm
NASA launched a Black Brant IX from White Sands at 08:39 GMT this morning.

This is NASA 36.207DG; the previous rocket by the same PI, -M. Kowalski of NRL - was the J-PEX ultraviolet spectrograph which got an EUV spectrum of a white dwarf star. I'm guessing this flight may be a reflight of J-PEX or of a similar instrument (Kowalski has also proposed a Small Explorer payload with an advanced version of J-PEX).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 10/20/2008 11:57 pm

This is NASA 36.207DG; the previous rocket by the same PI, -M. Kowalski of NRL - was the J-PEX ultraviolet spectrograph which got an EUV spectrum of a white dwarf star. I'm guessing this flight may be a reflight of J-PEX or of a similar instrument (Kowalski has also proposed a Small Explorer payload with an advanced version of J-PEX).

The "G" in the designation means it was a UV mission, which supports your theory.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/22/2008 09:58 am
Russian Strategic Rocket Forces have launched a SS-19/ RS-18 rocket today from Baikonur at 09.10 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/22/2008 12:40 pm
Russian Strategic Rocket Forces have launched a SS-19/ RS-18 rocket today from Baikonur at 09.10 UTC.

Images from http://www.tsenki.com/NewsDoSeleFed.asp?NEWSID=4533
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Stephan on 10/27/2008 02:59 pm
Video of the launch : http://tvroscosmos.ru/picture_library/video/Start/start34.wmv
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/28/2008 10:03 am
There was an Improved Orion launch from the CLBI Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno (Barreira do Inferno Launch Center), Brazil, at 0604:08UTC October 27. This launch was part of the Parelhas Operation.

Images from the CLBI press-center.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 10/29/2008 06:22 am
There was an Improved Orion launch from the CLBI Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno (Barreira do Inferno Launch Center), Brazil, at 0604:08UTC October 27. This launch was part of the Parelhas Operation.

Images from the CLBI press-center.

Was an upper stage flown? Without an upper stage, IO cannot reach space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 10/29/2008 06:48 am
There was an Improved Orion launch from the CLBI Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno (Barreira do Inferno Launch Center), Brazil, at 0604:08UTC October 27. This launch was part of the Parelhas Operation.

Images from the CLBI press-center.

Was an upper stage flown? Without an upper stage, IO cannot reach space.

Unlikely, as IO does generally not have upper stages. IO in turn is often used as an upper stage.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/01/2008 12:12 am
There was an Improved Orion launch from the CLBI Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno (Barreira do Inferno Launch Center), Brazil, at 0604:08UTC October 27. This launch was part of the Parelhas Operation.

Images from the CLBI press-center.

Was an upper stage flown? Without an upper stage, IO cannot reach space.

That's not entirely true. It depends on the launch site and the payload mass; IO routinely reaches 100-105 km from Andoya. The Brazlian space agency reports an expected apogee of 95-105 km
for this 80 kg payload.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/03/2008 10:08 pm
There were two SM-3 tests against SRBM targets on Saturday. Not sure of apogees, but one of the SM-3s failed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 11/04/2008 05:30 am
Last week, October 22, was the launch of the REXUS4 rocket from Esrange.

http://www.dlr.de/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-1/86_read-13855/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/05/2008 12:56 pm
A Minuteman III was launched from Vandenberg at 09:00 GMT this morning.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/06/2008 11:51 am
From Vandenberg Air Force Base...

VANDENBERG SUCCESSFULLY LAUNCHES MINUTEMAN III
                     by 2nd Lt. Raymond Geoffroy
                   30th Space Wing Public Affairs
                             2008 NOV 5

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- A Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile configured with a National Nuclear Security Administration test assembly was launched from North Vandenberg today at 1 a.m.

The launch was an operational test to determine the weapon system's
reliability and accuracy.

The missile's single unarmed re-entry vehicle traveled approximately
4,190 miles to the pre-determined target near the Kwajalein Atoll in
the Marshall Islands.

The missile was launched under the direction of the 576th Flight Test
Squadron. Operational tasks were conducted by maintenance and
operations task force personnel from the 90th Missile Wing, F.E.
Warren AFB, Wyo. Members of the 576th FLTS installed tracking,
telemetry and command destruct systems on the missile to collect data
and meet safety requirements.

"Tests like these are the cornerstone of nuclear deterrence," said
Capt. Chris Terry, 576th FLTS test launch director. "We gather data on
new modifications and aging components of the Minuteman weapon system to aide USSTRATCOM in operational planning."

Unique to this launch was the incorporation of airborne Launch Control
System crews from the 625th Strategic Operations Squadron, Offutt AFB, Neb., which entered the preparatory commands and executed launch command/keyturn during the countdown.

"Every launch we perform introduces some unique test element; it never gets old," said Captain Terry. "For this launch we will use a
contingency airborne system which will tell the missile to fire."

This airborne system is considered a fail-safe method of ensuring
Minuteman III can fire even in the event of the missile losing contact
with its Launch Control Center. The 576th FLTS periodically tests this
method of launch in order to gauge the system's effectiveness and
reliability.

Col. Steven W. Winters, 30th Space Wing vice commander, was the
spacelift commander. Lt. Col. Lesa K. Toler, 576th FLTS commander, was the mission director for this test launch.

"The fact that we can randomly select an on-alert operational ICBM from any missile wing and launch it without making any modifications to the components to hit a bulls-eye target is a testament of the systems reliability," Colonel Toler said. "I have complete confidence in our ICBM weapon system to perform as advertised."

The data collected will be used by the entire ICBM community, including
the United States Strategic Command planners and the NNSA/Department of Energy laboratories.

"Tests like this make Vandenberg the first line of defense in terms of
strategic deterrence," Colonel Winters said. "Thanks to the hard work
of the 30th Space Wing and the 576th Flight Test Squadron, we continue a proud legacy of ensuring global stability through assuring the readiness and reliability of our ICBM fleet."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 11/07/2008 05:34 pm
A video of the launch, complete with a Launch Director interview.  Interesting to see the silo door opening and scenes from launch control.

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-081105-024.wmv

Some terrific photos of this launch are also posted at:

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story_media.asp?id=123122619

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/09/2008 11:18 pm
A K-15 test from LC-3 at the ITR (Balasore) is scheduled for this Wednesday, and a Black Brant IX launch on a Solar research mission from White Sands is planned for Friday.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 11/12/2008 12:02 pm
A K-15 test from LC-3 at the ITR (Balasore) is scheduled for this Wednesday, and a Black Brant IX launch on a Solar research mission from White Sands is planned for Friday.
There was a launch in India today, but they say that´s no K-15.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/India_test-fires_N-capable_missile/articleshow/3703369.cms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/12/2008 01:46 pm
Iran also conducted a missile test this morning. From the descriptions and ranges, I'd say both missiles were capable of reaching space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/13/2008 05:15 pm
A K-15 test from LC-3 at the ITR (Balasore) is scheduled for this Wednesday, and a Black Brant IX launch on a Solar research mission from White Sands is planned for Friday.
There was a launch in India today, but they say that´s no K-15.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/India_test-fires_N-capable_missile/articleshow/3703369.cms

Most press reports call this a "Shaurya" missile, but I see the official Indian govt site
pib.nic.in calls it "SHOURYA".
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/16/2008 12:00 pm
France tested an M51 missile from Biscarrose on 13 November, and there was a Black Brant launch from White Sands on the 14th.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Stephan on 11/16/2008 01:30 pm
France tested an M51 missile from Biscarrose on 13 November
Video is available here : http://www.defense.gouv.fr/defense/webtv/livre_blanc/3eme_tir_experimental_du_missile_m51
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/16/2008 03:17 pm
France tested an M51 missile from Biscarrose on 13 November, and there was a Black Brant launch from White Sands on the 14th.

M51 launch was at 0906 UTC Nov 13.

The BB was NASA 36.221DS, with some kind of solar payload - the PI was Dan Moses of NRL,
whose background is in extreme ultraviolet solar telescopes, but I haven't discovered what this particular mission was.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/20/2008 07:03 am
There was an unsuccessful Japanese AEGIS test this morning. I believe the target was launched from Kauai at 02:18 GMT, followed by an SM-3 from the JDS Chōkai at 02:21 GMT. The test failed due to a sensor error, which I believe also occurred on the last SM-3 test.

Russia will test another Bulava next week.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/24/2008 06:25 pm
Video of the France M51 launch

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/defense/webtv/livre_blanc/3eme_tir_experimental_du_missile_m51
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Stephan on 11/24/2008 06:54 pm
Video of the France M51 launch

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/defense/webtv/livre_blanc/3eme_tir_experimental_du_missile_m51
Already posted by me a few posts above ;)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/24/2008 10:41 pm
Sorry for the repeat .....

Any additional info available on the Nov WSMR launch?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/26/2008 12:40 pm
Iran has conducted a sub-orbital research flight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/26/2008 02:45 pm
Russia tested an RS-24 at 13:20 GMT today. A Bulava will also be tested in the next few days.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/26/2008 03:24 pm
Iran has conducted a sub-orbital research flight.

Any other infos about this?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/26/2008 04:20 pm
Flight was reported to have lasted 40 minutes before the payload was recovered by parachute. The flight was designated "Kavoshgar-2" (some sources say "Kavosh-2").

I believe a Safir rocket was used for Kavoshgar-1 back in February. Nothing official on what was used for this one, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the same.


Interestingly, this is the third confirmed Iranian launch (including the August failure) since they said they'd need three tests before they launch a satellite, so the next one could be an orbital attempt.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/26/2008 08:14 pm
From IRNA web site http://www2.irna.ir/en/news/view/line-22/0811262190150611.htm :

Iran's aerospace experts have successfully launched 'Kavosh 2' (Explorer 2) rocket into space on Wednesday.

The rocket carried a space lab and data monitoring and processing unit and put it into orbit in several minutes with a special parachute.

The safe stationing of the space lab was the highlight of the test.

Kavosh 2 is made in line with Iran's strategic space program and in order to prepare the grounds for further scientific and technological progress.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/26/2008 08:21 pm
AP Photo of  "Kavoshgar 2" (Explorer 2) landing site

http://www.daylife.com/photo/06GS0rp9m38T9
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 11/27/2008 03:49 pm
Flight was reported to have lasted 40 minutes before the payload was recovered by parachute. The flight was designated "Kavoshgar-2" (some sources say "Kavosh-2").

I believe a Safir rocket was used for Kavoshgar-1 back in February. Nothing official on what was used for this one, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the same.


A video of this flight (see the Iran Space thread) appears to show this launch being performed by a relatively small solid fuel rocket.  This may be the same launch that was said to have occurred near the Iran/Iraq border.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 11/28/2008 05:50 pm
Russia tested another Bulava today.


According to RIA Novosti, thirteen missile tests (including five orbital Dnepr launches) will be conducted next year.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20081128/118590168.html

Of the eight sub-orbital launches, five will be new missiles, and three will be life-extension tests of old systems. I don't know whether this is just ground-launched missiles, or whether these figures include SLBMs.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/05/2008 03:54 pm
Didn't get even near space, but just to have a note on this... China conducts first successful test of hybrid rocket (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-12/06/content_10463480.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/05/2008 04:01 pm
Didn't get even near space, but just to have a note on this... China conducts first successful test of hybrid rocket (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-12/06/content_10463480.htm).

Cool - I've met some of the Beihang students - they were a fun bunch (we held the first ever Beijing-based Yuri's Night). It will be interesting to see if this develops beyond a student project
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/05/2008 09:50 pm
Three sub-orbital launches were conducted today.

At 10:35:10 GMT, a VS-30/Orion was launched from Svalbard on an auroral research flight.

At 20:04 GMT, a missile (probably a Polaris/STARS) was launched from Kodiak Island. A GBI was launched from Vandenberg at 20:21, and intercepted the Polaris at 20:29.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/06/2008 05:52 pm
Three sub-orbital launches were conducted today.

At 10:35:10 GMT, a VS-30/Orion was launched from Svalbard on an auroral research flight.

At 20:04 GMT, a missile (probably a Polaris/STARS) was launched from Kodiak Island. A GBI was launched from Vandenberg at 20:21, and intercepted the Polaris at 20:29.

Press releases, and neat photos (complete with rainbow effect in launch plume), of the GBI launch.

http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=679
http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123126885

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/07/2008 02:49 am
Three sub-orbital launches were conducted today.

At 10:35:10 GMT, a VS-30/Orion was launched from Svalbard on an auroral research flight.

At 20:04 GMT, a missile (probably a Polaris/STARS) was launched from Kodiak Island. A GBI was launched from Vandenberg at 20:21, and intercepted the Polaris at 20:29.

Press releases, and neat photos (complete with rainbow effect in launch plume), of the GBI launch.

http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=679
http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123126885

 - Ed Kyle

Note that the MDA press release [mda.mil] says the OBV was launched at 2023, not 2021.
But I tend to give more weight to the Vandenberg release.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/08/2008 12:46 am
Didn't get even near space, but just to have a note on this... China conducts first successful test of hybrid rocket (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-12/06/content_10463480.htm).

Cool - I've met some of the Beihang students - they were a fun bunch (we held the first ever Beijing-based Yuri's Night). It will be interesting to see if this develops beyond a student project

Anyone know of photos for this launch/recovery?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/10/2008 03:31 pm
Didn't get even near space, but just to have a note on this... China conducts first successful test of hybrid rocket (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-12/06/content_10463480.htm).

Cool - I've met some of the Beihang students - they were a fun bunch (we held the first ever Beijing-based Yuri's Night). It will be interesting to see if this develops beyond a student project

Anyone know of photos for this launch/recovery?

See http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=7058.45
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/11/2008 04:47 pm
Image of the VS-30/Orion that was launched from Svalbard on December 8th.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/17/2008 06:35 am
The next test launch of a Bulava missile is scheduled on Dec 21.
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20081216/118881590.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/23/2008 09:40 am
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/23/2008 01:29 pm
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.

Pravda reports it was sttage 3 the malfunctioned after successful stage 1 and 2 burn, so it probably reached space. Launch was from TK-208 Dmitriy Donskoy in the White Sea.
Time was "early tuesday morning'  Dec 23.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/23/2008 05:19 pm
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.

Pravda reports it was sttage 3 the malfunctioned after successful stage 1 and 2 burn, so it probably reached space. Launch was from TK-208 Dmitriy Donskoy in the White Sea.
Time was "early tuesday morning'  Dec 23.
Some other sources suggest it failed just after 1/2 separation.

The launch time I heard was 03:00 GMT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/23/2008 09:57 pm
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.

Pravda reports it was sttage 3 the malfunctioned after successful stage 1 and 2 burn, so it probably reached space. Launch was from TK-208 Dmitriy Donskoy in the White Sea.
Time was "early tuesday morning'  Dec 23.
Some other sources suggest it failed just after 1/2 separation.

The launch time I heard was 03:00 GMT.

OK - I haven't seen any sources with that info.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/23/2008 10:52 pm
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.

Pravda reports it was sttage 3 the malfunctioned after successful stage 1 and 2 burn, so it probably reached space. Launch was from TK-208 Dmitriy Donskoy in the White Sea.
Time was "early tuesday morning'  Dec 23.
Some other sources suggest it failed just after 1/2 separation.

The launch time I heard was 03:00 GMT.

OK - I haven't seen any sources with that info.


http://en.rian.ru/russia/20081223/119134332.html
"The missile left the tube, but went off course due to a malfunction after the first stage separation"

http://lenta.ru/news/2008/12/23/bulava/ (via an online translator)
"Start was made on 23 December at six o'clock in the morning Moscow time"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/24/2008 04:14 am
Bulava test occurred this morning. It was destroyed by the Russian equivalent of an RSO after it went off course.

Pravda reports it was sttage 3 the malfunctioned after successful stage 1 and 2 burn, so it probably reached space. Launch was from TK-208 Dmitriy Donskoy in the White Sea.
Time was "early tuesday morning'  Dec 23.
Some other sources suggest it failed just after 1/2 separation.

The launch time I heard was 03:00 GMT.

OK - I haven't seen any sources with that info.


http://en.rian.ru/russia/20081223/119134332.html
"The missile left the tube, but went off course due to a malfunction after the first stage separation"

http://lenta.ru/news/2008/12/23/bulava/ (via an online translator)
"Start was made on 23 December at six o'clock in the morning Moscow time"

Thanks,  I had missed these. The lenta story repeats the third stage reference. The RIAN story says "after first stage", could be a long time after...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/09/2009 02:06 pm
ATK's ALV X-1 failure caused by a "simple software error", according to the following report.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/Hyper010809.xml&headline=Software%20Faulted%20In%20Failed%20Hypersonic%20Test&channel=space

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/11/2009 11:39 am
An Orion was launched from Poker Flat this morning. Still waiting to hear the apogee (sometimes Orions make it into space, sometimes they don't)...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/24/2009 08:13 pm
France tested an M51 missile from Biscarrose on 13 November, and there was a Black Brant launch from White Sands on the 14th.

According to Jonathan McDowell that BB launch never happened. The report of the launch that I had seen seems to have been retracted, and the WFF operations schedule lists the launch in February 2009.



Also, it looks like the Orion launched earlier this month did not reach space.

There are three suborbital launches due over the next few days:
*An S-310 from LA-U3 at Andøya, with Delta-2.
*A BB IX from Poker Flat with ACES-I.
*A BB VB from Poker Flat with ACES-II.

The S-310 is scheduled for a late evening to early morning window (GMT), whilst the BBs are scheduled to be launched 90 seconds apart between 05:00 and 10:00. All three missions are Auroral research, and all three have been subject to repeated scrubs/delays over the last few days.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/26/2009 07:40 am
S-310/Delta2 launched at 00:15 GMT this morning.

Still waiting for news on the BBs.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/28/2009 12:03 am
S-310/Delta2 launched at 00:15 GMT this morning.

Still waiting for news on the BBs.



The flight is S-310-39 and it was expected to reach an apogee of 140-150 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/29/2009 06:20 pm
BBs have finally launched. ACES I was at 09:49, and ACES II followed 90 seconds later at 09:51.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/30/2009 03:18 pm
From Univ of Alaska

Two rockets fly through auroral arc

After days of waiting for precise aurora conditions, a team from the University of Iowa finally saw the launch of its two scientific sounding rockets from Poker Flat Research Range. The NASA rockets launched Jan. 29, just before 1 a.m. Alaska Standard Time, and flew through an auroral curtain, collecting data throughout their flights.

Scientists with the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure mission, or ACES for short, aimed to gain a clearer picture of aurora structure by simultaneously collecting data from both the top and bottom edges of an auroral arc. To get the data, two rockets were launched. A two-stage Black Brant IX launched at 12:49 a.m. and reached an altitude of more than 226 miles. The rocket flew for just under 10 minutes. At 12:50 a.m., a single-stage Black Brant V launched, reaching an altitude of nearly 83 vertical miles, flying for roughly eight minutes.

The payloads of each ACES rocket performed well during flight. Principal investigator Scott Bounds of the University of Iowa and the ACES team will begin to analyze all of the data collected, which should keep them busy for the next year. Bounds said this information will help refine current models of aurora structure. The ACES mission will provide insight on the structural subtleties of the aurora, details that researchers may have missed when previous measurements were done using only a single vehicle.

The ACES rockets were loaded onto launchers and had been ready to fly since Jan. 14. Each evening scientists scanned the sky with cameras at local and downrange sites for a sufficient auroral arc to appear just north of Fort Yukon. A stable, thin arc was required for the experiment to perform optimally and finally that arc appeared early on Jan. 29.

Bounds, from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa, worked on six previous launches from Poker Flat Research Range as a postdoctoral fellow and as a co-investigator. The ACES mission is the first project he’s managed as the principal investigator.

“I certainly feel relieved now that we’ve launched,” Bounds said. “The pressure was much greater before today.”

Bounds and his team aren’t taking much time to regroup. The team plans to return to Poker Flat Research Range in 2010, as the University of Iowa is a collaborator for another launch scheduled at the range.

Poker Flat Research Range is the largest land-based sounding rocket range in the world. It’s located 30 miles north of Fairbanks on the Steese Highway. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks operates the range under contract to NASA.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/30/2009 04:37 pm
From Univ of Alaska

Two rockets fly through auroral arc

After days of waiting for precise aurora conditions, a team from the University of Iowa finally saw the launch of its two scientific sounding rockets from Poker Flat Research Range. The NASA rockets launched Jan. 29, just before 1 a.m. Alaska Standard Time, and flew through an auroral curtain, collecting data throughout their flights.

Scientists with the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure mission, or ACES for short, aimed to gain a clearer picture of aurora structure by simultaneously collecting data from both the top and bottom edges of an auroral arc. To get the data, two rockets were launched. A two-stage Black Brant IX launched at 12:49 a.m. and reached an altitude of more than 226 miles. The rocket flew for just under 10 minutes. At 12:50 a.m., a single-stage Black Brant V launched, reaching an altitude of nearly 83 vertical miles, flying for roughly eight minutes.

The payloads of each ACES rocket performed well during flight. Principal investigator Scott Bounds of the University of Iowa and the ACES team will begin to analyze all of the data collected, which should keep them busy for the next year. Bounds said this information will help refine current models of aurora structure. The ACES mission will provide insight on the structural subtleties of the aurora, details that researchers may have missed when previous measurements were done using only a single vehicle.

The ACES rockets were loaded onto launchers and had been ready to fly since Jan. 14. Each evening scientists scanned the sky with cameras at local and downrange sites for a sufficient auroral arc to appear just north of Fort Yukon. A stable, thin arc was required for the experiment to perform optimally and finally that arc appeared early on Jan. 29.

Bounds, from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa, worked on six previous launches from Poker Flat Research Range as a postdoctoral fellow and as a co-investigator. The ACES mission is the first project he’s managed as the principal investigator.

“I certainly feel relieved now that we’ve launched,” Bounds said. “The pressure was much greater before today.”

Bounds and his team aren’t taking much time to regroup. The team plans to return to Poker Flat Research Range in 2010, as the University of Iowa is a collaborator for another launch scheduled at the range.

Poker Flat Research Range is the largest land-based sounding rocket range in the world. It’s located 30 miles north of Fairbanks on the Steese Highway. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks operates the range under contract to NASA.



Do you have a link to that article?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/30/2009 06:32 pm
(...)
Do you have a link to that article?

http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20090129163746.html

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-01/uoaf-trf012909.php

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/18/2009 10:09 pm
Four Terrier/Improved Orion rockets were launched from Poker Flat on Feb 18,
according to the Wallops site. They carry neutral air turbulence instruments from
Gerald Lehmacher at Clemson U.

Feb 18 0952   NASA 41.076     Terrier Orion   Poker Flat      Atmosphere   
Feb 18 1029   NASA 41.078     Terrier Orion   Poker Flat      Atmosphere   
Feb 18 1059   NASA 41.079     Terrier Orion   Poker Flat      Atmosphere   
Feb 18 1147   NASA 41.077     Terrier Orion   Poker Flat      Atmosphere   
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/20/2009 12:00 am
Article at Univ of Alaska web site:
http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20090218154554.html

Four rockets launch from Poker Flat Research Range

Submitted by Amy Hartley
Phone: 907-474-5823
02/18/09

Four NASA rockets launched from Poker Flat Research Range during a three-hour span on the morning of Feb. 18, 2009. The rockets, carrying payloads that emitted glowing vapor trails that help scientists study turbulence in the upper atmosphere, launched at 12:59 a.m., 1:29 a.m., 1:59 a.m., and 2:49 a.m. Alaska Standard Time. The whitish trails, some resembling corkscrews in the sky, were visible in many parts of interior and northern Alaska.

“There were four trails on the up-leg (of the rocket trajectory), four on the down-leg,” said Gerald Lehmacher of Clemson University, principal investigator for the experiment. “The instruments worked well.”

The experiment featured four rockets--35-foot, two-stage Terrier Orions--that released two trails each of trimethyl aluminum nearly 87 miles up into the night sky.

“They pretty much filled up a big part of the sky,” Lehmacher said.

The harmless vapor trails of the first rocket dissipated in about 20 minutes, after which Lehmacher and the launch crew sent following rockets into the same portion of the sky, which was clear with a faint arc of the aurora to the north. Researchers at ground stations in Fort Yukon, Coldfoot, and Toolik Lake captured images of the trails for later analyses.

With the experiment, known as “Turbopause,” Lehmacher wants to learn more about turbulence in the upper atmosphere about 50 to 80 miles above our heads. Winds there can be much faster than those in the jet stream.

“We want to measure the region where turbulence reaches its largest values and then stops acting,” Lehmacher said.

Lehmacher’s experiment was one of two set for February at Poker Flat. Next to launch is an experiment named Cascades II. Kristina Lynch of Dartmouth College is the principal investigator for the Cascades experiment, in which one 58-foot, four-stage Black Brant XII sounding rocket will blast off from Poker Flat into an active aurora display when the weather is clear above Chatanika and at camera sites in Toolik Lake and Kaktovik.

Poker Flat Research Range is the largest land-based sounding rocket range in the world. It’s located 30 miles north of Fairbanks on the Steese Highway. The Geophysical Institute at UAF operates the range under contract to NASA. More than 300 major scientific sounding rockets have launched from the facility since it was founded in 1969.

CONTACT: Poker Flat Research Range at 907-455-2110. Geophysical Institute science writer Ned Rozell at 907-474-7468 or [email protected]

ON THE WEB: www.gi.alaska.edu/pfrr
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/20/2009 09:06 pm
Some additional sites with photos

http://tuesdayadventures.blogspot.com/2009/02/week-4-with-40-degree-temperature.html
http://hannadahlgren.blogspot.com/2009/02/lehmacher-rocket-launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/21/2009 04:25 pm
Another article and a great picture

http://newsminer.com/news/2009/feb/18/four-rockets-launched-poker-flat-research-range/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/25/2009 02:46 pm
A BB IX launched from White Sands at 10:45 GMT this morning, with the CIBER IR Astronomy payload for the California Institute of Technology (NASA 36.226UG).


There is also a BB XII scheduled to launch from Poker Flat with an auroral payload for Dartmouth College in the early hours of tomorrow morning, but this launch has already been scrubbed several times due to weather and poor science conditions.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/27/2009 11:15 pm
There was a successful Trident II test on 13 February, from the USS Alabama in the Pacific Ocean.

It appears that only one missile was launched, which is unusual - they are usually tested in pairs.

The BB still hasn't gone.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ckiki lwai on 03/08/2009 07:33 pm
Some people of my rocketry club are at Esrange in Sweden to launch our Stratos rocket to 15 km. At the moment they are still waiting for Rexus 5 which will probably launched on 10 March.

More information about the Rexus rocket can be found in this link from ESA:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Education/SEMRSQCDNRF_0.html

More information about our Stratos rocket and a blog about its preparations can be found on www.projectstratos.nl
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/16/2009 03:52 am
REXUS 6 (Improved Orion) launched from ESRANGE on 2009 Mar 12 at 1008 UTC, apogee 88 km

REXUS 5 (Improved Orion) launched from ESRANGE on 2009 Mar 13
at 0600 UTC, apogee 87 km

Payload mass for REXUS is around 40 kg.

(source: www.ssc.se)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ckiki lwai on 03/17/2009 04:02 pm
Our Stratos rocket was finally launched today!
We reached an altitude of 12.5 km which means that we hold the new European altitude record for amateur rockets beating the British record who previously flew 10.7 km high. ;D

Pictures can be found on http://www.media.tudelft.nl/

A launch video of the Rexus 6 rocket:
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pN_IPgld-EY
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/18/2009 05:54 pm
The US MDA conducted a THAAD test yesterday, involving two interceptors against a single target. The test was successful.

This is the test which was delayed from last September after the target failed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/20/2009 10:52 pm
The BB XII finally launched from Poker Flat this morning. Payload was Cascades-2 for Dartmouth College, launch is reported to have been successful.

EDIT: Launch was at 11:04 GMT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/23/2009 05:49 pm
From article on UAF web site:

Final rocket launches, measures aurora movement

Submitted by Amy Hartley
Phone: 907-474-5823
03/20/09

It’s been a long wait, but it was worth it. The Black Brant XII sounding rocket with the CASCADES II experiment launched and flew through an active aurora display March 20 at 3:04 a.m. Alaska Standard Time. The successful launch occurred after 20 nights of preparing and then waiting to launch the NASA rocket. The CASCADES II team needed very specific conditions and clear weather for an optimal launch.

Kristina Lynch, the principal investigator for CASCADES II, is from Dartmouth College. For more than a month, Lynch has spent her days in Fairbanks and her evenings at Poker Flat Research Range, near Chatanika. Snow, strong winds and minimal aurora made for a significant delay in the launch. However, waiting was the right thing to do. When the rocket launched, it supplied an ideal performance.

“The trajectory looks great. The deployments and the mechanical systems behaved beautifully,” Lynch said. “We’re very happy. We had a beautiful event.”

The four-stage rocket, measuring more than 60 feet long, arced through the aurora, reaching its peak about 350 miles over Kaktovik. At that time, its payload separated into five different probes that simultaneously measured aurora movement. Analysis of preliminary data from the complex payload will begin today, Lynch said. Cameras stationed at Toolik Lake and Kaktovik, on Alaska’s North Slope, captured the CASCADES II experiment.

CASCADES II is the final rocket to launch in 2009 from Poker Flat Research Range. Range staff supported the launch of eight rockets this year, and worked with principal investigators from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Iowa, Clemson University, and Dartmouth College.

Poker Flat Research Range is the largest land-based sounding rocket range in the world. It’s located 30 miles north of Fairbanks on the Steese Highway. The Geophysical Institute at UAF operates the range under contract to NASA.

http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20090320155200.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/25/2009 03:22 am
From article on UAF web site:

Final rocket launches, measures aurora movement

Submitted by Amy Hartley
Phone: 907-474-5823
03/20/09

It’s been a long wait, but it was worth it. The Black Brant XII sounding rocket with the CASCADES II experiment launched and flew through an active aurora display March 20 at 3:04 a.m. Alaska Standard Time. The successful launch occurred after 20 nights of preparing and then waiting to launch the NASA rocket. The CASCADES II team needed very specific conditions and clear weather for an optimal launch.

Kristina Lynch, the principal investigator for CASCADES II, is from Dartmouth College. For more than a month, Lynch has spent her days in Fairbanks and her evenings at Poker Flat Research Range, near Chatanika. Snow, strong winds and minimal aurora made for a significant delay in the launch. However, waiting was the right thing to do. When the rocket launched, it supplied an ideal performance.

“The trajectory looks great. The deployments and the mechanical systems behaved beautifully,” Lynch said. “We’re very happy. We had a beautiful event.”

The four-stage rocket, measuring more than 60 feet long, arced through the aurora, reaching its peak about 350 miles over Kaktovik. At that time, its payload separated into five different probes that simultaneously measured aurora movement. Analysis of preliminary data from the complex payload will begin today, Lynch said. Cameras stationed at Toolik Lake and Kaktovik, on Alaska’s North Slope, captured the CASCADES II experiment.

CASCADES II is the final rocket to launch in 2009 from Poker Flat Research Range. Range staff supported the launch of eight rockets this year, and worked with principal investigators from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Iowa, Clemson University, and Dartmouth College.

Poker Flat Research Range is the largest land-based sounding rocket range in the world. It’s located 30 miles north of Fairbanks on the Steese Highway. The Geophysical Institute at UAF operates the range under contract to NASA.

http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20090320155200.html

I emailed them and they confirmed the release should read "Alaska Daylight Time" (not Alaska Standard Time) so 1104 UTC is the correct time.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/26/2009 10:45 pm
A Hera was launched from Fort Wingate at 13:25 GMT yestearday. It was the target for a Patriot test, but the ABM failed before even attempting an intercept. The Hera was reported to have operated successfully.

Hera launches sometimes reach space, sometimes they don't. I haven't heard the apogee for this launch yet. If anyone knows it, please can they post.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 04/10/2009 01:48 pm
Some information about todays launch http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121047976.html and the plan for 2009 http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121052406.html .
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 04/11/2009 02:16 pm
Some information about todays launch http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121047976.html and the plan for 2009 http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121052406.html .

This was a Topol' and it was launched at 0910 UTC from Plesetsk,
http://mil.ru/info/1069/details/index.shtml?id=61207
linked to from Pavel Podvig's russianforces.org
(0909 UTC according to the English-language
http://www.mosnews.com/military/2009/04/10/949/ )
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 04/25/2009 03:08 pm
FalconLaunch VII was launched from White Sands at 11:17 on 17 April.
It reached an apogee of 108.1 kilometres making it the first student-built rocket to reach space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 04/30/2009 02:03 am
Some information about todays launch http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121047976.html and the plan for 2009 http://en.rian.ru/russia/20090410/121052406.html .

This was a Topol' and it was launched at 0910 UTC from Plesetsk,
http://mil.ru/info/1069/details/index.shtml?id=61207
linked to from Pavel Podvig's russianforces.org
(0909 UTC according to the English-language
http://www.mosnews.com/military/2009/04/10/949/ )

Correction: although another source gave 1210 GMT+3 for the launch,
mil.ru gives 1210 MSK (Moscow summer time) which is GMT-4, so
0810 UTC seems to be the correct time.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 10:23 am
There will be a SpaceLoft-XL launch from Spaceport America at 14:00 GMT today. The payload consists of student experiments and the Celestis "Discovery" flight, carrying cremated human remains.

A webcast will be available at www.spaceportamerica.com
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ckiki lwai on 05/02/2009 01:49 pm
No webcast to be found on website, and the launch should occur in about 10 minutes.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 01:58 pm
No webcast to be found on website, and the launch should occur in about 10 minutes.

I can't find it either. 90 seconds to launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 02:00 pm
If launch occurred on schedule it will have happened by now.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 02:11 pm
They have finally posted a link to the webcast:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/spaceport-america-webcast

However it doesn't seem to be working...and we're already ten minutes into the launch window.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 02:19 pm
Video has started, but it keeps cutting out

Clock says T-0

Now it's gone down completely. I hate ustream.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 02:56 pm
Launch occurred and was successful. No other details at this time.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/02/2009 06:55 pm
I'm now hearing that the launch failed due to underperformance.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ckiki lwai on 05/03/2009 04:54 pm
Article about the launch from KRQE with video:
http://www.krqe.com/dpp/news/technology/technology_krqe_torc_nm_rocket_fails_to_reach_space_200905022346

It shows the rocket gyrating after burnout, didn't something similar happen during the first Spaceloft XL launch?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/22/2009 08:11 pm
A Nike-Orion was launched from Esrange at 10:32 GMT this morning with the MAPHEUS payload for DLR. It reached an apogee of 140.8 kilometres, and is reported to have been successful.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 05/23/2009 09:47 am
There was a hypersonic test launch designated "HIFiRE-0" from Woomera on 7 May. The rocket reached an apogee of 300 kilometres.

This is an image of the rocket used:
http://www.defence.gov.au/media/download/2009/May/20090522/22176-974.jpg

I'm having some difficulty identifying it, and was wondering if someone else could tell me what it is. Thanks.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/25/2009 06:32 pm
There was a hypersonic test launch designated "HIFiRE-0" from Woomera on 7 May. The rocket reached an apogee of 300 kilometres.

This is an image of the rocket used:
http://www.defence.gov.au/media/download/2009/May/20090522/22176-974.jpg

I'm having some difficulty identifying it, and was wondering if someone else could tell me what it is. Thanks.

The later HIFIRE are meant to be Terrier Orion. This one looks more like
a Nike Orion to me, but I have a hard time telling the difference.
I think the old model Orion is a bit shorter than the Improved Orion
usually used now.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/27/2009 07:44 am
A Nike-Orion was launched from Esrange at 10:32 GMT this morning with the MAPHEUS payload for DLR. It reached an apogee of 140.8 kilometres, and is reported to have been successful.

A mission report (in German) and pictures of the launch can be found on the DLR website: http://www.dlr.de/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-5105/8598_read-17565/

Information is also provided at the Esrange website: http://www.ssc.se/?id=14640&cid=14640&DivId=&Year=2009
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/29/2009 01:45 am
NASA Flies Experimental Probes in 'Wind Tunnel in the Sky'

 
 
PRESS RELEASE
Date Released: Thursday, May 28, 2009
Source: Ames Research Center



 

NASA today successfully launched two hypersonic experiments as secondary payloads atop a NASA-built Terrier-Orion two-stage research sounding rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Va., at 9:52 a.m. PDT.

The rocket lofted two Sub-Orbital Aerodynamic Re-entry Experiments, or SOAREX, probes more than 80 miles high. The two NASA-developed experiments will help engineers and scientists design efficient ways to return experiments to Earth from the International Space Station. Additionally the technology could be used to supplement future missions to Mars.

"Both experiments performed very well, but the Tube Deployed Re-entry Vehicle experiment performed even better than we had predicted," said Marc Murbach, the principal investigator for the SOAREX missions, which are managed by the NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif. "Because of how well the instruments worked, we expect to get very interesting and useful data."

The primary SOAREX experiment was a Tube Deployed Re-entry Vehicle (TDRV), which for the first time tested a heat shield that unfolded to protect the probe during its decent. The TDRV is designed to improve the way payloads are stabilized and packaged on an atmospheric entry probe to better guarantee its safe return.

The second experiment was an instrumented nose cone that carried several experimental temperature, pressure and light sensors as well as a mounted camera to determine what the nose cone experiences during launch and in flight.

The 40-foot tall Terrier-Orion flew about 40 miles downrange, to a point southeast of Wallops, where it and the experiments fell into the Atlantic Ocean. Following the successful launch, SOAREX team members and support staff from Wallops will analyze the experiments' flight data.

A series of SOAREX flights were conceived as a way to perform hypersonic flight experiments that complement ground test facilities and are often referred to as a 'wind tunnel in the sky.' This launch was the seventh in the series, also known as SOAREX-7.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/29/2009 02:37 am
NASA Flies Experimental Probes in 'Wind Tunnel in the Sky'

 
 

This is flight  NASA 41.080NR
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/06/2009 07:43 am
Brazil launched an Orion-1 on a mission code-named Maracati-1 on May 29; the rocket reached an altitude of 93 km.
Reports state the launch was conducted to test the facilities at the Alcantara launching center.
For more info; see http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-05/30/content_11455467.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/23/2009 09:58 pm
MDA launched Terrier-Lynx rockets from San Nicolas Island on Jun 6 and Jun 13
as targets for the Airborne Laser airplane to track.  The tracking test occurred low in the atmosphere, but if the missile profile was set up to be realistic, the upper stage may have reached space.

http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0012.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:03 am
There is a Terrier-Orion launch planned from Wallops Island this morning, with a RockOn student research payload.

The clock is currently at T-27 minutes and counting, with launch scheduled for 09:30 GMT.

Link to the webcast:
http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:10 am
T-20 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:15 am
T-15 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:18 am
Launch will be from the MRL at Launch Area 2.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:20 am
T-10 minutes and counting.

Range reports that several boats are violating the launch hazard area.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/26/2009 09:23 am
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:25 am
T-5 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:26 am
All stations green, so the boats must have left the hazard area.

T-4 minutes and counting.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/26/2009 09:26 am
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:26 am
Despite the webcast stream title, this launch has nothing to do with MLAS.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:28 am
T-120 seconds and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:28 am
T-90 seconds
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:29 am
T-60 seconds and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:29 am
T-30 seconds, still go
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:30 am
Liftoff
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:31 am
Tracking cameras having some problems following the rocket.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/26/2009 09:32 am
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:32 am
Staging has occurred and was successful.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:35 am
T+5 minutes
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:36 am
Parachute deployment confirmed
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:40 am
T+10 minutes
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 09:46 am
End of coverage.

Nothing official, but it looks like the launch was successful.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/26/2009 10:12 am
Launch video:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=17627.0

T-1 minute to T+2 minutes.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/29/2009 06:45 am
An article describing the launch is available on the Spaceref.com website: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=31637

It reads: "Nearly 100 university instructors and students saw their experiments rise to the sky at 5:30 a.m. this morning (26 June) with the successful launch of a NASA suborbital sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. 

During the past week the students have been at Wallops preparing their experiments through the week-long RockOn/RockSat workshop. The program is conducted in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia.

The purpose of the workshop is to provide a hands-on learning experience for future scientists and engineers that could one day be involved in flying rocket experiments.  The two-stage Terrier-Orion rocket carried the experiments to an altitude of 73 miles. 

The experiments were recovered and the students will begin analyzing their results this afternoon."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/29/2009 12:50 pm
Launch alert from Brian Webb...

LAUNCH ALERT
              
                              Brian Webb
                     Ventura County, California
                         [email protected]
                     http://www.spacearchive.info
             
                                   2009 June 29 (Monday) 04:47 PDT
----------------------------------------------------------------------

            VANDENBERG SUCESSFULLY LAUNCHES MINUTEMAN III
                    Vandenberg AFB News Release
                            2009 June 29

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - An unarmed Minuteman III
intercontinental ballistic missile configured with a National Nuclear
Security Administration test assembly launched from North Vandenberg
today at 3:01 a.m.

The launch was an operational test to verify the weapon system's
reliability and accuracy.

The missile carried three unarmed re-entry vehicles approximately
4,190 miles at speeds in excess of 24,000 mph to their pre-determined
targets near the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Col. David Buck, the 30th Space Wing commander, was the mission's
launch decision authority.  Lt. Col. Lesa K. Toler, the 576th Flight
Test Squadron commander, was the mission director for this test
launch.

"It's really something when you see a truly outstanding team come
together," Colonel Buck said.  "As a former Top Hander myself, I know
that the Airmen of the 576th FLTS are the best of the best when it
comes to force development evaluation, and, as the 30th Space Wing
commander, I know that this is the best range team in the world. I
couldn't think of a better team to demonstrate the awesome capability
of our ICBM fleet." 

Throughout the preparation and execution of the mission, maintenance
and operations task force personnel from the 91st Missile Wing out of
Minot AFB, N.D., integrated with the 576th FLTS to perform operational
tasks.  Members of the 576th FLTS installed tracking, telemetry and
command destruct systems on the missile to collect data and meet 30th Space Wing safety requirements.

"These are dangerous times we're living in right now," said Colonel
Toler. "It's extremely important our combatant commander has the
capabilities he needs to perform the mission of fighting and winning
our nation's wars. Testing an operational asset pulled from the
missile field at Minot provides us confidence our weapon system is
capable of performing when needed."

The data collected will be used by the entire ICBM community,
including the United States Strategic Command planners and Department
of Energy laboratories.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/29/2009 12:55 pm
More info about this Minuteman-III launch in here (http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123156457).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/29/2009 11:02 pm
Minuteman 3 video from the VAFB web site

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-090629-061.wmv
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/02/2009 04:45 am
Minuteman 3 video from the VAFB web site

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-090629-061.wmv

Brief "receiving end" video of RV impact at the tail end of this video.  "Wow" puts it mildly.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/02/2009 08:07 pm
From NASA Wallops web site

36.244 UG GREEN/UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 6-27-2009
36.244 UGTerrier-Black Brant was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on June 27, 2009.The purpose of this mission is to study the interstellar medium. The Principal Investigator is Dr. James Green, University of Colorado.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/03/2009 07:02 am
Indonesia launched a sounding rocket (RX-420) from a launch pad in Pameungpeuk, several kilometers from the town of Garut, West Java, at 08:00 local time (01:00 GMT).
The 6.2-meter rocket carried a GPS device, an accelerometer and a temperature sensor, and reached an altitude of about 50 km.
For more information: see http://thejakartaglobe.com/national/space-agency-launches-rx-420-rocket/315934
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/04/2009 04:18 am
Indonesia launched a sounding rocket (RX-420) from a launch pad in Pameungpeuk, several kilometers from the town of Garut, West Java, at 08:00 local time (01:00 GMT).
The 6.2-meter rocket carried a GPS device, an accelerometer and a temperature sensor, and reached an altitude of about 50 km.
For more information: see http://thejakartaglobe.com/national/space-agency-launches-rx-420-rocket/315934

And more info and pics at
http://www.lapan.go.id/doc_news/rx420.htm
(if only I spoke Indonesian.. but there's http://www.toggletext.com/main.cgi?page=translation)

Apogee 53 km. "Power per second 100 ton" ... I suspect this is thrust in kN, 100 kN would be reasonable but 980 kN (100 ton thrust) would be implausible for such a small rocket.

RX-320 launched 2008 May 30 and Jul 2;  earlier I had seen only one RX-320 noted, and the wire story had said 2008 May 19. Two RX-100, with 1.90m long 0.11m dia 30 kg, were used to test payload sub-systems? Implication seems to be these two were launched around the same time as the RX-420

RPS (Roket Pengorbit Satelit) will use three RX-420 stages and one RX-320.

 - Jonathan.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/04/2009 05:23 pm
North Korea's been launching missiles again. The launches on July 2 were reported as small anti-ship missiles, i.e. in-atmosphere. Seven launches on July 4 are being reported by S Korea's Yonhap news agency as being "Scud", which would be marginally exoatmospheric - but I'm not yet convinced that these reports are reliable.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/14/2009 08:18 pm
The flight of Flometrics' LOX-Biodiesel rocket. The engine puts out 1000lbf nominally, pushing the rocket to near Mach 1. Launched 7/11.

The rocket was built by Flometrics, http://www.flometrics.com/
The fuel was made by EERC.
The AFRL procured the fuel for Flometrics.
The rocket was launched at FAR, the Friends of Amateur Rocketry, http://far.pyroinnovations.com/

This video was recorded by Ben Brockert of Masten Space Systems, http://masten-space.com/


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0JEx_bjl04
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: hop on 07/15/2009 12:46 am
Pavel Podvig reports (http://russianforces.org/blog/2009/07/bulava_test_expected.shtml) that another test of the troubled Bulava SLBM is expected soon, possibly July 15th.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/15/2009 09:03 am
Russia launched two R-29RMU Sineva missiles on Monday and Tuesday, from the K-117 Bryansk submarine near the North Pole.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 07/15/2009 07:38 pm
Russia launched two R-29RMU Sineva missiles on Monday and Tuesday, from the K-117 Bryansk submarine near the North Pole.
According to RIANovosti the first launch was from  K-84 Ekaterinburg.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/15/2009 09:34 pm
Russia launched two R-29RMU Sineva missiles on Monday and Tuesday, from the K-117 Bryansk submarine near the North Pole.
According to RIANovosti the first launch was from  K-84 Ekaterinburg.

The situation is still confused but Pavel Podvig's reports suggest that
the K-84 report was an error and that both launches were from K-117.
One flight was aimed at Kamchatka, the other at Chizha. Each Sineva (R-29RMU) can carry up to 10 reentry vehicles.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/15/2009 09:51 pm
Russia launched two R-29RMU Sineva missiles on Monday and Tuesday, from the K-117 Bryansk submarine near the North Pole.
According to RIANovosti the first launch was from  K-84 Ekaterinburg.

The situation is still confused but Pavel Podvig's reports suggest that
the K-84 report was an error and that both launches were from K-117.
One flight was aimed at Kamchatka, the other at Chizha. Each Sineva (R-29RMU) can carry up to 10 reentry vehicles.


Interfaks is still saying today that both were from  K-117 Bryansk, but
Isvestia and RIAN (Novosti) are saying the first one was from K-84.
I conclude the latter are correct.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/17/2009 12:19 pm
Bulava has failed again.

According to Xinhua it launched yesterday, and was terminated during first stage flight. This is the sixth failure in eleven launches.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/23/2009 11:34 pm
Arrow 2 test cancelled after target missile launched from C-17 over the Pacific Ocean

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1248277867124&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/25/2009 04:55 am
Arrow 2 test cancelled after target missile launched from C-17 over the Pacific Ocean

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1248277867124&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

I'm guessing the target missile was probably a Castor 4B Medium Range Target,  tested in 2005, or an LRALT (Long Range Air Launched Target), tested in 2004 and using two SR19 motors.
Launch was at Jul 22 1945 UTC, probably on the Kauai range; known launches
have been in the vicinity of Kauai and further west at 175W 22N.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/26/2009 03:12 am
MDA release http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0014.pdf

Missile Defense Test Conducted

Today, July 22, at 12:45pm (PDT), the Arrow Weapon System (AWS) conducted an interception test at a missile test range in the United States. This test is a part of the Arrow System Improvement Program, jointly conducted by Israel and the United States. The test also exercised the Arrow Weapon System interoperability with other elements of the U. S. Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS), including the Terminal High Altitude Area (THAAD) Program, the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Program and the Patriot (PAC-3) Program. The target missile was dropped from a C-17 aircraft and represented a future ballistic missile threat. The radar detected the target and transferred its tracks to the battle management control center. The AWS and the BMDS elements exchanged data in real-time on the target. Not all test conditions to launch the Arrow Interceptor were met, and it was not launched. Interoperability objectives, including a simulated intercept by the Aegis destroyer, USS Benfold (DDG 65), were achieved. Results are being analyzed by the program engineers.
The Israel Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) and US Department of Defense representatives participated in the test, as well as all the industries in charge of the system development.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/31/2009 09:16 am
A Trident II was launched from HMS Victorious on 26 July May. Not sure where Victorious was at the time, but I believe all previous RN Trident tests have used the US Eastern Range.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/31/2009 01:28 pm
A Trident II was launched from HMS Victorious on 26 July. Not sure where Victorious was at the time, but I believe all previous RN Trident tests have used the US Eastern Range.

There's a Lockheed press release dated Jul 30 that says 26 *MAY*.
Perhaps this is an error..
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/31/2009 01:44 pm
The website I read it on has changed its story now, so I guess that it probably correct.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/01/2009 09:57 am
The US MDA conducted an SM-3 test yesterday. An SM-3 successfully intercepted a short-range target.
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0015.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/01/2009 01:21 pm
HMS Victorius was in the Atlantic Ocean (Eastern Test Range).

For the US MDA test there were TWO target missile launches - first one was intercepted, the second one was tracking only (no intercept tried).
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2009/073109_LM_AegisBMD.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/02/2009 07:00 am
The US MDA conducted an SM-3 test yesterday. An SM-3 successfully intercepted a short-range target.
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0015.pdf

There's also a video of the test:

http://www.youtube.com/v/pFXpods_nro&hl
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/02/2009 08:09 pm
The US MDA conducted an SM-3 test yesterday. An SM-3 successfully intercepted a short-range target.
http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0015.pdf

There's also a spectacular photo of the launch at this website: http://www.strategypage.com/military_photos/2009073120648.aspx
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/02/2009 09:50 pm


There's also a spectacular photo of the launch at this website: http://www.strategypage.com/military_photos/2009073120648.aspx

As usual in the past few years, no MDA statement on the rocket type used for the targets. There is a seeker image of the target though: doesn't look like a Castor 4B or an Aries to me,
possibly they used a Terrier Orion ARAV?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/13/2009 09:20 pm
Target missile launched from San Nicholas Island on 8/10. ABL successfully "intercepts" it.

The Missile Alternative Range Target Instrument is similar in size and
geometry to a ballistic missile, but with a section of sensors to record and measure the laser performance.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=796

http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/pdf/09news0016.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/13/2009 10:09 pm
Target was a Black Brant IX. The article mentions a previous test "just over two months" ago. Does anyone know when this happened (NASA are currently listing the two flights as being scheduled to launch some time this month)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/14/2009 01:26 am
In preparation for this low-power MARTI test, the ABL team conducted a series of tests including low-power tracking tests against non-instrumented boosting Terrier-Lynx target missiles June 6 and June 13.

MARTI = Missile Alternative Range Target Instrument

from Lockheed-Martin

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2009/0813_ss_abl_direct-laser.html

Is a  Black Brant IX really "similar in size and geometry to a ballistic missile"?
From MDA - The Missile Alternative Range Target Instrument is similar in size and geometry to a ballistic missile, but with a section of sensors to record and measure the laser performance.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/14/2009 10:15 am
In preparation for this low-power MARTI test, the ABL team conducted a series of tests including low-power tracking tests against non-instrumented boosting Terrier-Lynx target missiles June 6 and June 13.

In that case, the NASA website was probably correct, so there could be a couple more tests later this month.

The Terrer-Lynx launches probably reached space. Any idea where they launched from?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/14/2009 03:09 pm
They were launched from San Nicholas Island
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/17/2009 06:34 am
A Black Brant sounding rocket is scheduled to be launched from Wallops between 7-11 a.m. EDT (1100-1500 GMT) today, with onboard the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) to test an inflatable ballutet planetary reentry system.
More info here: http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0908/16wallops/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 08:31 am
There will be a webcast of the BB launch on the NASA WFF website.
http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/

Might make good viewing during the Delta II coast phase.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:25 am
The Black Brant launch is currently holding at T-30 minutes due to ships downrange of Wallops Island.

The rocket will fly in the Black Brant IX, or Terrier-Black Brant configuration, which is a Black Brant V atop a Terrier 70.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 11:39 am
webcast started
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 11:47 am
1 min and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 11:48 am
holding at T -18s
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 11:50 am
holding again at T -17s
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:51 am
This is a Viper sounding rocket which will be used to check the upper atmosphere before the Black Brant launches.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 11:51 am
60 seconds and holding
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:51 am
Back to T-60 seconds and holding, standing by to pick up the count
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:52 am
Counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:52 am
T-30 seconds on the Viper
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:52 am
T-10 seconds
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:52 am
Launched
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 11:53 am
Couldn't capture a screenie :(
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:53 am
T+1 minute on the Viper
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 11:54 am
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:56 am
I got a video, I'll try to upload it later.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:56 am
Aircraft violating WFF airspace.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 11:57 am
"Evaluating the performance of this Viper"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:00 pm
Oh, did I just read we have two rockets?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:01 pm
Oh, did I just read we have two rockets?
Yes. The one that was launched was a Viper, which was to support the main launch. The main launch is of the larger Black Brant, which we are looking at now.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:03 pm
Launch is "a little way off"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:07 pm
"Launch another Viper?"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:08 pm
Viper launch frame by frame
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:08 pm
"Launch another Viper?"
I think they're discussing launching one after the Black Brant.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:08 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:09 pm
Viper launch contd.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:10 pm
Viper launch; last set
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:16 pm
T-9 minutes and holding
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:21 pm
Configuring for the Black Brant launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:21 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:22 pm
Range is green
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:24 pm
Eight minutes and holding
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:24 pm
T-8 minutes and holding (they didn't bother counting between the two holds, they just went straight from T-9 to T-8)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:29 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:32 pm
T-8 minutes and holding (they didn't bother counting between the two holds, they just went straight from T-9 to T-8)

This is what makes a suborbital launch so different compared to the shuttle (apples and oranges)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:32 pm
Launcher being set to 104.5° azimuth, 83.3° elevation
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:33 pm
Standing by to pick up the count

Plan is to run it down to T-3 minutes, then hold again.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:35 pm
Surveillance aircraft being removed from the range
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:41 pm
Polling for launch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:44 pm
Go for launch with the exception of TD and RSO, who are waiting for the surveillance aircraft to clear the range.

Final launcher settings are 103.8° Azimuth, 83.2° Elevation
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:44 pm
T-8 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:44 pm
8 minutes and counting!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:45 pm
RSO and TD are go for launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:46 pm
T -6min
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:47 pm
PT-5 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:48 pm
T-4 minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:49 pm
T-3 minutes and counting, no hold
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:49 pm
Transferring to internal power
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:50 pm
T-120 seconds and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:50 pm
Two minutes and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:50 pm
Motors armed
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:50 pm
T-90 seconds
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:51 pm
T-90s and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:51 pm
T-60 seconds and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:51 pm
T-30 seconds
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:51 pm
Final 20 seconds
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:52 pm
LAUNCH
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:52 pm
Stage 2 ignition
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:52 pm
LAUNCH!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:52 pm
S2 burnout
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:53 pm
One minute into the launch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:53 pm
Pictures
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:53 pm
Spacecraft separation, some intermittent views from the onboard camera
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:53 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:54 pm
More pictures
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:54 pm
The final screenshot!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 12:54 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:55 pm
Telemetry is good, video is not as good as expected
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:56 pm
What is this actually?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:56 pm
Apogee
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:56 pm
What is this actually?

I think it is North America.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:58 pm
It's spinning as mad...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:58 pm
Experiment beginning
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 12:59 pm
Beginning re-entry.

EDIT: Maybe not, must have misheard
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 12:59 pm
Lost the payload camera
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:00 pm
Now seeing the inflatable heat shield
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:00 pm
Pressure is within design limits
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:01 pm
payload camera
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:03 pm
shadows walking across FOV; things wobble and breathe somewhat...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:05 pm
Altitude is below 10 km, maybe that was reentry earlier
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:06 pm
Ambient pressure 5psi
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 01:07 pm
A very fiery reentry...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:07 pm
Shield collapsed at 6psi. Mission was successful.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:07 pm
image is quite bad; back to control center
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:07 pm
A very fiery reentry...
That was at 8km altitude...hardly reentry.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 01:08 pm
Another Viper launch is being scheduled
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:08 pm
lift off once again; frame by frame
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:09 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:09 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:10 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:10 pm
and the final set
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/17/2009 01:18 pm
We are T-5 minutes and holding. Yet another launch of a Viper rocket
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:24 pm
launch sequence as animated gif
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:35 pm
Viper launch rail is now in horizontal position
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: mdo on 08/17/2009 01:41 pm
no more pictures from the webcast; that's all from me for now
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: rdale on 08/17/2009 02:04 pm
NASA LAUNCHES NEW TECHNOLOGY: AN INFLATABLE HEAT SHIELD

WALLOPS ISLAND, Va. -- A successful NASA flight test Monday demonstrated how a spacecraft returning to Earth can use an inflatable heat shield to slow and protect itself as it enters the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds.

The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment, or IRVE, was vacuum-packed into a 15-inch diameter payload "shroud" and launched on a small sounding rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va., at 8:52 a.m. EDT. The 10-foot diameter heat shield, made of several layers of silicone-coated industrial fabric, inflated with nitrogen to a mushroom shape in space several minutes after liftoff.

The Black Brant 9 rocket took approximately four minutes to lift the experiment to an altitude of 131 miles. Less than a minute later it was released from its cover and started inflating on schedule at 124 miles up. The inflation of the shield took less than 90 seconds.

"Our inflation system, which is essentially a glorified scuba tank, worked flawlessly and so did the flexible aeroshell," said Neil Cheatwood, IRVE principal investigator and chief scientist for the Hypersonics Project at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
"We're really excited today because this is the first time anyone has successfully flown an inflatable reentry vehicle."

According to the cameras and sensors on board, the heat shield expanded to its full size and went into a high-speed free fall. The key focus of the research came about six and a half minutes into the flight, at an altitude of about 50 miles, when the aeroshell re-entered Earth's atmosphere and experienced its peak heating and pressure measurements for a period of about 30 seconds.

An on board telemetry system captured data from instruments during the test and broadcast the information to engineers on the ground in real time. The technology demonstrator splashed down and sank in the Atlantic Ocean about 90 miles east of Virginia's Wallops Island.

"This was a small-scale demonstrator," said Mary Beth Wusk, IRVE project manager, based at Langley. "Now that we've proven the concept, we'd like to build more advanced aeroshells capable of handling higher heat rates."

Inflatable heat shields hold promise for future planetary missions, according to researchers. To land more mass on Mars at higher surface elevations, for instance, mission planners need to maximize the drag area of the entry system. The larger the diameter of the aeroshell, the bigger the payload can be.

The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment is an example of how NASA is using its aeronautics expertise to support the development of future spacecraft. The Fundamental Aeronautics Program within NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in Washington funded the flight experiment as part of its hypersonic research effort.

For images and more information about the experiment, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/irve.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/17/2009 02:43 pm
Very nice coverage everybody, thanks.
For the record, this was NASA 36.254NR, IRVE-II.
IRVE-I was NASA 41.055NP, a Terrier Orion launched 2007 Sep 6.

According to the Wallops schedule, the San Nicolas Island MARTI-ABL target launch also had a NASA designation,- there are three on the schedule in fact, NASA 36.228, 36.229, 36.247, not clear which one was the Aug 11 launch.
This is in contrast to the Terrier Lynx flights which don't seem to have NASA involvement
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/17/2009 02:49 pm
The Vipers were the Viper 3A variant, which sometimes reaches space. Does anyone have apogees for the ones launched today? (assuming the second one launched)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/19/2009 10:42 am
Video of the IRVE launch on a Black Brant IX

http://www.youtube.com/v/-43aFRaMVPA&hl=nl&fs=1
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 08/19/2009 11:31 am
2009 August 18 (Tuesday) 18:14 PDT
----------------------------------------------------------------------

              VANDENBERG SCHEDULES MINUTEMAN III LAUNCH
                    Vandenberg AFB Press Release
                           2009 August 18

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - An unarmed Minuteman III
intercontinental ballistic missile configured with a joint test
assembly is scheduled to launch from North Vandenberg Sunday between
3:01 a.m. to 9:01 a.m.

The launch is an operational test to determine the weapon system's
reliability and accuracy.

The missile's single unarmed re-entry vehicle is expected to travel
approximately 4,190 miles, hitting a pre-determined target near the
Kwajalein Atoll. 

The 576th Flight Test Squadron, which will direct the missile launch,
installed tracking, telemetry and command destruct systems on the
missile to collect data and meet safety requirements. Maintenance and
operations task force personnel from the 341st Missile Wing, Malmstrom
AFB, Montana are conducting operational tasks supporting the launch. 

Col. Steven Winters, the 30th Space Wing vice commander, is the launch
decision authority for this mission. Col. Carl T. DeKemper, the 576th
FLTS commander, is the mission director. A crew from Malmstrom AFB
will launch the missile under the direction of the 576th FLTS. 

This launch, the second of three in 2009, comes at a time of change
within the missile world, as the Air Force moves closer to combining
its nuclear missile and bomber assets into the newly created Global
Strike Command.

"Our team is dedicated to ensuring a credible, safe and combat-ready
ICBM force that convinces potential adversaries of our unwavering
commitment to defend our nation, its allies and friends," said Colonel
Dekemper. "This dedication will continue as the ICBM mission transfers
to Air Force Global Strike Command."

The test also comes as the missile community commemorates 50 years of
nuclear deterrence. For the past 50 years Vandenberg has been a key US
Air Force installation used in the development and operational
validation of our nation's intercontinental ballistic missile fleet.

The entire ICBM community, including the Department of Defense and the
Department of Energy, will use the data collected from this mission
for continuing force development evaluation. 

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 08/23/2009 06:43 pm
Minuteman was launched at 16:01 GMT today (at the end of the window), and was successful. It carried one RV.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 08/24/2009 06:04 pm
2009 August 23 (Sunday) 11:31 PDT
----------------------------------------------------------------------

                  VANDENBERG LAUNCHES MINUTEMAN III
                     Vandenberg AFB News Release
                           2009 August 23

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - An unarmed Minuteman III
intercontinental ballistic missile configured with a National Nuclear
Security Administration test assembly launched from North Vandenberg
today at 9:01 a.m.

The launch was an operational test to verify the weapon system's
reliability and accuracy.

The missile carried one unarmed re-entry vehicle approximately 4,190
miles at speeds in excess of 15,000 mph to a pre-determined target near
the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Col. Steven Winters, the 30th Space Wing vice commander, was the
mission's launch decision authority.  Col. Carl T. DeKemper, the 576th
Flight Test Squadron commander, was the mission director for this test
launch.

Throughout the preparation and execution of the mission, maintenance
and operations task force personnel from the 341st Missile Wing,
Malmstrom AFB, Mont., integrated with the 576th FLTS to perform
operational tasks.  Members of the 576th FLTS installed tracking,
telemetry and command destruct systems on the missile to collect data
and meet 30th Space Wing safety requirements.

The data collected will be used by the entire ICBM community,
including the United States Strategic Command planners and Department
of Energy laboratories.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 08/24/2009 06:07 pm
Vandenberg missile launch sparks controversy (http://www.ksby.com/Global/story.asp?S=10966728)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/30/2009 02:02 am
Anyone know the date of the launch of the ALICE research rocket at Purdue? All articles say "earlier this month ...."?

http://www.space-travel.com/reports/First_Launch_Of_Test_Rocket_Fueled_By_Aluminum_Ice_Propellant_999.html

http://spacefellowship.com/2009/08/22/nasa-afosr-test-environmentally-friendly-rocket-propellant/

http://www.scientificblogging.com/news_articles/alice_environmentallyfriendly_rocket_propellant
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/18/2009 10:39 pm
36.221 DS Terrier-Black Brant was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on September 14, 2009. The purpose of this mission is to combine, extend and refine the capabilities of the SOHO EIT, LASCO and UVCS instruments. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Dan Moses, Naval Research Laboratory.

From Wallops Web Site
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/19/2009 09:05 am
A Black Brant sounding rocket will be launched later today from Wallops. On Twitter, NASA Wallops stated: "Black Brant XII rocket launch on schedule between 7:32 and 7:49 p.m., Sat, Sep 19. Web cast begins at 6:30 p.m. sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast"

The launch is part of the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE), aiming to create artificial clouds at the outermost layers of Earth's atmosphere.

The launch had previously been planned for Sep 15.

For more info, see http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/090914-mm-noctilucent-clouds.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/21/2009 06:45 am
The CARE mission was successfully launched on a Black Brant XII rocket on September 19 at 19:46:00 EDT (23:46 UT).
The rocket was launched as part of an experiment to artificially create so-called noctilucent clouds. All along the US Atlantic seaboard, police stations and news desks received reports of strange lights in the sky. John A. Blackwell of Exeter, New Hampshire, snapped the attached picture of the phenomenon. Source: http://www.spaceweather.com/.
More info avaliable on:
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/CARE.html
or
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090920-nasa-noctilucent-cloud-rocket.html

A video of the launch can be found in the video section.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/21/2009 09:47 pm
A Black Brant sounding rocket will be launched later today from Wallops. On Twitter, NASA Wallops stated: "Black Brant XII rocket launch on schedule between 7:32 and 7:49 p.m., Sat, Sep 19. Web cast begins at 6:30 p.m. sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast"

The launch is part of the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE), aiming to create artificial clouds at the outermost layers of Earth's atmosphere.

The launch had previously been planned for Sep 15.

For more info, see http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/090914-mm-noctilucent-clouds.html

Actually, it's officially in some sense a Black Brant XI

From my site:The rocket was a Black Brant XI (Talos-Terrier-Black Brant)
not a Black Brant XII (Talos-Terrier-Black Brant-Nikha) as had been
widely reported; it therefore got a BB-XI '39'-series flight designation,
NASA 39.009DR, rather that a BB-XII '40'-series number. The rocket
did indeed have a Nikha motor, but not as a fourth stage - the
motor nozzle was removed and the motor was burnt in a test to release its
propellant as a cloud of dusty plasma, studying its effects
on the upper atmosphere. In this role, the motor was counted as part
of the payload and not of the launch vehicle.

(Admittedly, Wallops PAO is saying BB 12 , but the "NASA 39.009DR"
seems definitive.)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 09/27/2009 05:08 pm
News reports suggest a possible Shahab 3 launch from Iran will take place on Monday 9/28 or thereabouts.  Iran's Safir orbital launch vehicle's first stage is thought to be based on Shahab 3.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/28/2009 09:54 am
News reports suggest a possible Shahab 3 launch from Iran will take place on Monday 9/28 or thereabouts.  Iran's Safir orbital launch vehicle's first stage is thought to be based on Shahab 3.

 - Ed Kyle

From Al Jazeera http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2009/09/200992872918676989.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/09/2009 06:53 pm
There were two launches of Russian ballistic missiles.

http://russianforces.org/blog/2009/10/two_test_launches_of_r-29r_mis.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/11/2009 01:58 pm
Japan will launch the S-250-25 sounding rocket on December 8th.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 10/15/2009 02:41 am
Lockheed-Martin launch from Spaceport America - anyone know of photos?????


UP AEROSPACE, LOCKHEED MARTIN Launch from Spaceport America       
P R E S S  R E L E A S E • F O R  I M M E D I A T E  R E L E A S E
O C T O B E R 1 2 , 2 0 0 9 •

UPHAM, NM – New Mexico Spaceport Authority (NMSA) officials announced a successful launch of a test flight vehicle for Lockheed Martin by UP Aerospace from Spaceport America on Saturday, October 10. The brief test flight was a non-public, unpublished event at the request of Lockheed Martin, who is testing proprietary advanced launch technologies. “Saturday's launch successfully lifted off at 9:45 a.m. during our four-hour launch window," said UP Aerospace President Jerry Larson. "This is our third launch for Lockheed Martin from Spaceport America, which is proving to be an ideal location for supplying low-cost, fast-turnaround launch operations." UP Aerospace plans to double its number of customer launches from Spaceport America to six or more in 2010 as demand for the company's services increases.

The latest launch represents yet another successful launch from Spaceport America, the world's first purpose-built commercial spaceport. NMSA Executive Director Steve Landeene said, “We are extremely pleased to host another launch by UP Aerospace, the third this year, which continues to set the precedent for safe, practical commercial spaceflight at Spaceport America.” Earlier this year, UP Aerospace provided services for the New Mexico Education Launch on May 2, an event sponsored by the NMSA and the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium. On August 4, UP Aerospace had a successful launch for Moog-FTS, and Saturday's launch was the third. UP Aerospace first launched from Spaceport America in September 2006.

Currently under construction, Spaceport America is the world's first purpose-built commercial space facility. Spaceport America has been working closely with leading aerospace firms such as Virgin Galactic, Lockheed Martin, Moog-FTS, UP Aerospace, and Armadillo Aerospace to develop commercial spaceflight. Spaceport America's 10,000-foot long runway is now under construction and is expected to be complete by late summer 2010 with the Terminal Hangar Facility projected to be complete by early 2011.
 
  http://www.spaceportamerica.com/news/press-releases/264-up-areospace-lockheed-martin-launch-from-spaceport-america.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/16/2009 07:19 am
Lockheed-Martin launch from Spaceport America - anyone know of photos?????

It seems a prototype rocketplane was tested. Attached is a photo of a previous test in 2008.
More info: http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/091015-lockheed-spaceplane-testflight.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/01/2009 10:50 am
From Xinhua Russia test-launches ballistic missile from under water (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-11/01/content_12369316.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/01/2009 04:00 pm
From Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces Successful launch of a R-29RM missile (http://russianforces.org/blog/2009/11/successful_launch_of_a_r-29rm.shtml).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/18/2009 10:52 pm
From Wallops web site

A Black Brant IX sounding rocket was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM, on November 13, 2009. The scientific goal of this mission is to obtain x-ray spectral diagnostics of a nearby extended supernova remnant, the Cygnus Loop. The Principal Investigator is Dr.Webster Cash/University of Colorado.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Mighty-T on 11/25/2009 09:14 pm
A VSB-30 was launched from ESRANGE Sweden on November 22 on the TEXUS-46 mission (http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMMOW3VU1G_index_0.html).

Another one with TEXUS-47 will follow in the coming days.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/26/2009 11:12 am
Some pictures of the TEXUS-46 mission were posted on the DLR website: http://www.dlr.de/mp/DesktopDefault.aspx/tabid-1620/6111_read-21111/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Zond on 11/26/2009 06:35 pm
Rocket Lab (http://www.rocketlab.co.nz/) is planning to launch the Atea-1 (http://www.rocketlab.co.nz/atea-1.html) on monday 30 november (http://twitter.com/rocketlabnz/) from Great Mercury Island in New Zealand.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Tahii on 11/29/2009 05:52 pm
Launch of Atea-1 was due 40 minutes ago, but has been delayed by 3 hours due to a frozen valve.

*edit* apparently, the disconnect valve feeding NO2 to the rocket had a leak this morning, causing the valve to freeze over, stopping it from disconnecting. Launch is now expected within the hour.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Tahii on 11/30/2009 02:20 am
With one $6 part replaced, Atea-1 launched at 14:30NZDT. Video of the launch itself can be seen at http://tvnz.co.nz/technology-news/second-time-lucky-nz-rocket-launch-3207087.

While all indications are that the flight went as planned, the launch vehicle has not yet been recovered, so the data hasn't been checked. The southern hemisphere now has a sounding rocket program :).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/30/2009 07:46 am
On November 29 (at 09:00 UT), a VSB-30 sounding rocket was launched from Kiruna, Sweden on the Texus-47 mission. The rocket reached an apogee of 263,6 km.
Source: http://www.ssc.se/?id=5104&cid=15066

More info (in German): http://www.dlr.de/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-1/86_read-21223/

Info on Texus-47 experiments: http://www.ssc.se/?id=14314

I also attach two Texus-47 pictures (source: DLR).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/30/2009 05:21 pm
With one $6 part replaced, Atea-1 launched at 14:30NZDT. Video of the launch itself can be seen at http://tvnz.co.nz/technology-news/second-time-lucky-nz-rocket-launch-3207087.

While all indications are that the flight went as planned, the launch vehicle has not yet been recovered, so the data hasn't been checked. The southern hemisphere now has a sounding rocket program :).

hello... have you looked at the latitude of the launch sites in Brazil and Indonesia recently?
Admittedly they are not *very* south. And Woomera is still occasionally active - it was the site of the first regular southern hemisphere sounding rocket program beginning in 1957

If the altitude is confirmed, this is the first space launch from New Zealand, since the 1963-64 Arcas launches from Birdling's Flat near Canterbury probably did not reach space.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/01/2009 01:50 am
Further details of Atea-1 gleaned from the RocketLab web site combined with my own inferences:

Atea-1 is a small sounding rocket similar in general design to the Viper Dart, in that it has a single propulsive stage or 'booster' topped with a smaller diameter 'dart' and then a nosecone with a small payload. The dart is sometimes called a second stage though it has no rocket engine - it goes much higher than the booster since it remains stablized while the booster tumbles and falls back due to drag. One can guess that the booster reached perhaps 10 km and the dart with payload of order 100 km. (There are some older references on their web site to a second stage engine, which confuse me a bit, but the recent announcements seem pretty clear that there's just one engine).

Atea-1 is about 5.0m long 0.15m dia and has a hybrid N2O/polymer engine with a 6.9 kN thrust and 14.5s nominal burn time, for a total impulse of about 100 kNs.
Note that these parameters are very similar to eAc's Hyperion hybrid sounding rocket of the mid 1990s, although as far as I know there is no direct heritage.

Atea-1 is owned and fabricated by Rocket Lab Ltd. of Auckland-Parnell, North Island, New Zealand. The launch site is Great Mercury Island, New Zealand, at approximately 36.58S 175.92E. 
Flight 1 (Manu Karere) was launched 2009 Nov 30 at 0128 UTC (time from the Rocket Lab web site). Design apogee was around 120 km; although the vehicle carried a GPS beacon, I gather no GPS (or radar) tracking was available during the flight, so the actual apogee will never be known.

The booster was recovered, but the dart/payload has not yet been. If it is located, its downrange distance will provide some indirect evidence for the altitude achieved and so would provide (or not) support for the claim that the rocket reached space.
(I think this claim depends on the dart staying stabilized, and I'm not sure they actually have evidence for this yet - but I intend to provisionally accept the claim in my launch database.)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/10/2009 02:58 pm
Today was a launch of Topol ICBM (SS-25) from Kapustin Yar.
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20091210/157187972.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/20/2009 02:09 am
A launch of the high-speed surface-to-surface Sajjil-2 missile, by Iranian armed forces, at an undisclosed location on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009.

http://www.homeland1.com/homeland-security-news/682111-iran-tests-long-range-missle-despite-wishes-of-the-west/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/20/2009 02:10 am
12.068 GT HALL/HICKMAN/NASA WALLOPS FLIGHT FACILITY12-16-2009
A M26/MLRS vehicle was launched from Wallops Flight Facility, VA on December 16, 2009. The purpose of this mission is to evaluate the performance of new vehicle configuration under development. The Principal Investigator team consists of Brian Hall and John Hickman, both NASA Wallops Flight Facility, VA.

The Mesquito vehicle consists of a 4.5 inch Dart propelled to 90 - 100 km with an US Army M26 Basic Multiple Launch System Rocket (MLRS) motor, and is intended for temporal and spatial measurements in the lower Mesosphere.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story96.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/20/2009 02:11 am
41.086 UE ERDMAN/EMBRY-RIDDLE UNIVERSITY12-17-2009 HAROH mission
 
41.086 UO Terrier-Improved Orion was launched from White Sands Missile Range on December 17, 2009. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Peter Erdman/Embry-Riddle University

The mission objectives for 41.086 Erdman are to collect radiated emissions from the Hydroxyl (OH) in the Meinel Airglow region from 50-90 km altitudes. The payload consists of an instrument of with an array of ten optical tubes (photometers) aligned parallel to the thrust axis.

The increased number of observations made of polar mesospheric clouds at high latitude, and observations of noctilucent clouds at mid latitudes, have raised the scientific importance of understanding this mesospheric region. Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) was recently launched to study it more in depth. HAROH directly supports AIM’s fundamental goal and will also aid in better understanding groundbased mesospheric temperature measurements that will be compared with those obtained from AIM.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story97.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/24/2009 04:23 am
Japan will launch the S-250-25 sounding rocket on December 8th.


Did this ever launch?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/24/2009 09:30 am
There was a launch of a SS-18 today.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20091224/157339099.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 12/24/2009 01:00 pm
Japan will launch the S-250-25 sounding rocket on December 8th.


Did this ever launch?
There's nothing on the ISAS website, they usually announce sounding rocket launches there. By the way, I think it should be S-520-25, not S-250. The S-250 has been out of service for several decades.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/24/2009 01:21 pm
Japan will launch the S-250-25 sounding rocket on December 8th.


Did this ever launch?
There's nothing on the ISAS website, they usually announce sounding rocket launches there. By the way, I think it should be S-520-25, not S-250. The S-250 has been out of service for several decades.

Your're right, it's S-520-25. Launch window is until January 31st. It was suposed to be launched after the last H-2A, so I think it was delayed to 2010.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/30/2009 02:53 pm
Scheduled 2010 Sounding Rocket Flights - from NASA Sounding Rocket Office 4th Qtr report
http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Rocket_Report_4th_qt_2009.pdf

January
12.067 GT HALL/NASA-WFF WI
February
41.084 UE CONDE/UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FB
12.069 GT HICKMAN/NASA-WFF WI
12.070 GT HICKMAN/NASA-WFF WI
40.025 UE LABELLE/DARTMOUTH COLLEGE FB
36.265 UG BOCK/CAL TECH UNIVERSITY WS
March
36.173 UG NORDSIECK/UNIV. OF WISCONSIN WS
36.219 US HASSLER/SWRI WS
36.225 UG CHAKRABARTI/BOSTON UNIVERSITY WS
April
36.257 UG GREEN/UNIV. OF COLORADO WS
May
12.071 GT HICKMAN/NASA-WFF WI
36.258 UE WOODS/UNIV. OF COLORADO WS
12.072 GT HICKMAN/NASA-WFF WI
June
36.213 NS DAVIS/MSFC WS
36.253 US HASSLER/SWRI WS
36.239 DS KORENDYKE/NRL WS
41.087 NT HEYNE/JPL WS
41.088 UO KOEHLER/UNIV. OF COLORADO WI
July
36.261 UG CLARK/BOSTON UNIVERSITY WS
August
36.263 US JUDGE/USC WS
36.235 US HARRIS/UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS WS
36.264 UH MCCAMMON/UNIV. OF WISCONSIN WS
September
36.268 UG MCCANDLISS/JHU WS
36.269 GS RABIN/NASA-GSFC WS
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/12/2010 03:52 pm
China recently conducted an ABM test. Does anyone know what missiles were used, and whether either the target or interceptor reached space?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/12/2010 04:17 pm
The designation of the Chinese ground-based interception missile system is HQ-19 and some sources point that this is derived from the KT launch vheicle series. Launch was from Jiuquan.

Xinhua is showing some images of missile launches relating them to the test (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2010-01/12/content_12797459.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/12/2010 04:19 pm
A image of the missile test can be seen at http://www.china-defense-mashup.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/cnmd-3.jpg.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/15/2010 02:15 pm
ISRO launches rockets to study solar eclipse (http://www.deccanherald.com/content/46960/isro-launching-rockets-study-solar.html). Some of them reaching space.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/16/2010 03:08 am
A total of 11 ISRO rockets launched for the eclipse according to ISRO press release:

"Yesterday (January 14, 2010), two Rohini sounding rockets of the type RH 300 Mk II were launched at 12:20 pm and 1:05 pm respectively. This was followed by two RH 200 launches at 1:07 pm and 3 pm. Following the same pattern, another four launches were carried out today. Later, one more sounding rocket of RH 300 Mk II type was launched at 4 pm today. Two larger Rohini rockets of the series RH 560 MK II were also launched from SDSC, one each yesterday and today, which had a peak altitude of 548 km."



http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Jan15_2010
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Stephan on 01/22/2010 04:46 pm
According to well informed sources, a launch of a french M51 ICBM should take place soon. It will be the fourth launch and the first one from a SSBN.

Last launch video :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7glI_XAWgc
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/23/2010 10:55 pm
Video of ABL test of MARTI target on Jan 10 has appeared on the web:

http://closingvelocity.typepad.com/closing_velocity/2010/01/video-airborne-laser-abl-engages-marti-target.html

MARTI target said to have launched from San Nicholas Island.

Interestingly, no news release on Boeing site, nothing new posted on Missile Defense Agency site and Wallops Web Calendar does not list a flight that day -the three MARTI Black Brant IXs are still listed as unflown - NASA WFF supports the MARTI launches from San Nicholas Island.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/27/2010 03:38 am


Interestingly, no news release on Boeing site, nothing new posted on Missile Defense Agency site and Wallops Web Calendar does not list a flight that day -the three MARTI Black Brant IXs are still listed as unflown - NASA WFF supports the MARTI launches from San Nicholas Island.

The MDA site has the video at http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_abl.html
It is odd that there's no other data on this launch. It seems just possible to me that "Jan 10" is the date of the video release and not the flight, although the video caption definitely gives the impression that that's the date of the flight.  It is odd that the sched.wff.nasa.gov page still gives the MARTI launches on the schedule... that's usually pretty up to date even if the Code 810 pages are not.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/27/2010 01:47 pm

The MDA site has the video at http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_abl.html
It is odd that there's no other data on this launch. It seems just possible to me that "Jan 10" is the date of the video release and not the flight, although the video caption definitely gives the impression that that's the date of the flight.  It is odd that the sched.wff.nasa.gov page still gives the MARTI launches on the schedule... that's usually pretty up to date even if the Code 810 pages are not.


Found this buried on the MDA site under ABL:
On January 10, 2010 the ABL HEL [Airborne Laser - High Energy Laser] successfully acquired, tracked, provided atmospheric compensation and engaged an instrumented rocket. This phase of COIL [Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser] testing represents a major step towards ABL’s planned lethal demonstration against a boosting missile later this year.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Stephan on 01/27/2010 04:25 pm
According to well informed sources, a launch of a french M51 ICBM should take place soon. It will be the fourth launch and the first one from a SSBN.
After multiple launches from land, France's Defense Ministry said it today conducted a successful sea-based test of a new ballistic missile, Agence France-Presse reported.
http://www.globalsecuritynewswire.org/gsn/nw_20100127_8630.php
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/27/2010 09:37 pm
From Vandenberg AFB release:


MISSILE DEFENSE TEST SCHEDULED

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - The 30th Space Wing and Missile Defense Agency are scheduled to conduct a test of the ground-based interceptor system on Jan. 31.

The ground-based interceptor system will launch approximately between the times of 2-5:30 p.m.

The test will involve the launch of a target missile from Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the launch of a long-range interceptor missile from Vandenberg AFB, Calif., with the interceptor missile attempting to intercept the target warhead at a point over the south central Pacific Ocean.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/29/2010 04:56 pm
After multiple launches from land, France's Defense Ministry said it today conducted a successful sea-based test of a new ballistic missile, Agence France-Presse reported.
http://www.globalsecuritynewswire.org/gsn/nw_20100127_8630.php

Are there any photos/video of the launch?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 02/01/2010 02:09 am
From Vandenberg AFB release:


MISSILE DEFENSE TEST SCHEDULED

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - The 30th Space Wing and Missile Defense Agency are scheduled to conduct a test of the ground-based interceptor system on Jan. 31.

The ground-based interceptor system will launch approximately between the times of 2-5:30 p.m.

The test will involve the launch of a target missile from Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the launch of a long-range interceptor missile from Vandenberg AFB, Calif., with the interceptor missile attempting to intercept the target warhead at a point over the south central Pacific Ocean.


Missile flew O.K., but intercept failed.
http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123188302

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: V.V. on 02/01/2010 09:56 am
Is there any information of the test except af.mil and their blogs?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/01/2010 10:02 am
Is there any information of the test except af.mil and their blogs?

Not very much on the MDA website:
http://www.mda.mil/news/10news0001.html
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_gmd.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: V.V. on 02/01/2010 10:25 am
Gunter, thanks!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/01/2010 11:45 am
Does anyone know the type of target missile used?
This is a switcharound from the old days when the target would be launched from Vandenberg and an interceptor from Kwaj...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/01/2010 02:41 pm
Does anyone know the type of target missile used?
This is a switcharound from the old days when the target would be launched from Vandenberg and an interceptor from Kwaj...
Most likely STARS (modified Polaris A3), as used in the last years from Kodiak. Early STARS missions have also been launched from Kwaj.

Could also be a Trident C4 based "LV-2" vehicle from LM "Flexible Target Family"

Minotaur-II can not be launched from Kwaj.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/01/2010 02:52 pm
Does anyone know the type of target missile used?
This is a switcharound from the old days when the target would be launched from Vandenberg and an interceptor from Kwaj...
Most likely STARS (modified Polaris A3), as used in the last years from Kodiak. Early STARS missions have also been launched from Kwaj.

Could also be a Trident C4 based "LV-2" vehicle from LM "Flexible Target Family"

Minotaur-II can not be launched from Kwaj.

Just got confirmation from MDA, that it was a LV-2.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/01/2010 07:06 pm
Does anyone know the type of target missile used?
This is a switcharound from the old days when the target would be launched from Vandenberg and an interceptor from Kwaj...
Most likely STARS (modified Polaris A3), as used in the last years from Kodiak. Early STARS missions have also been launched from Kwaj.

Could also be a Trident C4 based "LV-2" vehicle from LM "Flexible Target Family"

Minotaur-II can not be launched from Kwaj.

Just got confirmation from MDA, that it was a LV-2.

That makes sense, they've been talking about the first LV-2 launch coming up. Thanks.
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/01/2010 07:28 pm
 

Most likely STARS (modified Polaris A3), as used in the last years from Kodiak. Early STARS missions have also been launched from Kwaj.
 

By the way, I don't think this is correct. STARS (the has flown from Kauai and Kodiak but not Kwaj. There were two OBV launches from Kwaj but not associated with STARS. They were from the Meck Island complex which I suspect was also used for this launch. The OBV launch from Kwaj against a STARS was scrubbed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/01/2010 07:35 pm
The video at http://closingvelocity.typepad.com shows a timetag for the GBI launch at 2345:05 GMT, so if the 6 minute sep is correct the target was at 2339.

The same tag shows position 120 33.16W 34 30.17N which may be good enough to confirm the pad location (I assume LF-23).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/01/2010 08:48 pm
Finally some details on the MARTI launch. NASA's SRPO Blue Book lists flight 36.247DR as launching successfully at 23:00 GMT on 10 January from San Nicolas. The 36 prefix indicates that it is, as suspected, a BBIX.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/01/2010 10:39 pm


Most likely STARS (modified Polaris A3), as used in the last years from Kodiak. Early STARS missions have also been launched from Kwaj.
 

By the way, I don't think this is correct. STARS (the has flown from Kauai and Kodiak but not Kwaj. There were two OBV launches from Kwaj but not associated with STARS. They were from the Meck Island complex which I suspect was also used for this launch. The OBV launch from Kwaj against a STARS was scrubbed.

You are correct - STARS as well as LV-2 were launched from the same launch pad at Meck Island. I confused the islands.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/02/2010 07:09 am
An Indonesian RKN-200 rocket failed on January 27, hitting a house. The leg of a woman inside the house had to be amputated.
See article: http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Indonesia_says_sorry_for_firing_test_rocket_into_house_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/02/2010 10:32 am
Does anyone have specifications for the RKN-200? I've never encountered it before.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/02/2010 01:10 pm
You are correct - STARS as well as LV-2 were launched from the same launch pad at Meck Island. I confused the islands.

Okay, my confusion is now perfect: To clear it up:

STARS was launched from Kauai and from Kodiak
LV-2 was launched from Meck Island

And i have now finally found an image of the LV-2 in a MDA brochure:

http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_lau/lv-2-3.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bad_astra on 02/02/2010 04:20 pm
ARCA is announcing April for the launch of the Helen 2 rockoon
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/03/2010 07:23 am
Iran launched a Kavoshgar sounding rocket yesterday:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=117739&sectionid=3510208
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/05/2010 08:39 pm
You are correct - STARS as well as LV-2 were launched from the same launch pad at Meck Island. I confused the islands.

Okay, my confusion is now perfect: To clear it up:

STARS was launched from Kauai and from Kodiak
LV-2 was launched from Meck Island
 

Yeah... that is what I was trying to say. Sorry if it wasn't clear.
There's also an LV-2 prototype picture in Av Week last year sometime.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 02/07/2010 10:37 am
Today was a launch of an Agni III in India.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_INDIA_MISSILE_TEST?SITE=NCASH&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/07/2010 04:30 pm
Today was a launch of an Agni III in India.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_INDIA_MISSILE_TEST?SITE=NCASH&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

From India Defense Ministry Press Release:
.... 10:50 this morning from the Wheeler Island, in the Bay of Bengal off the coast of Odisha. The AGNI-3 Missile tested for the full range, hit the target with pin-point accuracy and met all the mission objectives. Two down range ships located near the target tracked and witnessed the Missile reaching the target accurately.

.... Missile reached a peak height of 350 kms and re-entered into the atmosphere successfully tolerating the skin temperatures of nearly 3000 degree Celsius.  ....
http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=57681&kwd=
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/07/2010 09:11 pm
So does anyone know where the target zone for the Agni 3 is? We know it's in the Indian Ocean 'south of the equator' but maybe there's a NOTAM out there?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/08/2010 12:35 am
So does anyone know where the target zone for the Agni 3 is? We know it's in the Indian Ocean 'south of the equator' but maybe there's a NOTAM out there?


Guessing an answer to my own question: somewhere in the 70E to 90E,
12S to 15S range in the central Indian Ocean would be consistent with
the nominal range, while letting the early part of the flight stay within range
of coastal Indian radars but not overflying the mainland.
The center of the IC4 pad seems aimed generally SW, so if I guess that is the range centerline with an azimuth of 225 deg I get a trajectory that
skims the eastern coastline of India and then crosses the mainland from Chennai to Kerala. This is possible, but seems a bit brave - if there's an underburn the second stage could fall on land. I feel it's more likely that they go further south; an azimuth of 205 deg overflies Sri Lanka at apogee but otherwise avoids land. An azmuth of 180 deg flies over the ocean but seems a bit far from land-based tracking in the early ascent phase.

 
That leads to formal orbital parameters of about -4070 x 350 km x (80 to 131) deg with a 113 deg inclination for my preferred 205 deg azimuth.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/10/2010 10:02 pm
Poker Flat Research Range Launch

41.084 UE CONDE/UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA        2-9-2010
41.084 UE Terrier-Improved Orion was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on February 9, 2010.The purpose of this mission is to develop a new technique for measuring wide spread wind gradients from a single rocket by deploying a constellation of TMA pulses thorughout an extended three-dimensional volume. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Mark Conde/University of Alaska.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story98.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/12/2010 01:46 pm
Airborne Laser Testbed (ALTB) Destroys Missile in Flight

From MDA:
The Missile Defense Agency demonstrated the potential use of directed energy to defend against ballistic missiles when the Airborne Laser Testbed (ALTB) successfully destroyed a boosting ballistic missile. The experiment, conducted at Point Mugu Naval Air Warfare Center-Weapons Division Sea Range off the central California coast, serves as a proof-of-concept demonstration for directed energy technology. The ALTB is a pathfinder for the nation’s directed energy program and its potential application for missile defense technology.

At 8:44 p.m. (PST), February 11, 2010, a short-range threat-representative ballistic missile was launched from an at-sea mobile launch platform. Within seconds, the ALTB used onboard sensors to detect the boosting missile and used a low-energy laser to track the target. The ALTB then fired a second low-energy laser to measure and compensate for atmospheric disturbance. Finally, the ALTB fired its megawatt-class High Energy Laser, heating the boosting ballistic missile to critical structural failure. The entire engagement occurred within two minutes of the target missile launch, while its rocket motors were still thrusting.

This was the first directed energy lethal intercept demonstration against a liquid-fuel boosting ballistic missile target from an airborne platform. The revolutionary use of directed energy is very attractive for missile defense, with the potential to attack multiple targets at the speed of light, at a range of hundreds of kilometers, and at a low cost per intercept attempt compared to current technologies.

Less than one hour later, a second solid fuel short-range missile was launched from a ground location on San Nicolas Island, Calif. and the ALTB successfully engaged the boosting target with its High Energy Laser, met all its test criteria, and terminated lasing prior to destroying the second target. The ALTB destroyed a solid fuel missile, identical to the second target, in flight on February 3, 2010.
http://www.mda.mil/news/10news0002.html

From Boeing:
 The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA], industry teammates and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency on Feb. 11 successfully demonstrated the speed, precision and breakthrough potential of directed-energy weapons when the Airborne Laser Testbed (ALTB) engaged and destroyed a boosting ballistic missile.

This experiment marks the first time a laser weapon has engaged and destroyed an in-flight ballistic missile, and the first time that any system has accomplished it in the missile's boost phase of flight. ALTB has the highest-energy laser ever fired from an aircraft, and is the most powerful mobile laser device in the world.

"The Airborne Laser Testbed team has made history with this experiment," said Greg Hyslop, vice president and general manager of Boeing Missile Defense Systems. "Through its hard work and technical ingenuity, the government-industry team has produced a breakthrough with incredible potential. We look forward to conducting additional research and development to explore what this unique directed-energy system can do."

During the experiment, the aircraft, a modified Boeing 747-400F, took off from Edwards Air Force Base and focused its high-energy laser at the missile target during its boost phase as the aircraft flew over the Western Sea Range off the coast of California.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=1075


Images (from MDA http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_altb.html):
An infrared image of the Missile Defense Agency’s Airborne Laser Testbed destroying a threat representative short-range ballistic missile.

Sequence of images shows a threat representative ballistic missile’s breakup resulting from a high energy laser engagement.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/12/2010 01:59 pm
ABL media release contradiction?

MDA:
This was the first directed energy lethal intercept demonstration against a liquid-fuel boosting ballistic missile target from an airborne platform. ....
Less than one hour later, a second solid fuel short-range missile was launched from a ground location on San Nicolas Island, Calif. and the ALTB successfully engaged the boosting target with its High Energy Laser, met all its test criteria, and terminated lasing prior to destroying the second target. The ALTB destroyed a solid fuel missile, identical to the second target, in flight on February 3, 2010.

Boeing:
This experiment marks the first time a laser weapon has engaged and destroyed an in-flight ballistic missile, and the first time that any system has accomplished it in the missile's boost phase of flight. ALTB has the highest-energy laser ever fired from an aircraft, and is the most powerful mobile laser device in the world.


Contradiction:

MDA sounds like 2/3 first intercept solid-fuel missile 2/11 first intercept liquid-fueled
Boeing sounds like 2/11 first intercept.

MDA:
The ALTB destroyed a solid fuel missile, identical to the second target, in flight on February 3, 2010.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 02/12/2010 02:49 pm
ABL media release contradiction?

The ALTB destroyed a solid fuel missile, identical to the second target, in flight on February 3, 2010.



MDA : They used solid fuel missile in 2/11 is same type like second target flight on 2/3 .
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/12/2010 03:16 pm
The contradiction was MDA saying the first intercept was 2/3 and Boeing saying the first intercept was 2/11.


Think the solid fuel rockets would be MARTI/Black Brant IX.

What would the liquid-fuel rocket be?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/12/2010 03:41 pm
Finally some details on the MARTI launch. NASA's SRPO Blue Book lists flight 36.247DR as launching successfully at 23:00 GMT on 10 January from San Nicolas. The 36 prefix indicates that it is, as suspected, a BBIX.

Is there a link to the "SRPO Blue Book" somewhere?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 02/12/2010 04:17 pm
The contradiction was MDA saying the first intercept was 2/3 and Boeing saying the first intercept was 2/11.


Think the solid fuel rockets would be MARTI/Black Brant IX.

What would the liquid-fuel rocket be?

Meaning:

The ALTB destroyed a solid fuel missile (2/11) , identical to the second target, in flight on February 3, 2010 ( 2/3 ).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/12/2010 06:27 pm
The video is labelled "Flight 147 - FMA Engagement". FMA stands for Foreign Military Acquisition or Foreign Materiel Acquisition or something like that, and I believe implies that the sea-launched target was a Scud. (The target launched from San Nicolas was a Black Brant IX)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 02/12/2010 09:26 pm
Any idea what altitude the interceptions occurred at?

Is there a link to the "SRPO Blue Book" somewhere?
http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/12/2010 09:49 pm
The video is labelled "Flight 147 - FMA Engagement". FMA stands for Foreign Military Acquisition or Foreign Materiel Acquisition or something like that, and I believe implies that the sea-launched target was a Scud. (The target launched from San Nicolas was a Black Brant IX)

FMA = Foreign Military Asset
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/15/2010 03:37 am
Poker Flat Research Range Launch

41.084 UE CONDE/UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA        2-9-2010
41.084 UE Terrier-Improved Orion was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on February 9, 2010.The purpose of this mission is to develop a new technique for measuring wide spread wind gradients from a single rocket by deploying a constellation of TMA pulses thorughout an extended three-dimensional volume. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Mark Conde/University of Alaska.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story98.html

University of Alaska news http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20100211154200.html

 
The two-stage "Ampules" rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range on Feb. 9, 2010. Mark Conde, an assistant professor with the Geophysical Institute and the UAF Physics Department, was the principal investigator for the mission.


A NASA sounding rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range and flew to an altitude of more than 100 vertical miles at 12:01 a.m. Alaska Standard Time on Feb. 9, 2010. The rocket released 12 vials of trimethyl-aluminum that glowed in colors from orange to blue about 70 miles above northern Alaska.
“It was a successful mission,” said Mark Conde, an assistant professor at the Geophysical Institute and the University of Alaska Fairbanks physics department who led the experiment. “The basic process worked spectacularly well, although we did have some anomalies in several aspects of the payload. We're working on the flight data now to understand exactly what happened with these systems. We already have some good leads and we're confident they can be easily reconciled.”

The two-stage Terrier Orion rocket carried 16 vials of trimethyl-aluminum into the upper atmosphere. Researchers use the glow of the harmless chemical to track winds in the upper atmosphere accessible only by rocket. In this mission, called “Ampules,” the rocket was designed to release 12 vials of trimethyl-aluminum using a spring mechanism. Four other vials had their own rocket motors to help track winds farther from the rocket’s path. The 12 spring-loaded vials worked well, but the other four stayed with the rocket, which landed in northern Alaska. Poker Flat Research Range staffers are now recovering the payload.

Scientists stationed at the range, Fort Yukon and Toolik Lake captured data from the rocket through ground-based instruments. The Ampules mission tested the feasibility of releasing trimethyl-aluminum at some distances from the parent rocket to give space physicists a better picture of upper atmospheric winds.

“We saw some extraordinary things in the data,” Conde said.



Photo courtesy of Poker Flat Research Range

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/16/2010 09:50 pm
BB XII Poker Flat Research Range

40.025 UE LABELLE/DARTMOUTH COLLEGE 2-15-2010

40.025 UE Black Brant XII was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on February 15, 2010. The purpose of the Correlation of High Frequency and Auroral Roar Measurements (CHARM) II mission is answer several outstanding questions about the physics of high frequency waves in the Earth's aurora, and directly test theoretical predictions of wave growth, electron bunching, and resulting wave evolution. In addition, a dvelopmental X-band section provided redundant experiment data. Dr. Jim Labelle, Dartmouth College is the Principal Investigator.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story99.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/18/2010 06:21 pm
BB XII Poker Flat Research Range

40.025 UE LABELLE/DARTMOUTH COLLEGE 2-15-2010

40.025 UE Black Brant XII was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on February 15, 2010. The purpose of the Correlation of High Frequency and Auroral Roar Measurements (CHARM) II mission is answer several outstanding questions about the physics of high frequency waves in the Earth's aurora, and directly test theoretical predictions of wave growth, electron bunching, and resulting wave evolution. In addition, a dvelopmental X-band section provided redundant experiment data. Dr. Jim Labelle, Dartmouth College is the Principal Investigator.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story99.html


From University of Alaska Fairbanks

During a vivid aurora display, a NASA sounding rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range and arced over northern Alaska at 12:49 a.m. Alaska Standard Time on Feb. 16, 2010. The rocket, one of the largest used at Poker Flat, flew high over Kaktovik, gathering data on electric particle and wave interactions in the upper atmosphere.

“We got into a beautiful (auroral) arc,” said the leader of the experiment, Jim LaBelle of Dartmouth College. “It was the first active night in a long time. The rocket appears to have functioned well and we have a nice dataset.”

NASA officials at the range launched a 50-foot Black Brant XII rocket that reached its highest point above Kaktovik, located on Alaska’s northern coast.

“It was supposed to go up to 803 kilometers (about 500 miles above the ground) and it got to 802.7,” LaBelle said.

Far above Kaktovik and even above the visible aurora, the rocket nose cone separated and exposed eight fist-sized instruments that sampled electric particles in the upper atmosphere. Also attached to the rocket were two probes extending like arms. The probes contained instruments that sampled waves that sometimes accelerate the particles to high energies, which creates dazzling aurora displays.

“We’re using the aurora as a lab to study wave-particle interactions throughout space,” LaBelle said. “We hope to catch these waves and particles in the act of exchanging energy and momentum.”

The instruments transmitted their data back to Poker Flat Research Range and the instrumented stage of the rocket landed on the sea ice more than 400 miles north of Kaktovik. The researchers will not recover the instruments.

Though the scientists will have to wait for all the data, “we think all the ingredients are there for our science,” LaBelle said. Data from the launch will be part of the doctoral work of two students, one from Dartmouth and one from Iowa, and will aid LaBelle’s studies.

http://www.uaf.edu/news/headlines/20100217135945.html

Photo credit: Graduate student Micah Dombrowski of Dartmouth College
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Serafeim on 02/21/2010 01:47 pm
whats the mass of Space ship two? 8)
and you have information when will be the first test flight?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Danderman on 02/23/2010 12:38 pm
http://spacebusinessblog.blogspot.com/2010/02/suborbital-cargo-agent.html

An interesting blog about using Nanoracks for suborbital research.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/04/2010 12:49 pm
Novosti Kosmonavtiki is reporting the launch of a Sineva missile from the K-114 Tula
submarine in the Barents sea at 0450 UTC on Mar 4.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/04/2010 07:23 pm
There were launches of REXUS7 and REXUS8 at Kiruna.

http://www.dlr.de/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-11/129_read-22895/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/04/2010 09:14 pm
ISRO Successful flight testing of advanced sounding rocket (Scramjet) 
 
 
Indian Space Research Organisation successfully conducted the flight testing of its new generation high performance sounding rocket today (March 3, 2010) at 08.30 Hrs, from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), SHAR.

 
Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV-D01), weighing 3 tonnes at lift-off is the heaviest sounding rocket ever developed by ISRO. It carried a passive scramjet engine combustor module as a test bed for demonstration of Air- Breathing propulsion technology.

During the flight, the vehicle successfully dwelled for 7 seconds in the desired conditions of Mach number (6 + 0.5) and dynamic pressure (80 + 35 kPa). These conditions are required for a stable ignition of active scramjet engine combustor module planned in the next flight of ATV.

The successful flight testing of ATV-D01 is a step ahead towards the advanced technology initiative taken up by ISRO in the area of Air- Breathing propulsion.
 
 
http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Mar03_2010


photo credit: ISRO (accompanied press release)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/04/2010 09:18 pm
The NASA launch team must have got back from their San Nicolas Island trip, as the Blue Book has been updated with:

NASA 36.250DR  Feb 4 at 0803:07Z
NASA 36.251DR  Feb 12 at 0531:20Z
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: John Charles on 03/06/2010 09:53 pm
Apologies in advance from an intermittent lurker...

Can someone point me to a convenient way to calculate the max altitude and max velocity of a sounding rocket, given the initial weight, empty weight, burn time and thrust?

I am curious to calculate the maximum altitude and speed of the X-15 if it launched vertically off the ground.

Thanks!

John Charles
Houston, Texas
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 03/20/2010 05:51 pm
A Prithvi was launched at around 04:40 GMT on 15 March, it was intended to reach space but failed due to an apparent guidance problem.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 03/24/2010 11:40 am
Quote
NASA has scheduled a rocket launch on Saturday from the Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island.

The launch is scheduled to happen between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. with backup dates between March 28 and April 2.

The Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket will carry two cubesats developed by university students in Kentucky and California, according to a NASA news release. The flight’s main goal is to test the Improved Malemute rocket motor.

Residents in the Wallops area will be able to see the launch, which will be webcast, the release says.

Normally I dont copy entire articles, but this one was pretty short:

http://hamptonroads.com/2010/03/nasa-planning-rocket-launch-saturday-wallops-facility
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jacqmans on 03/26/2010 04:58 pm
ESA's Maxus-8 sounding rocket was launched today from Kiruna in northern Sweden carrying four microgravity research modules on a hectic 12-minute space voyage. The ultimate results may include improved turbine blades for aircraft engines.

Read more here: http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMNVY8I77G_index_0.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/27/2010 05:21 pm
India has launched today one Prithvi II and one Dhanush.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-successfully-tests-N-capable-Prithvi-II-Dhanush-missiles/articleshow/5730413.cms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/27/2010 09:13 pm
Quote
NASA has scheduled a rocket launch on Saturday from the Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island.

The launch is scheduled to happen between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. with backup dates between March 28 and April 2.

The Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket will carry two cubesats developed by university students in Kentucky and California, according to a NASA news release. The flight’s main goal is to test the Improved Malemute rocket motor.

Residents in the Wallops area will be able to see the launch, which will be webcast, the release says.


The launch occurded today.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/TerrierImpMalemute.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 03/29/2010 07:14 am
Additional info, pictures, and videos of the Terrier-Improved Malemute mission can be found here:
http://ssl.engr.uky.edu/sub_orbital/socem
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/29/2010 04:21 pm
Yesterday was a launch of an Agni I in India.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Agni-1-short-range-ballistic-missile-successfully-test-fired/articleshow/5734936.cms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/30/2010 12:43 am
Yesterday was a launch of an Agni I in India.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Agni-1-short-range-ballistic-missile-successfully-test-fired/articleshow/5734936.cms

Buried in the article:

On March 22, the super-sonic cruise missile BrahMos, jointly developed by India and Russia, was successfully test-fired from INS Ranvir off the Orissa coast.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: robertross on 04/12/2010 11:47 pm
Figured this was the best place to put this.

Quebec City mayor says space ticket treasure hunt will put spotlight on city:

http://www.cbc.ca/cp/science/100412/g041208A.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/05/2010 01:09 am
Black Brant IX from WSMR 5/3/10

36.258 UE Black Brant IX was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on May 3, 2010. The purpose of this mission is to provide a calibration underflight for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Thomas Woods/University of Colorado.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/#
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 05/05/2010 01:18 am
Per Clark Lindsey web page:

A video of today's UP Aerospace launch of educational payloads at Spaceport America: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5wWmM4maYw

The booster and payload have all been recovered.
The vehicle reached 70 miles (113 km).



From UP Aerospace web page:

Space Launch - May 4 at 6:41AM MT - UP Aerospace Successfully flies the SpaceLoft XL rocket vehicle to space, over 350,000 feet, and recovers the payloads in perfect condition.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/06/2010 06:49 am
More news on the Spaceloft-XL launch (including the Celestis payload) can be found here:
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/suborbital-rocket-human-ashes-100505.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/19/2010 08:27 am
A successful test of the Agni-II missile took place in India.
See:  http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Agni_II_launched_with_success_in_India_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: osiossim on 05/24/2010 07:22 am
Any information about today's Taiwanese suborbital launch for ionospheric research from Yi Peng launch site?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/24/2010 01:36 pm
Any information about today's Taiwanese suborbital launch for ionospheric research from Yi Peng launch site?

Are  you referring to the launch on May 5? Sounding Rocket VII reached an altitude of 287 km.
I'm not aware of a launch today.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/07/2010 04:51 pm
From MDA web site:

Modified Ground-Based Interceptor Completes Successful Flight Test [June 6, 2010]
 

The Missile Defense Agency successfully conducted a flight test of a two-stage Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI), launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., at 3:25 p.m. PDT. The two-stage GBI is undergoing developmental testing as part of the Department of Defense’s strategy to invest in a new missile defense option which can contribute to our homeland’s defense. Results from the test will characterize two-stage performance and design for potential future missile defense applications.

A target missile was not launched for this flight test. After performing flyout maneuvers, the two-stage booster delivered an exoatmospheric kill vehicle to a designated point in space. The exoatmospheric kill vehicle is the component that, if a target missile were present, would collide directly with the threat warhead to perform a “hit to kill” intercept. After separating from the second-stage booster, the kill vehicle executed a variety of maneuvers to collect data to further prove the performance of the kill vehicle in space.


Several missile defense assets and emerging technologies observed the launch and gathered data for future analysis. Participants included the Space Tracking and Surveillance System, AN/TPY-2 X-band Radar, and the Upgraded Early Warning Radar at Beale Air Force Base, Calif.

Initial indications are that all components performed as designed. Program officials will evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

http://www.mda.mil/news/10news0006.html

Photo and video credit: MDA
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/16/2010 05:48 pm
Minuteman III launched from Vandenberg LF10 on Jun 16 1001 UTC, single reentry vehicle sent to Kwajalein.

Do we know what the current mix is of Mk 12 and Mk 21 reentry vehicles on the Minuteman? When they just fly with one RV, can we guess it's the Mk 21, or that doesn't follow?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 06/16/2010 09:12 pm
There were also four Trident II launches earlier this month from the USS Maryland. Two on 8 June, and two on 9 June.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/22/2010 06:28 am
From MBDA-Systems website:

The first test firing of the SCALP Naval missile was carried out successfully by the French DGA (Direction Générale de l’Armement) at its Biscarosse test range on 28th May 2010. SCALP Naval is a development for the French Navy’s naval cruise missile MdCN (Missile de Croisière Naval) programme.

The firing was carried out using a FREMM frigate configuration from a production series Sylver ® A70 launcher.

As a result of this successful test, the maturity of the weapon system’s definition as well as the technology options selected by MBDA have been validated. Indeed, all phases of the missile’s flight proceeded perfectly to plan, from the vertical launch, the separation of the ejectable booster right through to the conclusion of its cruise flight. This first test firing, being representative of a typical mission, has, amongst other benefits, allowed the full flight envelope to be by and large carried out. It has also validated SCALP Naval’s interface with the operational Sylver ® launcher.

The SCALP Naval munition is a development covering two configurations responding to the French Navy’s mission needs, comprising a vertical launch variant destined for surface vessels such as the FREMM frigate and a sub-surface / air transition version to arm the nuclear-powered Barracuda attack submarine.

“MdCN is a major programme for MBDA. The total success of this first SCALP Naval firing demonstrates our ability to maintain the highest level of technology as well as a strong industrial base in France, both coming together in response to the country’s strategic needs”, said Antoine Bouvier, CEO of MBDA.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/24/2010 03:31 am
From NASA Wallops web site: BB IX 5/21

36.270 UG GREEN/UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO5-21-201036.270 UG Black Brant IX was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on May 21, 2010. The purpose of this mission is to sample the interface at the local cavity wall and determine whether the gas at the interface is flowing into the cavity or away from it.

The Diffuse Interstellar Cloud Experiment (DICE) will record high resolution (R ~ 60,000) spectra of the O VI doublet (1032 Å, 1038 Å). The selected targets, δ Sco and π Sco, separated by only ~ 10 parsecs, lie on opposite sides of a nearby hot/cold gas interface, evidenced by the increase in both Na I and O VI column densities between the two (Jenkins 1978, Hobbs 1974). DICE should be able to observe these targets with a velocity resolution of 5 km/s and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 50 – 100, and allow us to fit profiles to individual components of the spectra, calculating column densities, centroid velocities, and Doppler broadening parameters. The Local Inter Stellar Medium (LISM) provides an excellent laboratory for studying interstellar gas dynamics and the distribution of energy and matter throughout the Galaxy. Understanding the role of O VI in our own neighborhood will aid in analyzing the ISM of galaxies through the universe.

The Principal Investigator is Dr. James Green, University of Colorado.

 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/30/2010 07:39 pm
1,900th launch from Vandenberg AFB!!!!!

VAFB Press Release

June 30, 2010
Release No. 11-0610

VANDENBERG CONDUCTS MINUTEMAN III FLIGHT TEST

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.  - A scheduled Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile test was launched at 3:40 a.m. June 30 from Launch Facility-04 here.

The missile's single re-entry test vehicle traveled approximately 4,200 miles before reaching its pre-determined target near the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. ICBM analysts, including the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy, will use the data collected to ensure the readiness and capability of the ICBM fleet. 

 "These launches teach us a great deal and require a team approach," said Col. Carl DeKemper, the 576th Flight Test Squadron commander and mission director.  "The launch was part of our continuous self-assessment of the technical and weapons system expertise of our Airmen and the powerful capability of the ICBM fleet."

According to Vandenberg historic records, today also marked the 1,900th launch for Vandenberg AFB since the Air Force assumed the mission in 1957. "This 1,900th launch marks another milestone in the history of Vandenberg and the contribution Vandenberg has had as not only contributing to the nation's security, but also a continuing player in our nuclear deterrence role and overall space and missile launch history of the United States," said Col. Steven Winters, the 30th Space Wing vice commander and the Launch Decision Authority for this mission. 

The launch was a combined effort of the 576th FLTS here, 341st Missile Wing, Malmstrom AFB, Mont., and the 30th Space Wing here.   

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123211605

Photo Credit: USAF/Joe Davila
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 06/30/2010 09:39 pm
THAAD Weapon System Achieves Lowest Endo Intercept to Date, Maintains 100% Success Rate

The Missile Defense Agency and Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT] conducted a successful flight test of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Weapon System today at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, HI. This flight test was THAAD’s seventh intercept to date and proved the system’s ability to intercept a unitary target in the low endo-atmosphere.

There were many THAAD flight test program “firsts” accomplished during FTT-14, including the lowest endo–atmospheric intercept to date; use of fielded THAAD ground segment hardware and software from the THAAD production program; and the first live mission to demonstrate automatic engagement coordination between THAAD and Patriot.

In addition to Patriot, the flight test included participation by the C2BMC element. The C2BMC reported situational awareness to combatant commander displays monitoring the test.

Flight test objectives included demonstrating the integration of the THAAD Weapon System; intercepting the target at a highly stressing angle due to the high pressure environment of the endo-atmosphere; completing target acquisition and aimpoint selection by the interceptor’s seeker avionics flight software; and operating the radar, fire control and launcher by U.S. Army soldiers during the mission.

“Today’s successful low endo intercept further proves THAAD’s mission flexibility and capability,” said Tom McGrath, vice president and program manager for THAAD at Lockheed Martin. “The weapon system’s success is much to the credit of the U.S. Army soldiers’ superior performance in executing this mission and their dedication to 100 percent Mission Success.”

Since 2005, the program has completed 11 flight tests, with seven-for-seven intercepts. THAAD is the only missile defense system with the operational flexibility to intercept in both the endo- and exo-atmospheres to provide versatile capability to the Warfighter.

Two THAAD batteries have been activated at Ft. Bliss, TX. The first THAAD Battery (A-4 ADA Battery) was activated in May 2008. Soldiers from the battery recently completed the Force Development Exercise and began Limited User Testing in May in preparation for material release expected late this year. In October 2009, the U.S. Army activated the second THAAD Battery (A-2 ADA Battery). Unit training for this Battery began earlier this year.

A key element of the nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS), THAAD is a Missile Defense Agency program, with the program office located in Huntsville, AL. The Agency is developing the BMDS to defend the United States, its deployed forces, friends and allies against ballistic missiles of all ranges and in all phases of flight.

Lockheed Martin Press Release
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/MFC_062210_THAADWeaponSystem.html

Photo Credits: Lockheed Martin
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/01/2010 07:26 am
The Lockheed Martin site also has a video of the THAAD test
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/01/2010 07:45 am
A Terrier Orion sounding rocket (mission 41.088 Koehler) was launched from Wallops under the so-called Rock On program on June 24 at 10 a.m. UT.
University students and professors from across the country had come to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on June 19 for a week-long workshop (known as RockOn!) to learn how to build small experiments that can be launched on sounding rockets.
In addition to seven workshop-built experiments, 11 custom-built, self-contained experiments also flew on the rocket inside a payload canister known as RockSat. The latter experiments were developed at 10 universities that previously had participated in a RockOn! workshop.
After launch and payload recovery, the participants conducted preliminary data analysis and discuss their results.

For unknown reasons, NASA kept this launch low profile (one would expect the opposite considering the nature).
Links:
(1) http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/HQ_10-140_Wallops_Workshop_On_Rocket_Payloads.html
(2) http://nasawatch.com/archives/2010/06/yet-another-ste.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/10/2010 03:10 am
RH 200 Rocket with Students Payload flies from Thumba 
ISRO Press Release: http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Jul07_2010
 
Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station (TERLS) witnessed another major event - the Technology Demonstrator Flight of the advanced sounding rocket RH 200 from its launch station at Thumba. The rocket was successfully launched at 1550 hrs on July 7, 2010 and achieved its intended altitude of 60 km in 2 minutes.

ISRO has always encouraged students from universities to become partners for payload development. Towards this, students from Vellore Institute of Technology University (VITU), were being guided by Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre to develop a part of the payload as a co-passenger in the RH200 technology demonstrator flight. The students payload comprised of tri-axial accelerometers, power switching module and safe arm relay unit matching the requirements of RH 200 rocket. The tri-axial accelerometer can monitor accelerations in all three directions. The power-switching module is for the power control of the payload. The faculty and students of VITU has taken keen interest during the development and test activities of these payloads at various work centres.

The students of the Indian Institute of Space Technology (IIST) are also progressing well in their attempt to make the first indigenous students rocket with the support of the experts from VSSC. In its continued endeavour to handhold the student community, ISRO has included a picosatellite designed by undergraduate students across India, in its forthcoming PSLV-C15 mission. The major objective of this project is to provide hands-on experience in frontier areas of Space technology such as the design, fabrication and realization of a space mission at a reduced cost.

After the successful flight of the Advanced Technology Vehicle ATV D01, this is a major step to demonstrate the performance of super capacitors in flight pyro systems activation. The flight successfully tested the super capacitor developed by VSSC.

So far TERLS has recorded 2291 flights of sounding rockets and this is the 395th flight of RH 200 rocket. During January, 2010 the RH 200 along with RH 300 MkII and RH 560 MkII rockets made a history with first ever sounding rocket launch campaign with six flights in a day and five flights within a span of 3 hrs 40 minutes from TERLS and within a minimum 2 minutes between flights and tracking two rockets one after the other using the same radar in two minutes time gap. These deployments were for studying solar eclipse effects on atmospheric regions.

 
Photo Credit: ISRO
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 07/15/2010 01:34 pm
CIBER launch

36.265 UG BOCK/CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY7-11-2010


36.265 UG was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on July 11, 2010. The purpose of this mission is to conduct a pioneering search for IRB anisotropies and is specifically designed to measure fluctuations at wavelengths and spatial scales where a putative first-light galaxy signal can be best detected and discriminated from foregrounds. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Jamie Bock, California Institute of Technology.

From Wallops Flight Facility web site
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/16/2010 08:01 am
India has successfully test-fired an indigenously developed Astra air-to-air missile under poor weather conditions during the day and night.

For more info, see: http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Indias_Astra_tested_for_night_operations_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/28/2010 06:26 am
India has carried out a successful missile test, marking "a significant step in India's bid to build a fully operation missile shield for key areas and installations in its terrain."
India’s Defense Research and Development Organization said that a Prithvi interceptor missile managed to knock down a hostile missile at an altitude of about 9 miles. DRDO is developing the missile defense program.
The test, the fifth of the two-tier system, validated what The Hindu newspaper reported as "the endo-atmospheric layer of interception, when the ... (missile) achieved a kill of the Prithvi during the latter’s terminal phase."
The launch was staged from Whealer Island off the coast of Orissa, 45 miles across the sea from Chandipur, over the Bay of Bengal where the previous hypersonic missile, veered off course and officials lost sight of it on monitoring radars, last March.

For more info, see: http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Indias_defense_shield_tested_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/01/2010 03:40 am
Black Brant IX flight NASA 36.213NS, carrying the SUMI (Solar UV Magnetograph Investigation) instrument, flew to around 246 km from White Sands at 1818 UTC on Jul 30, according to my colleague Kelly Korreck who just got home from the launch.
(Kelly mostly does satellite-based studies and this was her first rocket launch. She says: "Whee! We have got to find more projects involving rockets!"). Congrats to Jonathan Cirtain who was one of the NASA-Marshall scientists responsible for SUMI.

For those unfamiliar with Zeeman splitting: the transition region between the chromosphere and the corona is at a temperature where most of the spectral lines come out in the ultraviolet, for example the Carbon IV line at 1549 Angstroms. In a strong magnetic field the line splits - appears at two different wavelengths. By measuring the difference in wavelength between the two halves of the line, you get the magnetic field strength at that point in the Sun.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/03/2010 10:41 pm
Black Brant X mission NASA 12.073GT will be launched from Wallops on Aug 4 to test improvements to the Nikha third stage motor. The Black Brant IX, which is used more often, is a Black Brant VC sustainer with a Terrier boost motor. Adding the Nikha third stage makes it a BB X.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/04/2010 01:18 pm
Black Brant X mission NASA 12.073GT will be launched from Wallops on Aug 4 to test improvements to the Nikha third stage motor. The Black Brant IX, which is used more often, is a Black Brant VC sustainer with a Terrier boost motor. Adding the Nikha third stage makes it a BB X.

Launch successful at 0915 UTC. Planned apogee 693 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/05/2010 06:24 am
Here's a picture of the Black Brant X launch. The Wallops site also has a video.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 08/07/2010 08:24 pm
Yesterday was a launch of a SS-N-23 ballistic missile.
http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20100807/257061117.html
Sorry, no English text found.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2010 12:19 am
Yesterday was a launch of a SS-N-23 ballistic missile.
http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20100807/257061117.html
Sorry, no English text found.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/Russia-tests-two-intercontinental-missiles/Article1-583365.aspx
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=137750&sectionid=351020602

http://english.ruvr.ru/2010/08/07/14847136.html

some of these sources report that two Sineva missiles were launched from sub K-114 Tula in the Barents towards the Kura range.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/09/2010 08:49 pm
Here's a picture of the Black Brant X launch. The Wallops site also has a video.

Can you provide a link to the site? - I didn't see it on the Wallops pages I visited. Thanks
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/10/2010 05:31 am
The link for the Black Brant X launch video is here: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/BBXlaunchadvisory.html

I originally wished to attach the video, but I was unable to record it.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/10/2010 12:25 pm
Yesterday was a launch of a SS-N-23 ballistic missile.
http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20100807/257061117.html
Sorry, no English text found.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/Russia-tests-two-intercontinental-missiles/Article1-583365.aspx
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=137750&sectionid=351020602

http://english.ruvr.ru/2010/08/07/14847136.html

some of these sources report that two Sineva missiles were launched from sub K-114 Tula in the Barents towards the Kura range.

Interestingly, what the Russian Defense Ministry statement *actually* says: http://www.mil.ru/info/1069/details/index.shtml?id=75168
is that Tula "launched two intercontinental ballistic missiles (one of which was a 'Sineva') from the waters of the Barents Sea to the Kura range in Kamchatka".

So one  R-29RGU(?)  Sineva and one other missile, presumably the R-29RM Shtil' or the R-29R Volna.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 08/12/2010 03:17 pm
Roscosmos is speaking today about two Sineva.
http://www.federalspace.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=12053
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/12/2010 05:35 pm
Roscosmos is speaking today about two Sineva.
http://www.federalspace.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=12053

Thanks - how confusing. (and a bit odd that Roscosmos talks about missile launches - like NASA issuing a press release on a USAF Minuteman test!)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ostangen on 08/12/2010 05:36 pm
Makeyev reports about a salvo launch of Sineva in Russian
http://www.makeyev.ru/infores/news/311

The English version says:
In August 6, 2010 two ballistic missiles of the SINEVA family were successfully launched from the TULA submarine board.
  The intercontinental ballistic missiles were launched from submerged position in accordance with the battle training plan. All warheads were landed on the KURA range in estimated time. The assigned objective related to the standard weapon of the sea-based strategic nuclear forces of Russia was performed completely.
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/12/2010 10:03 pm
Makeyev reports about a salvo launch of Sineva in Russian
http://www.makeyev.ru/infores/news/311

The English version says:
In August 6, 2010 two ballistic missiles of the SINEVA family were successfully launched from the TULA submarine board.
  The intercontinental ballistic missiles were launched from submerged position in accordance with the battle training plan. All warheads were landed on the KURA range in estimated time. The assigned objective related to the standard weapon of the sea-based strategic nuclear forces of Russia was performed completely.
 

That seems definitive. The Russian version quotes 1915 Moscow Time, which I assume is civil (summer) time corresponding to 1515 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/25/2010 01:15 am
From NASA Wallops web site:

36.219 US HASSLER/SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE8-23-2010

36.219 US Black Brant IX was launched from White Sands Missile Range, NM on August 23, 2010.The purpose of this mission is to observe and analyze dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) sounding rocket payload is an extremely high speed scanning-slit imaging spectrograph designed to observe and analyze dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona on time scales as short as 100 ms, with TRACE-like spatial resolution and a velocity sensitivity of 1-2 km/s. RAISE will address three general topics that are accessible only with our instrument's unique capabilities: 1) Small-scale multithermal dynamics in active-region loops; 2) the strength, spectrum, and location of high frequency waves in the solar atmosphere; and 3) the nature of transient brightenings in the chromospheric network. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Don Hassler/Soutwest Research Institute.


http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/#
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 08/27/2010 12:22 am
LM News Release - no idea where or when launches took place. Anyone know for either/both first and second exercise?


Lockheed Martin Completes Second Live Tracking Exercise for Ballistic Missile Defense

MOORESTOWN, N.J., August 25th, 2010 -- Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] successfully identified and tracked four  live targets during a test of its Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP) being fielded as part of the Aegis next-generation Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability. .....


http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/082510_LM_MMSP.html

first exercise:

Lockheed Martin Completes First Live Tracking Exercise with New Multi-Mission, Open Architecture Aegis Signal Processor
 
MOORESTOWN, N.J., April 12th, 2010 -- Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] successfully identified and tracked numerous live targets for the first time using its new Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP).  ......


http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2010/041010_LM_Aegis_LiveTracking.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/06/2010 06:47 am
S-520-25 successfully launched
The sounding rocket S-520-25 was successfully launched at 5:00 a.m. on August 31, 2010 (Japan Standard Time,) from the Uchinoura Space Center. The vertical angle at the launch was 82.5 degrees. The S-520-25 was designated to conduct basic experiments on the electro-dynamic tether (EDT) in the ionosphere and to control the attitude of a robot using a tether under the micro-gravity environment while the rocket was making a sub-orbit flight for about 10 minutes to reach its maximum altitude of some 300 km.
The rocket flew normally, and, at 55 seconds after liftoff, its top part opened, and at 58 seconds, the plasma measurement probe (FLP, SSP) was deployed to start observations. The conductive tether was extended at about 120 seconds, and the extension image was transmitted to the ground through the Ku telemetry. The Tethered Space Robot (TSR) was separated from the auxiliary unit of the rocket (DAU) at 297 seconds, and its attitude was controlled by the TSR arm until 310 seconds after liftoff. Concerning the plasma collection experiment, we were able to successfully extend the conductive tether and boom and verify the high-speed ignition function of the Hollow Cathode (HC) despite the fact that the high-voltage control was not carried out as scheduled, thus we have gained a perspective to develop a more efficient plasma collection device.
The S-520-25 rocket reached a maximum altitude of 309 km at 283 seconds after liftoff, completed all observation projects, and fell down to the ocean south-east of Uchinoura.

Source: JAXA
http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/10/2010 11:10 pm

Any ideas on where and when this test took place? Usually the tests are announced well after the test actually took place.


 Northrop Grumman Distributed Aperture System (DAS) for F-35 Demonstrates Ballistic Missile Defense Capabilities

BALTIMORE, Sept. 7, 2010 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE:NOC) AN/AAQ-37 Electro-Optical Distributed Aperture System (DAS) for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter successfully detected and tracked a two-stage rocket launch at a distance exceeding 800 miles during a routine flight test conducted aboard the company's BAC 1-11 test bed aircraft.

Photos accompanying this release are available at http://media.globenewswire.com/noc/mediagallery.html?pkgid=7952
 

Full release at: http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/pages/news_releases.html?d=200739


Image Credits: Nothrop Grumman
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 09/15/2010 02:37 am
Minuteman launch rescheduled

by Staff  Air Force Global Strike Command Public Affairs

9/14/2010 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.  -- The launch of an Air Force Global Strike Command unarmed operational test Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile has been rescheduled to launch from north Vandenberg Friday, Sept. 17, between 3 a.m. and 9 a.m.

The missile's single unarmed re-entry vehicle is expected to travel approximately 5,300 miles, to a pre-determined target about 200 miles southwest of Guam.

The launch has been rescheduled because of the need to ensure data collection equipment in the impact area is fully ready, according to officials. Neither the missile nor any missile launch mechanisms at Vandenberg are the cause of the delay, officials said.

"As with all launches, stringent criteria must be met before we proceed with the test," said Colonel David Bliesner, 576th Flight Test Squadron commander. "It is important to be able to gather as much data as possible to properly assess the capability, operational effectiveness, readiness and accuracy of the ICBM missile force."

The launch is one of a continuing series of pre-scheduled operational tests to ensure the weapon system's reliability and accuracy, officials said.

For more information, please call Air Force Global Strike Command public affairs at 318-456-0824.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/17/2010 01:26 am
Interesting thought .....

Minuteman III test & Valiant Shield 2010; anti-ASBM test?


The U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command announced that it will launched an unarmed operational test Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile to a pre-determined target about 200 miles southwest of Guam on Friday. It just happens that Valiant Shield 2010 is being held in the same vicinity at the same time.

Taking part in the exercise is the George Washington CSG including USS McCampbell, USS Chung-Hoon, and guided missile cruisers USS Shiloh and USS Cowpens. USS Shiloh is certified BMD-capable and USS Cowpens should be refitted with TBMD engagement capability by now.

The exercise calls for the ships to steam east from Palau towards Guam. The exercise started on Sunday and ends ten days later at Guam.

Is the Minuteman III launch a test for the ships to defend themselves from a simulated anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM) attack?

source: http://alert5.com/2010/09/16/minuteman-iii-test-anti-asbm-test/#more-3054
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/17/2010 06:10 pm
September 17, 2010
VAFB Release No. 04-0910

VANDENBERG CONDUCTS MINUTEMAN III FLIGHT TEST

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - A scheduled unarmed operational test Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launch occurred here at 3:03 a.m., Sept. 17 from Launch Facility-09.

The missile's single reentry test vehicle traveled approximately 5,300 miles to a pre-determined target about 200 miles southwest of Guam. ICBM analysts, including the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy, will use the data collected to ensure the readiness and capability of the ICBM fleet.


"The launch process requires tremendous teamwork and involves months of preparation," said Col. David Bliesner, 576th Flight Test Squadron Commander. "The data gained from these launches allows us to maintain a high readiness capability and ensures operational effectiveness of the most powerful weapons in the nation's arsenal."

The launch was a combined effort of the 576th FLTS here; 91st Missile Wing, Minot AFB, N.D.; 625th Strategic Operations Squadron, Offutt AFB, Neb.; and the 30th Space Wing here.


Image Credit: USAF/VAFB
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/18/2010 05:04 am
Interesting thought .....

Minuteman III test & Valiant Shield 2010; anti-ASBM test?


The U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command announced that it will launched an unarmed operational test Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile to a pre-determined target about 200 miles southwest of Guam on Friday. It just happens that Valiant Shield 2010 is being held in the same vicinity at the same time.

Taking part in the exercise is the George Washington CSG including USS McCampbell, USS Chung-Hoon, and guided missile cruisers USS Shiloh and USS Cowpens. USS Shiloh is certified BMD-capable and USS Cowpens should be refitted with TBMD engagement capability by now.

The exercise calls for the ships to steam east from Palau towards Guam. The exercise started on Sunday and ends ten days later at Guam.

Is the Minuteman III launch a test for the ships to defend themselves from a simulated anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM) attack?

source: http://alert5.com/2010/09/16/minuteman-iii-test-anti-asbm-test/#more-3054

Hmm... interesting thought. Aegis ships have used Minuteman flights as targets of opportunity for their radars (GT185 in Jun 2004 is documented as such a case, and GT203 is on the schedule as an Aegis target of opportunity).

There have been previous Guam flights - GT190 in Apr 2006, GT197 in May 2008 for example. So the Guam thing might just be a coincidence. I was assuming the current flight was GT202GM which is mentioned in
www.dtic.mil/descriptivesum/Y2011/MDA/0603888C_PB_2011.pdf
as being an ABL target of opportunity (but that could have changed).
GT202GM is mentioned in this blog posting from a month ago:
http://ontheedge.posterous.com/glory-trip-202gm-task-force

Anyone know of any other Minuteman flights to Guam?

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:20 pm
Terrier-Orion starts in few minutes.

Webcast here - http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/

edit: Target launch is 8:26:30 EDT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:21 pm
T-5 min and counting
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:23 pm
Transition to internal power.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:25 pm
Hold...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:26 pm
Heating issues..
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:28 pm
Resetting clock to T-2 min

There is need to load new launch settings. 30 minutes need to cool down some stuff (didn't heard what excatly).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 12:33 pm
Heating issues related to payload of rocket.

They are back to 'T-30 minutes and holding'.

Quote
T-30 minutes and holding. Cooling down the LCT2 experiment system and evaluating winds for launcher settings. Also need to send the surveillance plan back into the area to check for boats.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 09/21/2010 02:50 pm
Launch completed - from WFF webcast log

Anyone get screenshots from the launch?


Posted by RCC on 2010-09-21 at 09:28:04 EDT
Summary: Launch time: 9:07:30 a.m. Preliminary indications are that good data was received on all experiment systems. There are no further launches schedule from Wallops this month. This concludes today's webcast


Posted by RCC on 2010-09-21 at 09:23:32 EDT
payload impact in the ocean. Recovery of the payload in progress.


Posted by RCC on 2010-09-21 at 09:19:50 EDT
2.3 km altitude


Posted by RCC on 2010-09-21 at 09:14:52 EDT
Parachute deployed


Posted by RCC on 2010-09-21 at 09:07:30 EDT
Launch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: MikeMi. on 09/21/2010 06:54 pm
Anyone get screenshots from the launch?

My polish friend made a movie :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7hxby4HoXE
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 10/06/2010 07:15 pm
DLR launches 'STERN' rocket programme for students

5 October 2010

On Tuesday, 5 October 2010, the German Aerospace Centre (Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) launched a support programme for students to develop, build and launch their own rockets. The programme goes by the acronym STERN from the German Studentische Experimental-Raketen, or Student Experimental Rockets. The programme is aimed at all universities that offer courses in aerospace technology.

The rockets should have a small telemetry payload to transmit key trajectory data back to Earth during flight and provide information to the students including the rocket's altitude and speed. The rockets may be propelled by a solid-fuel, hybrid or steam motor.

The rockets will be launched from the Esrange Space Center at Kiruna, in Sweden. There, the European altitude record of 12.55 kilometres for an amateur rocket was set. To break this record and fly even higher could be a long-term objective of the DLR programme during its planned three-year duration.

Eligible universities are invited to submit their application now; the project starts in January 2011.

http://www.dlr.de/en/DesktopDefault.aspx/tabid-1/86_read-26898/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/07/2010 04:06 pm
From Roscosmos

Today, October 7, 2010, on board the nuclear submarine Dmitry Donskoy carried out the thirteenth test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile, sea-based Bulava.

It is planned that the missile R-30 - Bulava development of the Moscow Institute of Thermal become weapons of strategic nuclear submarines of Project 955 "Borey". The missile is a three. The design of the launch complex allows the launch of the Bulava on the move under water. Flight range of about eight thousand miles. The missile can carry from six to ten independently targetable nuclear units with capacity of up to 150 kilotons each.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 10/07/2010 06:31 pm
From Roscosmos

Today, October 7, 2010, on board the nuclear submarine Dmitry Donskoy carried out the thirteenth test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile, sea-based Bulava.

Reported to be a success.  Launched from the world's largest active submarine.
http://english.ruvr.ru/2010/10/07/24682374.html
http://russianforces.org/blog/2010/10/bulava_launch_reported_success.shtml

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/27/2010 09:21 pm
Today a launch of the Mapheus-2 rocket occured at Esrange near Kiruna, Sweden at 12.15 LT (10.15 UTC). The maximum altitude was 153km.
http://www.dlr.de/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-11/129_read-27373/ (at the moment there is a German version only)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/28/2010 12:57 am
Black Brant IX target launch for airborne laser, from San Nicolas Island, on Oct 21:
http://www.mda.mil/news/10news0014.html

The Mapheus-2 is a Nike-Orion - interesting to see there are still some old Nike boosters left.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: anik on 10/28/2010 04:55 pm
Three Russian ICBMs were successfully launched today: RT-2PM from Plesetsk cosmodrome, R-29R from K-433 submarine in Okhotsk sea and R-29RMU2 from K-117 submarine in Barents sea.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ostangen on 10/29/2010 04:08 am
Russia carries out another successful test launch of Bulava missile

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101029/161125562.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/09/2010 07:54 pm
A number of reports of a "mystery missile" on Nov 9 .....

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/mystery-missile-video-caught-california-coast-monday-night-2725975.html

http://www.dailytech.com/Mystery+Missile+Launch+Leaves+Californians+in+Shock/article20113.htm

http://www.dailytech.com/Mystery+Missile+Launch+Leaves+Californians+in+Shock/article20113.htm

http://michellemalkin.com/2010/11/09/mystery-missile-shades-of-scare-force-one/

http://www.cbs8.com/Global/story.asp?S=13468118
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/11/2010 07:53 am
Another Aegis test has been carried out on October 30.
A Standard Missile-3 was fired from the Japanese Kirishima ship, and successfully intercepted a target missile, launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Kauai.

http://blog.al.com/huntsville-times-business/2010/10/aegis_missile_defense_ship_sho.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/11/2010 04:11 pm
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/12/2010 07:11 am
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/12/2010 03:31 pm
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.

The "blue book" is there as I accessed it too. I was refering to the monthly schedule of WFF web calendar that is at: http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/12/2010 04:35 pm
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.

The "blue book" is there as I accessed it too. I was refering to the monthly schedule of WFF web calendar that is at: http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/

really? I can't see it for some reason. What URL are you finding it at? I get 404'd at http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/bluebook.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/12/2010 07:26 pm
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.

The "blue book" is there as I accessed it too. I was refering to the monthly schedule of WFF web calendar that is at: http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/

really? I can't see it for some reason. What URL are you finding it at? I get 404'd at http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/bluebook.pdf
Hmmmm ..... interesting .....
WFF web calendar was not accessable yesterday but blue book (at URL you list) was as I accessed it ..... today both are gone (web calendar "forbidden" - acess denied and blue book "file not found"!
Wonder what is going on??
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 11/12/2010 08:14 pm

Any ideas on where and when this test took place? Usually the tests are announced well after the test actually took place.


 Northrop Grumman Distributed Aperture System (DAS) for F-35 Demonstrates Ballistic Missile Defense Capabilities

BALTIMORE, Sept. 7, 2010 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE:NOC) AN/AAQ-37 Electro-Optical Distributed Aperture System (DAS) for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter successfully detected and tracked a two-stage rocket launch at a distance exceeding 800 miles during a routine flight test conducted aboard the company's BAC 1-11 test bed aircraft.

Photos accompanying this release are available at http://media.globenewswire.com/noc/mediagallery.html?pkgid=7952
 

Full release at: http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/pages/news_releases.html?d=200739


Image Credits: Nothrop Grumman


This was tracking the Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral on June 4, 2010.

video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZrvAFRhQZc&
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 11/13/2010 05:04 pm
This was tracking the Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral on June 4, 2010.

video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZrvAFRhQZc&

Very interesting that it shows part of the first stage reentry.  Very hot looking, that, with what appears to be a sudden flare up. 

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/14/2010 04:34 am
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.

The "blue book" is there as I accessed it too. I was refering to the monthly schedule of WFF web calendar that is at: http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/

really? I can't see it for some reason. What URL are you finding it at? I get 404'd at http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/bluebook.pdf
Hmmmm ..... interesting .....
WFF web calendar was not accessable yesterday but blue book (at URL you list) was as I accessed it ..... today both are gone (web calendar "forbidden" - acess denied and blue book "file not found"!
Wonder what is going on??

It's just possible it's simply incompetence; they have been unable to post any more Wallops Newsletters for almost 2 years due to a 'technical problem'... sigh.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/06/2010 08:20 am
Launch of a Topol yesterday.
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101205/161640678.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 12/07/2010 01:39 pm
I work at Wallops Flight Facility and I was (am) the payload mechanical design/manufacturing/test engineer for 41.087 NT Heyne launched from WSMR yesterday at ~10:30 am local time.

The top half of page 3 of this PDF has a few pictures from I&T at wallops:
http://rscience.gsfc.nasa.gov/keydocs/Rocket_Report_2nd_qt_2010.pdf

Here is a quick JPL news release:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-408

Pretty good high res launch picture is available at that link.

This was my first launch that I had the payload from Mission start to Launch. Still waiting to hear details on how everything went but I do know they recovered it successfully.

Check out http://phaeton.jpl.nasa.gov/external/projects/terrain.cfm for information about the payload.

Feel free to ask me questions. I'll answer whatever I think I can.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 12/07/2010 01:45 pm
I just went to look at the Wallops schedule on the web and received "access denied" error - has the web schedule for WFF moved to a new location or is it now resticted?

Interesting. I looked at it yesterday and it was still there, but I noticed that all future MARTI Black Brant IX launches had disappeared from it and from the Blue Book pdf, which also seems to have disappeared entirely today.

Losing the Blue Book would be bad.

The "blue book" is there as I accessed it too. I was refering to the monthly schedule of WFF web calendar that is at: http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/

really? I can't see it for some reason. What URL are you finding it at? I get 404'd at http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/bluebook.pdf
Hmmmm ..... interesting .....
WFF web calendar was not accessable yesterday but blue book (at URL you list) was as I accessed it ..... today both are gone (web calendar "forbidden" - acess denied and blue book "file not found"!
Wonder what is going on??

It's just possible it's simply incompetence; they have been unable to post any more Wallops Newsletters for almost 2 years due to a 'technical problem'... sigh.

I am able to access this http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/, but I am at wallops on a NASA network. I heard from someone that the schedule was no longer going to be available publicly. If I run into anyone from the PAO I'll see if I can get that confirmed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/07/2010 05:31 pm

I am able to access this http://sched.wff.nasa.gov/wffsched/, but I am at wallops on a NASA network. I heard from someone that the schedule was no longer going to be available publicly. If I run into anyone from the PAO I'll see if I can get that confirmed.
FYI, when we "outsiders" click that link it says the following:

"The Wallops Daily Range Schedule is no longer available for public use. Thank you for your patience as the Wallops Flight Facility Public Affairs Office works to create a public schedule, available on the Wallops home page."

So it would appear that a public schedule with less detailed info is planned to appear, eventually.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/08/2010 01:54 pm
Launch of a Topol yesterday.
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101205/161640678.html

Anatoly Zak notes that this was an unusual short range, probably very high apogee, test flight - possibly even ABM related ....  http://www.russianspaceweb.com/rockets_icbm.html#2010

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ostangen on 12/10/2010 06:01 pm
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101207/161664867.html

Nuclear warheads have been completed for Russia's new Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile, its designer Yury Solomonov said

and

Four Bulava test launches will be carried out in the second half of December from the Borei-class nuclear-powered missile submarine Yury Dolgoruky Solomonov said.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/11/2010 07:59 pm
India testfires Agni II plus missile (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/sci/2010-12/10/c_13643795.htm)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 12/12/2010 04:52 pm

"The Wallops Daily Range Schedule is no longer available for public use. Thank you for your patience as the Wallops Flight Facility Public Affairs Office works to create a public schedule, available on the Wallops home page."

Too bad as there was a lot of info gleaned from it I would have never known about (Mars Balloon drop tests come to mind) ..... I doubt the "public" versiion would have that kind of detail.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/13/2010 06:13 am
Launch of a VSB-3 on Sunday in Brasilia.
http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Brazil_launches_rocket_into_orbit_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/13/2010 09:33 am
India testfires Agni II plus missile (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/sci/2010-12/10/c_13643795.htm)

The launch has ended in failure
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Indias_test_of_nuclear-capable_missile_fails_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/14/2010 09:58 pm
I work at Wallops Flight Facility and I was (am) the payload mechanical design/manufacturing/test engineer for 41.087 NT Heyne launched from WSMR yesterday at ~10:30 am local time.

The top half of page 3 of this PDF has a few pictures from I&T at wallops:
http://rscience.gsfc.nasa.gov/keydocs/Rocket_Report_2nd_qt_2010.pdf

Here is a quick JPL news release:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-408

Pretty good high res launch picture is available at that link.

This was my first launch that I had the payload from Mission start to Launch. Still waiting to hear details on how everything went but I do know they recovered it successfully.

Check out http://phaeton.jpl.nasa.gov/external/projects/terrain.cfm for information about the payload.

Feel free to ask me questions. I'll answer whatever I think I can.




Thanks for the info! I gather this was sort of a followon to 41.068?
Do you happen to know the gross payload weight offhand? Thanks.
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/15/2010 06:20 am
According to NovostiKosmonavtiki there was a launch of a Black Brant XII from Andoya at Dec 12th.
The designation was NASA 40.026UE.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ostangen on 12/15/2010 07:29 am
According to NovostiKosmonavtiki there was a launch of a Black Brant XII from Andoya at Dec 12th.
The designation was NASA 40.026UE.

May it be this launch?
http://www.rocketrange.no/?page_id=751&campaign_id=1&preview=1

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Space Lizard on 12/16/2010 09:31 am
http://www.ksby.com/news/missile-blasts-off-from-vandenberg-air-force-base/

Does anyone know what the target was?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/16/2010 09:41 am
Target was a LV-2 (modified Trident-C4) launched from Kwajalein (Meck Island)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/16/2010 11:27 am
http://www.ksby.com/news/missile-blasts-off-from-vandenberg-air-force-base/

 

http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123235228
says launch was at 12:03pm (local) from launch facility 23, which
corresponds to 2003 UTC. If the time offset is the same as for
FTG-06 that would make the LV-2 launch around 1957 UTC.
The mission appears to be designated FTG-06A (e.g. http://www.youtube.com/user/30SWVandenberg)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/25/2010 07:31 am
On December 19 (at 03:36 local time), the third and final launch took place under the Ecoma project from Andoya, to study the effect of the Geminid meteor shower on the properties of meteor smoke particles. For this purpose, one rocket  was launched before the shower (Ecoma-7, on December 4), one at the peak (Ecoma-8, on December 13), and one after the peak of the shower activity (Ecoma-9 on December 19).
A Nike-Orion rocket was used for these launches.
More info: http://www.rocketrange.no/?page_id=751&campaign_id=2&post=58
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 01/20/2011 06:59 am
A Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket is schedule for launch on January 22 for the U.S. Navy from NASA’s Launch Range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Based on the approved range schedule, the rocket is set for launch between midnight and 4 a.m. The backup launch days are January 23 - 25. The rocket may be visible to residents on Delmarva. This launch will not be web casted.
Source: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=32521
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/23/2011 02:10 am
WFF Launch Part of Atlantic Trident 2011

A Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket is schedule for launch on January 22 for the U.S. Navy from NASA’s Launch Range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Based on the approved range schedule, the rocket is set for launch between midnight and 4 a.m. The backup launch days are January 23 - 25. The rocket may be visible to residents on Delmarva. This launch will not be web casted.
Source: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=32521


The Navy is planning to conduct its first live sea-based Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) test on the East Coast this weekend.

The test is part of exercise Atlantic Trident 2011 scheduled through January 25.

According to the Navy, the exercise will provide realistic training for BMD ships and give them the opportunity to track a live target and simulate intercept of a short-range target missile in the midcourse phase of flight.

A target missile will be launched from the NASA Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Source: http://www.wavy.com/dpp/military/Navy-plans-East-Coast-Aegis-Ballistic-Missile-Defense-exercise
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 01/25/2011 07:15 am
A Terrier-Oriole suborbital rocket for the U.S. Navy was launched from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility at 1:10 a.m., January 22.
Source: Wallops website
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/27/2011 04:10 pm
A Terrier-Oriole suborbital rocket for the U.S. Navy was launched from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility at 1:10 a.m., January 22.
Source: Wallops website

Thanks for the info - where did you find it on the Wallops website? I looked earlier to see if it had launched but didn't find anything on the flight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 01/28/2011 07:28 am
Thanks for the info - where did you find it on the Wallops website? I looked earlier to see if it had launched but didn't find anything on the flight.

The info is on the upper right-hand corner (incorrectly titled 'upcoming launches' of the main section 'What's happening at Wallops') of this page: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home/index.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/28/2011 01:49 pm
I gather there's been a launch from Poker Flat (probably the Colorado UV-astronomy payload) but haven't been able to find details yet.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/28/2011 08:58 pm
NASA Blue Book appears to be back up at sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf
but has not been updated with the new launch - I believe it to be 36.257UG.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 01/29/2011 07:16 am
I gather there's been a launch from Poker Flat (probably the Colorado UV-astronomy payload) but haven't been able to find details yet.

The launch took place on January 28. Video of the launch can be found on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWfuVt8Q2Ew

Some mission background info is here: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-01-rockets-poker-flat-range.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/31/2011 01:00 am
I gather there's been a launch from Poker Flat (probably the Colorado UV-astronomy payload) but haven't been able to find details yet.

Poker Flat launches rocket for University Colorado
Rocket launched for University of Colorado science project.

At about 1:49 a.m. on Jan. 28, 2011, a University of Colorado team launched a two-stage NASA sounding rocket from Poker Flat Research Range, about 30 miles north of Fairbanks.

Source: Univ of Alaska Geophysical Institute
http://www.gi.alaska.edu/node/329
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 01/31/2011 01:31 am
A Terrier-Oriole suborbital rocket for the U.S. Navy was launched from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility at 1:10 a.m., January 22.
Source: Wallops website

Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc. (Nasdaq:KTOS - News), a leading National Security Solutions provider, announced today that the company's Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) targets were used as part of the first live sea-based Aegis BMD test held on the East Coast. The test, held Saturday January 22nd, was part of Atlantic Trident 2011. Kratos provided rocket launch and engineering services and BMD targets under a previously awarded $100 million contract vehicle related to advanced rocket, propulsion, BMD and other National Defense programs.

During the test three Navy ships, the USS Monterey (CG 61), USS Ramage (DDG 61) and USS Gonzalez (DDG 66) all successfully tracked a short-range ballistic missile target that was launched from NASA's Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The target is part of the Aegis Readiness Assessment Vehicle (ARAV) family of targets specifically used to test the Aegis BMD system. Kratos' Rocket Support Services (RSS) Business Unit also provides the threat-simulating target nose tips for the ARAV-A, ARAV-B (used in this test) and ARAV-C target configurations, the Oriole rocket system which is part of the ARAV-B target, and electronic and aerodynamic hardware used on the ARAV-C booster.

Source: Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc. Press Release

Photo of target launch - source US Navy
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/01/2011 10:22 pm
I gather there's been a launch from Poker Flat (probably the Colorado UV-astronomy payload) but haven't been able to find details yet.

Poker Flat launches rocket for University Colorado
Rocket launched for University of Colorado science project.

At about 1:49 a.m. on Jan. 28, 2011, a University of Colorado team launched a two-stage NASA sounding rocket from Poker Flat Research Range, about 30 miles north of Fairbanks.

Source: Univ of Alaska Geophysical Institute
http://www.gi.alaska.edu/node/329

36.257 UG GREEN/UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

1136.257 UG Black Brant IX was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on January 28, 2011. The purpose of this mission is to search for young stars in nearby galaxies. FIRE imaged a spectral region unexplored astronomically. The imaging band of FIRE(~900‐1100 Å) will help fill the current wavelength imaging observation hole existing from~620 Å to the GALEX band near 1350 Å. The Principal Investigator is Dr. James Green from University of Colorado.

Source: Wallops Flight Facility web site http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story111.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/02/2011 03:53 am
I gather there's been a launch from Poker Flat (probably the Colorado UV-astronomy payload) but haven't been able to find details yet.

Poker Flat launches rocket for University Colorado
Rocket launched for University of Colorado science project.

At about 1:49 a.m. on Jan. 28, 2011, a University of Colorado team launched a two-stage NASA sounding rocket from Poker Flat Research Range, about 30 miles north of Fairbanks.

Source: Univ of Alaska Geophysical Institute
http://www.gi.alaska.edu/node/329

36.257 UG GREEN/UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

1136.257 UG Black Brant IX was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on January 28, 2011. The purpose of this mission is to search for young stars in nearby galaxies. FIRE imaged a spectral region unexplored astronomically. The imaging band of FIRE(~900‐1100 Å) will help fill the current wavelength imaging observation hole existing from~620 Å to the GALEX band near 1350 Å. The Principal Investigator is Dr. James Green from University of Colorado.

Source: Wallops Flight Facility web site http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story111.html


This is presumably 0149 AKST (GMT-9) or 1049 UTC / Jan 28.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/10/2011 06:56 pm
36.256 UE BAILEY/VIRGINIA TECH    2-5-2011

36.256 UE Black Brant IX was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on Feburay 5, 2011. The purpose of this mission is to measure the concentration of nitric oxide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere in the nighttime polar region. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Scott Bailey/Virginia Tech.

Source WFF website: http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/index.html

Poker Flat Research Range data: http://www.pfrr.alaska.edu/pfrr/index.html


..... Scientists launched a NASA sounding rocket at 11:11 p.m. [AKST] on Friday, Feb. 4, 2011 in an attempt to learn more about the concentration of nitric oxide in the upper atmosphere from a rocket that arced about 160 miles above northern Alaska.

While the rocket launched and flew as expected, useful scientific data was not obtained, said Scott Bailey of Virginia Tech, the lead scientist on the mission.

“We were not able to get the experiment lined up on the star, for reasons we don't yet understand, so there were no science observations,” said Bailey, a former faculty member at UAF’s Geophysical Institute. “The rocket worked fine, and the pointing system worked, but no star light ever got back to the instrument section. We won’t understand what happened until we get the payload back.” ......


Geophysical Institute article: http://www.gi.alaska.edu/node/346

Photo source: WFF web site

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/17/2011 06:11 pm
Pakistan test fires Babur cruise missile (http://www.china-defense-mashup.com/pakistan-test-fires-babur-cruise-missile.html)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/23/2011 07:39 am
The Rexus-9 sounding rocket was launched from Kiruna on Feb 22.

More info (and pictures) here: http://www.ssc.se/?id=5104&cid=19124
More info on the experiments carried onboard here: http://www.ssc.se/rexus-15.aspx

The launch of Rexus-10 is scheduled for today.
Info on Rexus-10 experiments: http://www.ssc.se/rexus-16.aspx
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/24/2011 07:32 am
The second student rocket in two days, REXUS 10, was successfully launched today at 11:00 local time from Esrange Space Center in the northern part of Sweden. The rocket, with its four experiments, reached an altitude of 82 km and landed after 14 minutes flight 40 km north of Esrange. The payload is back at the base and is right now undergoing studies performed by the students.

Source: http://www.ssc.se/?id=5104&cid=19175
More info (in German) here: http://www.dlr.de/DesktopDefault.aspx/tabid-1/9600_read-29274/
More info and pictures at the blogsite of one of the experiments: http://squidkth.wordpress.com/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/26/2011 05:05 pm
The following news release came from White Sands Missile Range, can't find any information if the launch and intercept took place or not. Anyone know of anything?


Release No.  9
Date:  February 14, 2011

White Sands Missile Range, N.M., February 14, 2011 - Preparations
are being completed at Fort Wingate near Gallup, N.M., for a Juno target
missile firing from the old depot to White Sands Missile Range.  The
launch is tentatively scheduled for February 16 between 6:30 and 7:30
a.m. and may be viewed from Red Rock State Park.

     The Juno missile will drop a booster into an evacuated safety zone
during its flight to the missile range.  In addition to this safety drop
zone near Datil, N.M., there will be short safety roadblocks and
evacuations around the immediate Fort Wingate area - mostly to the south
and east.

     The roadblocks include the following:  New Mexico Route 400 between
the Fort Wingate historic monument and McGaffey Lake; Forest Route 191
between New Mexico Route 400 and six miles to the west; Forest Route 547
between Sixmile Spring and McGaffey Lake.  In addition, gates along New
Mexico Route 400 will be closed to passage.

     The roadblocks should last between two and four hours.  However,
traffic traveling straight through on New Mexico Route 400 will be
screened through up to 30 minutes before launch time.

     In addition to the roadblocks, Quaking Aspens campground will be
evacuated for the launch.  Since the firing will be in the early
morning, camping at the site will not be allowed the night before so
that National Forest Service officials can be assured the area is
evacuated.

     The evacuation area for the booster drop zone is comprised of
private and national forest lands north of Datil and includes the
northern portion of the Datil Mountains.  The area is north of U.S.
Highway 60, west of State Highway 52 and east of Forest Road 6A.
Roadblocks of the perimeter of the area will be set at 4 a.m.

     The airspace over Fort Wingate and the booster drop zone will be
restricted for several hours for the launch.  The avoidance area will be
posted by the Federal Aviation Agency in the form of a Notice to Airmen
(NOTAM).  The airspace at the end of the flight is over White Sands
Missile Range and is already restricted.

     There have been 13 target missions from Fort Wingate to White Sands
Missile Range.  The first mission as conducted in November 1997 and the
most recent mission was in October 2009.  The most recent Juno mission
was launched from the missile range call-up area north of New Mexico
Highway 380 in February 2010.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/27/2011 03:18 pm
The following news release came from White Sands Missile Range, can't find any information if the launch and intercept took place or not. Anyone know of anything?


Release No.  9
Date:  February 14, 2011

White Sands Missile Range, N.M., February 14, 2011 - Preparations
are being completed at Fort Wingate near Gallup, N.M., for a Juno target
missile firing from the old depot to White Sands Missile Range.  The
launch is tentatively scheduled for February 16 between 6:30 and 7:30
a.m. and may be viewed from Red Rock State Park.

     The Juno missile will drop a booster into an evacuated safety zone
during its flight to the missile range.  In addition to this safety drop
zone near Datil, N.M., there will be short safety roadblocks and
evacuations around the immediate Fort Wingate area - mostly to the south
and east.

     The roadblocks include the following:  New Mexico Route 400 between
the Fort Wingate historic monument and McGaffey Lake; Forest Route 191
between New Mexico Route 400 and six miles to the west; Forest Route 547
between Sixmile Spring and McGaffey Lake.  In addition, gates along New
Mexico Route 400 will be closed to passage.

     The roadblocks should last between two and four hours.  However,
traffic traveling straight through on New Mexico Route 400 will be
screened through up to 30 minutes before launch time.

     In addition to the roadblocks, Quaking Aspens campground will be
evacuated for the launch.  Since the firing will be in the early
morning, camping at the site will not be allowed the night before so
that National Forest Service officials can be assured the area is
evacuated.

     The evacuation area for the booster drop zone is comprised of
private and national forest lands north of Datil and includes the
northern portion of the Datil Mountains.  The area is north of U.S.
Highway 60, west of State Highway 52 and east of Forest Road 6A.
Roadblocks of the perimeter of the area will be set at 4 a.m.

     The airspace over Fort Wingate and the booster drop zone will be
restricted for several hours for the launch.  The avoidance area will be
posted by the Federal Aviation Agency in the form of a Notice to Airmen
(NOTAM).  The airspace at the end of the flight is over White Sands
Missile Range and is already restricted.

     There have been 13 target missions from Fort Wingate to White Sands
Missile Range.  The first mission as conducted in November 1997 and the
most recent mission was in October 2009.  The most recent Juno mission
was launched from the missile range call-up area north of New Mexico
Highway 380 in February 2010.



News reports said planned launch on Feb 16 was cancelled.
No news of a reschedule. Juno is basically the same as Hera and was
launched previously on 2010 Feb 17.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 02/28/2011 11:29 pm
Joint U.S.-Israel Arrow Weapon System Intercepts Target During Successful Missile Defense Test
 

The joint U.S.-Israel Arrow Weapon System successfully intercepted a ballistic target missile during a flight test conducted today [February 21, 2011]. This test is part of the Arrow System Improvement Program (ASIP) and was conducted jointly by the Israel Missile Defense Organization and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency at the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division-Pt. Mugu Sea Range.

At 10:30 p.m. local time (Pacific Standard Time), the target missile was launched from a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) off the coast of California, within the Pt. Mugu test range. The target was representative of potential ballistic missile threats facing Israel.

The Arrow Weapon System’s Green Pine radar successfully detected and tracked the target and transferred information to the Citron Tree battle management control system. The Arrow Weapon System launched an interceptor missile which performed its planned trajectory and destroyed the target missile. The test represented a realistic scenario and all the elements of the weapon system performed in their operational configuration.

The Israel Missile Defense Organization (IMDO) and U.S. Department of Defense officials conducted the flight test. The main contractor for the integration and the development of the Arrow Weapon System is the MLM division of the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI). The “Green Pine” Radar is developed by ELTA Industries and the “Citron Tree” BMC is developed by Tadiran Electronic Systems, Ltd.

The success of the test is a major milestone in the development of the Arrow Weapon System and provides confidence in operational Israeli capabilities to defeat the developing ballistic missile threat.

Source: MDA website: http://www.mda.mil/news/11news0002.html

Photo & Video Source: MDA (see link below photo for video link)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/01/2011 02:08 am
  NEW MEXICO MISSILE LAUNCH RESCHEDULED - any word if this launch actually takes place is appreciated!!!!


               White Sands Missile Range News Release
     
White Sands Missile Range, N.M., February 28, 2011 - Preparations are
being completed at Fort Wingate near Gallup, N.M., for a Juno target
missile firing from the old depot to White Sands Missile Range. The
launch is tentatively scheduled for March 2 between 6:30 and 7:30
a.m. and may be viewed from Red Rock State Park.

The Juno missile will drop a booster into an evacuated safety zone
during its flight to the missile range. In addition to this safety
drop zone near Datil, N.M., there will be short safety roadblocks and
evacuations around the immediate Fort Wingate area - mostly to the
south and east.

The roadblocks include the following:  New Mexico Route 400 between
the Fort Wingate historic monument and McGaffey Lake; Forest Route 191
between New Mexico Route 400 and six miles to the west; Forest Route
547 between Sixmile Spring and McGaffey Lake.  In addition, gates
along New Mexico Route 400 will be closed to passage.

The roadblocks should last between two and four hours.  However,
traffic traveling straight through on New Mexico Route 400 will be
screened through up to 30 minutes before launch time.

In addition to the roadblocks, Quaking Aspens campground will be
evacuated for the launch.  Since the firing will be in the early
morning, camping at the site will not be allowed the night before so
that National Forest Service officials can be assured the area is
evacuated.

The evacuation area for the booster drop zone is comprised of private
and national forest lands north of Datil and includes the northern
portion of the Datil Mountains. The area is north of U.S. Highway 60,
west of State Highway 52 and east of Forest Road 6A. Roadblocks of the
perimeter of the area will be set at 4 a.m.

The airspace over Fort Wingate and the booster drop zone will be
restricted for several hours for the launch. The avoidance area will
be posted by the Federal Aviation Agency in the form of a Notice to
Airmen (NOTAM). The airspace at the end of the flight is over White
Sands Missile Range and is already restricted.

There have been 13 target missions from Fort Wingate to White Sands
Missile Range.  The first mission as conducted in November 1997 and
the most recent mission was in October 2009. The most recent Juno
mission was launched from the missile range call-up area north of New
Mexico Highway 380 in February 2010.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ginahoy on 03/01/2011 07:04 pm
Just saw a note in my astronomy group on Yahoo regarding possible light show (cc below, from Brian Webb of www.spacearchive.info). If Juno launches early in the window, the exhaust plume should be illuminated by the sun against dawn sky (sunrise at 6:48), and visible from my location in SE Arizona.

Does anyone know of a way to follow this launch in real time so I won't have to be staring at an empty sky for an hour?


                     POSSIBLE DAWN LIGHT SHOW
                            by Brian Webb
 
Observers across part of the American Southwest may enjoy a light
show on the morning of March 2nd thanks to the scheduled launch
of a missile from New Mexico.
 
The Juno target missile is scheduled to lift-off from Fort Wingate near
Gallup between 6:30 and 7:30 a.m. Mountain Time and fly across the
state to White Sands.
 
If liftoff takes place early in the launch window, the missile's exhaust
could be illuminated by the Sun with the dawn sky as a background.
 
Under ideal conditions, the launch and its aftermath may be visible to
the unaided eye from Arizona, western New Mexico, southern Nevada
and Utah, southwest Colorado, and northern Mexico.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ginahoy on 03/02/2011 12:44 pm
She's OFF!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ginahoy on 03/02/2011 12:54 pm
I estimate the launch was around 6:40 MST, although I'm only guessing since I didn't see the actual missile. I had stepped inside for just a minute to get some coffee :(

What I could see from my vantage point about 240mi SSW of the launch site was a corkscrew smoke trail no more than a minute after the fact. The trail extended from about 20 degrees to 25 degrees above the horizon. It dissipated within a few minutes.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ginahoy on 03/02/2011 08:40 pm
Here's a msg from someone who saw launch from Flagstaff (copied from my astronomy group). I almost cried when I read that the initial boost contrail wasn't the end of the show. I look forward to seeing his images.

> ---------- Forwarded Message ----------
> From: <[email protected]>
> To: [email protected]
> Subject: [AZ-Observing] Re: Juno Launch from New Mexico
> Date: Wed, 02 Mar 2011 07:37:27 -0700
>
> I enjoyed a beautiful view of the launch this morning. I was too busy running a couple cameras and a sketch pad to note the exact time but it seems to have launched about 10 minutes into the window around 6:40 AM. It gained a lot more altitude than I expected. The initial vertical boost contrail picked up a nice zig-zag pretty quickly. The trail disappeared for what seemed like about a minute and I wondered if the show was over. But a brilliant arc reappeared much higher in the sky with the apex of the plume beginning to blossom as the missile rose above the thickest layers of atmosphere.
>
> The remaining trajectory downrange was lost to twilight. If this had happened perhaps a half hour earlier, the larger, fainter plume may have added to the show. The brighter arc of exhaust was still a stunning sight as it twisted up amidst a colorful twilight and blazing orange cirrus. I'm planning to get the video and a few photos posted later today. I hope others had a chance to see it.
>
> Jeremy Perez
> Flagstaff
> www.beltofvenus.net
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/02/2011 09:52 pm
From http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/release.asp?prid=768

"Orbital Successfully Launches Patriot Target Vehicle for Missile Defense Test
-- Company Conducts Second PTV Juno Mission for U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center --

(Dulles, VA 2 March 2011) – Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB) announced today that it successfully launched a Patriot Target Vehicle (PTV) under a direct contract with the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) Space Development and Test Directorate (SD). The PTV served as an intercept target for the Lower Tier Project Office Patriot missile defense system. The PTV was launched on March 2, 2011 from Fort Wingate Launch Complex-96 into White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico. It flew a southerly trajectory over New Mexico into WSMR and was intercepted by the Patriot Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) interceptor system during reentry. This PTV, known as Juno, was the second of two targets Orbital is under contract to launch in support of the Patriot MSE test and evaluation program."

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/02/2011 11:31 pm
Here's a msg from someone who saw launch from Flagstaff (copied from my astronomy group). I almost cried when I read that the initial boost contrail wasn't the end of the show. I look forward to seeing his images.

...

running a couple cameras and a sketch pad

Are there any photos to post?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jperez1690 on 03/03/2011 02:33 am
Hello,

This is my first post to the forum. I observed the Juno launch from about 160 miles west in Flagstaff, AZ (as noted in the message that ginahoy posted). It sounds like the booster contrail* was difficult to see from central to southern Arizona. I'm attaching a photo that shows both contrails.

Video can be seen here:
YouTube: Juno Target Missile Launch - March 2, 2011 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUjyf3WYjA8)


Full report and other photos can be seen here: Report: Juno Target Missile Launch - March 2, 2011 (http://www.perezmedia.net/beltofvenus/archives/001472.html)

*Apologies if I've got the terminology wrong.
[edit: woah...looks like the forum auto-embeds YouTube links...hope that's ok...]
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/03/2011 02:43 am

This is my first post to the forum. I observed the Juno launch from about 160 miles west in Flagstaff, AZ (as noted in the message that ginahoy posted). It sounds like the booster contrail* was difficult to see from central to southern Arizona. I'm attaching a photo that shows both contrails.


Jeremy - thank you for posting the photo and the video of the launch. Welcome to the forum!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/03/2011 11:46 pm
Successful Trident II D5 Test flight

The Navy conducted the 135th successful test flight of a Trident II D5 Missile today [March 1, 2011] off the coast of Southern California. The missile was launched at approximately 1 p.m. PST from an Ohio-class Trident ballistic missile submarine. The Trident II D5 missile is the Navy’s sea based strategic deterrent.

Photo Credit: U.S. Third Fleet's Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/ThirdFleet
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yeknom-Ecaps on 03/04/2011 01:59 pm
Successful Trident II D5 Test flight

The Navy conducted the 135th successful test flight of a Trident II D5 Missile today [March 1, 2011] off the coast of Southern California.

Anyone know the name of the submarine the launch was from?

Also, anyone know the exact location of the launch - know it is around San Diego but I would like more precision if any one knows.

Thanks
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/05/2011 11:07 pm
Successful Trident II D5 Test flight

The Navy conducted the 135th successful test flight of a Trident II D5 Missile today [March 1, 2011] off the coast of Southern California.

Anyone know the name of the submarine the launch was from?

Also, anyone know the exact location of the launch - know it is around San Diego but I would like more precision if any one knows.

Thanks

There were some pictures of the launch next to pictures of the USS Nevada, so I took the implication that was the sub.

They keep the locations of the west coast launches very quiet - I don't think we know to within 500 km or so, presumably it's within the Point Mugu range area somewhere?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: seshagirib on 03/06/2011 03:14 pm
Indian ABM test successful:

http://frontierindia.net/indian-anti-missile-system-test-intercepts-ballistic-missile-at-an-altitude-of-16-km


"
........
........
The Interceptor intercepted the Ballistic Missile at an altitude of 16 km and blasted the missile into pieces. It was a text book launch and all the events and mission sequence took place as expected.
.....
......
"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/24/2011 11:23 pm
An ARAV-B target missile was launched from Kauai on Mar 16 according to http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42238237/ns/technology_and_science-space/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 03/29/2011 11:50 am
Today was a launch of a rocket of the TEXUS program from Kiruna.

http://www.dlr.de/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-11/129_read-29678/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/21/2011 07:17 am
On April 15, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) carried out another Aegis SM-3 test, catalogued as FTM-15 and nicknamed Stellar Charon.
At 2:52 a.m. EDT (6:52 p.m. April 15 Marshall Island Time), an intermediate-range ballistic LV-2 missile target was launched from the Reagan Test Site, located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, approximately 2,300 miles southwest of Hawaii.
A forward-based AN/TPY-2 X-band transportable radar, located on Wake Island, detected and tracked the threat missile and sent trajectory information to the Command, Control, Battle Management, and Communications (C2BMC) system, which processed and transmitted remote target data to the destroyer USS O’KANE, located to the west of Hawaii. The intercept SM-3 (the first Aegis BMD version 3.6.1) was launched approx. 11 minutes after the launch of the target, and succesfully destroyed the target.
Source: http://www.mda.mil/news/11news0007.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7cbZAUvXmQ
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/05/2011 08:18 am
On April 26, 2011, the K-84 Ekaterinburg submarine of the Project 667BDRM class successfully launched a R-29RM Sineva missile. The launch was performed from a submerged submarine deployed in Barents Sea. The Navy reported that all warheads reached their intended targets at the Kura test site in Kamchatka.

Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2011/04/successful_sineva_launch.shtml

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/05/2011 08:22 am
A Black Brant IX rocket was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska on April 27, 2011. The primary objective of this mission (36.278 GT) was to conduct a test flight of a recently manufactured Black Brant motor that was cast using a new mixing process.
Source: http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: starbase1 on 05/06/2011 09:54 pm
Can anyone point me at good reference material for the British "Skylark" sounding rocket? I'd really like to attempt a very highly detailed CGI version, but I am struggling to find good high res reference images.

With so many flown, it should not be THAT hard!

Thanks,
Nick
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 05/07/2011 04:06 pm
China successfully launched a space environment-monitoring rocket Saturday morning from the southern island province of Hainan as part of the nation's key "Meridian Project."

The rocket was sent into space at 7 a.m. from a launch site in Hainan, said a statement from the Center for Space Science and Applied Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Source:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-05/07/c_13863911.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 05/08/2011 03:20 pm
China successfully launched a space environment-monitoring rocket Saturday morning from the southern island province of Hainan as part of the nation's key "Meridian Project."

The rocket was sent into space at 7 a.m. from a launch site in Hainan, said a statement from the Center for Space Science and Applied Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Source:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-05/07/c_13863911.htm

This report seems to indicate a 196 km apogee and a 420 sec flight time.  It also provides a listing of experiments.
http://mareylv.blogspot.com/2011/05/safe-space-activities-play-important.html

I'm still seeking information about this TianYing 3C rocket.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/08/2011 04:24 pm
Ed beat me to it - I found this in Chinese
http://www.stdaily.com/kjrb/content/2011-05/08/content_302799.htm
which (thanks to google translate etc) seems to indicate launch at 0702
(which is 2302 UTC May 6 if they are talking Beijing time) with 196.6 km apogee
and 420s flight time, carrying an extensible electric field antenna, a Langmuir probe
and a GPS system for trajectory measurement. It also reports a previous weather
rocket launch on Jun 3 2010, possibly to 60 km. Tianying is 'Space Eagle';
the launch site was referred to as 'tan kong bu huojian fashechang fashe", Ministry sounding rocket launch site (didn't say which ministry).
Kunpeng-1 seems to be the name of the payload ("radiosonde"?)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 05/08/2011 04:58 pm
TianYing-3
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/09/2011 07:10 am
A video of the TianYing-3C - Meridian launch can be seen on this site: http://newscontent.cctv.com/news.jsp?fileId=110250
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/21/2011 08:17 am
On May 20, 2011, the K-84 Ekaterinburg submarine of the Project 667BDRM class successfully launched a R-29RM Sineva missile. The launch was performed from a submerged submarine deployed in Barents Sea. The Navy reported that all warheads reached their intended targets at the Kura test site in Kamchatka.

The previous Sineva launch took place less than a month ago, in April 2011, from the same submarine.

A report about a Sineva launch appeared in online publication Navy.ru on May 18, 2011. It appears that that report described the launch that actually took place on May 20th. The early release of the information may suggest that the launch was originally scheduled for May 17th, but then was postponed.

Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2011/05/another_sineva_launch_from_eka.shtml

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Moe Grills on 05/27/2011 08:02 pm
   UP Aerospace just had a successful suborbital launch
a few days ago.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/31/2011 08:21 am
   UP Aerospace just had a successful suborbital launch
a few days ago.

More info here: http://www.memorialspaceflights.com/goddardFlight.asp
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/09/2011 09:38 am
From Xinhua, India "successfully" testfires nuclear-capable Prithvi II missile (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-06/09/c_13919428.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/10/2011 09:08 pm
The SubTEC IV rocket, NASA 41.096GT, was launched from Wallops Island on Jun 10.
It carried a new high data rate X-band telemetry system and the 0.4-meter
SMART microsatellite bus.

Apogee was 188 km according to the Wallops Twitter feed. My impression is that SMART separated from the main payload; it is a GSFC/USAF-ORS payload 0.4m in size, but I haven't been able to find the mass.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/11/2011 09:04 am
Interesting fact: the Terrier Improved Orion sounding rocket launched on June 10 with the Subtec-IV payload had been scheduled for a June 9 launch. On that day, however, the rocket failed to ignite because of a short circuit in the ground electrical support system.

A video of the launch is on YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9rnb4iPrE0


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/22/2011 05:15 am
According to Aviation Week  (June 13, p 25) Iran launched Sejjil and Shahab-3 missiles in February 2011. These launches had not previously been reported.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/23/2011 12:59 pm
NASA 41.095UO Terrier Orion launched to 119 km from Wallops on Jun 13 at 1017 UTC.
Carried RockOn educational experiments.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/24/2011 07:21 am
NASA 41.095UO Terrier Orion launched to 119 km from Wallops on Jun 13 at 1017 UTC.
Carried RockOn educational experiments.

Here's a launch picture.
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/release-11-16.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/25/2011 08:22 am
A video of the Terrier-improved Orion launch (RockOn mission). The launch took place on June 23 (typo in the thread above).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCyarTzM4EU
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/28/2011 09:19 pm
From Xinhua, Iran test fires 14 missiles (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/photo/2011-06/28/c_13954573.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: anik on 06/29/2011 01:36 pm
Bulava missile was successfully launched yesterday at 11:55 UTC from Yuriy Dolgorukiy submarine in White Sea.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/07/2011 02:13 am
We missed a Minuteman III launch on this thread!

June 22 from Vandenberg AFB LF10 to Kwajalein. 
http://wikimapia.org/#lat=34.8531503&lon=-120.5959797&z=15&l=0&m=b

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2011/06/ap-air-force-vandenberg-glitch-affects-minuteman-iii-launch-062211/

Another Minuteman III is planned for July 27.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/11/2011 06:57 am
NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia successfully launched two NASA sounding rockets carrying experiments to study the ionosphere on Sunday, July 10, 2011. A Black Brant V rocket (NASA 21.140GE) was launched at 10 a.m. local time (14:00 UT) and the second rocket, a Terrier-Improved Orion (NASA 41.090GE), was launched 15 seconds later.
One rocket measured data about the ionized gas as well as the neutral gas, through which it traveled. The other shot out a long trail of lithium gas to track the wind movement.
The launches had been delayed as from July 5 because scientific and weather conditions had not been perfect.

A second pair of rockets will follow NET July 12.

Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/pfaffpostlaunch1.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/12/2011 08:07 am
From Xinhua, Argentina launches rocket to conduct atmospheric research (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/sci/2011-07/12/c_13979937.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 07/12/2011 07:00 pm

Argentinian Ministry of Defense Press Release (http://www.mindef.gov.ar/info.asp?Id=1927) [Spanish]

Highlights:
Quote
This is the second prototype on the Gradicom project. The first was the single stage PCX Gradicom successfully launched in December 2009 from Serrezuela, Cordoba province. The Gradicom II is a dual stage sounding rocket designed and built by the Ministry of Defense research lab CITEDEF (Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa). Its weight on launch pad was 933kg and its total length 7.686m.
This prototype objective was to reach 120 seconds in space to test systems and subsystems for general rocketry (both civil and military) and demonstrate it solid engines for sounding rockets, missiles and long range artillery. This project didn't had vector nozzles or sophisticated guidance systems.
It reached close to 100km of apogee and 120 of downrange.

Video of the Launch:
http://www.youtube.com/embed/nmlr_8GpTRU
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/15/2011 07:46 am
The launch of the second pair of "Dynamo" sounding rockets, scheduled for this week from Wallops, has been delayed to 2012.
The postponement will allow scientist to review the results from two previous rockets launched from Wallops on July 10 and make adjustments to the project to enhance the science data obtained during the flights.

Source: NASA Wallops
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/17/2011 04:19 am

Argentinian Ministry of Defense Press Release (http://www.mindef.gov.ar/info.asp?Id=1927) [Spanish]

Highlights:
Quote
This is the second prototype on the Gradicom project. The first was the single stage PCX Gradicom successfully launched in December 2009 from Serrezuela, Cordoba province. The Gradicom II is a dual stage sounding rocket designed and built by the Ministry of Defense research lab CITEDEF (Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa). Its weight on launch pad was 933kg and its total length 7.686m.
This prototype objective was to reach 120 seconds in space to test systems and subsystems for general rocketry (both civil and military) and demonstrate it solid engines for sounding rockets, missiles and long range artillery. This project didn't had vector nozzles or sophisticated guidance systems.
It reached close to 100km of apogee and 120 of downrange.

Video of the Launch:
http://www.youtube.com/embed/nmlr_8GpTRU

pic from riojavirtual.com.ar
I see two reports of launch time:
http://riojavirtual.com.ar/noticias/locales/tras_22_anos_chamical_fue_otra_vez_epicentro_del_lanzamiento_de_un_cohete
says "1535 GTM"  (presumably GMT) and http://www.mindef.gov.ar/info.asp?Id=1927# says "15.28" with no time zone.
So, launch time on Jul 11 was 1528, 1535, 1828, or 1835 UTC :-)
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/21/2011 02:34 am
MDA launched a SRALT target from a C-17 aircraft off Pt Mugu on Jul 8.
http://www.mda.mil/news/11news0013.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 07/22/2011 09:02 pm
41.092 GO / Rosanova launched successfully from WFF at 7:58 am on 7/21/2011. This was the first mission that I have been assigned to (I am a mechanical engineer working for a contractor for NASA at WFF) as the payload mechanical engineer from the mission initiation through mission closeout to launch from Wallops! I've had one other from White Sands (WSMR) and another that I wasn't on the entire mission from WFF.

The vehicle was a Mk. 12 Terrier - Improved Orion.

The payload was a student experiment carrier designed to be parachute recovered from the ocean surface.

I can provide details if anyone is interested.

3 pictures;
-The payload on the launcher with pad 0B (Taurus II pad) behind it. This is how far the blockhouse for the 41.092 launch is away from the vehicle.
-Rocket on the rail with shelter over it.
-Rocket on the rail with shelter removed.

From Wallops Flight Facility:
The launch of a NASA Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital rocket was successfully conducted at 7:58 a.m. EDT today from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The launch was carrying experiments developed by undergraduate students at four universities. The mission also included a test of a new recovery system.

The universities involved in the project, supported by the Colorado Space Grant Consortium, were the University of Puerto Rico, University of Wyoming, University of Northern Colorado and University of Colorado at Boulder.

The payload was recovered.

This was the last launch scheduled from Wallops Island during the summer. The next launch, a flight test of a Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital rocket, is currently scheduled for no earlier than September.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/july21postlaunch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/23/2011 01:17 am
41.092 GO / Rosanova launched successfully from WFF at 7:58 am on 7/21/2011. This was the first mission that I have been assigned to (I am a mechanical engineer working for a contractor for NASA at WFF) as the payload mechanical engineer from the mission initiation through mission closeout to launch from Wallops! I've had one other from White Sands (WSMR) and another that I wasn't on the entire mission from WFF.

The vehicle was a Mk. 12 Terrier - Improved Orion.

The payload was a student experiment carrier designed to be parachute recovered from the ocean surface.

I can provide details if anyone is interested.
 
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/july21postlaunch.html

Nice! Yes please...     in particular, do you have the apogee reached and the mass of the payload section?   
This payload was  Rocksat-X, done in collaboration with the Colorado Space Grant consortium, if I understand correctly.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/23/2011 09:53 am
No additional info (other than stated above) is available on the Wallops site or the Wallops twitter page, except for a picture of the launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/23/2011 05:21 pm
Here's a video of the recovery of the Rocksat payload (launch July 21, Wallops).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFtNtOcE3Ro



Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 07/24/2011 10:45 am
'Prahaar' missile successfully test-fired (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2279166.ece)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwNGmbuTWBo&feature=player_embedded
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 07/24/2011 10:53 am
More photos:
http://livefist.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/25/2011 02:20 am
'Prahaar' missile successfully test-fired (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2279166.ece)

 

Apparently the missile has a ceiling of around 35 km (so endoatmospheric)
and is a version of the AAD interceptor.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 07/25/2011 12:16 pm
41.092 GO / Rosanova launched successfully from WFF at 7:58 am on 7/21/2011. This was the first mission that I have been assigned to (I am a mechanical engineer working for a contractor for NASA at WFF) as the payload mechanical engineer from the mission initiation through mission closeout to launch from Wallops! I've had one other from White Sands (WSMR) and another that I wasn't on the entire mission from WFF.

The vehicle was a Mk. 12 Terrier - Improved Orion.

The payload was a student experiment carrier designed to be parachute recovered from the ocean surface.

I can provide details if anyone is interested.
 
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/july21postlaunch.html

Nice! Yes please...     in particular, do you have the apogee reached and the mass of the payload section?   
This payload was  Rocksat-X, done in collaboration with the Colorado Space Grant consortium, if I understand correctly.


I haven't heard exact numbers on apogee yet, but I think it was on the order of 120 km. The launch configuration of the payload weighed about 650 lb.

This launch was for the Rocksat-X project. UCSGC served as the payload integrator and our (from the sounding rocket program side of things) contact through which all information was feed to students. The UCSGC group was real pleasure to work with as our primary point of contact. For that matter all the teams were great to work with. Enthusiastic, always asking questions, very willing to listen to friendly suggestions, etc. From everything I can gather it was a very good learning experience for all the teams.

UCSGC had a camera payload. I'll see what I can do about getting some of that video posted to youtube. At least some screen shots. They got some real amazing footage!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 07/25/2011 01:51 pm
The pictures are all pretty self explanatory.

You can make out Assateague Island an Wallops Island in the first 4 pictures. For that matter you can make at the main land as well. Chincoteague and Assawoman are also visible. I'm sure more are too but that's the limit of my knowledge for having lived here for only 2 years!

The second to last photo shows the deploying probe that the University of Northern Colorado.

Thanks to the Colorado Space Grant Consortium team for the video from which I captured the pictures!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/27/2011 05:08 pm
A Minuteman-III was destroyed during a flight test from Vandenberg AFB on July 27.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 07/27/2011 06:14 pm
Russia test fires Sineva missile in Barents Sea
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20110727/165419044.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/27/2011 08:00 pm
A Minuteman-III was destroyed during a flight test from Vandenberg AFB on July 27.

According to the USAF, the RSO destroyed the vehicle when it was flying northeast of Roi-Namur, about five minutes into its flight.

This is the first Minuteman launch failure since May 2000, and the eleventh Minuteman III failure in total (according to an archived version of Astronautix)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/27/2011 08:43 pm
A Minuteman-III was destroyed during a flight test from Vandenberg AFB on July 27.

According to the USAF, the RSO destroyed the vehicle when it was flying northeast of Roi-Namur, about five minutes into its flight.

This is the first Minuteman launch failure since May 2000, and the eleventh Minuteman III failure in total (according to an archived version of Astronautix)

It is only the sixth Minuteman 3 failure in 283 attempts since 1968.  When all of the Minuteman 1A, 1B, and 2 failures are included the total gets up to 26 or so during 861 or so flights.

Hate to see a Minuteman 3 failure, for many reasons, but I wonder if the failure involved the boost stages, since RSO didn't occur until about two minutes into the post-boost phase.  But there is an eyewitness account of the flight path looking "low" and "sparkly", so a nozzle failure or separation failure, etc., are also possibilities.
http://www.theweatherspace.com/news/TWS-07_27_2011_failedmissile.html

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 07/27/2011 10:10 pm
Ed, do you know which previous Minuteman III launches failed?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/28/2011 03:11 am
Ed, do you know which previous Minuteman III launches failed?
Mostly from the following:
http://www.planet4589.org/space/lvdb/launch/Minuteman
Prepared by a personal hero, Jonathan McDowell!

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/28/2011 05:06 am
Thanks Ed  *blush*

I'm puzzled by the Roi-Namur comment. Roi-Namur is at Kwajalein. It takes about 30 minutes for a Minuteman to get from Vandenberg to Kwaj.  So I would think that
5 minutes in the missile would be way, way closer to California than to Roi-Namur.

It *is* true that California is northeast of Roi-Namur. But that's like saying "Northeast of Lubbock, Texas" when what you mean is "In the suburbs of New York City".
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: FinalFrontier on 07/31/2011 07:43 am
Any idea on why this missile failed? Pretty disconcerting that something we rely on for national defense had to be terminated in flight, but these things do happen, its rocketry after all.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Space Lizard on 08/03/2011 02:07 pm
I count 8 failures:

24 Oct 1968 - FTM-202
12 Apr 1969 - FTM-210
13 Mar 1970 - FTM-212
28 Aug 1986 - GT-117GM
04 Nov 1992 - GT-150GM
20 Feb 1998 - GT-166GB
24 May 2000 - FTM-02
27 Jul 2011 - GT-205GM

Am I wrong?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 08/03/2011 06:49 pm
I count 8 failures:

24 Oct 1968 - FTM-202
12 Apr 1969 - FTM-210
13 Mar 1970 - FTM-212
28 Aug 1986 - GT-117GM
04 Nov 1992 - GT-150GM
20 Feb 1998 - GT-166GB
24 May 2000 - FTM-02
27 Jul 2011 - GT-205GM

Am I wrong?

The lists that I follow (JCM's, Gunter's, http://www.spacearchive.info/vafblog.htm, and even Astronautix) do not show failures for FTM-202 or GT117GM.

There are different "layers" of success/failure for missile tests, depending on the listing.  Most will call a successful down-range propulsion performance that aims the warhead bus in the right direction and velocity a success.  Other stuff can happen downrange involving RV separation, spin up, reentry, and target performance, etc.  We may not know the true story about the latter part of every test flight for years or decades.  For now, each launch is generally considered a success unless the Air Force says it failed - which usually means that an RSO command was transmitted.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 08/09/2011 08:37 am
The Indian army is due within 45 days to test-launch versions of the country's nuclear-capable Agni 1 and Agni 2 ballistic missiles.
Separately, the Indian military has announced plans to conduct a first flight test of the Agni 5 missile in December.

http://www.globalsecuritynewswire.org/gsn/nw_20110808_3147.php
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 08/24/2011 11:07 pm
A state commission has scheduled the next test launch of the Bulava ballistic missile for August 27, a source in the commission told RIA Novosti on Wednesday.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20110824/166123582.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 08/27/2011 12:50 pm
Successfull launch of Bulava today.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20110827/166223833.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 08/29/2011 08:07 pm
Iran plans to launch another domestically-built satellite carrier, Kavoshgar 5, into space by the end of summer, the head of the Iranian Space Agency (ISA) says.

“Kavoshgar (Explorer)'s cargo, with a weight of 300 kg, contains a biological capsule in which a rhesus monkey will be placed,” Hamid Fazeli said on Monday.

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/195202.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/03/2011 01:31 pm
Japanese ISAS will launch the suborbital S-520-26 on September 11. Launch window is 0150UTC to 1104UTC. This mission will be launched from Uchinoura Space Center.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/03/2011 01:53 pm
Launch of a Topol/SS-25 from Plesetsk today.

http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20110903/260388081.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/03/2011 02:07 pm
Launch of a Topol/SS-25 from Plesetsk today.

http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20110903/260388081.html

From SpaceDaily: http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Russia_successfully_tests_veteran_missile_with_new_warhead_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/06/2011 11:53 am
Blue Origin failed a suborbital test on August 24, http://www.blueorigin.com/letter.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/06/2011 08:50 pm
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/197676.html (http://www.presstv.ir/detail/197676.html)

Quote
Iran to launch new space mission soon
Tue Sep 6, 2011 9:10AM

Iran's Defense Minister Brigadier General Ahmad Vahidi has announced the forthcoming launch of a bio-capsule into space carrying a live creature.

Iran's domestically-built satellite carrier, Kavoshgar 5, is tasked with carrying the bio-capsule into space with a live creature over the next few days, IRIB quoted General Vahidi as saying on Tuesday.

Reports indicate that the launch could take place as early as Wednesday.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/07/2011 06:21 pm
Japanese ISAS will launch the suborbital S-520-26 on September 11. Launch window is 0150UTC to 1104UTC. This mission will be launched from Uchinoura Space Center.

According to http://blog.livedoor.jp/h2a_f8/, the launch was delayed because of a equipment failure. No new launch date was announced.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/14/2011 04:11 am
NASA flight 12.076GT on Sep 8 from Wallops was a test of the Terrier booster,
apparently with a dummy upper stage - it presumably only reached 10 km or so in altitude and I mention it here only to avoid potential confusion - it was not a space launch.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/16/2011 05:49 pm
Iran to test life-support capsule in space

Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:25AM GMT

The head of the Iranian Space Agency (ISA) says Iran will test a bio-capsule capable of sustaining life in the upcoming launch into space of Kavoshgar 5 (Explorer) satellite carrier.

ISA chief Hamid Fazeli told IRNA on Wednesday that the forthcoming launch of the domestically-built satellite carrier takes the country a step closer to its future manned mission to space.

He said the findings of the bio-capsule studies will provide the Iranian space agency with the essential know-how in developing life support systems in space as well as detection and recovery mechanisms.

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/199033.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/18/2011 11:26 am
18 Sep, 2011, 03.50PM IST, PTI
India plans to test-fire 3,000 km range 'Agni-2 Prime' by next month

NEW DELHI: India is planning to test fire by next month 'Agni-2 Prime', an advanced nuclear-capable ballistic missile with a strike range of around 3,000 km.

"We are planning to test fire an advanced nuclear capable Agni-2 Prime missile by next month," Defence Ministry officials said here.

The new missile will be an advancement over the existing Agni-2, which has a strike range of 2,000 km.

The 'Agni-2 Prime' has been developed by making some changes in the Agni 2 missile and will have the same size of boosters which are there in the existing missile but will have an extended range of 1,000 km, they said.

Powered by solid fuel propellants, the 'Prime' will also have a better navigational system and greater accuracy in comparison to the Agni-2 missile.

Newer technologies have also been incorporated in the missile to make it lighter and the weapon system has also been provided with greater thrust.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics/nation/india-plans-to-test-fire-3000-km-range-agni-2-prime-by-next-month/articleshow/10029080.cms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/25/2011 03:19 pm
It will be a busy week from Saturday for the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) — it will test-fire three surface-to-surface missiles, which can carry nuclear weapons, from Orissa's coast.

Hypersonic missile Shourya (valour), which can also carry conventional warheads, will be test-fired from the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur near Balasore.

This will be followed by the launch of Prithvi-II on September 26, also from Chandipur, and Agni-II on September 30 from the Wheeler Island off Damra.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2480100.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/26/2011 03:04 pm
Prithvi-II ballistic missile successfully test-fired

Within a span of two days, India demonstrated the reliability of another surface-to-surface missile by successfully test-firing nuclear-weapons capable Prithvi-II ballistic system for its full range of 350 km on Monday.

The nine-metre tall missile, built indigenously by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), was launched 9.00 hrs from Launch Complex-III of the Integrated Test Range, Chandipur, Orissa by the personnel of Strategic Force Command as part of regular user trial.

The missile which was picked up randomly from the production lot met all the mission objectives and closed in onto the pre-designated target in the Bay of Bengal with a high degree of accuracy after a 500-second flight, according to DRDO officials. The Circular Error Probability was (CEP) was a few metres, they added.

A battery of sophisticated radars, electro-optical systems, telemetry stations and a ship located near the target point tracked the entire flight path until its splash down.

The liquid-propelled Prithvi-II is a single stage missile and equipped with sophisticated inertial navigation, control and guidance system. It can carry payload of 500-1,000 kg and has already been inducted into the Armed Forces.

The launch operations were carried out by SFC personnel and supervised by DRDO missile scientists.

Hypersonic Shourya missile was successfully test-fired on Saturday.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2486470.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/26/2011 03:14 pm
Shaurya test-fire a copy-book success
TNN Sep 25, 2011, 11.00am IST

BALASORE: India on Saturday test-fired a new-age surface-to-surface nuclear capable missile from the Integrated Test Range (ITR), about 15- km from Balasore. Indigenously developed Shaurya missile was test-launched from an underground silo located in the launching complex-III around 2.30 pm.

Defence sources said the missile was test fired in its final configuration and met all mission objectives. "The test was a copy book success. The missile travelled along the pre-coordinated path as expected and covered a distance of nearly 700 km," said a defence release.

Shaurya can carry both nuclear and conventional warheads. It is the land version of the underwater-launched missile K-15 and was first fired in 2008 from the same test range. This missile can remain hidden and camouflaged in underground silos from enemy surveillance or satellites till they are fired from the special storage-cum-launch canisters.

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-09-24/news/30198208_1_nuke-capable-surface-to-surface-ballistic-missile-integrated-test-range

Photo:
http://www.domain-b.com/aero/mil_avi/miss_muni/20110926_shaurya_trials.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/28/2011 07:49 am
Unsuccessful new ICBM test launch from Plesetsk 09/27/2011:
http://vz.ru/news/2011/9/28/525917.html
http://www.interfax.ru/politics/txt.asp?id=209789
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/29/2011 07:21 am
Unsuccessful new ICBM test launch from Plesetsk 09/27/2011:

English-language article
http://russianforces.org/blog/2011/09/what_was_the_icbm_that_crashed.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/29/2011 06:57 pm
Russia carries out successful test of Liner SLBM:

http://www.interfax.ru/society/news.asp?id=210065
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/29/2011 08:33 pm
India's 5,000 km, Agni-V ballistic missile to fly in December    
28 September 2011         
   
New Delhi: In track with its long-term plan to develop a family of ballistic missiles that will address India's tactical and strategic security issues, India will carry out the first development flight of the long range Agni-V missile in December this year. This was stated by DRDO chief and scientific advisor to the defence minister , Dr VK Saraswat, in New Delhi on Tuesday.

''The first development flight of Agni-V will be in the month of December this year... Agni-V will take us to a level of 5,000-km plus class of missile systems which meets all our threat requirements,'' Dr Saraswat said.

http://www.domain-b.com/aero/mil_avi/miss_muni/20110928_agni_v_ballistic_missile.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/30/2011 12:40 pm
Agni-II successfully test fired
PTI | 03:09 PM,Sep 30,2011

 Balasore (Orissa), Sep 30 (PTI) After perfect trial of 'Shourya' and 'Prithvi-II', India today successfully test fired nuclear capable 'Agni-II' ballistic missile with a strike range of 2,000 km as part of user trial by armed forces from Wheeler Island off Orissa coast. "The trial of Agni-II surface-to-surface missile, conducted from Launch complex-IV of the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at around 0930 hrs, was successful meeting the mission objectives," ITR Director S P Dash said. The indigenously built 'Agni-II', developed by Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO), has already been inducted into armed forces and forms part of India's arsenal for strategic deterrence, defence sources said. "It was a hat-trick after successful trials of Shourya and Prithvi-II on September 24 and 26, 2011 respectively. The successful launch once again proved reliability of the medium range missile," DRDO spokesman and scientist Ravi Kumar Gupta said. The missile was launched as a training exercise by the armed forces. The two stage missile equipped with advanced high accuracy navigation system, guided by a novel scheme of state-of-the-art command and control system was propelled by solid rocket propellant system, said another scientist. The missile reached an apogee (peak altitude) of 220 km and hit the target. All radar, telemetry systems, ectopic system tracked and monitored all parameters throughout the trajectory. Two ships located near the target point have tracked the missile in final stage, a DRDO official said. With this success story, India also is planning to test by next month "Agni-2 Prime", an advanced nuclear-capable ballistic missile with a strike range of around 3,000 km, defence sources said. .

http://ibnlive.in.com/generalnewsfeed/news/agniii-successfully-test-fired/841256.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/30/2011 12:50 pm
‘Launch confirms India’s readiness for strategic defence’
Y. Mallikarjun

 T.S. Subramanian 

 The successful launch of three missiles in the past one week confirmed India’s readiness for strategic defence and that the country’s missile development and production capability have reached a high maturity level, observed V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Advisor to Defence Minister.

Talking to The Hindu soon after the launch of the nuclear weapons-capable Agni-II on Friday, he said the hat-trick of successes has proved the country’s capability to develop and produce missiles of any range and the possession of technology to meet any threat profile.

He said that Agni-II Prime surface-to-surface missile would be launched in November and the first flight test of India’s longest range strategic system Agni-V (5,000 km range) would be conducted in December. Besides, an interceptor missile test would also be held as part of the plans to put in place Ballistic Missile Defence system.

Dr. Saraswat said Agni-II’s performance on Friday was outstanding and all the performance parameters were in copy-book manner, including the terminal event and detonation of the warhead. The Circular Error Probability (CEP) was within a few metres showing that the missile’s terminal accuracy was good. The propulsion rockets too performed as per the thrust profile.

During its flight, Agni-II reached an altitude of 220 km and re-entered the atmosphere as the re-entry vehicle withstood temperatures of more than 3,000 deg.C and the accuracy of thermal and aerodynamic loads was proved.

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/article2500455.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/04/2011 10:30 am
The NASA sounding rockets report for 2010 is available here (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Annual_Report_2010_web.pdf).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/05/2011 03:39 pm
http://english.farsnews.net/newstext.php?nn=9007100222
Quote
Iran Reiterates Plan for Sending Monkey into Space

 TEHRAN (FNA)- Head of Iran's Space Agency renewed his earlier promise that Iran would send a live monkey into space, but did not give any specific date for action.    
 "One cannot give a set date for this project and as soon as our nation's scientists announce the readiness (of the project) it will be announced," said Hamid Fazeli said.
Fazeli had said in mid-June that Iran plans to launch a Kavoshgar-5 rocket with a 285-kilogram capsule carrying a monkey to an altitude of 120 kilometers (74 miles)."
"Our scientists are exerting continuous efforts on this project... our colleagues are busy with empirical studies and sub-system testing of this project so it is a success," he said.
In mid-March, Iran's space organization announced the launch of the Kavoshgar-4 rocket carrying a test capsule designed to house the monkey.
The capsule had been unveiled in February by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, along with four new prototypes of home-built satellites the country hopes to launch before March 2012.
At the time, Fazeli called the launch of a large animal into space as the first step towards sending a man into space, which Tehran says is scheduled for 2020.
Iran has already sent small animals into space - a rat, turtles and worms - aboard a capsule carried by its Kavoshgar-3 rocket in 2010.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/09/2011 09:58 pm
According to a friend involved in the launch, 36.225 PICTURE launched from White Sands on Oct 8. It is attempting to directly image an exoplanet.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/13/2011 11:49 am
UP Aerospace Awarded NASA, DOD Contracts for Spaceport America Launches

Posted by Doug Messier on October 11, 2011, at 12:15 pm

UP AEROSPACE PR – NASA’s Office of Chief Technologist Launch Opportunities Program has awarded UP Aerospace a contract to integrate technology payloads and launch them into space on up to 8 flights using the company’s SpaceLoft rocket. The launch contract is part of the 2 year IDIQ contract awarded to the firm on August 9, 2011. The contract reserves 2 SpaceLoft launches with options to purchase 6 additional flights in 2012 and 2013. The first flight for NASA is in the planning phase and is expected to be launched from Spaceport America in the 1st quarter of 2012. UP Aerospace has teamed with Schafer Corporation to provide NASA with comprehensive launch and payload integration services.

The US Department of Defense Operationally Responsive Space Office has awarded UP Aerospace a full manifested sub-orbital launch contract to be flown from Spaceport America in New Mexico. UP Aerospace will launch their sixth SpaceLoft for the DoD to an altitude of 115 km. This will be the forth mission flown by UP Aerospace for the DoD and the first fully dedicated launch for the defense agency. The official launch date for this mission is under negotiations with the DoD but is anticipated to be in the first quarter of 2012.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2011/10/11/up-aerospace-awarded-nasa-dod-contracts-for-spaceport-america-launches/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/18/2011 02:35 am
NASA 41.094UE and 41.093UE, the two CHAMPS launches to study meteoritic dust in the upper atmosphere, were launched Oct 11 and Oct 13 from Andoya. One daytime and one nighttime launch.
I haven't been able to find the launch times.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/22/2011 10:58 am
NASA 41.094UE and 41.093UE, the two CHAMPS launches to study meteoritic dust in the upper atmosphere, were launched Oct 11 and Oct 13 from Andoya. One daytime and one nighttime launch.
I haven't been able to find the launch times.

More info (and pictures) here:
http://www.rocketrange.no/?page_id=751&campaign_id=7

Videos of the launches and mission:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7wh9PLEaXY&feature=youtube_gdata

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SmQuAFI1Qw

In the second video, the splashdown of the payload is visible.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/25/2011 01:19 pm
Bulava missile test launch scheduled for late October (http://www.itar-tass.com/en/c32/254933.html)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/28/2011 07:42 am
Bulava missile test launch scheduled for late October (http://www.itar-tass.com/en/c32/254933.html)
The launch occured today.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2011/10/successful_launch_of_bulava_fr.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/28/2011 10:16 am
Video:
http://www.vesti.ru/only_video.html?vid=373233
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 11/03/2011 08:17 am
According to the NK news there was a launch of a Topol (SS-25) from Plesetsk today at 06.45 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/03/2011 07:30 pm
Video:
http://www.tvzvezda.ru/news/forces/content/201111031322-imwe.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: GClark on 11/10/2011 12:39 pm
According to NASA's Sounding Rockets Program Office website, Black Brant IX 36.264UH (diffuse background X-ray measurements) was launched from White Sands on 6 Nov (no time given).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/15/2011 09:53 am
Agni-II Prime N-capable missile test-fired

Published on Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 12:00 |  Source : IBNLive.com

Balasore (Odisha): Adding teeth to its nuclear deterrence, India on Tuesday successfully test-fired an advanced variant of nuclear-capable Agni-II ballistic missile with a strike range of 3,000 km from an island off Odisha coast.

"The surface-to-surface intermediate range missile was test-fired from a mobile launcher" at 0900 hours from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Wheeler Island, about 100 km from Balasore, defence sources said.

Christened "Agni-II Prime", the new missile is a two-stage weapon system powered by solid propellant. It is 20 metres long and launch weight is 17 tonnes. It can carry one tonne pay-load.

A Defence Ministry spokesman said in Delhi that from now on, the missile would be called 'Agni-IV'.

Describing the test-firing as "successful", defence sources said the missile’s exact performances would be known after all data was collected and analysed from different telemetry and tracking stations as well as naval ships positioned near the terminal point.

"The indigenously developed new variant of 'Agni-II' series missile would have better accuracy and improved range", the sources said.

"While the Agni-II missile has a strike range of 2000 km and Agni-III can hit a target at a distance up to 3500 km, this new variant with a strike range of 3000 km would bridge the gap between Agni-II and Agni-III," they said.

In terms of accuracy, "some more improved features have been incorporated in it," a DRDO scientist said.

The first developmental trial of Agni-II Prime, conducted on December 10, 2010, had failed due to some technical problem in the control system. It deviated from its trajectory within seconds of its lift off from the same base and had plunged into the sea.

http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/current-affairs/agni-ii-prime-n-capable-missile-test-fired_617817.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/16/2011 07:58 pm
HYDERABAD, November 15, 2011
Agni-IV test-flight a ‘stupendous success'
T.S. Subramanian

The test-flight of Agni-IV, India's most advanced long-range missile was “a stupendous success” on Tuesday, with the missile covering a range of more than 3,000 km in 20 minutes of fluent flight.

This was the longest range mission flown by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) so far. Agni-IV, capable of carrying nuclear warheads, was earlier called Agni-II Prime. The first flight of Agni-II Prime in December 2010 was a failure.

As the Sun shone on the tiny Wheeler Island, off the Odisha coast, Agni-IV lifted off majestically at 9 a.m. from a specially designed truck, accelerated to a height of 900 km, sliced across a distance of 3,000 km and accurately reached the targeted area in the Bay of Bengal. As it plunged into the atmosphere, its re-entry systems withstood a searing 3,000 degrees Celsius. Several radars and electro-optical systems along the Odisha coast tracked the vehicle.

The two-stage Agni-IV, which weighs 17 tonnes and is 20 metres long, carried an 800-kg payload of conventional explosives. However, it is designed to carry a 1,000-kg payload.

In this mission, the DRDO used a host of new technologies for the first time. Agni-IV “has opened a new era” for India in the class of long-range missiles to carry strategic [nuclear] warheads for the armed forces and “provides a fantastic deterrence,” DRDO missile technologists asserted. “Strategically, it can cover the whole area on the other side of the border [China],” they explained.

V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister, called it “one of the most stupendous missions.”

The launch had put India in “a different league” because “the kind of technologies we used in this flight are different from those we had developed in the 1980s and 1990s.”

Dr. Saraswat, who is also the DRDO Director-General, said: “I will say that India does not need any foreign assistance for surface-to-surface missiles of this class.”

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2629274.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/16/2011 08:13 pm
16 Nov, 2011, 03.49PM IST, PTI
5,000-km range Agni-5 to be test fired in February 2012

NEW DELHI: Buoyed by the successful test- firing of the Agni-4, DRDO will launch the 5,000-km version of the nuclear capable missile after three months as part of strengthening India's deterrence capabilities.

"Agni-V is presently undergoing integration and we may test fire it by the end of February next year. It is right on schedule and the successful test of Agni-4 will prove to be a building block in development of this missile," DRDO Chief V K Saraswat said here today.

Addressing a press conference here, Saraswat talked about India's missiles programme and developing effective deterrence capability against adversaries.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics/nation/5000-km-range-agni-5-to-be-test-fired-in-february-2012/articleshow/10754986.cms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 11/23/2011 05:45 pm
There will be a launch from Esrange on November, 25th.
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10212/332_read-2126/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 11/27/2011 04:12 pm
Today a launch occured from Esrange.
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10212/332_read-2153/year-2011/ (At the moment only in German)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/27/2011 07:07 pm
Double Bulava launch on Monday (http://www.barentsobserver.com/double-bulava-launch-on-monday.4989332-16149.html)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/28/2011 07:21 am
The launch is delayed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 12/01/2011 03:08 pm
Today a launch occured from Esrange.
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10212/332_read-2153/year-2011/ (At the moment only in German)

ESA and the DLR German Space Center fired a Texus rocket 263 km into space on 27 November to test a new way of handling propellants on Europe’s future rockets.
 
Texus 48 lifted off at 10:10 GMT (11:10 CET) from the Esrange Space Centre near Kiruna in northern Sweden on its 13-minute flight.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMOPZ1XFVG_index_0.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/07/2011 07:11 am
On December 4, Armadillo's STIG-A rocket was launched from Spaceport America; it reached an altitude of 38 km.

More info here: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=35459

Pix and video here: http://www.spaceportamerica.com/press-access.html
and
http://www.spaceadventures.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=suborbital.View_Album&typeid=3944CF9D-1125-AADA-EA7B9A46D879AD6D&albumid=87FF8514-B105-A4CF-53AA2D9065A52CAB
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 12/19/2011 08:20 pm
New russian sounding rocket succesfully launched from Kapustin Yar. It reached an altitude of 304 km.

http://www.meteorf.ru/rgm3d.aspx?RgmFolderID=a4e36ec1-c49d-461c-8b4f-167d20cb27d8&RgmDocID=3bb5193a-551c-41a5-bec7-0c0c9ad5c6c6

http://ria.ru/science/20111219/520863102.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/20/2011 08:21 am
Article on the ICI-3 launch on Dec 3
http://www.mn.uio.no/fysikk/english/research/news-and-events/news/2011/ici3-launch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 12/20/2011 03:03 pm
Russia tests domestic interceptor missile:
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20111220/170388329.html

Video:
http://multimedia.mil.ru/multimedia/video/clips/[email protected]
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/22/2011 12:57 am
Russia tests domestic interceptor missile:
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20111220/170388329.html

Video:
http://multimedia.mil.ru/multimedia/video/clips/[email protected]

This is a 53T6 endoatmospheric missile  - http://russianforces.org
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 12/22/2011 09:20 am
Maximum speed 5500 m/s.  ;)

Twin test of Prithvi-II postponed: ITR Director
http://ibnlive.in.com/news/twin-test-of-prithviii-postponed-itr-director/213812-3.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/23/2011 04:58 pm
http://russianforces.org/blog/2011/12/successful_salvo_launch_of_bul.shtml

http://www.1tv.ru/news/social/194811

Two Bulava missiles were salvo-launched on Dec 23 (I don't have a launch time)
from the Yuri Dolgorukiy submarine, flying from the White Sea to Kamchatka,
each with multiple reentry vehicles. According to the second reference the
launches were 8 seconds apart.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: anik on 12/24/2011 09:36 am
I don't have a launch time

I was told ~15:50 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/24/2011 02:53 pm
I don't have a launch time

I was told ~15:50 UTC.

Thanks!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/25/2011 10:28 am
Video of Dec 23 twin Bulava test

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9v_N2hGfwg
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/25/2011 10:48 am
Video of Dec 23 twin Bulava test

The salvo launch shown in this video certainly does not show the Bulava launch. Bulava is a solid fueld missile ad leaves a significant smoke trail, but these missiles don't. These are liquid fueled missiles of the R-29 family.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 12/27/2011 12:53 pm
UR-100N ICBM succesfully launched from Baikonur.
http://www.interfax.ru/news.asp?id=224039
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 12/27/2011 08:17 pm
Russia successfully test launched an RS-18 (SS-19 Stiletto) intercontinental ballistic missile from the Baikonur Space Center in Kazakhstan on Tuesday.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20111227/170519962.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/30/2011 05:41 pm
A Minuteman-III was destroyed during a flight test from Vandenberg AFB on July 27.

According to the USAF, the RSO destroyed the vehicle when it was flying northeast of Roi-Namur, about five minutes into its flight.

This is the first Minuteman launch failure since May 2000, and the eleventh Minuteman III failure in total (according to an archived version of Astronautix)

I have yet to hear an explanation for this failure.  Has anyone heard anything?  The next Minuteman III launch is apparently on the schedule for February 25.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 01/04/2012 03:23 pm
Russia’s Strategic Rocket Forces plan 11 ICBM launches in 2012.
http://www.itar-tass.com/en/c154/311063.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/11/2012 08:55 am
The launch of a Terrier - Improved Malemute sounding rocket, mission 12.074 - Hall, is scheduled for 0730 local time today (01/11/2012) from Wallops Flight Facility. Window runs from 0730 to 0900.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/

If anyone has questions I can probably elaborate more than the webcast will explain. I am in the blockhouse for this launch. Here's hoping we get it launched today!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/11/2012 11:39 am
T minus 12 and counting!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/11/2012 11:47 am
We are go for launch. Count proceeding!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: tehwkd on 01/11/2012 01:10 pm
Test flight of Terrier-Improved Malemute.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVNizfATh4k
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 01/12/2012 02:04 pm
January 12, 2012 Updated

S-520-26 launch result

JAXA launched the sounding rocket S-520-26 at 5:51 a.m. on January 12, 2012 (Japan Standard Time) from the Uchinoura Space Center. The vertical angle at the launch was 72.5 degrees. The S-520-26 was designated to clarify the combining process of the neutral atmosphere and plasma in the thermosphere.

http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/13/2012 08:53 pm
The launch of a Terrier - Improved Malemute sounding rocket, mission 12.074 - Hall, is scheduled for 0730 local time today (01/11/2012) from Wallops Flight Facility. Window runs from 0730 to 0900.

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/

If anyone has questions I can probably elaborate more than the webcast will explain. I am in the blockhouse for this launch. Here's hoping we get it launched today!

Hi - can you tell me the apogee height? (actual or planned) ..( the T/IM should
go pretty high, around 500 km right? A nice addition to the stable)
During the webcast they referred to the "Malemute-Witt" payload or something like that... any clues?

 thanks, Jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/13/2012 09:08 pm
Test flight of Terrier-Improved Malemute.

NASA now has at least one high resolution image up of this sharp-looking rocket.  http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/615313main_Terrier2_full.jpg
(I've attached a shrunk version as an index.  Love those yellow/gold fins matched with that red-bodied Imrpoved Malemute.)

Would love to see more, including pre-launch.  I wish Wallops would tell its story better.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/13/2012 11:53 pm
We missed JAXA's S-310-40 launch in December:
http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/topics_e.html

JAXA launched the sounding rocket S-310-40 at 11:48 p.m. on Dec. 19, 2011 (Japan Standard time) from the Uchinoura Space Center. The vertical angle at the launch was 76 degrees. The S-310-40 was designated to analyze radio wave propagation in the mid-latitude ionosphere during the night.
The flight and operation of the onboard devices were all normal, and its top part (the nose fairing) opened at the preordain timing of 60 seconds after liftoff, reached its highest altitude of 180 km at 210 seconds, then dropped onto the south eastern ocean of Uchinoura after completing its observation missions.
All onboard devices worked properly throughout the ascending and descending, and, at about 80 seconds, the high electron density area was observed at an altitude of around 103 km. It means that the rocket passed through the expected high density plasma area.
We are currently analyzing acquired data for more details.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 01/16/2012 09:24 pm
Agni-V, the 5,000-km version of the nuclear capable missile, is in the final phase of testing and is soon set for launch, a senior DRDO official said here today.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2803904.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: BLS on 01/25/2012 01:53 am
A few quick questions for the sounding rocket experts and fans here.  Any help is much appreciated:

1) Is there a file or online list of NASA sounding rocket missions going back to ~2005 or ~2000 (or earlier) with the apogee (intended and/or achieved) and payload mass of each mission?  Ideally, the data would also include the launch vehicle type and launch site.  The usual suspects -- the Wallops Blue Book, various Wallops reports, Jonathan's Space Report, and Pietrobon's website -- don't appear to include apogee or payload mass.

2) Is there a similar list for other U.S. (primarily military) suborbital launches, at least with apogee?

3) What is the code for interpreting the mission numbers that NASA assigns to its sounding rocket missions?  For example, what do the numbers and letters in 40.026UE and 36.278NT mean/refer to?

Much thanks for letting me pick your brains.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/25/2012 04:22 am
A few quick questions for the sounding rocket experts and fans here.  Any help is much appreciated:

1) Is there a file or online list of NASA sounding rocket missions going back to ~2005 or ~2000 (or earlier) with the apogee (intended and/or achieved) and payload mass of each mission?  Ideally, the data would also include the launch vehicle type and launch site.  The usual suspects -- the Wallops Blue Book, various Wallops reports, Jonathan's Space Report, and Pietrobon's website -- don't appear to include apogee or payload mass.

2) Is there a similar list for other U.S. (primarily military) suborbital launches, at least with apogee?

3) What is the code for interpreting the mission numbers that NASA assigns to its sounding rocket missions?  For example, what do the numbers and letters in 40.026UE and 36.278NT mean/refer to?

Much thanks for letting me pick your brains.


The launch vehicle database on my site does have apogee where known, but only guesses for most launches. There's no general source for apogee or payload mass info, I've hinted to Wallops it would be great to include that info in their news releases but it seems they have no interest in doing so.
I believe that my lists at
http://planet4589.org/space/lvdb/
(the data of interest is in the files at
http://planet4589.org/space/lvdb/list.html
)
are the best you will currently find for both q. 1 and 2.

For q.3, this system goes back to the 1957-58 International Geophysical Year.
The scheme is   "AGENCY   ROCKET-TYPE.FLIGHT-ID.SUBTYPE"
and has also been used by other agencies, not just NASA.
For NASA, the specific scheme is  "NASA  nn.mmmAB" where nn is the rocket type (40 = Black Brant XII, 36 = Black Brant IX)  mmm is the flight number in order of initial planning (i.e. not at all in order of actual launch),
A is the type of payload sponsor  (G = govt, U = university, D = DoD) and B is the scientific discipline  (T = test, E = plasma, A = atmospheric studies, H = high energy astrophysics etc)

- Jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/01/2012 01:49 pm
Armadillo launched a new STIG-A rocket from Spaceport America on January 28th, http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-news/ci_19865600
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Sven Grahn on 02/02/2012 07:23 pm
Hi!

We could talk here about the suborbital launches that reach the edge of space or space itself without orbital velocity.


I found this the other day:

http://www.svengrahn.pp.se/histind/Swefirst/Soundingrocketdetails/OTRAG/OTRAGEsrange.htm

Sven
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/03/2012 07:10 am
Armadillo launched a new STIG-A rocket from Spaceport America on January 28th, http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-news/ci_19865600

The STIG A III rocket reached an altitude of 82 km.
See http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Armadillo_rocket_flys_high_999.html

For pictures, see http://www.spaceportamerica.com/press-access.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/03/2012 03:09 pm
We missed JAXA's S-310-40 launch in December:
http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/topics_e.html

S-310-40 launch http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/19253906
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 02/03/2012 06:30 pm
http://msdb.gsfc.nasa.gov/change_log.php
Quote
2012-02-03   SubTEC IV   Launch date slipped to NET July 2012.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 02/10/2012 12:35 pm
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/industry-and-economy/government-and-policy/article2879087.ece?ref=wl_industry-and-economy
Quote
Ballistic missile defence system tested

(http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/multimedia/dynamic/00919/BL10_BALLISTICDEFEN_919747e.jpg)
Photo released by the DRDO on Friday. An air defence missile successfully struck down an incoming ballistic missile at a height of 15 km off the Orissa coast.
Photo released by the DRDO on Friday.

Hyderabad, Feb 10:
India has joined a select club of nations with capability to build its own operational ballistic missile defence.

In tests off the Orissa coast today, an air defence missile successfully struck down an incoming ballistic missile at a height of 15 km, according to the Defence Research and Development Organisation.

A modified Prithvi missile, which mimics the ballistic missile was launched at 10.10 a.m. from the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur. Explaining the event, DRDO scientists said radars located at different points tracked the incoming ballistic missile.

The interceptor missile, was kept in complete readiness at the Wheeler Island. With the help of guidance computers, the trajectory of the ballistic missile was calculated and the missile launched at the precisely calculated time.

As the radars, inertial navigation system and the onboard computer working in perfect harmony, the onboard radio frequency seeker identified the target missile and guided the interceptor missile to home-in and hit the incoming missile directly and destroyed it. The warhead also exploded and broke down the target missile into pieces, they described.

India is the fifth country to have these capabilities. The mission was carried out in the final deliverable user configuration mode said Dr V.K. Saraswat, Director-General, DRDO. The Defence Minister, Mr A.K. Antony has congratulated the scientists for the successful demonstration of the ballistic missile defence.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 02/13/2012 01:53 pm
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEME8LYXHYG_index_0.html

Quote
Five experiments on a Maser rocket were launched from northern Sweden today. Faster than most people take a coffee break, Maser-12 travelled 250 km upwards, provided six precious minutes of microgravity, and landed safely back on Earth.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/14/2012 07:13 am
Israel and the United States recently carried out a successful test of the Arrow anti-missile system over the Mediterranean Sea.

see: http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Israel_conducts_final_test_on_Arrow_anti-missile_system_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/22/2012 06:02 am
A Black Brant sounding rocket was launched from the Poker Flat base in Alaska in the evening of February 18 local time (Feb 19, GMT). Instruments onboard sampled electric and magnetic fields as well as charged particles in Earth's upper atmosphere (ionosphere) that get sloshed back and forth by a specific form of electromagnetic energy known as Alfven waves.

Source: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=36156
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 02/22/2012 03:01 pm
The Atlas V launch delay suggests a possible SLBM test off Cape Canaveral early this week, but that is just a guess.  If it hasn't happened already, it would have to happen today.  It's been a couple of years since the last such test off of the Cape.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 02/24/2012 03:56 am
The Atlas V launch delay suggests a possible SLBM test off Cape Canaveral early this week, but that is just a guess.  If it hasn't happened already, it would have to happen today.  It's been a couple of years since the last such test off of the Cape.

 - Ed Kyle

Here's a video titled "Missile Launch from SSBN-734" (USS Tennessee) with a date/time 2/22/12 1:05 PM.  No other info, though.  SSBN-734 is reported to have departed Kings Bay, GA on February 3 "for routine operations" according to this site:  http://www.uscarriers.net/ssbn734history.htm  Note that she has launched Trident II missiles on multiple occasions in the past.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ys1pKnifyU

Next up is a Minuteman III this weekend from Vandenberg AFB - first to fly since last year's failure (cause still hush-hush).

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 02/29/2012 10:32 am
DRDO Readies for K-15 
Hemant Kumar Rout

BALASORE: The DRDO is preparing for twin tests of submarine launched ballistic missile (SLBM) K-15 from an underwater platform off the Andhra Pradesh coast. While the first test has been scheduled for March 4, the second test will be conducted anytime between March 16 and 19.

Sources at the defence base at Chandipur here said preparations are on for the proposed tests near the Visakhapatnam coast for over a fortnight now. The indigenously built nuclear capable missile will be launched from a Pontoon (replica of a submarine) which is being readied under the sea.

A defence official said along with the missile assembling team, several other technical teams including� the wings of Electro Optical Tracking System (EOTS) and communication and range safety from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) are busy in preparations for a smooth and successful test of the missile which has a strike range of 700 km.

“We are forced to use the pontoon as the launching platform as India does not have an operational submarine to test-fire such missiles. Though the advanced technology vehicle (ATV) INS Arihant has been developed, it is yet to be equipped with the K-15 missile. Missile tests from the submarine can be possible after the success of sea trials,” he said.

Developed by DRDO, K-15 has both the versions, SLBM and SLCM (submarine-launched cruise missile). While the cruise missile is a loose trajectory missile guided to its destination by an onboard computer, its ballistic version has a high-trajectory and transcends the atmosphere to re-enter from above the targeted site.

This K-15 missile is, in fact, an advanced clone of naval version of Prithvi and designed to be exclusively launched from a submarine. The missile can be compared with the Tomahawk missile of the US. The Navy has reportedly been insisting on the K-15’s cruise variant as it is hard to be obstructed and has pinpoint accuracy.

“Cruise missiles are more difficult to detect and hence less vulnerable to anti-missile defence system, which can track and destroy ballistic missiles with comparative ease,” said a defence scientist.

After the K-15 tests, India will go for the much-awaited maiden test of 5,000-km range Agni-V missile, which has been scheduled for the third week of April.

http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=17296
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 02/29/2012 11:23 pm
http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123291442

Minuteman III test missile launches from Vandenberg

Posted 2/25/2012   Updated 2/25/2012 Email story   

by 30th Space Wing Public Affairs

2/25/2012 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 2:46 a.m. Feb. 25 from Launch Facility-09 on north Vandenberg. Col. Nina Armagno, 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority. 30th Space Wing Western Range safety operations went as planned during the flight test. "Extensive resources are devoted to every launch mission to ensure safety in our local area and downrange," said Armagno. "Public safety is my first priority during all launch operations." For information on the flight test, call Air Force Global Strike Command Public Affairs at (318) 456-1305 or after hours at (318) 456-2151.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 03/14/2012 01:39 pm
SUNNYVALE, Calif., March 14, 2012 - The U.S. Navy conducted a successful test flight Feb. 22 of a Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) built by Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT). The Navy launched the unarmed missile from the submerged submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) in the Atlantic Ocean.

This test marked the 137th successful test flight of the D5 missile since 1989 - a reliability record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile or space launch vehicle.




[DASO 23  Vert A Size_Approved Image]

An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from Ohio-class fleet ballistic missile submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) Feb. 22, 2012.  (U.S. Navy photo)


"We are proud of our partnership with Navy Strategic Systems Programs in this most recent successful demonstration of the readiness and reliability of the Trident II D5 missile," said Melanie A. Sloane, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, the Navy's Trident missile prime contractor. "The performance of this critical strategic weapon system is a testament to the dedication of the entire government and industry team."

The Navy launched the missile as part of demonstration and shakedown operation 23 (DASO-23) to certify USS Tennessee for deployment, following a shipyard overhaul period. The missile was converted into a test configuration using a test missile kit produced by Lockheed Martin that contains range safety devices and flight telemetry instrumentation.

First deployed in 1990, the D5 missile currently is aboard OHIO-class and British VANGUARD-class submarines. The three-stage, solid-propellant, inertial-guided ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles and carries multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles.

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, Calif., has been the strategic missile prime contractor for the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs since the inception of the Fleet Ballistic Missile program more than 50 years ago. Lockheed Martin employees, principally in California, Georgia, Florida, Washington, Utah, Virginia and Scotland, support the design, development, production, test, and operation and sustainment of the Trident Strategic Weapon System.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 03/14/2012 01:58 pm
Saw this on Fox, up coming Wallops flights

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/14/nasa-to-light-up-east-coast-with-rocket-barrage/?intcmp=features

Quote
NASA will launch five rockets in five minutes Wednesday, March 14, to study fast-moving winds at the edge of space -- and many skywatchers along the United States' mid-Atlantic coast will be able to watch the show
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Chris Bergin on 03/14/2012 07:50 pm
I've set up a thread for the above:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=28341.0
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 03/15/2012 01:48 am
SUNNYVALE, Calif., March 14, 2012 - The U.S. Navy conducted a successful test flight Feb. 22 of a Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) built by Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT). The Navy launched the unarmed missile from the submerged submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) in the Atlantic Ocean.

So the YouTube video, linked in a previous message, was legit!  It takes the U.S. Navy nearly a month to confirm?

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 03/24/2012 07:29 am
The Rexus-12 sounding rocket (an improved Orion rocket) was launched from the Esrange center on March 19. The Rexus-11 launch (planned for March 21) was postponed due to technical reasons.

For more info on the flight and the experiments carried onboard, see page http://www.sscspace.com/rexus-12
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 03/24/2012 03:43 pm
I checked the background of the problems delaying the Rexus-11 launch. Apparently, the parachutes did not work on Rexus-12, and it made a hard landing. The payload was recovered (it landed in the snow), and the experiments were delivered to the respective teams (four or five; sources differ).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 03/27/2012 01:49 pm
ATREX mission successfully launched this morning 4:58 a.m. EDT. More details, photos and videos later this morning.
http://www.nasa.gov/

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=o.191575794205863&type=3

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/sets/72157629162147612/show/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 03/27/2012 01:58 pm
Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSXf2C8RKXU&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 03/28/2012 06:53 pm
The Rexus-12 sounding rocket (an improved Orion rocket) was launched from the Esrange center on March 19. The Rexus-11 launch (planned for March 21) was postponed due to technical reasons.

For more info on the flight and the experiments carried onboard, see page http://www.sscspace.com/rexus-12

REXUS 11 and 12 students met the challenges of a real launch

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Education/SEMY5LGY50H_0.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 03/30/2012 07:28 am
A Black Brant-IX rocket was launched from White Sands on March 22 for astronomy research (CIBER-mission).

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/CIBERprelaunch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 04/04/2012 03:19 pm
The next launch out of Vandenberg will be a flight test of the Minuteman III on April 10.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/apr/3/rocket-with-secret-payload-launches-from-calif/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: savuporo on 04/06/2012 07:32 pm
http://www.parabolicarc.com/2012/04/05/up-aerospace-conducts-tenth-launch-from-spaceport-america/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 04/12/2012 06:58 pm
A ' tactical ballistic missile' was launched at White Sands, probably on March 29 (date of press release) and was intercepted by two Patriots. It's possible this was a Hera or Storm class vehicle and might have flown an exoatmospheric trajectory from Wingate to White Sands, but there's not enough information given to establish this.
http://raytheon.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=2067
http://www.bizjournals.com/prnewswire/press_releases/2012/03/29/NE78438
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/13/2012 08:19 am
Some additional info on the Spaceloft XL 6 launch payload can be found here: http://www.kirtland.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123296138

Some pictures of the launch preps: https://flightopportunities.nasa.gov/blog/2012/04/04/spaceloft-6-flight-preparations-sfem/

Video of launch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWpWZYgWopU&feature=related
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: AnalogMan on 04/15/2012 06:45 pm
A couple of weeks late, but recently came across this time-lapse photo of the ATREX launches that I don't recall seeing posted on this site before.

(click to enlarge)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/17/2012 08:30 pm
Agni-V missile test likely this Wednesday (http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-04-16/india/31349492_1_agni-v-inter-continental-ballistic-missiles-agni-iv)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/18/2012 09:02 am
Top 10 facts about Agni-V (http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/agni-v-launch-today-top-10-facts-198961)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/18/2012 03:01 pm
Agni V launch postponed to tomorrow due to heavy lightening (http://www.dnaindia.com/india/commentary_live-countdown-to-agni-v-launch_1677696)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 04/19/2012 03:56 am
Agin V Launched:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/19/us-india-missile-idUSBRE83I03Z20120419
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 04/19/2012 09:19 am
From Xinhua, India testfires intercontinental Agni-V ballistic missile off eastern coast (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2012-04/19/c_131537650.htm)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Nahavandi on 04/19/2012 09:46 am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bo8EGM91_wg
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: osiossim on 04/19/2012 10:26 am
South Korean launch;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lp4QGwrZs74
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/19/2012 10:29 am
There are some more pictures Agni V launch:
http://tarmak007.blogspot.com/2012/04/agni-v-photso-from-drdo.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/25/2012 08:48 am
Pakistan successfully launches Ballistic Missile Hatf IV Shaheen-1A    
       
RAWALPINDI, Apr 25 (APP): Pakistan on Wednesday successfully conducted the launch of the intermediate Range Ballistic Missile, Hatf IV Shaheen-1A Weapon System.The missile is an improved version of Shaheen-1 with the improvements in range and technical parameters.It is capable of carrying nuclear and conventional warheads, said an ISPR press release issued here.Director General Strategic Plans Division, Lieutenant General ® Khalid Ahmed Kidwai, Chairman NESCOM Muhammad Irfan Burney, Commander Army Strategic Force Command, Lieutenant General Tariq Nadeem Gilani witnessed today’s launch, whose impact point was at sea.

http://app.com.pk/en_/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=191823&Itemid=2

 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 04/25/2012 10:27 am
Northrop Grumman Supports U.S. Air Force Minuteman Missile Test Launch

HERNDON, Va., April 20, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) recently supported the successful reliability testing of the United States Air Force's Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) weapons system.

 The Northrop Grumman led ICBM prime team includes Boeing, Lockheed Martin, ATK and more than 20 other subcontractors. The ICBM team is responsible for overall sustainment of the weapon system including development, production, deployment and system modifications. 

 "We are honored to be part of this ongoing ICBM test process and the day-to-day deterrent mission the Minuteman force provides to the nation," said Bill Carty, vice president and general manager of Northrop Grumman's Defense and Government Services division. "Northrop Grumman has supported our nation's ICBM missile systems program for more than 50 years and we look forward to supporting the needs of the Air Force long into the future."

 The operational test was designated Glory Trip 203GM. The test launch proceeded as planned with the missile traveling roughly 4,800 miles in 30 minutes. The Minuteman III carried a single Mk21 re-entry vehicle specially instrumented to measure operational performance parameters such as in-flight reliability and accuracy.

 The re-entry vehicle landed on target in a pre-designated area within the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site near Kwajalein Atoll in the western chain of the Marshall Islands. Operational tests, with the aide and oversight of the 576th Test Squadron, were conducted by maintenance and operations personnel from the 90th Missile Wing at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo.

 "The Northrop Grumman System Engineering Support team executes critical support functions before, during and after each Air Force Global Strike Command test launch," said Tony Spehar, vice president and ICBM prime integration contract program manager for Northrop Grumman. "Successful operational test launches assess and demonstrate the effectiveness of the deployed weapon system and are critical to determining the health of the Minuteman weapon system."

http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/pages/news_releases.html?d=252780
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/17/2012 03:48 am
On May 9 at 0618 UTC an unidentified short range missile was launched from Kauai,
as the target for Aegis  FTM-16 Event 2.  A few minutes later the second Block IB SM-3
missile was launched from the USS Lake Erie and intercepted the target over the Pacific.

http://www.mda.mil/news/12news0007.html

It's not clear what the apogee of these flights were, but probably marginally exoatmospheric.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/18/2012 07:23 am
Video of Aegis FTM-16 test

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTrYUK2K72M

Another video and two pictures can be found here:
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 05/18/2012 07:25 pm
Video of Aegis FTM-16 test

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTrYUK2K72M

Another video and two pictures can be found here:
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html

Commentary mentions that the target was an ARAV-A  (which is a Terrier Orion based vehicle)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 05/23/2012 07:56 am
Russia Test Fires New Ballistic Missile
11:41 23/05/2012

 MOSCOW, May 23 (RIA Novosti) - Russia's Strategic Missile Forces test-fired a new prototype ballistic missile from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Arkhangelsk Region on Wednesday, Defense Ministry spokesman Vadim Koval said, but did not name the new weapon.

"The training round landed in the western region of the Kamchatka peninsula, hitting its target" he said.

The launch took place at 10.15 a.m. from a mobile launcher, he said.

"The new intercontinental ballistic missile is intended to strengthen the capabilities of Russia's Strategic Missile Forces, including its capabilities for overcoming anti-missile defenses," he said.

"The missile was built with maximum use of existing components with new elements and technologies developed during the production of fifth-generation missile systems, in order to shorten its development time," he said.

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20120523/173620397.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 05/29/2012 06:24 pm
On the Wallops Facebook page ( http://www.facebook.com/NASAWFF ):

Quote
The next launch from the Wallops Flight Facility is scheduled for the early morning on June 21. A Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital sounding rocket will carry various education experiments through programs with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. This launch will only be visible in the Wallops area.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 05/31/2012 01:36 pm
Lockheed Martin-Built Trident II D5 Missile's Reliability Record Reaches 142 Successful Test Flights
05/31/2012 | 09:05am

SUNNYVALE, Calif., May 31, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Navy conducted successful test flights April 14 and 16 of four Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles (FBMs) built by Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT). The Navy launched two unarmed missiles each day from the submerged submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) in the Atlantic Ocean.

These tests marked the 139th, 140th, 141st and 142nd successful test flights of the Trident II D5 missile since design completion in 1989 - a reliability record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile or space launch vehicle.

"Under the leadership of Navy Strategic Systems Programs, the Trident Strategic Weapon System continues to demonstrate solid reliability in operationally representative flight testing," said Melanie A. Sloane, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, the Navy's Trident missile prime contractor. "These tests are an important part of the strategic deterrence mission because the mere presence of this highly capable system discourages aggression. The stealth and mobility of the submarine-based Trident Strategic Weapon System give it a unique role in deterrence as the most survivable leg of the strategic triad, which ensures the security of our nation against any potential adversary."

The Navy launched the missiles as part of Follow-on Commander's Evaluation Tests. The Navy conducts a continuing series of operational system evaluation tests to assure the safety, reliability, readiness and performance of the Trident Strategic Weapon System, as required by the Department of Defense's National Command Authority. The Navy conducts the tests under the testing guidelines of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The missiles were converted into a test configuration using a test missile kit produced by Lockheed Martin that contains range safety devices, tracking systems and flight telemetry instrumentation.

First deployed in 1990, the D5 missile currently is aboard OHIO-class and British VANGUARD-class submarines. The three-stage, solid-propellant, inertial-guided ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles and carries multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles.

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, Calif., has been the strategic missile prime contractor for the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs since the inception of the Fleet Ballistic Missile program more than 50 years ago. Lockheed Martin employees, principally in California, Georgia, Florida, Washington, Utah, Virginia and Scotland, support the design, development, production, test, and operation and sustainment of the Trident Strategic Weapon System.

Lockheed Martin leads the industry in performance and domain expertise in strategic missile and missile defense systems. Lockheed Martin designs and produces ballistic missiles, interceptors, target missiles and reentry systems with unmatched reliability. Lockheed Martin's focus on operational excellence yields affordable high-quality systems and services.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 123,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation's net sales for 2011 were $46.5 billion.

http://www.4-traders.com/LOCKHEED-MARTIN-CORPORATI-13406/news/Lockheed-Martin-Corporation-Lockheed-Martin-Built-Trident-II-D5-Missile-s-Reliability-Record-Reach-14351447/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/01/2012 06:44 pm
The February launch of DASO-23 was reported to be the 137th success.
So there must be a secret (138th success) Trident 2 launch between Feb 22 and Apr 14.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 06/03/2012 03:10 am
The February launch of DASO-23 was reported to be the 137th success.
So there must be a secret (138th success) Trident 2 launch between Feb 22 and Apr 14.

New RV ?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 06/03/2012 04:14 am
The February launch of DASO-23 was reported to be the 137th success.
So there must be a secret (138th success) Trident 2 launch between Feb 22 and Apr 14.

Can such launches really be secret?  It wouldn't seem a good idea to launch an intercontinental range missile on a test without first notifying other nations who have their own armed missiles waiting to respond to any launch perceived to be a threat.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: SgtPoivre on 06/04/2012 10:56 am
The February launch of DASO-23 was reported to be the 137th success.
So there must be a secret (138th success) Trident 2 launch between Feb 22 and Apr 14.

Can such launches really be secret?  It wouldn't seem a good idea to launch an intercontinental range missile on a test without first notifying other nations who have their own armed missiles waiting to respond to any launch perceived to be a threat.

 - Ed Kyle

Maybe a UK launch from a Vanguard SSBN?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/05/2012 04:44 am
The February launch of DASO-23 was reported to be the 137th success.
So there must be a secret (138th success) Trident 2 launch between Feb 22 and Apr 14.

Can such launches really be secret?  It wouldn't seem a good idea to launch an intercontinental range missile on a test without first notifying other nations who have their own armed missiles waiting to respond to any launch perceived to be a threat.

 - Ed Kyle

Our launch lists for Polaris A3 and Trident C4 and D5 are  incomplete.
We know total launches so we can count the gaps.
For  Trident I C4 we are missing 50 launches, for Trident 2 we are missing 5.
Mostly these are launches in the Pacific, probably towards Kwajalein.
I think they are done by subs on operational patrol and that's why they don't want to announce them...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Yarrah on 06/07/2012 09:17 pm
Missile sightings today in: 

Astrakhan
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=hb2QsJVH3ps#!)

Iran
Iran (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9TlyroKp_E)

Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOEB7EgijjI),

... and Armenia (https://twitter.com/57UN/status/210827690289274881/photo/1), Israel and Palestine.

Anyone know whose rocket this was?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 06/07/2012 10:06 pm
Missile sightings today in: 

Astrakhan

Anyone know whose rocket this was?

According to http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20120607/263747061.html there was a launch of a Topol from Kapustin Yar in the region of Astrakhan today at 17.39 UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 06/07/2012 10:53 pm
Missile sightings today in: 

Astrakhan

Anyone know whose rocket this was?

According to http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20120607/263747061.html there was a launch of a Topol from Kapustin Yar in the region of Astrakhan today at 17.39 UTC.

this time from the firing ground at "Kapustin Yar" in Astrakhan in Southern Russia.

The exercise saw the missile accurately hit its target on the firing range "Sary-Shagan" in Kazakhstan.

http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_06_08/77444075/

How the missile can seen in Israel and Palestine ?

 ::)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/07/2012 11:11 pm
Missile sightings today in: 

Astrakhan

Anyone know whose rocket this was?

According to http://de.rian.ru/security_and_military/20120607/263747061.html there was a launch of a Topol from Kapustin Yar in the region of Astrakhan today at 17.39 UTC.

this time from the firing ground at "Kapustin Yar" in Astrakhan in Southern Russia.

The exercise saw the missile accurately hit its target on the firing range "Sary-Shagan" in Kazakhstan.

http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_06_08/77444075/

How the missile can seen in Israel and Palestine ?

 ::)

A rough calculation says that the angle between Israel and Kap Yar is about 18 degrees, putting Kap Yar about 300 km below the tangent plane to Israel - if the Topol goes to 1000 km altitude, quite plausible, it should be well above the horizon in Israel.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/22/2012 07:11 am
A  Terrier Improved Orion sounding rocket was launched from Wallops at 06:40 local time. On board were seventeen educational experiments as part of the RockOn! 2012 program.

The rocket carried the experiments to an altitude of 73 miles before impacting into the Atlantic Ocean off the Virginia coast. The experiments have been recovered and will be returned this morning to the program participants at Wallops so they can begin their data analysis.

source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/post621.html

Video of the launch here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRdzErcfAN0
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/26/2012 07:25 am
A Black Brant IX sounding rocket was launch from White Sands at 19:30 UT. The flight’s primary purpose was to provide an underflight calibration for the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) instrument onboard the SDO satellite studying the sun (NASA 36.286, PI Tom Woods).

Based on the quicklook realtime data, all of the rocket EVE instrument channels appear to have made excellent solar EUV irradiance measurements. The two new soft X-ray spectrometers appear to have worked too. Detailed data analysis will be done to further analyze the quality of the rocket data and to produce a solar EUV irradiance reference spectrum that then can be used to calibrate the satellite SDO EVE and other solar EUV instruments.

Cameras onboard captured spectacular footage of the trip into space and back (see video).

source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/eve-calibration.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBbSrjM4z9Q


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/26/2012 10:08 pm
I was going to post the same a few days ago until I discovered that the video is from a past launch and the link above is just a rehash.  The following description is provided:

"On March 23, 2011, two on-board cameras followed a sounding rocket on its journey from Earth to space and back again. The rocket was launched to measure solar energy output and calibrate the EVE instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Credit: NASA"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 07/01/2012 04:08 pm
DLR Launches SHEFEX II Experimental Re-entry Vehicle (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2012/07/01/dlr-launches-shefex-ii-experimental-re-entry-vehicle/)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/02/2012 11:46 am
DLR Launches SHEFEX II Experimental Re-entry Vehicle (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2012/07/01/dlr-launches-shefex-ii-experimental-re-entry-vehicle/)

More info (and photos) here
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10081/151_read-4100/year-all/

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOFBH6c_HLw
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/04/2012 05:27 am
On Jun 27 a medium range target was launched from Kauai and intercepted by a SM-3 Block 1B launched by the USS Lake Erie  [source: mda.mil]
http://www.mda.mil/news/12news0008.html
This was the FTM-18 test.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/04/2012 07:27 am
On Jun 27 a medium range target was launched from Kauai and intercepted by a SM-3 Block 1B launched by the USS Lake Erie  [source: mda.mil]
http://www.mda.mil/news/12news0008.html
This was the FTM-18 test.

Pictures and a video of this test (nick-named Stellar Minotaur) can be be found here: http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html

Below another video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpX0EwO5SkE
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/05/2012 09:35 pm
We just heard that SUMI launched successfully from White Sands this afternoon.
No details yet.  (SUMI is an ultraviolet solar physics payload)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo Ukr on 07/10/2012 08:30 pm
HI-C Sounding Rocket Mission Has Finest Mirrors Ever Made
07.05.12
 
Waiting for launch: NASA's HI-C mission, sitting in the front of this image, will launch on July 11, 2012 to observe the sun's corona in the highest detail ever captured during a 381-second flight. Credit: NASA

On July 11, NASA scientists will launch into space the highest resolution solar telescope ever to observe the solar corona, the million degree outer solar atmosphere. The instrument, called HI-C for High Resolution Coronal Imager, will fly aboard a Black Brant sounding rocket to be launched from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The mission will have just 620 seconds for its flight, spending about half of that time high enough that Earth's atmosphere will not block ultraviolet rays from the sun. By looking at a specific range of UV light, HI-C scientists hope to observe fundamental structures on the sun, as narrow as 100 miles across.

"Other instruments in space can't resolve things that small, but they do suggest – after detailed computer analysis of the amount of light in any given pixel – that structures in the sun's atmosphere are about 100 miles across," says Jonathan Cirtain, a solar scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. who is the project scientist for HI-C. "And we also have theories about the shapes of structures in the atmosphere, or corona, that expect that size. HI-C will be the first chance we have to see them."

The spatial resolution on HI-C is some five times more detailed than the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), that can resolve structures down to 600 miles and currently sends back some of our most stunning and scientifically useful images of the sun. Of course, AIA can see the entire sun at this resolution, while HI-C will focus on an area just one-sixth the width of the sun or 135,000 miles across. Also, AIA observes the sun in ten different wavelengths, while HI-C will observe just one: 193 Angstroms. This wavelength of UV light corresponds to material in the sun at temperatures of 1.5 million Kelvin and that wavelength is typically used to observe material in the corona.

During its ten-minute journey, HI-C will focus on the center of the sun, where a large sunspot is predicted to be – a prediction based on what the sun looked like 27 days previously, since it takes 27 days for the sun to complete a full rotation.

"We will start acquiring data at 69 seconds after launch, at a rate of roughly an image a second," says Cirtain. "We will be able to look through a secondary H-alpha telescope on the instrument in real time and re-point the main telescope as needed."

In addition to seeing the finest structures yet seen in the sun’s corona, the launch of HI-C will serve as a test bed for this high-resolution telescope. Often one improves telescope resolution simply by building bigger mirrors, but this is not possible when constraining a telescope to the size of a sounding rocket, or even a long-term satellite. So HI-C's mirror is only about nine and a half inches across, no bigger than that of AIA. However, the HI-C mirrors, made by a team at Marshall, are some of the finest ever made, says Cirtain. If one could see the surface at an atomic level, it would show no greater valleys or peaks than two atoms in either direction.

"So it's super smooth," says Cirtain.

In addition, the team created a longer focal length – that is, they increased the distance the light travels from its primary mirror to its secondary mirror, another trick to improve resolution – by creating a precise inner maze for the light to travel from mirror to mirror, rather than a simple, shorter straight line.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is leading the international effort for Hi-C. Key partners include the University of Alabama at Huntsville, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, University of Central Lancashire in Lancashire, England, and the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/HI-C.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/11/2012 10:22 pm
Hi-C launched at 1850 UTC Jul 11. I've talked to the folks here who listened in by telecon. Flew as planned and got good data - 'better than SDO AIA', as hoped. Kudos to Jonathan Cirtain, Kellly Korreck et al!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 07/13/2012 01:41 am
Shame it didn't fly today, it would have been in for a real light show!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/09/2012 01:49 pm

India launched an Agni  I missile on Jul 13 and an Agni II on Aug 9.
The Agni I and II are derived from the SLV-3 rocket used to launch India's first satellites.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 08/09/2012 03:51 pm
http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html

Quote
JAXA launched the sounding rocket S-310-41 at 4:30:00 p.m. on Aug. 7, 2012 (Japan Standard time) from the Uchinoura Space Center. The purpose of the launch was a flight experiment of the small inflatable capsule. The vertical angle at the launch was 81 degrees.
 The flight and operation of the onboard devices were all normal, and its top part (the nose fairing) opened at the preordained timing of 60 seconds after liftoff, reached its highest altitude of 150 km at 191 seconds, then dropped onto the south eastern ocean of Uchinoura.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/09/2012 08:07 am
Military rocket launch from Virginia postponed
http://www.examiner.com/article/military-rocket-launch-from-virginia-postponed
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: input~2 on 09/13/2012 07:49 am
NOTAM for Indian launch planned on Sept 21 or 22
Quote
F2217/12 - ROCKET LAUNCH FROM INDIA WILL TAKE PLACE
FLW RECEIVED FROM GOVERNMENT OF INDIA:
INDIAN EXPERIMENTAL FLIGHT TRIAL LAUNCH IS SKED TO TAKE PLACE WITHIN
THE FOLLOWING DANGER ZONE WHICH ENCROACHES THE MELBOURNE FLIGHT
INFORMATION REGION (FIR)

THE ROCKET HAS BEEN SCHEDULED FROM 21 SEPTEMBER TO 22 SEPTEMBER 2012.

THE DANGER ZONE IS BOUNDED BY THE FOLLOWING COORDINATES:

N20 48 20.16 E087 02 35.88
N18 12 20.52 E086 07 07.68
S07 16 16.32 E087 03 06.48
S07 10 28.56 E089 26 22.20
S06 52 46.20 E091 48 35.28
N18 24 08.28 E088 30 27.72
N20 48 44.28 E087 07 25.32
N20 48 20.16 E087 02 35.88. SFC - UNL, 1209210230 TO 1209210500 1209210700 TO
1209210900 1209220500 TO 1209220830, 21 SEP 02:30 2012 UNTIL 22 SEP 08:30 2012.
CREATED: 12 SEP 08:41 2012
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Ronsmytheiii on 09/14/2012 11:23 pm
Quote
Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB) announced today that it successfully launched a Patriot Target Vehicle (PTV) under contract with the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) Space Development Launch Operations (SDLO). The PTV served as an intercept target for the U.S. Army Lower Tier Project Office (LTPO) Patriot missile defense system. The PTV was launched this morning from Fort Wingate into White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico. It flew a southerly trajectory over WSMR and was intercepted by a Patriot PAC-3 missile interceptor system during reentry.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=38550

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=HmMHv4P75vo
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/16/2012 05:53 pm
Military rocket launch from Virginia postponed
http://www.examiner.com/article/military-rocket-launch-from-virginia-postponed


The first of two Terrier Lynx rockets was launched Sep 12 between 0000 and 0200 UTC:

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/11/4810698/rocket-launch-completed-from-wallops.html

These launches are just referred to as 'for DoD' - does anyone have any more info? Some earlier Terrier Lynx launches were for the now-ended ABL program - not clear if these are Missile Defense Agency targets or
something for the Navy ...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/19/2012 08:57 am
Today a Agni-IV was launched.
http://de.ria.ru/security_and_military/20120919/264460085.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 09/19/2012 10:07 am
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/article3914340.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 09/21/2012 01:53 pm
Military rocket launch from Virginia postponed
http://www.examiner.com/article/military-rocket-launch-from-virginia-postponed


The first of two Terrier Lynx rockets was launched Sep 12 between 0000 and 0200 UTC:

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/11/4810698/rocket-launch-completed-from-wallops.html

These launches are just referred to as 'for DoD' - does anyone have any more info? Some earlier Terrier Lynx launches were for the now-ended ABL program - not clear if these are Missile Defense Agency targets or
something for the Navy ...

I work at wallops on the sounding rocket program. We were not involved in this launch but some colleagues that work for another company were.
The Terrier-Lynx-Star 13 launches are for the MDA. They are some kind of target but I have no idea what is tracking them. They are 14" diameter payloads and covered in grey RTV. The payloads (or mission) are called "Shark".
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 09/21/2012 01:58 pm
In keeping up with suborbital launches, 46.004 - Rosanova, t Terrier-Improved Malemute, was launched this morning from Wallops Island, VA. The payload, known as Rocksat-X, was a carrier for up to 5 college team's experiments. It is a water recovered payload.

12.075 - Brodell is set to launch Saturday morning. It is a 3 stage (simulated 4th stage) vehicle. Talos-Terrier-Oriole with a mass simulator of a 4th stage Nihka. It is a new vehicle configuration that is being tested out for possible use.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/launchadvisory918.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/22/2012 03:02 pm
Military rocket launch from Virginia postponed
http://www.examiner.com/article/military-rocket-launch-from-virginia-postponed


The first of two Terrier Lynx rockets was launched Sep 12 between 0000 and 0200 UTC:

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/11/4810698/rocket-launch-completed-from-wallops.html

These launches are just referred to as 'for DoD' - does anyone have any more info? Some earlier Terrier Lynx launches were for the now-ended ABL program - not clear if these are Missile Defense Agency targets or
something for the Navy ...

I work at wallops on the sounding rocket program. We were not involved in this launch but some colleagues that work for another company were.
The Terrier-Lynx-Star 13 launches are for the MDA. They are some kind of target but I have no idea what is tracking them. They are 14" diameter payloads and covered in grey RTV. The payloads (or mission) are called "Shark".

Fabulous info on this and on the 12.075 launch, thanks

Details on the new launches: (per Wallops web site and FB page)

Sep 21 1116:30Z NASA 46.004GO  Terrier Imp. Malemute with the 397 kg RockSat-X education payload, apogee 153 km

Sep 22 1100:00Z NASA 12.075GT  Talos Terrier Oriole with a 775 kg
test payload (dummy Nihka per block51's info), actual apogee 269 km

Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka sounds like an interesting replacement for Black Brant XII

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 09/24/2012 04:54 pm

Fabulous info on this and on the 12.075 launch, thanks

Details on the new launches: (per Wallops web site and FB page)

Sep 21 1116:30Z NASA 46.004GO  Terrier Imp. Malemute with the 397 kg RockSat-X education payload, apogee 153 km

Sep 22 1100:00Z NASA 12.075GT  Talos Terrier Oriole with a 775 kg
test payload (dummy Nihka per block51's info), actual apogee 269 km

Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka sounds like an interesting replacement for Black Brant XII



I've attached some shots of 46.004 in the water and on the recovery boat. I didn't ask the people's permission to post them so I grayed them out. Just wanted to give you guys an idea of what the payload looks like on the boat. Also, I don't like posting pictures of people doing their job, especially without their permission. Even the smallest little safety issue has a way of somehow being sent to someone at HQ, which is always a bad day for everyone involved.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 09/24/2012 08:57 pm
Some images of the NASA 12.075GT Talos Terrier Oriole launch.

More at http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/TTOLaunch.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/25/2012 07:27 am
Videos of the two recent Wallops launches. Especially the Talos-Terrier-Oriole is a nice once !
(source: Wallops Facebook)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/28/2012 10:12 am
Brazil launch a FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) - Basic Training Rocket, from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA) - Alcântara Launching Center, on September 27 at 1111UTC. The launch was part of the 'Operação Falcão V' - Falcon V Operation that aims to test the means on the ground and the technicians, engineering and other professionals involved with this operational area. 

The rocket reached a maximum altitude of 31.742 Km in a flight lasting 79 seconds. It took 166 seconds to reach the impact area located at 17.5 Km from the launch base.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/29/2012 02:57 am
Brazil launch a FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) - Basic Training Rocket, from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA) - Alcântara Launching Center, on September 27 at 1111UTC. The launch was part of the 'Operação Falcão V' - Falcon V Operation that aims to test the means on the ground and the technicians, engineering and other professionals involved with this operational area. 

The rocket reached a maximum altitude of 31.742 Km in a flight lasting 79 seconds. It took 166 seconds to reach the impact area located at 17.5 Km from the launch base.

One source says 1411 Brasilia time. Are you sure you got the sign right on the time zone correction?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/29/2012 03:21 am
Brazil launch a FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) - Basic Training Rocket, from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA) - Alcântara Launching Center, on September 27 at 1111UTC. The launch was part of the 'Operação Falcão V' - Falcon V Operation that aims to test the means on the ground and the technicians, engineering and other professionals involved with this operational area. 

The rocket reached a maximum altitude of 31.742 Km in a flight lasting 79 seconds. It took 166 seconds to reach the impact area located at 17.5 Km from the launch base.

One source says 1411 Brasilia time. Are you sure you got the sign right on the time zone correction?


You're right Jonathan, I didn't. It's 1711UTC.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/29/2012 06:33 am
Brazil launch a FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) - Basic Training Rocket, from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA) - Alcântara Launching Center, on September 27 at 1111UTC. The launch was part of the 'Operação Falcão V' - Falcon V Operation that aims to test the means on the ground and the technicians, engineering and other professionals involved with this operational area. 

The rocket reached a maximum altitude of 31.742 Km in a flight lasting 79 seconds. It took 166 seconds to reach the impact area located at 17.5 Km from the launch base.

One source says 1411 Brasilia time. Are you sure you got the sign right on the time zone correction?


You're right Jonathan, I didn't. It's 1711UTC.


I hadn't paid attention to the FTB rocket before (it's endoatmospheric of course, but its sibling FTI is mesospheric)
I've added a launch list at http://planet4589.org/space/lvdb/launch/FTB
based on the wonderful data at the excellent brazilianspace.blogspot.com
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/29/2012 11:52 am

I hadn't paid attention to the FTB rocket before (it's endoatmospheric of course, but its sibling FTI is mesospheric)
I've added a launch list at http://planet4589.org/space/lvdb/launch/FTB
based on the wonderful data at the excellent brazilianspace.blogspot.com

You should also «read» this one http://panoramaespacial.blogspot.pt/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/29/2012 02:35 pm

I hadn't paid attention to the FTB rocket before (it's endoatmospheric of course, but its sibling FTI is mesospheric)
I've added a launch list at http://planet4589.org/space/lvdb/launch/FTB
based on the wonderful data at the excellent brazilianspace.blogspot.com

You should also «read» this one http://panoramaespacial.blogspot.pt/


Thanks - it reminds me to mention the launch of HiFire 3 from Andoya
on a VS-30/Orion on Sep 13.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/01/2012 06:48 am
More activity at Andoya:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBVxtu3myQk
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/03/2012 07:22 pm
More activity at Andoya:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBVxtu3myQk

These Canadian student launches in the past have been 'home-built' rockets with  low apogees in the 10 km range - I haven't managed
to find data on this latest one, but I assume it is also a low altitude launch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/06/2012 10:41 pm
Chennai, October 4, 2012

Prithvi-II successfully test-fired from Odisha

Prithvi-II missile was successfully test-fired on Thursday by the Strategic Forces Command (SFC) of the Services from the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur in Odisha. The surface-to-surface missile, which can be armed with nuclear warheads, travelled its full range of 350 km before plunging into the Bay of Bengal. It carried conventional explosives.

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) developed the single-stage missile for the Air Force for deep interdiction. It can carry a payload weighing between 500 kg and 1,000 kg depending on the range for which it is launched. It is equipped with sophisticated navigation system.

The Army is already armed with this missile, which uses liquid propellants.

For Thursday’s launch, the SFC picked up a Prithvi-II missile from the production lot and fired it from a road-mobile launcher. The launch was part of training for the SFC to fire strategic missiles at short notice. The SFC did all the launch operations guided by the DRDO missile technologists.

Several radars and electro-optical tracking systems, located along the coast of Odisha, tracked the missile’s path and evaluated its parameters in real time. The tracking stations confirmed the successful completion of the flight’s terminal events.

From July, the SFC has fired a series of Agni and Prithvi-II missiles, including Agni-I, Agni-II and Agni-III. It launched a Prithvi-II on August 25. The DRDO had successfully launched Agni-V with a range of more than 5,000 km in April and Agni-IV with a range of about 4,000 km in September. The Agni and Prithvi variants are surface-to-surface missiles.

The SFC is slated to fire a Dhanush, a naval variant of Prithvi, on Friday off the eastern coast.

The DRDO will conduct a ballistic interceptor missile test in November.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/prithviii-successfully-testfired-from-odisha/article3964130.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 10/06/2012 11:36 pm
HYDERABAD, October 5, 2012

Nuclear-capable Dhanush successfully test-fired
Y. Mallikarjun

Launched from a ship, the missile met mission objectives in a flawless performance

A day after the launch of Prithvi-II, India successfully test-fired nuclear-capable Dhanush ballistic missile for its full range of 350 km from a naval ship off Odisha on Friday.

The surface-to-surface Dhanush, a naval variant of Prithvi-II, was fired by the personnel of Strategic Forces Command (SFC) at 11.25 a.m. as part of regular training. The missile rose from the ship and splashed down near the pre-designated target in the Bay of Bengal with an accuracy of less than 20 metres. All the mission objectives were met in a flawless performance, official sources said.

All the radars, telemetry stations and electro-optical systems tracked and evaluated the performance of the missile in real time.

The single-stage, liquid propelled Dhanush has already been inducted into the armed services and is one of the five missiles developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) under the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme (IGMDP). For Friday’s launch the missile was picked up randomly from the production lot and the entire operation was carried out by personnel of the SFC, which is tasked with handling strategic systems.

Dhanush can carry conventional or nuclear payload of 500-1,000 kg and hit both land and sea-based targets.

Although Dhanush was originally planned to be launched within a short time after test-firing of Prithvi-II on Thursday as was done on previous occasions, the mission was postponed to Friday due to rough sea conditions.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/dhanush-prithvis-naval-version-successfully-testfired/article3968040.ece
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/07/2012 03:06 pm
A very interesting record of suborbital missions using Brazilian rockets can be found at http://brazilianspace.blogspot.pt/2012/10/a-historia-dos-foguetes-brasileiros-em.html. This is the complete list of all non-Brazilian missions launched from other countries.

This is in Portuguese, so if someone needs any help in translation just tell me.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/21/2012 03:28 am
At russianforces.org  Pavel Podvig notes the launch of a Topol and R-29R missile
on Oct 19, and an endoatmospheric launch of the 53T6 interceptor on Oct 16
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/21/2012 06:38 am
At russianforces.org  Pavel Podvig notes the launch of a Topol and R-29R missile
on Oct 19, and an endoatmospheric launch of the 53T6 interceptor on Oct 16

Interesting anecdote regarding the Topol launch:
According to official statements, the goal of the test launch was to confirm the technical characteristics of the missile during its current 24-year service life term and to evaluate the possibility of extending that term to 25 years. The launch was also part of a strategic forces exercise that included a launch of a R-29 SLBM.

The Rocket Forces were planning to extend service life of the Topol ICBM to 25 years after a test launch in November 2011. However, it apparently remained at 24 years. It is possible that today's launch will also not lead to the extension of the service life - according to some reports the main missile that was prepared for launch failed and a backup missile was launched instead. UPDATE: It wasn't a failure of the missile, as it turned out. Rather, the problem was with the command and control system - when the president, who was participating in the exercise, "pressed the button", the missile didn't take off.

Source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2012/10/test_launch_of_a_topol_missile_2.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/26/2012 06:25 pm
http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/s_rockets/index_e.html

Quote
JAXA launched the sounding rocket S-310-41 at 4:30:00 p.m. on Aug. 7, 2012 (Japan Standard time) from the Uchinoura Space Center. The purpose of the launch was a flight experiment of the small inflatable capsule. The vertical angle at the launch was 81 degrees.
 The flight and operation of the onboard devices were all normal, and its top part (the nose fairing) opened at the preordained timing of 60 seconds after liftoff, reached its highest altitude of 150 km at 191 seconds, then dropped onto the south eastern ocean of Uchinoura.

Images from http://www.sacj.org/openbbs/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/31/2012 12:37 am
http://www.mda.mil/news/12news0011.html

FTI-01 missile defense test included:

Three-stage E-LRALT dropped from C-17 north of Wake I
  (SR-19/SR-19/unknown)
ARAV-B (Terrier Oriole) launch from Wake
THAAD launch from Meck,  intercepts E-LRALT
SM-3-1A launch from USS Fitzgerald,  fails to intercept ARAV-B
Unknown SRBM target launch (Scud?) from Mobile Launch Platform NE of Kwaj
PAC-3 launch from Omelek, intercepts SRBM

plus some endoatmospheric stuff:
Launch date  Oct 24    (Oct 25 in GMT+12, Oct 24 in unspecified US time zone probably GMT-4, and local daytime, so between Oct 24 1800UTC and Oct 25 0400 UTC?)

Launch times not available
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/31/2012 12:49 am
http://www.mda.mil/news/12news0011.html

FTI-01 missile defense test included:

Three-stage E-LRALT dropped from C-17 north of Wake I
  (SR-19/SR-19/unknown)
 

Ah...
www.mda.mil/global/.../pdf/env_IFT_USAKA-RTS_EA.pdf
says third stage is an Orbus -  presumably an ATK Orbus 1A
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/31/2012 07:22 am
FTI-01 fact sheet
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 10/31/2012 09:28 pm
Space News has a story about the Oct 20 test flight of a Garvey/Orbitec P-15 rocket. The story is stunning in its lack of technical details, but I am guessing this launch was to just a few km - does anyone have real details?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/02/2012 01:31 am
http://russianforces.org  - Pavel Podvig's site - reports the third test launch of a new Russian ICBM on Oct 24. The missile flew from the Kapustin Yar site
to the Balkash (Sary Shagan) range.

Original Russian report at
http://lenta.ru/news/2012/10/25/kapustin/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/02/2012 06:26 pm
According to the Brazilian blog 'Brazilian Space', the sixth Brazilian FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) was launched from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA) - Alcântara Launch Center, on October 31st.

The launch took place at 1703UTC. The vehicle traveled 16 km and reached 32.06 km in altitude on a 78 second flight. The flight duration was 167 seconds.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/06/2012 02:59 pm
Armadillo's STIG-B Suborbital Rocket Suffers another Abort

Nov. 6, 2012

Armadillo Aerospace, the Heath, Texas-company gunning to fly NASA-funded suborbital payloads on its reusable STIG-B rocket, conducted a Nov. 3 test launch in New Mexico that  fell short of expectations.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/armadillos-stig-b-suborbital-rocket-suffers-another-abort#.UJkxQmJAcqE
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/06/2012 03:01 pm
Ventions Rocket to Launch from NASA Wallops

Posted by Doug Messier on November 5, 2012, at 11:48 am in News

WALLOPS ISLAND, VA (NASA PR) – NASA will support the test flight of a commercial suborbital rocket between 6 and 9 a.m. EST, November 7, from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The backup launch days are November 8 – 14.

Ventions VR-1 is a 10.6 feet tall, 6-inch diameter liquid-fueled rocket from Ventions LLC. It is projected to fly to about 3 miles altitude during its nearly 3.5 minute flight.

The launch may be seen in the Wallops area.

Mission status on launch day also can be followed on Twitter and Facebook at: www.twitter.com/NASA_Wallops and www.facebook.com/NASAWFF
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 11/07/2012 10:16 am
Wallops Island commercial rocket launch postponed
Source: The Virginia Pilot | Nov. 6, 2012

The launch of a commercial suborbital rocket on Wednesday [Nov. 7] from the Wallops Flight Facility has been postponed because of the weather.

The earliest the launch will now happen is Saturday between 6 and 9 a.m., according to a NASA news release.

The Ventions VR-1 is more than 10 feet tall and is about 6 inches in diameter. The liquid-fueled rocket belongs to Ventions LLC. It is expected to achieve an altitude of about 3 miles during a 3.5 minute flight.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/wallops-island-commercial-rocket-launch-postponed#.UJpBdWJAcqE
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: thydusk666 on 11/07/2012 11:17 am

It is expected to achieve an altitude of about 3 miles during a 3.5 minute flight.

I wonder if these figures are correct...
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/08/2012 06:47 pm
Brazil as launch the seventh FTB (Foguete de Treinamento Básico) - Basic Tranning Rocket at 1700UTC on November 7th, from the Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno at Parnamirim (Barreira do Inferno Launch Center, Parnamirim).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 11/13/2012 12:11 am
Source: http://www.edhat.com/site/tidbit.cfm?nid=103522

Minuteman III Test Launch
updated: Nov 12, 2012, 1:21 PM
Source: Launch Alert

Quote
An operational test launch of an Air Force Global Strike Command unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile is scheduled for Nov. 14 between 1:44 a.m. and 7:44 a.m. from North Vandenberg.

The purpose of the ICBM test launch program is to validate and verify the effectiveness, readiness and accuracy of the weapon system, according to Air Force Global Strike Command.

Col. Brent McArthur, 30th Space Wing vice commander, is the Launch Decision Authority.

"Team V Hawks, working with AFGSC, are poised to provide safe launch operations to ensure a secure and effective combat ready ICBM force,'" said McArthur. "It's a pleasure to work with our military, government civilian and contractor mission partners."

The launch team, under the direction of the 576th Flight Test Squadron, includes crew members from the 341st Missile Wing, Malmstrom AFB, Mont. Maintenance and operations task force members from the 341st Missile Wing have also conducted operational tasks in support of the launch.

The 576 FLTS is responsible for installed tracking, telemetry and command destruct systems on the missile, which collect data and ensure safety requirements are met.

The entire ICBM community, including the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy, will use the data collected from this mission for continuing force development evaluation.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: sdsds on 11/13/2012 04:28 am
Minuteman III Test Launch

Brian Webb has a bit more on this:

http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/launch-alert/2012-November/000774.html

The launch, known as "GT 206GM", was originally planned for 2012 March
1, but was delayed until November 14 due to problems with a unit
carried onboard the missile for safety and tracking purposes. The
unit is only installed for Minuteman III test launches.


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/14/2012 07:07 am
It seems the Ventions VR-1 rocket has finally been launched from Wallops on Nov 11 (delayed from Nov 10 and Nov 7).

On NASA's Wallops Facebook site has been posted:
on Nov 9: "The VENTIONS launch scheduled for tomorrow has been postponed. The next possible launch date is Sunday morning. Stay tuned."

and then: "The Ventions mission has been completed. Next launch is a Terrier-Lynx suborbital rocket for the Department of Defense. Date is December 1."
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/14/2012 07:23 am
News on the Nov 2 launch from White Sands
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/xray-scope.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 11/14/2012 06:03 pm
Minuteman III Test Launch

Brian Webb has a bit more on this:

http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/launch-alert/2012-November/000774.html

The launch, known as "GT 206GM", was originally planned for 2012 March
1, but was delayed until November 14 due to problems with a unit
carried onboard the missile for safety and tracking purposes. The
unit is only installed for Minuteman III test launches.




Launched !!

Quote
This morning's planned Minuteman III launch from Vandenberg AFB took place at 03:07 PST.

As mentioned in a previous Launch Alert, the high altitude portion of the missile exhaust may be visible at dawn.

Brian Webb
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/15/2012 07:41 am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjBs4wdCaNM&feature=share
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/15/2012 07:47 am
Some pix of the Minuteman-III launch

Source: VAFB
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/16/2012 07:30 am
Rexus-11 is scheduled for launch today from Kiruna.

For info, see page http://www.ssc.se/rexus-11
for pictures, see http://www.flickr.com/photos/esa_events/sets/72157632013728261/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: arkaska on 11/16/2012 01:02 pm
Rexus-11 is scheduled for launch today from Kiruna.

For info, see page http://www.ssc.se/rexus-11
for pictures, see http://www.flickr.com/photos/esa_events/sets/72157632013728261/

Info on the RAIN experiment which was onboard.

http://rainexperiment.se/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/22/2012 06:58 am
Article on the IMAGER payload, launched on a Black Brant IX from White Sands on Nov. 21.
http://www.uml.edu/News/stories/2011-12/Cook-rocket-experiment.aspx
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 11/29/2012 01:18 pm
Rawalpindi - November 28, 2012:
Pakistan today successfully conducted the training launch of Medium Range Ballistic Missile Hatf V (Ghauri). The launch was conducted by a Strategic Missile Group of the Army Strategic Force Command on the culmination of a field training exercise that was aimed at testing the operational readiness of the Army Strategic Force Command. Ghauri ballistic missile is a liquid fuel missile which can carry both conventional and nuclear warheads over a distance of 1300 kms.
The test monitoring of the launch was conducted at the National Command Centre through the medium of National Command Authority’s fully automated Strategic Command and Control Support System (SCCSS). It may be recalled that the SCCSS enables robust Command and Control capability of all strategic assets with round the clock situational awareness in a digitized network centric environment to decision makers at the National Command Centre (NCC). The test consolidates and strengthens Pakistan’s deterrence capability, and national security.
The President and Prime Minister congratulated all ranks of the Army Strategic Force Command on the excellent standard achieved during training which was reflected in the proficient handling of the weapon system in the field and the accuracy of the training launch.

Source: http://www.defence.pk/forums/pakistan-strategic-forces/221560-hatf-5-missile-test-fired-successfully.html#ixzz2DcZ3Lvav

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xvg6y1_pakistan-conducts-successful-test-fire-of-nuclear-ballistic-missile-hatf-v-ghauri_news?start=3
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/01/2012 04:26 pm
Brazil launch a FTI (Foguete de Treinamento Intermediário - Intermediary Training Rocket) from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA - Alcântara Launch Center). This launch was part of the Operação Iguaiba (Iguaiba Operation) initiated on November 19 with the objective of launching the VS-30/ORION V10 sounding rocket.

The FTI was launched at 1752UTC on November 29, reaching 52.39 km altitude at T+108 seconds. The flight traveled 82.58 km in 215 seconds.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: bolun on 12/04/2012 01:08 pm
Launch of a Mapheus-3 rocket on 25 November 2012, from the Swedish Esrange Space Center in Kiruna.

http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10081/151_read-5707//year-all/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/10/2012 06:02 pm
Brazil launched the VS-30/Orion V10 on December 8th at 2100UTC. The launch took place from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara – CLA. Launch had been delayed for 24 hours because of strong winds.

The rocket reached an apogee of 428.12 km and the total flight time was 11 minutes. Total distance traveled was 382.69 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/10/2012 06:12 pm
Brazil launched the VZ-20/Orion V10 on December 8th at 2100UTC. The launch took place from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara – CLA.

VZ-20/Orion? That should certainly read VS-30/Orion
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 12/10/2012 06:24 pm
Brazil launched the VZ-20/Orion V10 on December 8th at 2100UTC. The launch took place from the Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara – CLA.

VZ-20/Orion? That should certainly read VS-30/Orion

Of course, you are right! VS-30.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 12/17/2012 08:38 am
JAXA has just launched a S-520 sounding rocket (s/n S-520-28) at 07:00 UTC today. Details to follow soon.....

(photos from https://twitter.com/koumeiShibata (https://twitter.com/koumeiShibata))
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/18/2012 07:11 am
It's a busy time in "sounding rocket land." Apart from the Japanese launch, a Black Brant-IX was launched from White Sands on Dec 13.

Two day later, another Black Brant-IX was launched from White Sands; this was the EUNIS misison to study the sun. More info here:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/eunis.html

A Terrier Lynx rocket is scheduled for launch from Wallops on December 18 (delayed from Dec 14).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/19/2012 09:59 pm
JAXA has just launched a S-520 sounding rocket (s/n S-520-28) at 07:00 UTC today. Details to follow soon.....

(photos from https://twitter.com/koumeiShibata (https://twitter.com/koumeiShibata))

Press release http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2012/12/20121217_s-520-28_j.html
in Japanese; launch at 16:00:00 JST at elevation 76 deg, apogee 312 km at 283 km carrying microgravity experiments: nucleation of calcium carbonate and ? another experiment to study dust nucleation

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/19/2012 10:00 pm


A Terrier Lynx rocket is scheduled for launch from Wallops on December 18 (delayed from Dec 14).

Appears that this launch (apparently called 'Shark') has been further delayed
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/20/2012 02:38 am
Rawalpindi - November 28, 2012:
Pakistan today successfully conducted the training launch of Medium Range Ballistic Missile Hatf V (Ghauri). The launch was conducted by a Strategic Missile Group of the Army Strategic Force Command on the culmination of a field training exercise that was aimed at testing the operational readiness of the Army Strategic Force Command. Ghauri ballistic missile is a liquid fuel missile which can carry both conventional and nuclear warheads over a distance of 1300 kms.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/473227/mysterious-dadu-debris-was-part-of-hatf-v-missile/  and other sources report debris in Dadu, which is about 1000-1100 km downrange of the possible launch area at Tilla near Islamabad. This gives a clue as to the launch azimuth... the claimed 1300 km range would put impact just offshore in the Arabian Sea, which makes sense. Seems like the rocket body separated from the RV and drag made it impact significantly uprange of the RV.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/20/2012 02:56 am

Two day later, another Black Brant-IX was launched from White Sands; this was the EUNIS misison to study the sun. More info here:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/eunis.html
 

The above link implies a delay, and I haven't found any other evidence that
EUNIS / NASA 36.269GS Rabin  has actually been launched - do you have info to the contrary?


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 12/20/2012 08:22 am

Two day later, another Black Brant-IX was launched from White Sands; this was the EUNIS misison to study the sun. More info here:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/eunis.html
 

The above link implies a delay, and I haven't found any other evidence that
EUNIS / NASA 36.269GS Rabin  has actually been launched - do you have info to the contrary?


The delay mentioned at the top of the article refers to SLICE, which I assume is another mission. White Sands launches are rather difficult to follow, as there are no fancy webpages. I found this link that the launch did occur on Dec 15.
http://infomag.nl/nasa-suddenly-launched-a-mission-eunis-for-study-of-solar-flares-at-december-15-2012/

PS: more pix of the Japanese launch can be found here. I hope more info (in English) will come later...
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/j/topics/topics/2012/1015_s-520-28.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/20/2012 11:50 am

Quote from: jcm
The above link implies a delay, and I haven't found any other evidence that
EUNIS / NASA 36.269GS Rabin  has actually been launched - do you have info to the contrary?


The delay mentioned at the top of the article refers to SLICE, which I assume is another mission. White Sands launches are rather difficult to follow, as there are no fancy webpages. I found this link that the launch did occur on Dec 15.
http://infomag.nl/nasa-suddenly-launched-a-mission-eunis-for-study-of-solar-flares-at-december-15-2012/

PS: more pix of the Japanese launch can be found here. I hope more info (in English) will come later...
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/j/topics/topics/2012/1015_s-520-28.shtml


The delay text is a cut and paste error, the same text is found on the real page for SLICE, but I believe both missions were delayed.
The infomag.nl link 404s for me but other links to "nasa-suddenly-launched-a-mission-eunis-for-study-of-solar-flares" seem to be Maya Apocalypse conspiracy theories with a video of the 2009 launch of 39.009DR.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 12/27/2012 10:29 pm
Some pix of the Minuteman-III launch

Source: VAFB

patche

USAF 576 FLTS/341 MW Glory Trip 206-GM Launch Patch Minuteman III ICBM Nuclear

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/24/2013 12:16 am
Sun Corona Imager Goes Sub-Orbital On Sounding Rocket | Video

Published on Jan 23, 2013
In July 2012, NASA launch the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. It delivered the highest resolution imagery to date of the Sun's atmosphere.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSjZbUzw5KE

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/24/2013 01:52 am
And now the results:

Zoom Into Sun's Atmosphere Delivered In Stunning Detail | Video

Published on Jan 23, 2013
The High Resolution Coronal Imager (HI-C) was launched by NASA on a sounding rocket in July 2012. Full Sun AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly) and full field of view images taken by the imager are compared.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzGgL6F1_iQ
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/25/2013 03:30 am
30th Space Wing Public Affairs

source: http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123333779

1/24/2013 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The 30th Space Wing and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency are scheduled to conduct a flight test exercising elements of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense system Jan. 26, between the hours of 2 and 6 p.m on North base.

Col. Nina Armagno, 30th Space Wing commander, is the Launch Decision Authority.

"Vandenberg Hawks are working with MDA to provide safe launch operations for the test," " said Armagno."It's a pleasure to work with our MDA mission partners."

The test will involve the launch of a three-stage Ground-Based Interceptor missile. It does not involve an intercept, and no target missile will be launched. MDA will use the test results to improve and enhance the GMD element of the Ballistic Missile Defense System, designed to defend the Nation, deployed forces, friends and allies from ballistic missile attacks, according to an MDA spokesperson.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: sdsds on 01/27/2013 01:52 am
A missile carrying an improved anti-missile kill vehicle was launched from north Vandenberg AFB at 14:00:00 PST/22:00:00Z today.
http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/launch-alert/2013-January/000782.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 01/27/2013 03:00 am
Raytheon Company : Enhanced Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle successful in non-intercept flight test
01/26/2013| 10:55pm US/Eastern

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Jan. 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon Company's (NYSE: RTN) upgraded Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle played a mission-critical role in a non-intercept flight test of Boeing's Ground-based Midcourse Defense program. The EKV is a vital component of the GMD's Ground-Based Interceptor.

The EKV allows the GBI to lock on and eliminate high-speed ballistic missile warheads in space using nothing more than the force of impact.

"Rigorous non-intercept flight tests are important in proving the effectiveness and operational capability of ballistic missile defense weapons and their various components," said Wes Kremer, Raytheon Missile Systems' vice president of Air and Missile Defense Systems. "Today's test allowed us to challenge the EKV in a series of realistic outer-space environments, which gives us a broad range of data prior to moving toward an intercept scenario."

During the test, the EKV performed as planned, maneuvering the interceptor to the appropriate altitude and closing velocity required for an intercept.

"The sole purpose of the Ground-based Midcourse Defense program is to defend the homeland from the threat of ballistic missile attack," said Kremer. "This test moves us one step closer to an intercept flight test in 2013."

About the EKV

Leveraging more than two decades of kill vehicle technology expertise, the EKV is designed to destroy incoming ballistic missile threats by colliding with them, a concept often described as "hit to kill."


-- The EKV has an advanced multi-color sensor used to detect and
discriminate incoming warheads from other objects.
-- The EKV also has its own propulsion, communications link, discrimination
algorithms, guidance and control system, and computers to support target
selection and intercept.
-- Deployed and operational today, the EKV has had eight successful
intercepts throughout the life of the program.

http://www.4-traders.com/RAYTHEON-COMPANY-14299/news/Raytheon-Company-Enhanced-Exoatmospheric-Kill-Vehicle-successful-in-non-intercept-flight-test-15975280/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/27/2013 06:23 am
Video from Press Site:

http://ktla.com/2013/01/26/military-tests-missile-system-at-vandenberg-afb/#axzz2J9rkzTPY

Military Tests Missile System at Vandenberg Air Force Base

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (KTLA) — The 30th Space Wing and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency conducted a flight test of the Ground-Based Mid-course Defense system Saturday.

The missile test was designed to demonstrate the latest version of the advanced kill vehicle.

The launch is the cumulation of three years of study, development and modernization from the nation’s top engineers.

The military says the test is also an opportunity to demonstrate the ability of the U.S. to nullify ballistic missile threats, particularly from North Korea.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/27/2013 03:11 pm
India carried out its first SLBM test launch from a submerged submarine at 1340 IST Jan 27. The submarine was the INS S-73 Arihant. The missile is called BO-5 and has a range of 700 km.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/india-test-fires-missile-from-under-sea-completes-nuclear-triad-322839

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-test-fires-ballistic-missile-from-underwater-platform/articleshow/18208492.cms

http://inagist.com/all/295519686534250497/

The Indian SLBM program has a lot of disinformation going around - there are claimed to be K-5 and K-15 missiles with different ranges. My best guess is that the BO-5 is the K-15 = Sagarika, and that the Shourya is the same missile in its land based role, with K-5 being another longer range missile still in development, but Indian officials are making conflicting statements (one saying that BO-5 = K-5)
- it will probably take a long time for the fog to clear.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/27/2013 04:35 pm
One of two images posted on the VAFB site of the January 26 GMD test flight.  This was the first GMD (OBV?) launch since December 15, 2010, which suffered an EKV intercept failure.  I've wondered what the program was up to.  It seems it may have been going through a big redevelopment effort, at least for the EKV.

The "Taurus Lite" family has only flown 11 times since it began in 2003.  The good news is that the launch vehicle itself has not failed in flight.

Am I right that this missile's motors harken back to a "Midgetman" heritage, at least in terms of their ancestors?

And does anyone know which launch site was used?

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/27/2013 08:00 pm
One of two images posted on the VAFB site of the January 26 GMD test flight.  This was the first GMD (OBV?) launch since December 15, 2010, which suffered an EKV intercept failure.  I've wondered what the program was up to.  It seems it may have been going through a big redevelopment effort, at least for the EKV.

The "Taurus Lite" family has only flown 11 times since it began in 2003.  The good news is that the launch vehicle itself has not failed in flight.

Am I right that this missile's motors harken back to a "Midgetman" heritage, at least in terms of their ancestors?

And does anyone know which launch site was used?

 - Ed Kyle

According to a video on the space command Facebook page  it was silo LF-23.

Interesting comment on the Midgetman - I don't know much about that ICBM's solid motors.  They were 1.17m dia, built by ATK-Promontory (St 1, Thiokol), Aerojet-Sacramento (St2) and ATK-Magna (St 3, Hercules).
I believe the Orion motors used for the GBI booster, which were first flown on Pegasus, are ATK-Magna heritage. They are somewhat comparable to the SICBM motors but slightly larger diameter and the first stage has a longer burn time but similar total impulse. It would be interesting to know if there was indeed a design link.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/27/2013 11:26 pm
Official Video of the Ground-based Midcourse Defense system launch at VAFB

Launch site is from this silo on the north base.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=34.855727,-120.596615&hl=en&sll=33.975324,-118.44787&sspn=0.043632,0.077162&t=w&z=16&iwloc=A

Launch VAFB Jan 26, 2013

Published on Jan 26, 2013
A Ground-based Interceptor, an element of the overall Ground-based Midcourse Defense system, was launched from North Vandenberg Saturday at 2 p.m. by 30th Space Wing officials and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. The launch was part of a test to improve and enhance the GMD element of the Ballistic Missile Defense System.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0PIGQ0Hnpg
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 01/28/2013 06:51 am
India carried out its first SLBM test launch from a submerged submarine at 1340 IST Jan 27. The submarine was the INS S-73 Arihant. The missile is called BO-5 and has a range of 700 km.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/india-test-fires-missile-from-under-sea-completes-nuclear-triad-322839

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-test-fires-ballistic-missile-from-underwater-platform/articleshow/18208492.cms

http://inagist.com/all/295519686534250497/

The Indian SLBM program has a lot of disinformation going around - there are claimed to be K-5 and K-15 missiles with different ranges. My best guess is that the BO-5 is the K-15 = Sagarika, and that the Shourya is the same missile in its land based role, with K-5 being another longer range missile still in development, but Indian officials are making conflicting statements (one saying that BO-5 = K-5)
- it will probably take a long time for the fog to clear.

DRDO has released some images of the launch, which show, that the BO-5  is the K-15 missile.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/29/2013 06:42 pm
Launch scheduled from WFF today between 5:30 and 6:30 pm eastern. Video stream should go live at 4:30 pm.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/west129.html

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-wallops

The vehicle is a Mk. 70 Terrier - Improved Orion launching 41.107 West. The payload is a technology demonstrator / development flight for lithium canisters that are to be used on upcoming flights. The lithium canisters produce trails in the sky at altitude that allow for the tracking of upper level winds in the same way that Trimethlaluminum was used most recently on the ATREX launches.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 08:07 pm
USTREAM is already broadcasting.  Just got done with an interview with one of the project staff.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 08:42 pm
1:07 till Launch at 5:50 pm EST
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 09:07 pm
Different View
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 09:52 pm
Launched at 5:50 EST.

(added later) confirmed that Lithium canisters did deploy.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Chris Bergin on 01/29/2013 09:54 pm
Well done capturing Tony!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 10:09 pm
Well done capturing Tony!

Thanks Chris.  ;D

Public reports, of spotting the red lithium tracer, came from as far away as Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, North Carolina and Virginia.  Public is being requested to submit photos to the Wallops Facebook site. 

There seems to be video from perhaps an on board rocket cam but the images were poor.  I'll keep an eye for any video replays when made available.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/29/2013 10:27 pm
Launch of Terrier-Improved Orion from Wallops on Jan 29th

Published on Jan 29, 2013
A Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket blasted off from Wallops Island today, January 29th 2013 at 22:50 UTC in support of a NASA mission. The rocket released coloured vapours which were filmed and will be analysed to see which is better to use for upcoming launches this year.

From NASA Wallops

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6u-Z92-JOM
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/30/2013 05:19 pm
Some good pictures are available on the Wallops FB page.

http://www.facebook.com/NASAWFF
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/08/2013 08:14 am
Another sounding rocket was launched yesterday, carrying the VISIONS payload for auroral studies.

Info here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/visions-aurora.html

Pictures here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/sets/72157632697652876/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/08/2013 12:46 pm
Ha! Great photo set. I just forwarded it to a bunch of people actually in the photos (well, posted it to our private facebook group for sounding rocket folk at wallops). Thanks!

Everything we've heard about the mission has been very positive. Dr. Rowland was "very happy" about his data despite a slight under performance on apogee (~1 sigma, which isn't bad for a 4 stage sounding rocket). Also it was the first a successful launch of this vehicle. We had a test flight of a Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka simulator (steel tube) last year, but this was the first one with a live Nihka.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/08/2013 02:08 pm
Ha! Great photo set. I just forwarded it to a bunch of people actually in the photos (well, posted it to our private facebook group for sounding rocket folk at wallops). Thanks!

Everything we've heard about the mission has been very positive. Dr. Rowland was "very happy" about his data despite a slight under performance on apogee (~1 sigma, which isn't bad for a 4 stage sounding rocket). Also it was the first a successful launch of this vehicle. We had a test flight of a Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka simulator (steel tube) last year, but this was the first one with a live Nihka.

Are there any photos showing the whole Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka vehicle pre launch (before the insulation boxes were fitted)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/08/2013 02:33 pm
Are there any photos showing the whole Talos-Terrier-Oriole-Nihka vehicle pre launch (before the insulation boxes were fitted)

Hmmm, pre insulation might be tough. I have a feeling they never had it elevated without insulation due to concerns with getting the motors too cold. They probably had it in a shelter, and thus no really good views of the vehicle without boxes. I'll see what I can do though.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/08/2013 02:56 pm
NASA sounding rocket mission codes:

On http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Sounding_Rockets_Annual_Report_2012.pdf there is a lineup of the current sounding rocket stable, but, alas, it is has a very low resolution and the lables are hardly legible.

Can anyone (perhaps block51 ;) ) tell me, what the lables of the vehicles of the Oriole vehicles are?

    45 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole)
    47 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
    48 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
    49 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

What are the vehicles with number 43 and 44, which are not present on this diagram?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/08/2013 05:00 pm
Give me a few minutes and I'll see what I can get you!

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/08/2013 05:08 pm
    45 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole)
    47 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
    48 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
    49 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

What are the vehicles with number 43 and 44, which are not present on this diagram?

Per the diagram supplied to me by our vehicles group a few years back
43 = Talos-Tarus-Oriole
44 = Talos-Oriole

Per the poster in our hallway

45 = Oriole II (= Terrier Oriole)
47 = Oriole III-A (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
48 = Oriole III (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
49 = Oriole IIII (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/08/2013 05:12 pm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/08/2013 06:59 pm
Thank you very much, block51!

And rightaway the next question: What has happened to the "Mesquito" mesospheric sounding rocket. Was it cancelled after the troubled first three flights or is it still lingering around?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/08/2013 08:24 pm
    45 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole)
    47 = Oriole ?? (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
    48 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
    49 = Oriole ?? (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

What are the vehicles with number 43 and 44, which are not present on this diagram?

Per the diagram supplied to me by our vehicles group a few years back
43 = Talos-Tarus-Oriole
44 = Talos-Oriole

Per the poster in our hallway

45 = Oriole II (= Terrier Oriole)
47 = Oriole III-A (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
48 = Oriole III (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
49 = Oriole IIII (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)




Thanks for this, very useful!  Do you actually see these "Oriole III"
type designations used much? (and really, Oriole IIII rather than Oriole IV?)  I saw  "Oriole XII" used for 49.001 on one of the Poker Flat documents, presumably by analogy to Black Brant XII, but I gather that was unofficial.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/09/2013 06:28 am
Here's a video of the VISIONS launch from Poker Flat.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LigBKtqPzs
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/11/2013 02:35 pm

Thanks for this, very useful!  Do you actually see these "Oriole III"
type designations used much? (and really, Oriole IIII rather than Oriole IV?)  I saw  "Oriole XII" used for 49.001 on one of the Poker Flat documents, presumably by analogy to Black Brant XII, but I gather that was unofficial.


Given that we've just started launching these vehicles (I think the Rowland launch was the first one that was an operational launch of a more than two stage Oriole based vehicle), I haven't heard any commonly accepted names for these vehicle configurations yet. I think that the "Oriole III", etc designations are what SRPO calls them though. For now, among co-workers, we'd prob just say "such and such mission number" and know what the vehicle is, or actually say "Talos, Terrier, Oriole, Nihka. I think the Talos Terrier Oriole vehicle has been refered to by a few people as a "Tater" (spelling?) because it sounds funny.

No enough launches to know what we are going to actually end up calling it. I suppose we'll end up going with the NASA designations though.

Also, Rowland was supposed to go on a BBXII origionally, but for various reasons it didn't go on one. The Oriole gave it a bit of a higher apogee as I recall.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 02/11/2013 02:49 pm
I think the Talos Terrier Oriole vehicle has been refered to by a few people as a "Tater" (spelling?) because it sounds funny.

There has already been a rocket named "Tater" - a Talos Terrier Recruit - which was flown in the 70ies

(http://space.skyrocket.de/img_lau/tater__1.jpg)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/11/2013 02:58 pm
Ha! Awesome. I'll have to mention this at lunch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kch on 02/11/2013 03:13 pm

... (and really, Oriole IIII rather than Oriole IV?) ...


It's not that unusual to see IIII as an alternative to IV:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals#.22IIII.22_on_clocks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals#.22IIII.22_on_clocks)

:)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/11/2013 07:51 pm

... (and really, Oriole IIII rather than Oriole IV?) ...


It's not that unusual to see IIII as an alternative to IV:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals#.22IIII.22_on_clocks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals#.22IIII.22_on_clocks)

:)


True for the example you give and historically more generally,
 but for contemporary non-clock usage it's pretty unusual I would say...
 of course, NASA and SRPO can do what they like, I was just surprised.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 02/12/2013 12:16 pm

Per the diagram supplied to me by our vehicles group a few years back
43 = Talos-Tarus-Oriole
44 = Talos-Oriole

Per the poster in our hallway

45 = Oriole II (= Terrier Oriole)
47 = Oriole III-A (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
48 = Oriole III (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
49 = Oriole IIII (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

So, erm, uh... yeah. I had a typo and per the poster in our hallway it should be 49 = Oriole IV, not IIII. Not sure how I let that one slip through.

Sorry!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 02/23/2013 08:07 am
A Terrier-improved-Orion sounding rocket was launched from White Sands on Feb 15.
The flight tested several technologies to improve pointing control and data collection capabilities during suborbital flights. The primary purpose of the mission was to verify the ground based command uplink equipment from when it was recently moved into a new facility at White Sands. The sounding rocket program also took this opportunity to test technology developments, as well as provide an educational experience for students at the White Sands Middle School.

source: Wallops Facebook
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/01/2013 02:01 am

Per the diagram supplied to me by our vehicles group a few years back
43 = Talos-Tarus-Oriole
44 = Talos-Oriole

Per the poster in our hallway

45 = Oriole II (= Terrier Oriole)
47 = Oriole III-A (= Terrier Oriole Nihka)
48 = Oriole III (= Talos Terrier Oriole)
49 = Oriole IIII (= Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka)

So, erm, uh... yeah. I had a typo and per the poster in our hallway it should be 49 = Oriole IV, not IIII. Not sure how I let that one slip through.

Sorry!

Thanks! Easily done, that's why I am always a pain in the ass about chasing down anomalies.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/01/2013 02:08 am
Perhaps worth mentioning here that there have been at least 20 Scud launches and 3 Fateh-110 launches in Syria between Dec 10 and Feb 22, launched by the Syrian regime mostly
from An Nasriyah near Damascus towards Aleppo, causing casualties in rebel areas.
The Scuds probably were mildly exoatmospheric over the 300 km range; not sure if the Fateh-110 goes as high.

Also the first flight of the Israeli Arrow 3 exoatmospheric missile defense interceptor was on Feb 25 from Palmachim.

And on Feb 13, a Terrier Oriole ARAV-B was launched from Kauai and intercepted by an Aegis SM-3.

Looking forward to some more NASA scientific launches!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/01/2013 02:30 am
To complete block51's list, here is the full set of NASA sounding rocket code numbers

1   Aerobee 100 
 2   Arcon
 3   Nike Asp
 4   Aerobee 150
 5   Iris 
 6   Aerobee 300 (Aerobee-Sparrow)
 7   Argo E-5 Jason  (not flown)
 8   Argo D-4 Javelin (HJ Nike Nike Altair)
 9   Skylark
10   Nike Cajun
11   Journeyman (Sergeant-Lance-Lance-Altair)
12   Special Test
13   Nike Aerobee  (Aerobee 170)
14   Nike Apache   
15   Arcas
16   Astrobee 1500  (Aerojet Jr-Alcor)
17   Aerobee 350  (Nike/AJ60-91)
18   Nike Tomahawk
19   Black Brant IVA 
20   Bullpup Cajun
21   Black Brant VB/C
22   Black Brant IIIB
23   Astrobee D
24   M56A1  (A r i e s)
25   Astrobee F
26   Aerobee 200A
27   Nike Black Brant (BB8)
28   Nike Malemute
29   Terrier Malemute
30   Orion
31   Nike Orion
32   Nike Javelin
33   Taurus Orion
34   Taurus Tomahawk
35   Terrer Black Brant Nihka (BB10)
36   Terrier Black Brant (BB 9)
37   Viper 3A
38   Taurus Nike Tomahawk
39   Black Brant XI
40   Black Brant XII
41   Terrier Imp. Orion
42   Terrier Lynx
43   Talos-Taurus-Oriole
44   Talos-Oriole
45   Terrier-Oriole (Oriole II)
46   Terrier-Imp.Malemute
47   Terrier Oriole Nihka (Oriole IIIA)
48   Talos Terrier Oriole (Oriole III)
49   Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka (Oriole IV)

The NASA "12" special test series has included tests using rockets in the above list as well as Aerobee, Nike, Terrier and Taurus booster stages with dummy sustainers, and the Mesquito, Strypi, and Strypi 7AR rockets.
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/01/2013 02:32 am
Chris, do you have one of your special autocorrects that stops me typing "Ar i e s"?
Presumably because people usually mean "Ares"? There is an "A ri e s" rocket too  and I'd like to be able to mention it! Or even talk about the constellation of that name!

[Edit: Chris says he's removed it - let's see
Aries Aries Aries wheeee! 
Aries is the Ram
Ares is the God of War
OK!]
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 03/01/2013 04:44 am
THE FOLLOWING MDA AEGIS BMD TEST LAUNCH OCCURRED ON: 12 Feb 2013: SM-3 Block IA Flight Test Standard Missile-20 (FTM-20)

Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Intercepts Target Using Space Tracking and Surveillance System-Demonstrators (STSS-D) Data

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS LAKE ERIE (CG 70) successfully conducted a flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system, resulting in the intercept of a medium-range ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean by a Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IA guided missile.

At 11:10 p.m. HST (4:10 a.m. EST) a unitary medium-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, on Kauai, Hawaii. The target flew northwest towards a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean.

The in-orbit Space Tracking and Surveillance System-Demonstrators (STSS-D) detected and tracked the target, and forwarded track data to the USS LAKE ERIE. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, used Launch on Remote doctrine to engage the target.

The ship developed a fire control solution from the STSS-D track and launched the SM-3 Block IA guided missile approximately five minutes after target launch. The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space and released its kinetic warhead. The kinetic warhead acquired the target reentry vehicle, diverted into its path, and, using only the force of a direct impact, engaged and destroyed the target.

Initial indications are that all components performed as designed. Program officials will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

Today's event, designated Flight Test Standard Missile-20 (FTM-20), was a demonstration of the ability of space-based assets to provide mid-course fire control quality data to an Aegis BMD ship, extending the battlespace, providing the ability for longer range intercepts and defense of larger areas.

FTM-20 is the 24th successful intercept in 30 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002. Across all Ballistic Missile Defense System programs, this is the 58th successful hit-to-kill intercept in 73 flight tests since 2001.

Aegis BMD is the sea-based component of the MDA's Ballistic Missile Defense System. The Aegis BMD engagement capability defeats short- to intermediate-range, unitary and separating, midcourse-phase ballistic missile threats with the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3), as well as short-range ballistic missiles in the terminal phase with the SM-2 Block IV missile. The MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program.

Approved for Public Release, 13-MDA-7152 (12 Feb 2013).


Aegis BMD Video LINK:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Um1rKUrXVc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Um1rKUrXVc)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 03/10/2013 06:03 am
http://brazilianspace.blogspot.com/2013/03/duas-novas-missao-para-foguetes.html

See below for all missions planned or foreseen in the Brazilian rockets in Europe in the period 2013 to 2015:

TEXUS 50           Apr 2013               Esrange          VSB-30
TEXUS 51           Apr 2013               Esrange          VSB-30
WADIS 1            Jun/Jul 2013          Andøya           VS-30
HIFIRE - 7          Sept 2013              Andøya           VSB-30
Scramspace I     Sept 2013              Andøya           VS-30/Orion
MAPHEUS – 4    Oct 2013               Esrange          VS-30
Cryofenix            Nov 2013               Esrange          VSB-30
ICI - 4                 Nov/Dec 2013        Andøya           VS-30/Orion
WADIS 2            Jan/Feb 2014         Andøya           VS-30
HIFIRE - 5B        Apr 2014                Andøya           VS-30/Orion
Maxi Dusty-1      Jun/Jul 2014           Andøya           VS-30
HIFIRE - 4          Sept. 2014              Andøya           VSB-30
MAIUS-1            Nov 2014                Esrange          VSB-30
SPIDER-1           Feb/Mar 2015 (?)    Esrange          VSB-30
MASER-13          Feb/Mar 2015 (?)    Esrange          VSB-30
TEXUS 52           Apr 2015 (?)            Esrange          VSB-30
TEXUS 53           Apr 2015 (?)            Esrange          VSB-30
HIFIRE - 8           2015 or 2016 (?)      Andøya           VS-40
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: isro-watch on 03/11/2013 02:41 am
I know this may be a dumb question...But, considering the political and economic impact on U.S. and the rest of the world including India...

Is the U.S. sufficiently protected against any missile launch from North Korea ?

Is the MDA AEGIS BMD TEST LAUNCH part of that preparedness ?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Jason1701 on 03/11/2013 06:24 am
Where are the sounding rockets produced?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/11/2013 10:38 am
Where are the sounding rockets produced?

NASA's sounding rocket program office (SRPO) is located at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of VA (the little penisula part of VA that most people don't think about, the VA in DELMARVA).

The vehicles (rocket motors) come from several sources. The Black Brant and Nihka rockets are produced by Bristol Aerospace in Canada. The Oriole rocket motor is produced by ATK and the booster as supplied to NASA is "built up" by Kratos Defense. All other motors come from the military in some way or another. Some are former Navy hardware (Terrier, Talos). Some are former Army hardware (Improved Malemute [Patriot of some flavor], Improved Orion [Hawk], Taurus [Honest John]).

SRPO contracts out essentially 100% of the engineering and manufacturing functions of the program via the NSROC II contract. NSROC II is located on base at WFF. Orbital Sciences Corp is the prime on this contract with several sub contractors forming the rest of the team. NSROC makes, or subs out to other shops (prob ~10% of all hardware is made at outside shops), all vehicle AND payload hardware. This includes but is not limited to nose-cones (actually, many of them are subed out), skins, structures, igniter safe and arm components, mechanisms, electrical components, Telemetry systems, power systems, etc. All of the hardware that NSROC makes is made on base at WFF. Sometimes experimenters will build their own structure for supporting their experiments and sometimes NSROC has to build most of it.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 03/12/2013 05:07 pm
Took place on March 11th from Wallops Island...

Rocket Launch Completed from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia
03.11.13
 
A launch of Terrier-Lynx suborbital rocket was completed this morning for the Department of Defense from NASA's launch range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The next launch currently scheduled from Wallops is Orbital Sciences Corporation's Antares rocket in April.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/14/2013 04:03 am
Where are the sounding rockets produced?

NASA's sounding rocket program office (SRPO) is located at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of VA (the little penisula part of VA that most people don't think about, the VA in DELMARVA).

The vehicles (rocket motors) come from several sources. The Black Brant and Nihka rockets are produced by Bristol Aerospace in Canada. The Oriole rocket motor is produced by ATK and the booster as supplied to NASA is "built up" by Kratos Defense. All other motors come from the military in some way or another. Some are former Navy hardware (Terrier, Talos). Some are former Army hardware (Improved Malemute [Patriot of some flavor], Improved Orion [Hawk], Taurus [Honest John]).

SRPO contracts out essentially 100% of the engineering and manufacturing functions of the program via the NSROC II contract. NSROC II is located on base at WFF. Orbital Sciences Corp is the prime on this contract with several sub contractors forming the rest of the team. NSROC makes, or subs out to other shops (prob ~10% of all hardware is made at outside shops), all vehicle AND payload hardware. This includes but is not limited to nose-cones (actually, many of them are subed out), skins, structures, igniter safe and arm components, mechanisms, electrical components, Telemetry systems, power systems, etc. All of the hardware that NSROC makes is made on base at WFF. Sometimes experimenters will build their own structure for supporting their experiments and sometimes NSROC has to build most of it.


Very interesting summary, thanks. So to summarize, the NASA sounding rockets are all assembled and integrated at WFF, for both WFF and White Sands launches - and Poker Flat too?

I'm assuming that some of the suborbital rockets used by DoD and MDA
are produced by Orbital in Arizona, and the ARAVs by Kratos somewhere.
I believe the sounding rockets managed by the German DLR are integrated at the Swedish and Norwegian launch sites in Kiruna and Andoya, but maybe some of the work is done at Oberpfaffenhofen.
And of course there's the Brazilian rockets launched from Natal and Alcantara which are probably produced at Sao Jose de Campos.
All of those use surplus US military motors too, in addition to the Brazilian-built Sonda-class motors.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/14/2013 10:32 am

Very interesting summary, thanks. So to summarize, the NASA sounding rockets are all assembled and integrated at WFF, for both WFF and White Sands launches - and Poker Flat too?

I'm assuming that some of the suborbital rockets used by DoD and MDA
are produced by Orbital in Arizona, and the ARAVs by Kratos somewhere.
I believe the sounding rockets managed by the German DLR are integrated at the Swedish and Norwegian launch sites in Kiruna and Andoya, but maybe some of the work is done at Oberpfaffenhofen.
And of course there's the Brazilian rockets launched from Natal and Alcantara which are probably produced at Sao Jose de Campos.
All of those use surplus US military motors too, in addition to the Brazilian-built Sonda-class motors.

For WSMR the answer is that it depends. For new missions we fully integrate and test they payloads at WFF. They are then disassembled and shipped to WSMR, reassembled, put through a shorter round of electrical checkouts, a check balance (spin stabilized, balance is a good thing, mass models are used for several things at WFF so balance is normally out of spec), and then they go to the rail for integration with the motors.

For refly missions out of WSMR, there is almost always no WFF integration and testing. The payloads are put through full I&T at WSMR though. They have the facilities to do the vibration, bend, balance, and mass properties measurement at WSMR. New payloads usually have more problems though and WFF is a much better place to deal with these issues, thus I&T on new payloads is conducted at WFF. The exception to this rule is SPARCS (sun pointing ACS) shots. Even if it is a brand new payload it go through I&T at WSMR. WFF doesn't have the correct facilities to support I&T for a SPARCS mission.

For a remote misson (Poker, Andøya, Esrange, etc) all I&T is conducted at WFF, payload is disassembled, crated up, shipped to the location, reassembled, electrically tested, and taken to the rail.

DOD and MDA stuff also get's made elsewhere. There is an operation right up the road (40 minutes) from WFF that does only DOD type stuff (with sounding rockets). The first NSROC contract did a lot of work on DOD type projects but that hasn't been the case on NSROC II. The folks up the road also support ARAV stuff as the first NSROC contract did.

I know the Germans use old Patriot (Improved Malemute) and Hawk (Improved Orion). NASA used to use Nike's but for various reason those are not used any more. I think the Germans might still use them?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/14/2013 01:29 pm


For WSMR the answer is that it depends. For new missions we fully integrate and test they payloads at WFF.  [....] then they go to the rail for integration with the motors.

[...]


Here you are talking mostly about payload I&T, rather than assembling the motors into a sounding rocket.
 
What I mean is, if you think of orbital rockets there are three levels
of 'manufacture' that I care about: who built the motors or engines, who
built the 'stage'  (motor/engine + avionics+other packaging), and who built the 'launch vehicle' which integrates the stages. And that final step,
integrating the stages, is always done at the launch site, but it's done in general by the launch vehicle contractor.

But for sounding rockets one has somewhat the impression that you don't really have stages or launch vehicles, you just have a bunch of motors that you get out of the stockpile, balance one atop the other with a payload on top and light the blue touch paper.... I exaggerate of course.
 
I'm wondering what is involved in turning a Terrier motor and an Oriole motor into a Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket that is ready to receive a payload,  I assume that that work is done for NASA sounding rockets by NSROC at the launch pad, or do you assemble the full rocket at WFF, (not just payload) then disassemble, ship and reassemble.

Quote
 
I know the Germans use old Patriot (Improved Malemute) and Hawk (Improved Orion). NASA used to use Nike's but for various reason those are not used any more. I think the Germans might still use them?

Yes, most recent Nike-Improved Orion launch was a German microgravity mission 2012 Nov 25 from Sweden. They are starting to phase them out and use the Brazilian motors instead though. The last non-German Nike was in 2005 from White Sands, there have been 14 German Nike flights since then, all with the Improved Orion (M112 motor)

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 03/14/2013 02:42 pm
I'm assuming that some of the suborbital rockets used by DoD and MDA
are produced by Orbital in Arizona, and the ARAVs by Kratos somewhere.
I believe the sounding rockets managed by the German DLR are integrated at the Swedish and Norwegian launch sites in Kiruna and Andoya, but maybe some of the work is done at Oberpfaffenhofen.
And of course there's the Brazilian rockets launched from Natal and Alcantara which are probably produced at Sao Jose de Campos.
All of those use surplus US military motors too, in addition to the Brazilian-built Sonda-class motors.
Only the VS-30/Orion uses the American built Orion as second stage. The Sonda, the VS-30, the VSB-40, the VS-40 and the future VS-15/43/50 are all made in Brazil by IAE. And if you look it would seem that DLR is basing all their strategy on the Bazilian rockets.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/14/2013 04:08 pm
Quote from: jcm
Here you are talking mostly about payload I&T, rather than assembling the motors into a sounding rocket.
….
 

100% correct sir. Payload I&T. There is a certain amount (of course) of processing that goes on with the motors, though that isn’t referred to as I&T. They do a pressure test (checking for leaks anywhere), lots of other inspections, some degree of modification (removal of tactical hardware in the case of former military rockets), etc. Then they have to put them on the rail (this is called  staging the vehicle). The electronics in charge of igniting second stage and great motors are called CDI’s (Capacitive Discharge Initiation system) or Ignitor housings, or motor adapters (all used interchangeably to help confuse new engineers I think… ha) go through the same vibration qual tests that the payloads do, though if they aren’t attaching directly to the payload they go through it separately. Same goes for the spin motor initiation decks (basically they are CDIs).

Quote from: jcm
But for sounding rockets one has somewhat the impression that you don't really have stages or launch vehicles, you just have a bunch of motors that you get out of the stockpile, balance one atop the other with a payload on top and light the blue touch paper.... I exaggerate of course.
 
Watch it now! ;)

Quote from: jcm
I'm wondering what is involved in turning a Terrier motor and an Oriole motor into a Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket that is ready to receive a payload,  I assume that that work is done for NASA sounding rockets by NSROC at the launch pad, or do you assemble the full rocket at WFF, (not just payload) then disassemble, ship and reassemble.
 

The terrier is either pulled out of the local stock at WFF or received from Indian Head at WFF (they have a crap load of them there / they do x-ray inspections there). Tactical hardware is removed. It goes through various and numerous inspection procedures. Fins are installed and the specified fin cant is set (for spin up). Drag plates (if necessary for first stage sep) are installed. At this point the motor is ready. The second stage (be it an Oriole or Brant or Orion or Malemute) basically goes through the same steps. One step I missed is that the ignitor is usually pulled and inspected as well.

I'm not directly involved with the motor stuff so I'm not 100% on all of this, but it is definitely very close to mostly correct.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 03/14/2013 06:48 pm
On March 13th, Brazil launched the first Foguete de Treinamento Básico (FTB) - Basic Training Rocket - of 2013. Four launches of the FTB are planned for 2013.

The floght time was 2m 53s. The rocket traveled a distance of 18 km and reached 34 km high.

The launch was from Centro de Lançamento da Barreira do Inferno (CLBI), Parnamirim, - Barreira do Inferno Launch Center.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/15/2013 03:39 am

Quote from: jcm
But for sounding rockets one has somewhat the impression that you don't really have stages or launch vehicles, you just have a bunch of motors that you get out of the stockpile, balance one atop the other with a payload on top and light the blue touch paper.... I exaggerate of course.
 
Watch it now! ;)

Quote from: jcm
I'm wondering what is involved in turning a Terrier motor and an Oriole motor into a Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket that is ready to receive a payload,  I assume that that work is done for NASA sounding rockets by NSROC at the launch pad, or do you assemble the full rocket at WFF, (not just payload) then disassemble, ship and reassemble.
 

The terrier is either pulled out of the local stock at WFF or received from Indian Head at WFF (they have a crap load of them there / they do x-ray inspections there). Tactical hardware is removed. It goes through various and numerous inspection procedures. Fins are installed and the specified fin cant is set (for spin up). Drag plates (if necessary for first stage sep) are installed. At this point the motor is ready. The second stage (be it an Oriole or Brant or Orion or Malemute) basically goes through the same steps. One step I missed is that the ignitor is usually pulled and inspected as well.
 

So basically, your answer is 'yes'  :-)  (ducks)

The impression I'm getting is that, notwithstanding the fact that I'm sure your (super interesting) summary above actually involves a lot of careful work by very expert people, in the main for a sounding rocket the payload
preparation is the thing that involves most of the work and care  (because so much of the propulsion work was done decades ago when the motors were built) - not even counting the years of work by the grad student to build the experiment (as many of my friends have done)
-  in contrast to a satellite launch where, complicated as the payload is,  preparing the launch vehicle is a fabulously expensive, complicated and personnel-intensive exercise.

Given the relatively low cost of these vehicles, I'm impressed they are so reliable these days. If you go back through the old mid-1960s documents, the fraction of sounding rockets that actually returned decent data was, er, not so impressive. So much kudos to your team at Wallops. (The Hi-C/36.272 mission folks down the corridor from me are still gushing over their data..)

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/15/2013 03:46 am
I'm assuming that some of the suborbital rockets used by DoD and MDA
are produced by Orbital in Arizona, and the ARAVs by Kratos somewhere.
I believe the sounding rockets managed by the German DLR are integrated at the Swedish and Norwegian launch sites in Kiruna and Andoya, but maybe some of the work is done at Oberpfaffenhofen.
And of course there's the Brazilian rockets launched from Natal and Alcantara which are probably produced at Sao Jose de Campos.
All of those use surplus US military motors too, in addition to the Brazilian-built Sonda-class motors.
Only the VS-30/Orion uses the American built Orion as second stage. The Sonda, the VS-30, the VSB-40, the VS-40 and the future VS-15/43/50 are all made in Brazil by IAE. And if you look it would seem that DLR is basing all their strategy on the Bazilian rockets.

Yes, sorry for not being clear, by "all of those" I meant "all of those programs, German/Swedish/Norwegian/Brazilian" - which use Orion single-stage rockets and in some cases Nike-Orion and VS-30/Orion. But I agree there does seem to be a Brazil strategy by the Germans now - wonder if it is a reaction to ITAR issues, making it easier to get the VS-30 than, say, Orioles.

I should of course have given a shout out to the Japanese, whose home grown S-310 and S-520 rockets have a great record, and the Indians, who have RH-200 weather rockets but rarely launch the larger RH-560 class sounding rockets which are derived from old French motor technology.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/15/2013 11:35 am


So basically, your answer is 'yes'  :-)  (ducks)

The impression I'm getting is that, notwithstanding the fact that I'm sure your (super interesting) summary above actually involves a lot of careful work by very expert people, in the main for a sounding rocket the payload
preparation is the thing that involves most of the work and care  (because so much of the propulsion work was done decades ago when the motors were built) - not even counting the years of work by the grad student to build the experiment (as many of my friends have done)
-  in contrast to a satellite launch where, complicated as the payload is,  preparing the launch vehicle is a fabulously expensive, complicated and personnel-intensive exercise.

Given the relatively low cost of these vehicles, I'm impressed they are so reliable these days. If you go back through the old mid-1960s documents, the fraction of sounding rockets that actually returned decent data was, er, not so impressive. So much kudos to your team at Wallops. (The Hi-C/36.272 mission folks down the corridor from me are still gushing over their data..)



Though I don't have any direct experience outside of sounding rockets, I think that compared to liquid vehicles and orbital stuff I'd say that sounding rockets are much simpler. That is definitely the point too. "High risk" / low cost is the program mantra for sure.

That being said, sounding rockets aren't a completely static and non-evolving thing. New vehicles are always evolving. As new surplus become available, they are put to use. The improved malamute is a perfect example of new surplus becoming available. Also, as motors run out or become obsolete, new ideas are concocted. The Taurus (old Honest John motors... really really old) is being completely phased out because it is a beast when it comes to handling. It is a higher grade of explosive classification which means it takes more time and money to handle. Also, given it's age it requires more inspection. The Terrier is being used in it's place.

Quick fun fact: not all sounding rockets are solids (or at least not all have been). The Aerobee's had a second stage (that was ground lit) that used fuming red nitric acid and aniline. That was some NASTY stuff. I've heard a few stories from WSMR folks about how dangerous it was. No way they would ever use it in sounding rockets today. More sidebar: The 350 tower (Aerobee 350 launcher) is still intact at WSMR and (they used to have one at WFF too) is home to a very protective mother owl that may or may not have pooped on me a few month ago. Also, just to show how long lived some experiments can be, we just launch a payload who's main detectors were last flown on an Aerobee 350 and have flown many times in the past during the 70's and 80's. Same electronics on the experiment side. If it ain't broke, don't fix it I guess!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 03/15/2013 02:30 pm
Keeping on the fun fact. The Brazilians are working on a single stage liquid sounding rocket. The VS-15 will use a 15kN CH4/LOX pressure fed L15 engine. And they plan not only to make it recoverable but having a standardize payload accommodation. If you are interesting most of the technology is in development by Orbital Engenharia (http://www.orbitalengenharia.com/).
And the reason DLR is using so many Brazilian sounding rockets is that they are actually developing them together. Even the VLM is a joint development. Between the Swedes and Norway launch ranges and the Brazilian ones they cover poles and equator pretty well.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/15/2013 06:59 pm
  The Aerobee's had a second stage (that was ground lit) that used fuming red nitric acid and aniline. That was some NASTY stuff. I've heard a few stories from WSMR folks about how dangerous it was. No way they would ever use it in sounding rockets today. More sidebar: The 350 tower (Aerobee 350 launcher) is still intact at WSMR and (they used to have one at WFF too) is home to a very protective mother owl that may or may not have pooped on me a few month ago. Also, just to show how long lived some experiments can be, we just launch a payload who's main detectors were last flown on an Aerobee 350 and have flown many times in the past during the 70's and 80's. Same electronics on the experiment side. If it ain't broke, don't fix it I guess!


Yes, the Wisconsin Aerobee  IV payload on 36.283, I heard about that! Very cool.  We also have a lot of ex-Wisconsin folks here at SAO

The French Veronique-61 used white-fuming nitric acid and turpentine,
I think that's the most off-the-wall prop combo I've come across for a sounding rocket. (I'm not entirely sure if they mean organic turpentine or white spirit/WD-40...)


Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/16/2013 01:40 pm
Yes, the Wisconsin Aerobee  IV payload on 36.283, I heard about that! Very cool.  We also have a lot of ex-Wisconsin folks here at SAO

Ha, small world. We have, at best, 2 degrees of separation right now with people that we know.

From what I've heard, the DXL team has been very happy with their data. Not sure about the STORM folks, but I've not heard anything negative so that's always a good sign!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 03/21/2013 12:34 am
Yes, the Wisconsin Aerobee  IV payload on 36.283, I heard about that! Very cool.  We also have a lot of ex-Wisconsin folks here at SAO

Ha, small world. We have, at best, 2 degrees of separation right now with people that we know.
 

Yeah, maybe less than 2  if you were involved Hi-C (Jonathan C, Kelly K) or IMAGER (Tim C, Meredith D) or SUMI or XQC  (Dan McM.)  ... the astronomers tend not to make it out to Wallops that much though.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 03/21/2013 10:28 am
Yeah, maybe less than 2  if you were involved Hi-C (Jonathan C, Kelly K) or IMAGER (Tim C, Meredith D) or SUMI or XQC  (Dan McM.)  ... the astronomers tend not to make it out to Wallops that much though.

I've not worked directly on any of those payloads, though I've meet Dan on more than one occasion. I am / have working/worked with Tali Figueroa and Max Galeazzi though.

Enough de-rail! Sounding rockets!

Here is the NASA SRPO schedule which is of course subject to daily change.

4-9     36.269 -Rabin     WSMR
4-21     36.271 - Beasley     WSMR
4-27     46.001 - Kudeki     Kwajalein
4-27     45.005 - Kudeki     Kwajalein
4-27     41.100 - Caton     Kwajalein
4-27     41.102 - Caton     wajalein
5-10     36.268 - McCandliss     WSMR
5-29     36.239 - Korendyke     WSMR
6-4     40.030 - Bock     WFF
6-20     41.106 - Koehler     WFF
6-27     21.140 - Pfaff     WFF
6-27     41.090 - Pfaff     WFF

Here are some pictures of the 41.104 - Rosonova test flight that just flew at WSMR. It was a technology demonstration mission that flew a bunch of new electronic systems to qualify them for flight on operational missions.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 04/05/2013 08:33 am
China made another sub-orbital sounding rocket launch earlier today. The Tianying-3E rocket was launched from a base on Hainan island (*) at 21:55 UTC on April 4 and reached an altitude of 191 km. The rocket carried 1 kg of solid barium particles that were released at apogee, and the resulting barium clouds were observed by 3 ground observing sites and equipment on the rocket (a Langmuir probe and an electric field probe).

This is the first Chinese active release sounding rocket mission launched, and is part of the Meridian ionosphere monitoring program managed by the National Space Science Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Other participants of the launch includes the CAS Xian Optical Machinery Institute and Austria's University of Graz for the "Kunpeng-1" payload package and the Chinese Academy of Aerospace Propulsion Technology for the sounding rocket.

(*) The launch site has been reported as the "Chinese Academy of Sciences Hainan Sounding Rocket Launch Site", and is apparently located near the village of Fuke, Yaxing Town, Danzhou City, Hainan Island, at 19.52 deg. North and 109.14 deg. East.

Sources:
news.xinhuanet.com/2013-04/05/c_115276269.htm (http://news.xinhuanet.com/2013-04/05/c_115276269.htm)
http://bbs.9ifly.cn/forum.php?mod=redirect&goto=findpost&ptid=2200&pid=61732 (http://bbs.9ifly.cn/forum.php?mod=redirect&goto=findpost&ptid=2200&pid=61732)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 04/09/2013 06:18 pm
DRDO faces four critical 'tests' in coming months (http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=20025)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/11/2013 06:24 am
Preparations are underway at the Kiruna base for the Texus-50 & 51 launches.
See: http://www.ssc.se/texus-5051
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 04/11/2013 10:38 am
Pakistan tests nuclear-capable Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2013-04/10/c_132298051.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/13/2013 06:29 am
The Texus-50 launch from Kiruna was successful. The flight lasted 20 minutes, reached an altitude of 261 km with six minutes of microgravity. A parachute then returned the scientific payload to the ground. 

Next up: Texus-51, planned for April 19.
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10081/151_read-6722/year-all/#gallery/9349
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/17/2013 07:11 am
Video of Texus-50 launch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAXwAh4RqI8
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 04/23/2013 11:49 am
The TEXUS 51 campaign has been cancelled due to technical reasons.
http://www.ssc.se/news-activities/all-news-archives/2013/texus-51-campaign-cancelled
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/02/2013 08:19 am
It's a busy time in sounding rocket land.
Three NASA rockets were launched during the past two weeks; a Black Brant IX (mission SLICE) on April 21, another Black Brant IX (mission EUNIS) on April 23, with both launches from White Sands.

On May 1, a Terrier Orion (mission MOSC) was launched from Roi-Namur, Marshall Islands. MOSC released a Samarium vapor creating a red cloud of charged particles in the ionosphere. Researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory studied the cloud as it dispersed and its impact on radio transmissions sent from multiple locations.

Source: Wallops facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/NASAWFF

More info:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/slice.html
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/eunis.html

Photo set for EUNIS:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_goddard/sets/72157633255000650/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 05/02/2013 11:46 am

On May 1, a Terrier Orion (mission MOSC) was launched from Roi-Namur, Marshall Islands. MOSC released a Samarium vapor creating a red cloud of charged particles in the ionosphere. Researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory studied the cloud as it dispersed and its impact on radio transmissions sent from multiple locations.


MOSC photo's lifted from a friend of mine that is working on the project out at Roi-Namur
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: plutogno on 05/05/2013 10:31 am
A French M51 SLBM has been destroyed on May 5 shortly after launch

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/salle-de-presse/communiques/ministere/cp-un-missile-balistique-m51-detruit-lors-de-son-lancement
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/06/2013 10:52 am
The launch of REXUS-14 & 13 from Kiruna have been postponed for 1 day due to strong wind shears this morning. The next launch opportunity for REXUS 14 is 06:00 on May7, with REXUS 13 following some time later.
https://www.facebook.com/Team.CERESS

For an overview of the experiments:
http://www.ssc.se/rexus-1314

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/06/2013 11:27 am
A French M51 SLBM has been destroyed on May 5 shortly after launch

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/salle-de-presse/communiques/ministere/cp-un-missile-balistique-m51-detruit-lors-de-son-lancement

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKS06BGPDhU
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/06/2013 03:41 pm
Friends of Amateur Rocketry rocket motor and flights tests for 5-4-2013

Published on May 6, 2013
This is a record of the activities at the Friends of Amateur Rocketry test site in the Mojave Desert on Saturday, May 4, 2013. Includes the launch of a high power sugar fueled rocket and the first successful static firing of a 6" rocket motor for the Sugar Shot to Space project (the previous two motor tests resulted in CATOs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CP2SrOol58s
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/06/2013 03:52 pm
DoubleSShot 6" 2-Grain Sugar Rocket Motor Test

Published on May 5, 2013
Static test of the short 2-grain DoubleSShot sugar rocket motor for the Sugar Shot to Space project. Each of the Bates grains had a mass of approximately 7kg (15 pounds) of propellant and contained about 0.1% CF for increasing tensile strength.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykLyrmrDKg8
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/07/2013 09:44 am
REXUS 14 was successfully launched from Esrange Space Center on May 7 at 04:00 UTC.
The rocket reached an altitude of 81, 5 km and landed approximately 40 km north of Esrange.
http://www.ssc.se/rexus-1314

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGUEkOEVrZo&feature=youtu.be

For more info on the experiments on this mission and Rexus-13 (launch either later today or tomorrow), see
http://rexuspolecats.com/

This page is of the Polecats team; a link to the other teams is on the right-hand side of the page. More info can be found on the Facebook pages of the respective teams.

ESA photos on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/esa_events/sets/72157633384875997/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/08/2013 09:11 am
Another sounding rocket mission took place from Roi Namur, the Marshall Islands on May 7: NASA's Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX).
A Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket was launched at 3:39 a.m. EDT followed by the launch of a Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket 90 seconds later. Preliminary indications are that both rockets released their vapor clouds of lithium or trimethyl aluminum, which were observed from various locations in the area, and all science instruments on the rockets worked as planned.
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.618564764840295.1073741836.191575794205863&type=1
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/evex.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/10/2013 09:44 am
Rexus-13 (an Improved Orion sounding rocket) was launched from Kiruna at 06:00 local time on May 9, after a one-day weather delay.
Onboard were four student experiments: CERESS, MUSCAT, StrathSat-R and SOLAR.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QARohefnyPM

Also check out the video of the Space Sailors experiment on Rexus-14 (the action starts 60 seconds into the video).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkqIoaSVnYo
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/10/2013 11:19 am
A Terrier-Improved Orion rocket was launched from Roi Namur, Marshall Islands on May 9; the second launch under the MOSC (Metal Oxide Space Cloud Experiment) program.

The rocket flew to more than 117 miles altitude and safely splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. At approximately 113 miles altitude, the payload released a Samarium vapor cloud, which was seen at several observation sites in the neighboring islands. This allowed researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory to study the cloud as it dispersed and its impact on radio transmissions.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.619437344753037.1073741838.191575794205863&type=1

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/kwajpost2013.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/13/2013 03:48 pm
Rexus-13 (an Improved Orion sounding rocket) was launched from Kiruna at 06:00 local time on May 9, after a one-day weather delay.
Onboard were four student experiments: CERESS, MUSCAT, StrathSat-R and SOLAR.

Some more details provided by Esrange:
The student rocket REXUS 13 was launched from Esrange Space Center on May 9, at 04.00 UTC.

It reached an altitude of 83.1 kilometers and landed after 8 minutes of flight 40 km north of Esrange Space Center.
http://www.ssc.se/news-activities/all-news-archives/2013/rexus-13-launched-from-esrange-space-center

Also check out this video posted by the Muscat team of the four so-called FFUs being ejected from the rocket during the flight.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=9p5seTgU010

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/13/2013 03:50 pm
NASA successfully launched the Far-Ultraviolet Off Rowland Circle for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS) experiment at 1 a.m. EDT, May 11, from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Science data was obtained and an assessment of the data is underway. The payload was recovered. FORTIS was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX sounding rocket and flew to an altitude of approximately 174 miles.

Source: NASA Wallops Facebook.
More info:
http://krieger.jhu.edu/magazine/v10n1/it-really-is-rocket-science/
and
http://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2012/october/building-a-rocket-from-scratch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 05/13/2013 05:27 pm
NASA successfully launched the Far-Ultraviolet Off Rowland Circle for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS) experiment at 1 a.m. EDT, May 11, from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Science data was obtained and an assessment of the data is underway. The payload was recovered. FORTIS was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX sounding rocket and flew to an altitude of approximately 174 miles.

Source: NASA Wallops Facebook.
More info:
http://krieger.jhu.edu/magazine/v10n1/it-really-is-rocket-science/
and
http://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2012/october/building-a-rocket-from-scratch

The payload was recovered but with significant damage to the experiment due to the aft looking shutter door failing on impact.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 05/14/2013 04:09 pm
Quote from: Galactic Penguin SST on Today at 10:22:18

http://www.chinanews.com/gn/2013/05-14/4817925.shtml (http://www.chinanews.com/gn/2013/05-14/4817925.shtml)


Google Translate of that, in case the original should evaporate:

Quote
China once again high-altitude scientific exploration test: height higher data more
On May 14, 2013 20:57 Source: China News (5)

BEIJING, May 14 (Reporter Sun Zifa) reporter learned from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Space Science Center on the 14th, following the April 5, 2013, China successfully conducted for the first time sounding of the space environment and space science initiative test, May 13 and the success of a higher degree of high-altitude scientific exploration test.

The pilot commander, GONG Jian village Fellow, National Space Science Center, deputy director of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said the active test probe test compared to the space in Danzhou, Hainan on April 5 this year, at the altitude has been greatly increased by hundreds of kilometers to more than 10,000 kilometers; equipped with a more scientific instruments, data obtained relates to a wider range of space, the amount of data is more. Preliminary analysis indicates that the test has been obtained first-hand scientific data, the vertical distribution of different heights on the space environment parameters and space science research has a very important value.

The trial, sounding rocket through the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and finally into the magnetosphere. Sounding rocket carrying scientific instruments, space radiation in low latitudes with high-energy particles, ionospheric plasma and magnetic field distribution in situ detection. Sounding rocket released at the height of 10,000 km near the metal barium meal, barium cloud is formed in the space and ground-based optical telescope follow-up observations of the barium cloud evolution, measured to study the dynamic characteristics of this region of the magnetosphere data.

It is reported that the space scientific experiments at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, energetic particle detectors, Langmuir probe, magnetometer, the barium metal powder release device and other scientific instruments designed and developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Space Science Center, launch vehicles the Kunpeng VII "developed by the China Aerospace Science and Industry Group. (End)

Edit by mod: this is extracted from the dedicated thread for this launch:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=31898.0
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 05/14/2013 07:49 pm
NASA successfully launched the Far-Ultraviolet Off Rowland Circle for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS) experiment at 1 a.m. EDT, May 11, from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Science data was obtained and an assessment of the data is underway. The payload was recovered. FORTIS was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX sounding rocket and flew to an altitude of approximately 174 miles.

Source: NASA Wallops Facebook.
More info:
http://krieger.jhu.edu/magazine/v10n1/it-really-is-rocket-science/
and
http://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2012/october/building-a-rocket-from-scratch

The payload was recovered but with significant damage to the experiment due to the aft looking shutter door failing on impact.

Successful Launch of FORTIS on May 11
05.13.13
 
UPDATE: May 13, 2013

NASA successfully launched the Far-ultraviolet Off Rowland-Circle for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS) experiment at 1 a.m. EDT, May 11, from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Science data was obtained and an assessment of the data is underway. The payload was recovered. FORTIS was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX sounding rocket and flew to an altitude of approximately 174 miles.

NASA will launch a new telescope designed to observe distant galaxies on a suborbital sounding rocket at 1 a.m. EDT, May 11, from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

The observations will be conducted using the FORTIS (Far-ultraviolet Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) spectro/telescope developed at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Stephan McCandliss, principal investigator for the mission, said, “The goal of FORTIS is to explore the mysteries of escaping of ultraviolet radiation from the dusty confines of galaxies, using a new type of spectro/telescope with more than six times the sensitivity of our previous experiments. FORTIS can acquire spectra from forty-three individual targets simultaneously, and autonomously, within an angular region as large as the diameter of the moon (1/2 degree).”

FORTIS is to fly on a Black Brant IX suborbital sounding rocket to an altitude of about 173 miles, providing approximately 360 seconds of exo-atmospheric observation time for FORTIS. The experiment will land via parachute approximately 50 miles from the launch site where it will be recovered. The total mission time is approximately 900 seconds from launch to landing.

More information on FORTIS, is available on the web at:

› http://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2012/october/building-a-rocket-from-scratch
› http://krieger.jhu.edu/magazine/v10n1/it-really-is-rocket-science/

To find out more about NASA’s sounding rocket missions, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/17/2013 06:31 am
The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie (CG-70) successfully conducted a flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system, resulting in the intercept of a separating ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean by the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and a Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB missile.

            At 5:25 p.m. (Hawaii time, 11:25 p.m. EDT), May 15, a separating short-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, on Kauai, Hawaii.  The target flew northwest towards a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean.  Following target launch, the USS Lake Erie (CG-70) detected and tracked the missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar.  The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, developed a fire control solution and launched the SM-3 Block IB missile.  The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space based on guidance from Aegis BMD Weapons Systems and released its kinetic warhead.  The kinetic warhead acquired the target reentry vehicle, diverted into its path, and, using only the force of a direct impact, engaged and destroyed the target.

            Initial indications are that all components performed as designed.  Program officials will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

            This test exercised the latest version of the second-generation Aegis BMD Weapon System and Standard Missile, providing capability for engagement of longer-range and more sophisticated ballistic missiles.

            Last night’s event, designated Flight Test Standard Missile-19 (FTM-19), was the third consecutive successful intercept test of the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and the SM-3 Block IB guided missile.  Previous successful ABMD 4.0 SM-3 Block IB intercepts occurred on May 9, 2012 and June 26, 2012.  Other Aegis BMD intercepts have employed the ABMD 3.6 and 4.0 with the SM-3 Block IA missile, which is currently operational on U.S. Navy ships deployed across the globe.

source:
http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16008

photos:
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html

video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFUSqzztpcg
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/17/2013 08:42 pm
Wow, excellent quantity of video.  Lot's of multi-angle and so-mo.  Thanks for the post Lewis 007.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/18/2013 01:37 am
The Air Force has announced the window for next Tuesday's Minuteman III launch from Vandenberg AFB. The launch window is 3:01-9:01 a.m. PDT.

Brian Webb
______________________________________________________________
Launch-Alert mailing list
Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/launch-alert
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: apollolanding on 05/18/2013 02:12 am
Thanks for the video Lewis007!  My son (who's dream is to join the Navy and "invent cool things") will love this!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 05/19/2013 10:37 pm
The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie (CG-70) successfully conducted a flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system, resulting in the intercept of a separating ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean by the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and a Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB missile.

            At 5:25 p.m. (Hawaii time, 11:25 p.m. EDT), May 15, a separating short-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, on Kauai, Hawaii.  The target flew northwest towards a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean.  Following target launch, the USS Lake Erie (CG-70) detected and tracked the missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar.  The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, developed a fire control solution and launched the SM-3 Block IB missile.  The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space based on guidance from Aegis BMD Weapons Systems and released its kinetic warhead.  The kinetic warhead acquired the target reentry vehicle, diverted into its path, and, using only the force of a direct impact, engaged and destroyed the target.

            Initial indications are that all components performed as designed.  Program officials will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

            This test exercised the latest version of the second-generation Aegis BMD Weapon System and Standard Missile, providing capability for engagement of longer-range and more sophisticated ballistic missiles.

            Last night’s event, designated Flight Test Standard Missile-19 (FTM-19), was the third consecutive successful intercept test of the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and the SM-3 Block IB guided missile.  Previous successful ABMD 4.0 SM-3 Block IB intercepts occurred on May 9, 2012 and June 26, 2012.  Other Aegis BMD intercepts have employed the ABMD 3.6 and 4.0 with the SM-3 Block IA missile, which is currently operational on U.S. Navy ships deployed across the globe.

source:
http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16008

photos:
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html

video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFUSqzztpcg
LINK: http://www.aerojet.com/inc/051613.php

16 May 2013:
News Release

Aerojet Rocket Motors Contribute to Third Standard Missile-3 Block IB Intercept
SACRAMENTO, Calif., May 16, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aerojet, a GenCorp (NYSE:GY) company, announced today that its propulsion systems successfully contributed to the third consecutive intercept test of Raytheon's Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB.

The SM-3 Block IB missile is part of the Missile Defense Agency's (MDA) Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system. During Flight Test Mission-19, the sea-based missile intercepted and destroyed a separating ballistic missile target, further validating the system's capability. Aerojet's MK 72 booster and MK 104 dual-thrust rocket motor provided the first- and second-stage propulsion, while Aerojet's Throttling Divert and Attitude Control System (TDACS) maneuvered the Kinetic Warhead into the target for the final hit-to-kill impact.

The SM-3 Block IB missile incorporates kinetic warhead improvements to increase the SM-3 Block IB missile's capability against current and emerging target threat sets. Aerojet incorporated its throttling solid rocket technology advancements into the TDACS design to provide increased mission flexibility to the warfighter while maintaining the solid propellant safety features.

The SM-3 Block IB missiles will be deployed on Aegis cruisers and destroyers, and also on land sites as part of the Aegis Ashore program to defend against short-to-intermediate range ballistic missile threats in the mid-course phase of flight. Raytheon is the prime contractor for SM‑3 development.

"Aerojet continues its string of successes with this third consecutive successful intercept," said Vice President of Missile Defense and Strategic Systems, Michael Bright. "The TDACS has demonstrated exceptional performance under varying test scenarios for all flight tests. This flight testing and the recent successful TDACS ground qualification testing provide Raytheon and the MDA with the confidence that this system is ready to move into production and become the workhorse for the fleet. I am extremely proud of the Aerojet TDACS team. The long hours and individual sacrifices may be what no one sees, but they see the results and the world will be a safer place for this effort. We are proud to be a part of the Raytheon team."

In concert with Raytheon, Aerojet is developing the next generation of sea- and land-based U.S. missile defense capabilities by providing reliable, low-risk propulsion technologies. In addition to the current production of MK 72 and MK 104 rocket motors and the SM-3 Block IB TDACS, the company is developing the TDACS for SM-3 Block IIA, the planned missile variant upgrade to the current SM-3 Block IA and IB.

Aerojet is a world-recognized aerospace and defense leader providing propulsion and energetics to the space, missile defense, strategic, tactical missile and armaments areas in support of domestic and international markets. GenCorp is a leading technology-based manufacturer of aerospace and defense products and systems with a real estate segment that includes activities related to the entitlement, sale, and leasing of the company's excess real estate assets. Additional information about Aerojet and GenCorp can be obtained by visiting the companies' websites at http://www.Aerojet.com and http://www.GenCorp.com.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 05/22/2013 03:40 pm
Here's another video of the recent FTM-19 Aegis missile test; this one from Aegis themselves. The test was nicknamed "Stellar Hecate," after the Greek goddess.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-Ti8a0bekk
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/22/2013 06:01 pm
REXUS video

Published on May 22, 2013
Sequences extracted from the REXUS 11 and 12 campaign (March 2012) in Kiruna, Sweden.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hOTd9qiHAQ
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/22/2013 06:03 pm
Minuteman III Launch GT-207GM 22 May 2013

Published on May 22, 2013
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 6:27 a.m. from Launch Facility-4 on north Vandenberg.

The launch, originally slated for 3:01 to 9:01 a.m. Tuesday, was rescheduled due to a range safety instrumentation issue.
"I am proud of our team," said Col. Brent McArthur, 30th Space Wing vice commander and the launch decision authority. "Because of their professionalism, discipline and intense focus on mission assurance, we saw a safe and successful launch this morning."

For information about the results of the flight test, call Air Force Global Strike Command Public Affairs at (318) 456-1305.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7fE0oRWyS0

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 05/22/2013 06:45 pm
Minuteman III Launch GT-207GM 22 May 2013
Published on May 22, 2013
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 6:27 a.m. from Launch Facility-4 on north Vandenberg.
This was the one delayed by the Korean situation.

Here's a video of a "light bubble" purportedly created by the missile that was visible from Hawaii.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/05/22/expanding_halo_missile_launch_creates_expanding_bubble_of_light.html

And some USAF images of the ball of fire and smoke ring.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 05/24/2013 10:16 pm
Successful Launch by Rocket U

Published on May 24, 2013
A single-stage, high-powered rocket designed and built by engineers from NASA's Rocket University program was launched successfully from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 24. "Rocket U" allows agency engineers to gain and hone critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets at the spaceport. Engineers participate in courses, workshops, labs and projects as time from their regular NASA duties permits.

This rocket's motor burned for about 1.7 seconds, achieved a maximum speed of about 450 mph and reached a height of more than eight-tenths of a mile.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvG54NCdKNU
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 05/29/2013 07:55 pm
Next Wallops Launch Scheduled June 4
Wed, 22 May 2013 05:40:25 PM GMT+0300

When did the first stars and galaxies form in the universe? How brightly
did they burn their nuclear fuel? Scientists will seek to gain answers to
these questions with the launch of the Cosmic Infrared Background
ExpeRiment (CIBER) on a Black Brant XII suborbital sounding rocket between
11 and 11:59 p.m. EDT, June 4, from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home/index.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 06/04/2013 04:54 pm
Next Wallops Launch Scheduled June 4
Wed, 22 May 2013 05:40:25 PM GMT+0300

When did the first stars and galaxies form in the universe? How brightly
did they burn their nuclear fuel? Scientists will seek to gain answers to
these questions with the launch of the Cosmic Infrared Background
ExpeRiment (CIBER) on a Black Brant XII suborbital sounding rocket between
11 and 11:59 p.m. EDT, June 4, from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home/index.html

Some more information for the launch scheduled for tonight, and some pictures of they payload and vehicle attached.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/05/2013 03:57 am
Nice pics!  The launch was scrubbed for tonight because of problems with the payload cooling system.

I have an affection for this payload as my PhD thesis involved modelling the cosmic infrared background.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 06/05/2013 03:24 pm
Nice pics!  The launch was scrubbed for tonight because of problems with the payload cooling system.

I have an affection for this payload as my PhD thesis involved modelling the cosmic infrared background.

They have to be vertical (well 80 something degrees elevation) in order to properly cool and for whatever reason they didn't go vertical soon enough is what I've heard. They'll be counting again tonight.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 06/05/2013 05:52 pm
LINK: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/ciberpostponed.html

Rocket Launch Postponed from Wallops
06.04.13

The launch tonight of a Black Brant XII suborbital rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia, has been postponed.

The mission was postponed due to insufficient time to cool the instruments on the payload down to the required temperatures before launch.

The launch is now scheduled between 11 and 11:59 p.m., June 5. The launch window runs through June 10. The rocket may be visible to residents in the mid-Atlantic region.

With CIBER, scientists will study when the first stars and galaxies formed in the universe and how brightly they burned their nuclear fuel.

The NASA Visitor Center at Wallops will open at 9:30 p.m. on launch day for public viewing of the launch.

The mission will be available live on Ustream beginning at 10 p.m. on launch day at: http://www.ustream.com/channel/nasa-wallops

Mission status on launch day can be followed on Twitter and Facebook at: http://www.twitter.com/NASA_Wallops or http://www.facebook.com/NASAWFF

Mission status also is available on the Wallops launch status line at 757-824-2050.

More information on CIBER and the NASA Sounding Rocket Program is available at:http://www.nasa.gov/soundingrockets
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/06/2013 03:09 am
CIBER has launched, but the ustream feed has hung for me.... if anyone is following it, would be great to know if they mention the apogee height reached
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 06/06/2013 03:14 am
Apogee reported at 577 km prelim!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/06/2013 03:15 am
Apogee reported at 577 km prelim!

Awesome, thanks!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 06/06/2013 03:22 am
PI reports great science collected and everyone is reporting 100% nominal. Yehaw!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/06/2013 03:26 am
There is a Live Thread with pictures at this location:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32081.0
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/06/2013 06:46 am
Black Brant XII Sounding Rocket Launched From Wallops
06.05.13
 
A Black Brant XII suborbital rocket carrying the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) was successfully launched at 11:05 p.m. June 5 from NASA’s launch range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

CIBER Black Brant XII launch With CIBER, scientists are studying when the first stars and galaxies formed in the universe and how brightly they burned their nuclear fuel. Jamie Bock, CIBER principal investigator from the California Institute of Technology, reported that good data was received from the payload.

CIBER was lofted to an altitude of approximately 358 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. CIBER will not be recovered, as planned.

The Black Brant XII rocket was launched under clear skies. The launch was reportedly seen from as far away as central New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania and northeastern North Carolina.

The next rocket launch from Wallops is a Terrier-Orion sounding rocket between 5:30 and 10 a.m., June 20. The rocket will be carrying experiments developed by participants in the RockOn and RockSat-C programs conducted jointly with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/ciberlaunch.html
Some photos are on the Facebook page of NASA Wallops.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/07/2013 01:34 am
Russia launched a missile from Kapustin Yar at 1745 UTC Jun 6.

http://en.ria.ru/military_news/20130607/181546726/Russia-Tests-New-Ballistic-Missile.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/07/2013 07:21 am
Russia launched a missile from Kapustin Yar at 1745 UTC Jun 6.

http://en.ria.ru/military_news/20130607/181546726/Russia-Tests-New-Ballistic-Missile.html

This news report at the Russian Ministry of Defense webpage includes a photo of the missile (unless it is a file pic of another launch, but it doesn't say so).
http://function.mil.ru/news_page/country/[email protected]

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 06/07/2013 05:01 pm
Russia launched a missile from Kapustin Yar at 1745 UTC Jun 6.

http://en.ria.ru/military_news/20130607/181546726/Russia-Tests-New-Ballistic-Missile.html

This news report at the Russian Ministry of Defense webpage includes a photo of the missile (unless it is a file pic of another launch, but it doesn't say so).
http://function.mil.ru/news_page/country/[email protected]
Russianforces.org calls it a test of the new "Avangard" missile.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/06/russia_continues_tests_of_new.shtml

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: anik on 06/07/2013 05:30 pm
The name of this rocket complex is Rubezh: http://ria.ru/defense_safety/20130607/942136785.html. There were four launches: in 2011 (failure), in 2012 - two, in 2013. The first two launches were from Plesetsk, others - from Kapustin Yar.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/07/2013 07:38 pm
June 7, 2013
 
RELEASE : 13-176
 
 
NASA Selects New Suborbital Payloads, Total Tops 100 Experiments
 
 
WASHINGTON -- NASA has selected 21 space technology payloads for flights on commercial reusable launch vehicles, balloons, and a commercial parabolic aircraft.

This latest selection represents the sixth cycle of NASA's continuing call for payloads through an announcement of opportunity. More than 100 technologies with test flights now have been facilitated through NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate's Flight Opportunities Program.

"This new group of payloads, ranging from systems that support cubesats to new sensors technology for planetary exploration, represent the sorts of cutting-edge technologies that are naturally suited for testing during returnable flights to near-space," said Michael Gazarik, NASA's associate administrator for space technology in Washington. "NASA's Flight Opportunities Program continues to mature this key technology development pipeline link, thanks to America's commercial suborbital reusable vehicles providers."

Fourteen of these new payloads will ride on parabolic aircraft flights, which provide brief periods of weightlessness. Two will fly on suborbital reusable launch vehicle test flights. Three will ride on high-altitude balloons that fly above 65,000 feet. An additional payload will fly on both a parabolic flight and a suborbital launch vehicle, and another will fly on both a suborbital launch vehicle and a high-altitude balloon platform. These payload flights are expected to take place now through 2015.

Flight opportunities currently include the Zero-G Corporation parabolic airplane under contract with the Reduced Gravity Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston; Near Space Corp. high-altitude balloons; and reusable launch vehicles from Armadillo Aerospace, Masten Space Systems, UP Aerospace and Virgin Galactic. Additional commercial suborbital flight vendors under contract to NASA, including XCOR and Whittinghill, also will provide flight services.

Payloads selected for flight on a parabolic aircraft are:
-- "Technology Maturation of a Dual-Spinning Cubesat Bus," Kerri Cahoy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
-- "Testing Near-Infrared Neuromonitoring Devices for Detecting Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes in Parabolic Flight," Gary Strangman, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
-- "Resilient Thermal Panel: Microgravity Effects on Isothermality of Structurally Embedded Two Dimensional Heat Pipes," Andrew Williams, Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, N.M.
-- "Wireless Strain Sensing System for Space Structural Health Monitoring," Haiying Huang, University of Texas, Austin
-- "Monitoring tissue oxygen saturation in microgravity," Thomas Smith, Oxford University, United Kingdom
-- "Testing the deployment and rollout of the DragEN electrodynamic tether for Cubesats," Jason Held, Saber Astronautics Australia Pty Ltd., Australia
-- "Creation of Titanium-Based Nanofoams in Reduced Gravity for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Production," Kristen Scotti, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.
-- "Testing a Cubesat Attitude Control System in Microgravity Conditions," Eric Bradley, University of Central Florida, Orlando
-- "Demonstration of Adjustable Fluidic Lens in Microgravity," James Schwiegerling, University of Arizona, Tucson
-- "Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Microgravity," Douglas Ebert, Wyle Laboratories, Houston
-- "DYMAFLEX: DYnamic MAnipulation FLight Experiment," David Akin of University, Maryland, College Park
-- "Characterizing Cubesat Deployer Dynamics in a Microgravity Environment," Kira Abercromby, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
-- "Demonstration of Food Processing Equipment," Susana Carranza, Makel Engineering Inc., Chino, Calif.
-- "Advanced Optical Mass Measurement System," Jason Reimuller, Mass Dynamix Inc., Longwood, Fla.

Payloads selected for flight on a suborbital reusable launch vehicle are:
-- "Precision Formation Flying Sensor," Webster Cash, University of Colorado, Boulder
-- "Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor Demonstration for Precision Landing on Solar System Bodies," Farzin Amzajerdian, NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.

Payloads selected for flight on a high altitude balloon are:
-- "Planetary Atmosphere Minor Species Sensor," Robert Peale, University of Central Florida, Orlando
-- "Satellite-Based ADS-B Operations Flight Test," Russell Dewey, GSSL Inc., Tillamook, Ore.
-- "Low-Cost Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV) Surrogate," Timothy Lachenmeier, GSSL Inc.
One payload will be manifested on a parabolic aircraft and a suborbital reusable launch vehicle:
-- "Real Time Conformational Analysis of Rhodopsin using Plasmon Waveguide Resonance Spectroscopy," Victor Hruby, University of Arizona, Tucson.

One payload will be manifested on a suborbital reusable launch vehicle and a high altitude balloon:
-- "Test of Satellite Communications Systems on-board Suborbital Platforms to provide low-cost data communications for Research Payloads, Payload Operators, and Space Vehicle Operators," Brian Barnett, Satwest Consulting, Albuquerque, N.M.

NASA manages the Flight Opportunities manifest, matching payloads with flights, and will pay for payload integration and the flight costs for the selected payloads. No funds are provided for the development of the payloads.

NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate, is dedicated to innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in the agency's future missions. The Flight Opportunities Program is managed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif. NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif., manages the technology maturation activities for the program.

For more information about NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate and the Flight Opportunities Program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

 
- end -
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 06/08/2013 07:12 pm
UP Aerospace to Launch Experiments at Spaceport America on June 21 (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2013/06/05/up-aerospace-to-launch-experiments-at-spaceport-america-on-june-21/)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/12/2013 06:46 am
Brazil launched a FTB rocket (under Operação Falcão I - 2013) from the Alcântara Launching Center at 14:29 local time on May 23.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GajFeKmtmoo
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 06/12/2013 03:08 pm
BTW, FTB mean Foguete de Trenamiento Basico (Basic Training Rocket). These are mainly used to keep the launch crew trained.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/12/2013 04:16 pm
BTW, FTB mean Foguete de Trenamiento Basico (Basic Training Rocket). These are mainly used to keep the launch crew trained.

Not 'Trenamiento', but 'Treinamento' and not 'Basico' but 'Básico'  ;)

Also, and just a footnote on this, on Portuguese (from Portugal) we say 'Foguetão' when we want to refer to a space rocket, while on Brazilian Portuguese its 'Foguete'. In European Portuguese 'Foguete' means the traditional Chinese fire crackers, while in Brazil they use the word 'Foguetão'.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 06/12/2013 05:16 pm
BTW, FTB mean Foguete de Trenamiento Basico (Basic Training Rocket). These are mainly used to keep the launch crew trained.

Not 'Trenamiento', but 'Treinamento' and not 'Basico' but 'Básico'  ;)

Also, and just a footnote on this, on Portuguese (from Portugal) we say 'Foguetão' when we want to refer to a space rocket, while on Brazilian Portuguese its 'Foguete'. In European Portuguese 'Foguete' means the traditional Chinese fire crackers, while in Brazil they use the word 'Foguetão'.
Isn't it Foguete do Treinamento Básico?  ;)
BTW, I can speak fluently with a Brazilian but can't understand a word of Portuguese. The pronunciation is that different. You seem more like Galician.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/12/2013 05:56 pm
BTW, FTB mean Foguete de Trenamiento Basico (Basic Training Rocket). These are mainly used to keep the launch crew trained.

Not 'Trenamiento', but 'Treinamento' and not 'Basico' but 'Básico'  ;)

Also, and just a footnote on this, on Portuguese (from Portugal) we say 'Foguetão' when we want to refer to a space rocket, while on Brazilian Portuguese its 'Foguete'. In European Portuguese 'Foguete' means the traditional Chinese fire crackers, while in Brazil they use the word 'Foguetão'.
Isn't it Foguete do Treinamento Básico?  ;)
BTW, I can speak fluently with a Brazilian but can't understand a word of Portuguese. The pronunciation is that different. You seem more like Galician.

No, its Foguete de Treinamento Básico.

...and, no, we seem more like Portuguese ;)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 06/12/2013 08:18 pm
BTW, as part of Operação Águila I/ 2013 (http://www.zonamilitar.com.ar/foros/threads/asuntos-aeroespaciales.9162/page-84#post-1376816) (Eagle Operation), on Centro de Lanzamiento de Alcântara, the DCTA will launch a Foguete de Treinamento Intermediário (FTI, or Intermediate Training Rocket) tomorrow (2013-06-12).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/14/2013 05:58 pm
BTW, as part of Operação Águila I/ 2013 (http://www.zonamilitar.com.ar/foros/threads/asuntos-aeroespaciales.9162/page-84#post-1376816) (Eagle Operation), on Centro de Lanzamiento de Alcântara, the DCTA will launch a Foguete de Treinamento Intermediário (FTI, or Intermediate Training Rocket) tomorrow (2013-06-12).

The 8th FTI launch took place on June 13.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/15/2013 07:00 am
BTW, as part of Operação Águila I/ 2013 (http://www.zonamilitar.com.ar/foros/threads/asuntos-aeroespaciales.9162/page-84#post-1376816) (Eagle Operation), on Centro de Lanzamiento de Alcântara, the DCTA will launch a Foguete de Treinamento Intermediário (FTI, or Intermediate Training Rocket) tomorrow (2013-06-12).

The 8th FTI launch took place on June 13.

Here's a video. The rocket reached an altitude of 52.6 km.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFYkfY4_tNU

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: ChileVerde on 06/15/2013 07:39 pm
BTW, I can speak fluently with a Brazilian but can't understand a word of Portuguese. The pronunciation is that different. You seem more like Galician.

Really? I have usable if not fluent learned Spanish and could read the newspapers in Rio but understood not a word that people were saying. My in-laws are from Galicia (Cedeira) and, as I suppose could expected, the situation there was somewhat intermediate.

P.S.: Aside from the wonderful seafood and potatoes(*), my favorite, if slightly disorienting, memory of Cedeira is of waking up to the sound of bagpipes.

(*) Monkfish en salsa verde con papas! (I don't think the autocensor would allow "Monkfish" to be posted in its Spanish form.)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/16/2013 06:16 pm
Sugar Shot DSS TM-2 + 1 static rocket motor test 6-15-2013 FAR site (Pressure video)

Published on Jun 16, 2013
Static sugar rocket motor test of the DSS TM-2 +1 for the Sugar Shot to Space project. The motor contained three 6" sugar propellant grains with two grains separated from a single grain by a Delrin mid-bulkhead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuXrAPr_uZY
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/17/2013 01:40 am
Sugar Shot to Space DSS TM-2 + 1 static motor test CATO 6-15-2013 high speed video

Published on Jun 16, 2013
Static sugar motor test of the Sugar Shot to Space DoubleSShot test motor DSS TM-2-1. This was the same motor tested last month successfully as a two 6" grain sugar motor. This test lso had a third grain located behind a Delrin mid bulkhead to be fired after the first two grains, propellant was sorbitol and KNO3.
For more information, go to sugarshot.org

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjvAM6b_NGw
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 06/17/2013 01:52 pm
BTW, I can speak fluently with a Brazilian but can't understand a word of Portuguese. The pronunciation is that different. You seem more like Galician.

Really? I have usable if not fluent learned Spanish and could read the newspapers in Rio but understood not a word that people were saying. My in-laws are from Galicia (Cedeira) and, as I suppose could expected, the situation there was somewhat intermediate.

P.S.: Aside from the wonderful seafood and potatoes(*), my favorite, if slightly disorienting, memory of Cedeira is of waking up to the sound of bagpipes.

(*) Monkfish en salsa verde con papas! (I don't think the autocensor would allow "Monkfish" to be posted in its Spanish form.)
Galician is not Spanish. Is a different romance language, just like Catalonian. Galician is more closely related to Portuguese than Spanish, as Catalonian is more like a pidgin French than a Spanish. Notably, Basque is so different to everything else that they haven't quite pin down the root.
But when I said I can speak fluently with a Brazilian I meant that I speak in Argentinian variation of Spanish and he in the Brazilian version of Portuguese and we can understand us perfectly. But I be that if you learned Spanish in Spain and came here, you wouldn't get a word.
BTW, my grandmother was Galician, too. So I have had cornalitos, vesugo and rápe a lot.  ;)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/18/2013 11:29 pm
CubeSat Demo Flight Tests Technologies

Published on Jun 18, 2013
A quartet of small satellites, better known as CubeSats, flew high above California's Mojave Desert on June 15 on a demonstration mission to study the launch environment all the way from liftoff to landing. The spacecraft are being developed to help simplify and lower the cost of small-satellite missions that could fly on smaller, dedicated rockets. Although the rocket's parachute deployed prematurely and the vehicle tumbled to a hard landing, the flight is considered a success and a valuable learning opportunity. Teams now are retrieving their data and gearing up for another flight in the coming months.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQb7RiVDxcM
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/19/2013 10:47 am
More info here:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/smallsats/elana/cubesat_launch.html

For lots of high-res pix, see the KSC gallery page http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
and search for "RUBICS"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 06/20/2013 05:29 am
CubeSat Demo Flight Tests Technologies

...
A quartet of small satellites, better known as CubeSats, flew high above California's Mojave Desert on June 15 on a demonstration mission to  ...
...

For the record, note that "high" here  means 2.7 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/20/2013 10:08 am
A NASA Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital sounding rocket carrying experiments developed by students from the US was launched today from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/21/2013 07:42 am
More info on this RockOn! launch (using a Terrier Improved Orion) can be found here:
http://phys.org/news/2013-06-nasa-rocket-successful-june-wallops.html
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/HQ_13-186_Rocket_Week_WFF.html

photos:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.639659179397520.1073741841.191575794205863&type=1

video:
http://wtvr.com/2013/06/20/nasa-launches-a-student-research-rocket-from-wallops-this-morning/

The next Wallops launch is scheduled for June 24 (twin launch under the Daytime Dynamo project).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 06/21/2013 11:18 pm
UP Aerospace's Spaceloft 7 Launches Successfully | Video

Published on Jun 21, 2013
A reusable suborbital rocket launched by UP Aerospace soared aloft from Spaceport America in New Mexico, carrying multiple technology payloads for NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate's Flight Opportunities Program. The SpaceLoft 7 suborbital flight June 21 provided about four minutes of micro gravity for testing of seven technology experiments in a space-relevant environment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrINfa_XEqU
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 06/22/2013 08:09 am
More info here:
http://www.newspacewatch.com/articles/up-aerospace-statement-on-successful-spaceloft-xl-7-launch-from-spaceport-america.html

Some info on the experiments:
http://www.sv411.com/index.php/2013/06/nasa-ames-tests-new-technology-spaceloft-7/

Some photos here:
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/Features/SpaceLoft_7_collage.html

The rocket reached an altitude of 118.9 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/24/2013 11:26 am
Published on Facebook NASA's Wallops Flight Facility at 1030UTC

Great day for a launch! We are at T-3 hours and counting for today’s launch of two rockets as part of the Daytime Dynamo experiment. The launch window today is 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.. A Black Brant V and a Terrier-Improved Malemute will be launched 15 seconds apart in a study of a global electrical current called the dynamo which sweeps through the ionosphere. Today’s mission is a joint project between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA.
Live coverage on Ustream begins at 8:30 a.m.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/24/2013 11:53 am
Webcast of this Daytime Dynamo experiment double launch will be available at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-tv-wallops
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/24/2013 04:44 pm
Published on Facebook NASA's Wallops Flight Facility at 1030UTC

Great day for a launch! We are at T-3 hours and counting for today’s launch of two rockets as part of the Daytime Dynamo experiment. The launch window today is 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.. A Black Brant V and a Terrier-Improved Malemute will be launched 15 seconds apart in a study of a global electrical current called the dynamo which sweeps through the ionosphere. Today’s mission is a joint project between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA.
Live coverage on Ustream begins at 8:30 a.m.

Launch has scrubbed for the day. Unfortunately, the clouds were not planned to clear before the time needed for launch. Additionally, there were boats in our hazard area. We will attempt again tomorrow, Tuesday June 25, with a window of 930-1130 a.m. The webcast will begin at 830 a.m.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:24 pm
T-30 minutes and holding for the Daytime Dynamo experiment double launch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:35 pm
Launch is schedule for 1400:00UTC (Black Brant V) and 1400:15UTC (Terrier-Improved Orion). All is go for launch.

The Daytime Dynamo experiment is a joint project between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:38 pm
T-22m and counting...

The Daytime Dynamo project is designed to study a global electrical current called the dynamo, which sweeps through the ionosphere. The ionosphere stretches from about 30 to 600 miles above Earth and plays a crucial role in our day-to-day lives. For example, radio waves bounce off it as they travel from sender to receiver, and communications signals from satellites travel through it as well. A disruption in the ionosphere can disrupt these signals.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:41 pm
T-20m...

Countdown will be hold at T-10m to await favorable science conditions..
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 06/25/2013 01:47 pm
T-20m...

Countdown will be hold at T-10m to await favorable science conditions..

It sounds like they are waiting for magnetic field readings to be within a certain range.  It isn't clear where the readings are being made, unless it is from the aircraft mentioned in the earlier briefing.  The range is GO.  Now the PI is essentially in charge of the launch decision.

I've always like the look of those Terrier (Improved) Orions.  :)

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:50 pm
T-10m and holding...

Holding for science conditions. The principal investigator is looking for certain atmospheric conditions in the ionosphere. Currently, those conditions are present, but they are just at a level that is not optimal.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:56 pm
Holding for the next 10 to 15 minutes while waiting for the science conditions to improve.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 01:58 pm
The first rocket scheduled for launch is a single-stage Black Brant V, which will collect data on the neutral and charged particles it travels through. The second rocket is a two-stage Terrier-Improved Orion. It will shoot out a long trail of lithium gas to track how the upper atmospheric wind varies with altitude. These winds are believed to be the drivers of the dynamo currents.

Since the launch is during the day, the lithium trails will not be highly visible to the naked eye.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 02:09 pm
Green for winds but red for boats on the hazard area.

Still holding at T-10m but the guys are not very hopeful of a launch today.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 02:13 pm
Back to green for the range!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 02:33 pm
The science conditions are still not favorable for launch. Will wait more time to see if the conditions get better.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 02:37 pm
If the launch does not takes place today, the launch will be delayed for 48 hours with next attempt to take place Friday.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/25/2013 02:52 pm
...and we have a scrub! :(

The next opportunity for launch will be Friday morning with a window of 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. EDT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 06/28/2013 06:48 pm
From NASA's Wallops Flight Facility facebook...

The launch of the two sounding rockets supporting the Daytime Dynamo experiment from the Wallops Flight Facility has been postponed to no earlier than Sunday, June 30. The postponement is because of unacceptable weather forecasted for Saturday, June 29. A decision on whether to launch on June 30 will be made tomorrow evening. The launch window remains 9:30 – 11:30 a.m.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 07/01/2013 12:13 pm
Heard on a local radio station this AM that the launch is scrubbed for today (it is quite clouding this morning), next attempt NET Tuesday.

From WFF facebook:

"The launch this morning of the 2 rockets for the Daytime Dynamo experiment has been scrubbed because of weather. We will take a look at Tuesday, July 2, sfter this afternoon's weather briefing."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/02/2013 01:30 pm
From Wallops Flight Facility facebook...

"We have scrubbed today's launch attempt of the Daytime Dynamo mission due to weather."
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/02/2013 01:48 pm
From Wallops Flight Facility facebook...

Next launch attempt for the 2 rockets supporting the Daytime Dynamo experiment from Wallops will be 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 3.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: DaveS on 07/03/2013 02:17 pm
From Wallops Flight Facility facebook...

Next launch attempt for the 2 rockets supporting the Daytime Dynamo experiment from Wallops will be 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 3.
Scrubbed due to upper-level windows. 24hr turnaround. Same launch window (9:30 am-11:30 am EDT).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/04/2013 09:47 pm
Daytime Dynamo was launched today at 10:31:25 a.m. (Black Brant V) and at 10:31:40 a.m. (Terrier-Improved Orion).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/05/2013 06:50 am
A video of the twin Daytime Dynamo launch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROHkEtiepQk
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 07/06/2013 01:33 am
Sounds like a swing and a miss for GBI

http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16140

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/07/05/missile-designed-to-intercept-nukes-fails-weapon-test/?test=latestnews

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/06/us/missile-defense-interceptor-misses-target-in-test.html?_r=0
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: sdsds on 07/06/2013 06:16 am
Sounds like a swing and a miss for GBI

According to http://www.missiledefenseadvocacy.org/news.aspx?news_id=4772 the GBI record is now, "Eight intercepts out of 14 intercept attempts."

Ouch.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: GClark on 07/06/2013 07:10 am
Sounds like a swing and a miss for GBI

According to http://www.missiledefenseadvocacy.org/news.aspx?news_id=4772 the GBI record is now, "Eight intercepts out of 14 intercept attempts."

Ouch.

That statistic isn't granular enough.  How many of those failures were GBI itself?  How many payload?  Non-vehicle ground?  Target?  Guidance?  System-level?

Need more information.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 07/06/2013 05:18 pm
You know , shudder, wiki has a complete list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground-Based_Midcourse_Defense

I am curious where the 14 half of the statistic comes from.
By my wiki math 17 intercept attempts and with 8 hits and 20 additional non intercept flight tests with 2 failures and one mixed results.

Of the 9 intercept failures
2 failures to launch
2 failures to separate
1 cooling failure
1 misbehaving target
1 ground radar failure
and
2 misses

The disturbing thing about these tests, is it is only the second 4000 mile test (and second failure). The distance from Iran and North Korea ranges from 6000 to 8000 miles depending on what you target. Vehicles flying that profile have not yet been targeted. We do not know how it will perform against targets that will be flying faster and higher than what has been intercepted to date.

No statistics actually exist for an ICBM launched from Iran or North Korea because no test against ICBM's profiles have actually been flown.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/07/2013 01:44 am
Sounds like a swing and a miss for GBI

According to http://www.missiledefenseadvocacy.org/news.aspx?news_id=4772 the GBI record is now, "Eight intercepts out of 14 intercept attempts."

Ouch.

That statistic isn't granular enough.  How many of those failures were GBI itself?  How many payload?  Non-vehicle ground?  Target?  Guidance?  System-level?

Need more information.

There have only been 12 "Taurus Lite" based launches.  None of those launch vehicles have failed.  Some of the "failures" listed above may have included tests that did not see an interceptor launched at all.

The main problem with this system is that it has been neglected by, well, whoever is in charge.  There were no tests at all for two full years - for a system that obviously needs to be pushed much harder in testing. 

OBV has flown an average of once per year since the first launch in 2003.  They should be flying these once per month, in my opinion.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 07/07/2013 03:07 am
Ed, I'm sure the reason for the low flight rate is political.

More concerning to me, is it will be several years before it fly's against a representative ICBM flight profile. Until those tests occur, the whole systems ability to intercept anything lobbed at the US from Iran, North Korea, China, Russia, or France should be prefaced with a giant question mark. And we know the French are just itching to push ze button ;)

It's a system that may work against ICBM's, but the two tests against targets with a 4000 mile failed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 07/17/2013 10:01 pm
Here is some insight into the recent GBI failure.  The interceptor apparently did not separate from the third stage, possible due to a "faulty battery". 
http://news.yahoo.com/pentagon-wants-more-regular-testing-failed-missile-test-193545623.html

I wonder if this was an interceptor battery or a launch vehicle battery.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Salo on 07/19/2013 08:08 pm
S-520-27 and S-310-42:

http://twitpic.com/photos/koumeiShibata?page=1
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kevin-rf on 07/22/2013 12:46 pm
Here is some insight into the recent GBI failure.  The interceptor apparently did not separate from the third stage, possible due to a "faulty battery". 
http://news.yahoo.com/pentagon-wants-more-regular-testing-failed-missile-test-193545623.html

I wonder if this was an interceptor battery or a launch vehicle battery.

 - Ed Kyle

Another failure to separate? This would be the fourth failure to separate! Wow!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 07/22/2013 01:13 pm
Here is some insight into the recent GBI failure.  The interceptor apparently did not separate from the third stage, possible due to a "faulty battery". 
http://news.yahoo.com/pentagon-wants-more-regular-testing-failed-missile-test-193545623.html

I wonder if this was an interceptor battery or a launch vehicle battery.

 - Ed Kyle

Another failure to separate? This would be the fourth failure to separate! Wow!

But, to be fair, it was the first failure to separate, when the OBV booster was used.

The earlier separation failures were 2 times on the PLV test booster and one time on Lockheed Martin's BV-Plus booster.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 07/22/2013 04:00 pm
The Brazilian rocket VS-30 was launched from Esrange Space Center on July 15, at 0553UTC. It reached an altitude of approx. 151 kilometers and landed 60 km north of Esrange Space Center. Recovery has been made and the payload is back at the base for analysis. MAPHEUS 4 is a DLR research rocket programme conducting annual launches of scientific payloads dedicated to material studies. Experiments on MAPHEUS cover a wide range of material physics topics such as gelation, the behaviour of granulates, diffusion and the mixing and demixing of metallic alloys. Propelled by a S30 motor, MAPHEUS typically offers more than three minutes of microgravity time at 10-4g.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 07/22/2013 05:28 pm
S-520-27 and S-310-42:

http://twitpic.com/photos/koumeiShibata?page=1


JAXA release
S-310-42 and S-520-27 launched at 0200 and 0257 UTC Jul 20
to apogees of 139 and 316 km respectively

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2013/07/20130721_s-310-42_s-520-27_j.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 07/23/2013 08:05 am
Additional info on the Mapheus-4 mission can be found here:
http://www.sscspace.com/mapheus
and (in German)
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10081/151_read-7599/year-all/#gallery/11623

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/02/2013 07:18 pm
I missed this earlier, it's mentioned (without a date) in the latest AvWeek: Israeli Jericho-3 (prob. not real name) missile launch from Palmachim on July 12.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/09/2013 08:00 pm
NASA 36.239DS VERIS, an NRL solar physics telescope, was launched from White Sands Aug 8  by Black Brant IX  (Terrier Mk 70/BB Mk I)

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story152.html

No launch time given yet.  [Edit: I believe planned time was 1800 UTC]
Planned apogee was 280 km
Payload mass about 550 kg

Side note: (in case Block51 is reading) - the current Black Brant sustainer seems to be called Black Brant Mk I.  It's really a new version of the Black Brant Mk V (VB/VC)
- the original Mk I went out of use in the early 1960s; Mk II, III,  VI and VII
are also history (and IV and 8 to 12 were combos of the Mk V with other stages)
So this one should really be the  Black Brant Mk VD or Mk VC Mod I or something like that. It messes up my databases to have two  types of rocket motor both called Black Brant Mk I !!
Comments from anyone in the know?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/10/2013 07:27 am
VERIS launch from White Sands: the launch time was 18:10 (14:10 EDT). Apogee reached was 282 km (175 miles).
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/veris-sounding-rocket-to-study-active-regions-on-sun/#.UgXop387sYI

PS: sorry, no answer to the BB question.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: DaveS on 08/12/2013 11:37 pm
A Terrier-Improved Malemute is scheduled to launch the RockSat-X tomorrow in a window that extends from 6 am EDT to 11 am EDT. The launch will be streamed here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-tv-wallops and will begin at 5 am EDT.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/13/2013 02:45 pm
VERIS launch from White Sands: the launch time was 18:10 (14:10 EDT). Apogee reached was 282 km (175 miles).
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/veris-sounding-rocket-to-study-active-regions-on-sun/#.UgXop387sYI

PS: sorry, no answer to the BB question.

Thanks!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/13/2013 02:46 pm
A Terrier-Improved Malemute is scheduled to launch the RockSat-X tomorrow in a window that extends from 6 am EDT to 11 am EDT. The launch will be streamed here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-tv-wallops and will begin at 5 am EDT.

46.004UO RockSat-X successfully launched at 1000 UTC to 151 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 08/13/2013 08:28 pm
NASA 36.239DS VERIS, an NRL solar physics telescope, was launched from White Sands Aug 8  by Black Brant IX  (Terrier Mk 70/BB Mk I)

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story152.html

No launch time given yet.  [Edit: I believe planned time was 1800 UTC]
Planned apogee was 280 km
Payload mass about 550 kg

Side note: (in case Block51 is reading) - the current Black Brant sustainer seems to be called Black Brant Mk I.  It's really a new version of the Black Brant Mk V (VB/VC)
- the original Mk I went out of use in the early 1960s; Mk II, III,  VI and VII
are also history (and IV and 8 to 12 were combos of the Mk V with other stages)
So this one should really be the  Black Brant Mk VD or Mk VC Mod I or something like that. It messes up my databases to have two  types of rocket motor both called Black Brant Mk I !!
Comments from anyone in the know?

I really wish I could post our mision milestone meeting deliverables (MIC [Mission Initiation Conference], RDM [Requirements definition meeting], DR [Design Review], MRR [Mission Readiness Review], MCR [Mission Closeout Report]), but there are vast sections of it stamped with ITAR warnings. As to whether or not they are really ITAR sensitive or not (certainly the Flight Performance and trajectory guidance stuff is) isn't for me to decide. My place is to follow the rules. I like my job after all...

On to stuff I can answer though:

I don't work in the launch vehicles department so I'm just going off documentation. That being said, this work is being done for NASA so they tend to be sticklers on getting documentation correct!

The sustainer (second stage) that was used on 36.239's Black Brant IX is a Black Brant V, Mk.3 Ver. 0. SN Mk3-001. That *is* without any doubt, the nomenclature that is currently used.

The Mk. 3 is what Bristols production has moved to. I think we *might* have some Mk. 2 motors around still around. For instance, 36.283 Galeazzi (launched November 2012) was a Black Brant V Mk. 2. SN Mk2-009 to be exact.

Also, looking at some documents, 36.271 France flew a Black Brant V Mk.1 Ver. 4.

So it seems that we (let's say NASA or the contractors working for NASA) seem to use the "mark" number as a major revision denotation with "version" number being reserved for smaller changes within that major revision.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 08/13/2013 08:33 pm
A Terrier-Improved Malemute is scheduled to launch the RockSat-X tomorrow in a window that extends from 6 am EDT to 11 am EDT. The launch will be streamed here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-tv-wallops and will begin at 5 am EDT.

46.004UO RockSat-X successfully launched at 1000 UTC to 151 km.


I was on the "backup" recovery team slated to go out for the backup launch date. Since it was an ~13 hour work day for the recovery team (long boat ride out there!) it was decided to have two complete recovery teams. As I didn't go out today I didn't get any nice recovery pictures. Oh well.

Also, I've been too busy with this silly thing called work today to get any good pictures once we got it back here. I'd just try Wallop's FB page, their main webpage, and the various RockSatX 2013 university team webpages for more pictures that you'll ever be able to shake a stick at.

Feel free to ask me questions related to this or most any other sounding rocket flight. I'll answer within the limits of ITAR of course.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/13/2013 09:48 pm
NASA 36.239DS VERIS, an NRL solar physics telescope, was launched from White Sands Aug 8  by Black Brant IX  (Terrier Mk 70/BB Mk I)

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story152.html

No launch time given yet.  [Edit: I believe planned time was 1800 UTC]
Planned apogee was 280 km
Payload mass about 550 kg

Side note: (in case Block51 is reading) - the current Black Brant sustainer seems to be called Black Brant Mk I.  It's really a new version of the Black Brant Mk V (VB/VC)
- the original Mk I went out of use in the early 1960s; Mk II, III,  VI and VII
are also history (and IV and 8 to 12 were combos of the Mk V with other stages)
So this one should really be the  Black Brant Mk VD or Mk VC Mod I or something like that. It messes up my databases to have two  types of rocket motor both called Black Brant Mk I !!
Comments from anyone in the know?

I really wish I could post our mision milestone meeting deliverables (MIC [Mission Initiation Conference], RDM [Requirements definition meeting], DR [Design Review], MRR [Mission Readiness Review], MCR [Mission Closeout Report]), but there are vast sections of it stamped with ITAR warnings. As to whether or not they are really ITAR sensitive or not (certainly the Flight Performance and trajectory guidance stuff is) isn't for me to decide. My place is to follow the rules. I like my job after all...

On to stuff I can answer though:

I don't work in the launch vehicles department so I'm just going off documentation. That being said, this work is being done for NASA so they tend to be sticklers on getting documentation correct!

The sustainer (second stage) that was used on 36.239's Black Brant IX is a Black Brant V, Mk.3 Ver. 0. SN Mk3-001. That *is* without any doubt, the nomenclature that is currently used.

The Mk. 3 is what Bristols production has moved to. I think we *might* have some Mk. 2 motors around still around. For instance, 36.283 Galeazzi (launched November 2012) was a Black Brant V Mk. 2. SN Mk2-009 to be exact.

Also, looking at some documents, 36.271 France flew a Black Brant V Mk.1 Ver. 4.

So it seems that we (let's say NASA or the contractors working for NASA) seem to use the "mark" number as a major revision denotation with "version" number being reserved for smaller changes within that major revision.


Ahh, ok - so the  "Black Brant Mk 1" (with no "V")  is just sloppy PAO reporting. I'm perfectly happy for them to call it "Black Brant V Mk 1"  (Mk 2, etc) even though that's a bit ugly (and why they couldn't stick with the 50 year tradition of letters to distinguish variants, just change for sake of change, but whatever)

Thanks for the clarification!!

 - Jonathan
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 08/14/2013 07:26 am

46.004UO RockSat-X successfully launched at 1000 UTC to 151 km.


The WFF website (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/) says the vehicle number is 46.005UO.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/14/2013 08:16 am
India test-launched a Prithvi II missile on Aug 12.
More info:
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-08-12/india/41331286_1_prithvi-ii-guided-missile-development-programme-sleek-missile
and
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-08-13/india/41372826_1_test-fires-surface-to-surface-missile-chandipur
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 08/14/2013 09:10 am
Some Rocksat-X videos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sVEfhToeKU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbmgYWZtWZg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV4sjIvaqis
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Artyom. on 08/14/2013 10:26 am
Suborbital Rocket Launches From NASA's Wallops Flight Facility

http://www.nasa.gov/content/suborbital-rocket-launches-from-nasas-wallops-flight-facility/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 08/15/2013 11:40 am

Ahh, ok - so the  "Black Brant Mk 1" (with no "V")  is just sloppy PAO reporting. I'm perfectly happy for them to call it "Black Brant V Mk 1"  (Mk 2, etc) even though that's a bit ugly (and why they couldn't stick with the 50 year tradition of letters to distinguish variants, just change for sake of change, but whatever)

Thanks for the clarification!!

 - Jonathan

Sounds about right. I must say though, with regards to "sloppy PAO reporting", the outreach and social media interaction of the Wallops PAO has become infinitely better than it was just 4 years ago. They have a ways to come still, sure, but they are definitely trending in the right direction. Thank heavens for that. We can't all work here and have the inside scoop, and the more people outside of wallops that know we even exist, the better my job prospects look in the long run. :)

Also, here's a picture of 46.005 coming in on the recovery boat (stolen from a co-worker's Facebook):
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 08/15/2013 08:10 pm
block51, how's your relationship to the rest of the international sounding rocket community. Do you colaborate with JAXA, DLR/Brazil, etc.?
Do you help the recoverable suborbital market (Virgin, Masten, etc.) Do you perceive them as a danger to your job or as a great opportunity?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 08/16/2013 12:03 pm
block51, how's your relationship to the rest of the international sounding rocket community. Do you colaborate with JAXA, DLR/Brazil, etc.?
Do you help the recoverable suborbital market (Virgin, Masten, etc.) Do you perceive them as a danger to your job or as a great opportunity?

As far as I know the most we do in terms of collaboration is use their ranges. The Nasa sounding rocket program launches out of Andøya Rocket Range with a fair amount of regularity. Due to lots of complicated ITAR stuff it would be VERY difficult nowadays to help design a payload that then launches on a, say German, sounding rocket. Very difficult for NASA (or their contractors) that is. Even launching US payloads on a US rocket from a foreign range takes a lot of paperwork coordinated (I think) through the department of state.

Now, that being said, American citizen principle investigators (PIs) very often bring in international collaborators. Often times we are flying foreign designed / made instruments and working with foreign co-PIs. This is a bit of a pain in terms of the whole ITAR thing. We have to establish a technical assistance agreement (TAA) that is coordinated (I think) through the department of state. You can imagine that taking a month or so for something simple. 

All that being said, it isn't uncommon for US researchers to fly their instruments on foreign rockets. I think companies tend to be a bit on the extreme side of deciding what needs a TAA whereas university types tend to say "Eh... whatever". Of course I don't really know what all the rules are with respect to ITAR. An example of a US researcher flying on forgien vehicles would be (and he's not the only one... just one that I happen to know of off the top of my head) is Dr. Miguel Larsen. He was the PI on ATREX last year, anything with TMA, and is someway involved with most any chemical trace release that is done across the world it seems. I know he has launched many of his payloads (same design as launched with us) on Japanese suborbital vehicles.

As far as commercial stuff goes, the NASA sounding rocket program seems to stay very far away from them. I, however, have been watching them with great interest. I don't see them as a threat to my career so much as I see them as an opportunity to further expand suborbital access to space which would do nothing but further the opportunity for people to fly the things we already fly. I think the NASA sounding rocket program is going to be around in some form for quite a while, but I don't think I'll be here forever. I am very excited, personally, for the development of the reusable suborbital vehicle market because I think it means the possibility of more job opportunities for me!

Finally, any growth in the space industry can be turned into a good thing for Wallops because there is a great launch range here. If we can get more things launching from here it means more jobs, and more high paying jobs. The county that wallops is located in (Accomack) has a per capita income that is 28.7% lower than the VA average ($23,556 vs $33,040) and a median household income that is 34.3% lower than the VA average ($41,595 vs $63,302). More well paying technical jobs in this area can only help, and if the community and NASA play it smart I see no reason they can't leverage an increase in the number of suborbital launches in the world into something that is good for this area. There is a HUGE amount of experience in this area in all aspects of space flight (well perhaps not manned spaceflight) that can be tapped.

So short answer... more flights is good for the industry which is good for everyone which is good for me :).

Sorry for the giant de-rail in the suborbital thread!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 08/16/2013 01:35 pm
Oh no! Please, I super appreciate your answer. One thing that made me think is about the processing infrastructure (and experience). You must have some world class (for sub orbital) payload processing flow. And quite a lot of experience. I'm wondering how will Virgin, Masten et all tap on that potential. How many missed steps could be avoided by talking to people like you.
BTW, another place where ITAR seems to complicate even basic science.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 08/16/2013 01:56 pm
Oh no! Please, I super appreciate your answer. One thing that made me think is about the processing infrastructure (and experience). You must have some world class (for sub orbital) payload processing flow. And quite a lot of experience. I'm wondering how will Virgin, Masten et all tap on that potential. How many missed steps could be avoided by talking to people like you.
BTW, another place where ITAR seems to complicate even basic science.

I'd say that an engineer generally has 4 to 5 missions (at various places in the mission life cycle of course) on the books at any time. In the 4 years I've been here I've supported 5 payloads launching (3 of which I was assigned to from day 1 of the project). That's a pretty brisk pace for projects that are flying in space. The other really awesome aspect of our missions is that we are THE engineer on them for our discipline. We do conceptual design, detailed design, analysis, submit and track things through manufacturing, support assembly, integration, and environmental testing as well as launch (where and when it's needed, which for mech engr isn't every launch). The same pace goes for all of our engineering departments, our technicians. Then you have all the other groups that support launches from wallops.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/17/2013 02:29 pm
 

Sounds about right. I must say though, with regards to "sloppy PAO reporting", the outreach and social media interaction of the Wallops PAO has become infinitely better than it was just 4 years ago. They have a ways to come still, sure, but they are definitely trending in the right direction. Thank heavens for that. We can't all work here and have the inside scoop, and the more people outside of wallops that know we even exist, the better my job prospects look in the long run. :)
 

Yes, I completely agree - very noticeable improvement!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/18/2013 04:06 pm

46.004UO RockSat-X successfully launched at 1000 UTC to 151 km.


The WFF website (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/) says the vehicle number is 46.005UO.

Sorry - I meant 46.005 but typed a 4! Thanks for the catch
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 08/22/2013 01:34 am
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2013/august/mfc-lm-conducts-successful-pac-3-missile-flight-test.html

A PAC-3 missile at White Sands intercepted a mock TBM target. They didn't say, but
it's possible the target was an Orbital Juno missile launched from Fort Wingate,
as per previous tests, in which case it may have been mildly exoatmospheric.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/03/2013 09:57 am
What was that?
http://en.rian.ru/world/20130903/183135898/Russia-Spots-Ballistic-Attack-in-Mediterranean--Defense-Ministry.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 09/03/2013 10:04 am
What was that?
http://en.rian.ru/world/20130903/183135898/Russia-Spots-Ballistic-Attack-in-Mediterranean--Defense-Ministry.html

Likely an israeli air-launched ballistic missile target:

http://www.rafael.co.il/marketing/SIP_STORAGE/FILES/1/1171.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/03/2013 11:35 am
What was that?
http://en.rian.ru/world/20130903/183135898/Russia-Spots-Ballistic-Attack-in-Mediterranean--Defense-Ministry.html

Likely an israeli air-launched ballistic missile target:

http://www.rafael.co.il/marketing/SIP_STORAGE/FILES/1/1171.pdf
It is now acknowledged by Israel.
http://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/nato-prueft-angeblichen-raketenstart-im-mittelmeer-a-920105.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/14/2013 08:24 am
Video of Falcao-II (2013) launch from Alcantara, Brazil on August 8.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egx2IOQ1uqM
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 09/14/2013 07:13 pm
http://www.mda.mil/news/13news0007.html

Sep 10, FTO-01 missile defense test. From this and other sources I gather:

 - launch of eMRBM  target airdrop from C17 north of Wake I.  eMRBM is a Lockheed Martin target with
two SR-19 solid motors and the avionics/other systems from their Trident-based LV-2.
 - launch of a medium range ballistic missile target from a surface pad at Wake I.  Seems likely to be one of the
(several) other variants of a double SR-19, but I haven't found evidence for what it was. Five  dual-SR-19 class
vehicles were launched from Wake in the 1999-2004 period, but the only launch since then was a small Terrier Oriole.
-  launch of an Aegis SM-3-1A from the USS Decatur, intercepting the second target
- launch of two THAAD missiles from Meck Island on Kwajalein Atoll, the first intercepting the eMRBM's reentry vehicle
and the second used as a backup for the other target, not needed as the Aegis succeeded.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/15/2013 08:15 am
Some photos of the FTO-01 test.
Source: http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html#Photo13
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/15/2013 08:45 am
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2013-09/15/c_132721951.htm

India testfires nuclear capable Agni-V intercontinental ballistic missile


NEW DELHI, Sept. 15 (Xinhua) -- India Sunday testfired its home- made, nuclear capable Agni-V intercontinental ballistic missile from Wheeler Island off the coast of the eastern state of Odisha, sources said.

''The missile, which can hit targets up to 5,000 km, was launched at around 8.45 a.m. local time. This was in fact the second launch since the longest-range missile was developed by the state-owned Defense Research Development Organization,'' the sources said.

Top military officials witnessed the launch of the missile which is hailed as a giant leap in India's defense capabilities.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Solar_OPS on 09/17/2013 12:49 am
"Weather permitting, there's a high chance Australia's hypersonic scramjet will soar to the edge of space on Tuesday (Sept 17). Follow the excitement here https://www.facebook.com/ScramspaceOne?ref=br_tf"

and aviationweek blog:
"Aviation Week Senior Editor Guy Norris is on the range with the team to watch the launch. Check out his blog here.

http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx?plckBlogId=Blog%3A04ce340e-4b63-4d23-9695-d49ab661f385&plckPostId=Blog%3A04ce340e-4b63-4d23-9695-d49ab661f385Post%3A7bda2738-72b3-4fad-9dea-408923d8c965"
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/17/2013 07:13 am
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2013-09/15/c_132721951.htm

India testfires nuclear capable Agni-V intercontinental ballistic missile


NEW DELHI, Sept. 15 (Xinhua) -- India Sunday testfired its home- made, nuclear capable Agni-V intercontinental ballistic missile from Wheeler Island off the coast of the eastern state of Odisha, sources said.

''The missile, which can hit targets up to 5,000 km, was launched at around 8.45 a.m. local time. This was in fact the second launch since the longest-range missile was developed by the state-owned Defense Research Development Organization,'' the sources said.

Top military officials witnessed the launch of the missile which is hailed as a giant leap in India's defense capabilities.


Video of Agni-V test

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXYdUE2X4Ms
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 09/19/2013 07:34 pm
Missile test yesterday.
http://www.mda.mil/news/13news0008.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/20/2013 07:54 am
Some photos of the FTM-21 test can be found here:
http://www.mda.mil/news/gallery_aegis.html#Photos13
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/21/2013 07:01 am
Video of the FTM-21 Aegis test, nicknamed Stellar Ninja

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKP1MN5NOHs
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 09/22/2013 06:44 am
The ScramspaceOne launch from Andoya (on Sep 18) was not successful due to a problem with the first stage (S-30).
http://www.rocketrange.no/?p=1719
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/22/2013 03:25 pm
A Minuteman-III was launched on September 22 from Vandenberg AFB.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9kd706on0E

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 3:01 a.m. here Sunday from Launch Facility-10 on north Vandenberg.
Col. Keith Balts, 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority.
"Our mission partners in the 576th Flight Test Squadron have a big footprint here at Vandenberg," said Balts. "We support several of their test launches each year as they help keep our Nation's critical system ready to support national security."
For information about the results of the flight test, call Air Force Global Strike Command Public Affairs at (318) 456-1305 or after hours at (318) 456-7242.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/22/2013 03:27 pm
The next test launch of the Minuteman III from Vandenberg is scheduled for Sept. 26.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 09/23/2013 03:01 pm
A Minuteman-III was launched on September 22 from Vandenberg AFB.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9kd706on0E

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 3:01 a.m. here Sunday from Launch Facility-10 on north Vandenberg.
Col. Keith Balts, 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority.
"Our mission partners in the 576th Flight Test Squadron have a big footprint here at Vandenberg," said Balts. "We support several of their test launches each year as they help keep our Nation's critical system ready to support national security."
For information about the results of the flight test, call Air Force Global Strike Command Public Affairs at (318) 456-1305 or after hours at (318) 456-7242.
Lompoc newspaper says launch was a success, but the Wall Street Journal says that Vandenberg had yet to confirm 

Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 09/23/2013 06:00 pm
SCRAMSPACE 1 launch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Wr8G2w1Wp8#t=89
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 09/24/2013 05:59 am
Thanks Satori. Looks like the vehicle became unstable during first stage flight, the second stage broke off, the first stage veered off course, and then the second ignited pointing in the wrong direction.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Solar_OPS on 09/24/2013 11:27 am
Thanks Satori. Looks like the vehicle became unstable during first stage flight, the second stage broke off, the first stage veered off course, and then the second ignited pointing in the wrong direction.

Official press release from Andoya Rocket Range:
http://www.rocketrange.no/?p=1719
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 09/24/2013 10:54 pm
Navy Launches Four Missiles in Tests


SUNNYVALE, Calif., Sept. 24, 2013 – The U.S. Navy has conducted four successful test flights of the Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles built by Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT]. The U.S. Navy launched the unarmed missiles Sept. 10 and 12 in the Atlantic Ocean from a submerged Ohio-class submarine home-ported at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Georgia.

This event marked the 145th, 146th, 147th and 148th successful test flights of the D5 missile since design completion in 1989 – a reliability record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile.

“This ultra-capable system serves a critical role in deterring aggression,” said Doug White, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, the Navy’s Trident missile prime contractor. “We are dedicated to supporting Navy Strategic Systems Programs in assuring the system’s continued readiness, reliability, performance and affordability.”

The Navy launched the missiles as part of Follow-on Commander’s Evaluation Tests. The missiles had been converted into test configurations using kits produced by Lockheed Martin that contain range safety devices and flight telemetry instrumentation. As required by the Department of Defense’s National Command Authority, the U.S. Navy conducts a continuing series of operational system evaluation tests of the Trident Strategic Weapon System under the testing guidelines of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

First deployed in 1990, the D5 missile is currently aboard U.S. Navy Ohio-class and U.K. Royal Navy Vanguard-class submarines. The three-stage, solid-propellant, inertial-guided ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles and carries multiple independently targeted reentry bodies. The Fleet Ballistic Missile team has produced six generations, each more capable than its predecessor: the Polaris A1, Polaris A2, Polaris A3, Poseidon C3, Trident I C4 and Trident II D5 missiles.

Lockheed Martin has been the Navy’s strategic missile prime contractor since the program’s inception in 1955. The United States and the United Kingdom signed the Polaris Sales Agreement in 1963, which was modified in 1982 to provide for the Trident II D5 missile system. Since 1968, Lockheed Martin has provided program management and engineering services to the Royal Navy under the terms of the agreement.

Lockheed Martin employees, principally in California, Georgia, Florida, Washington, Utah, Virginia, Scotland and England, support the design, development, production, test, operation and sustainment of the Trident Strategic Weapon System.

Lockheed Martin leads the industry in performance and domain expertise in strategic missile and missile defense systems, designing and producing ballistic missiles, interceptors, target missiles and reentry systems with unmatched reliability and a focus on affordable high-quality systems and services.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 116,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products, and services. The corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2013/september/924-ss-FBM.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 09/25/2013 06:45 am
Official press release from Andoya Rocket Range:
http://www.rocketrange.no/?p=1719

Quoting:

"The Australian managers of the project concluded that it had been technologically successful, though scientific expectations were not fulfilled because the flight did not proceed as planned."

It was a success, even though it failed! Brought to you by the Ministry of Truth.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: QuantumG on 09/25/2013 06:51 am
Quoting:

"The Australian managers of the project concluded that it had been technologically successful, though scientific expectations were not fulfilled because the flight did not proceed as planned."

It was a success, even though it failed! Brought to you by the Ministry of Truth.

Ha! When I was on The Space Show last month I was struggling to find the words to describe how Australia's "space research" was designed to be so unimportant. Sure, it's world class science, but if it fails it doesn't really matter, even if this particular mission is a failure, they can always write that up. Seems like that philosophy is alive and well.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 09/27/2013 12:03 am
ICBM test-launched from California

September 27, 2013 Last Updated at 03:35 IST

The US Air Force has test-launched an unarmed Minuteman 3 intercontinental ballistic missile from California.

The missile lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 3:33 a.M. PDT (1033 GMT) yesterday.

It was the second Minuteman launch from Vandenberg this week. The first was launched early Sunday.

The Air Force Global Strike Command said the test was a success. No other details were released because it was a classified mission. Such tests typically involve a flight over the Pacific Ocean to a target in the Kwajalein Atoll.

Col. Scott Fox, vice commander of the 20th Air Force, said in a statement that the test was a visible demonstration of the nation's nuclear deterrent.

Private rocket maker SpaceX will attempt to launch a Canadian satellite from Vandenberg on Sunday.

http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/icbm-test-launched-from-california-113092700064_1.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 10/09/2013 01:03 pm
From Xinhua, India successfully testfires nuclear capable Prithvi II missile (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/sci/2013-10/07/c_132776997.htm).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/10/2013 06:45 pm
There was a launch of a Topol from Kapustin Yar today.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/10/topol_launch_from_kapustin_yar_1.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 10/11/2013 02:08 am
There was a launch of a Topol from Kapustin Yar today.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/10/topol_launch_from_kapustin_yar_1.shtml

I think this photo by Mike Hopkins from the ISS may be related with the Topol-M launch:

Quote
Mike Hopkins ‏@AstroIllini
Saw something launch into space today.  Not sure what it was but the cloud it left behind was pretty amazing pic.twitter.com/dPJc9XXDZm (http://pic.twitter.com/dPJc9XXDZm)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/14/2013 03:35 pm
Another Aegis test (FTM-22 "Stellar Raven") was conducted on October 3.
More info: http://www.mda.mil/news/13news0009.html

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVaxpBrGF5I

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 10/23/2013 07:47 am
NASA successfully launched a Black Brant IX sounding rocket on October 21 at 1800 UTC from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, carrying instrumentation to support the calibration of the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite.
More info: http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Sounding_Rocket_Calibrates_NASAs_SDO_Instrument_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 10/30/2013 05:07 pm
There were some launches today in Russia.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/10/russia_conducts_large-scale_ex.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/01/2013 07:13 am
A Black Brant IX rocket carrying the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) payload is scheduled for launch today (Nov 1) from White Sands.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Yes_There_is_Activity_in_the_Darkness_of_Space_999.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/02/2013 07:50 am
There were some launches today in Russia.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/10/russia_conducts_large-scale_ex.shtml

Check out this video of the Russian missile launches.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afVCCuvdvQo
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 11/02/2013 05:07 pm
I'm glad we're both on the same side now.  ;)

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/05/2013 08:27 pm
A Black Brant IX rocket carrying the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) payload is scheduled for launch today (Nov 1) from White Sands.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Yes_There_is_Activity_in_the_Darkness_of_Space_999.html


Launched 0925 UTC on Nov 3 (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf) or Nov 4 (http://www.nasa.gov/content/yes-there-is-activity-in-the-darkness-of-space/#.UnliCOFHnsM)

Anyone know which?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: savuporo on 11/13/2013 07:14 am
Another succesfful UP aerospace launch
http://www.parabolicarc.com/2013/11/12/50644/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: albatros68 on 11/16/2013 07:16 pm
An Argentine 2 stage Sounding rocket carrying a 50 kg experiments payload is scheduled for launch December 13 from Chamical (Argentine Air Force launch site).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 11/19/2013 11:34 am
A Black Brant IX rocket carrying the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) payload is scheduled for launch today (Nov 1) from White Sands.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Yes_There_is_Activity_in_the_Darkness_of_Space_999.html


Launched 0925 UTC on Nov 3 (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf) or Nov 4 (http://www.nasa.gov/content/yes-there-is-activity-in-the-darkness-of-space/#.UnliCOFHnsM)

Anyone know which?

November 3rd, early in the morning.

Short news blurb: http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story155.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 11/19/2013 11:37 am
36.296 McCandliss was scheduled from 0430 to 0445 Mountain Time on November 19th, 2013. They had to scrub due to an "experiment butterfly valve issue". I'm pretty sure it had to do with a vacuum butterfly valve they need to close before launch. Haven't heard anything on the next launch window.

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/19/2013 09:37 pm
A Black Brant IX rocket carrying the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) payload is scheduled for launch today (Nov 1) from White Sands.
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Yes_There_is_Activity_in_the_Darkness_of_Space_999.html


Launched 0925 UTC on Nov 3 (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf) or Nov 4 (http://www.nasa.gov/content/yes-there-is-activity-in-the-darkness-of-space/#.UnliCOFHnsM)

Anyone know which?

November 3rd, early in the morning.

Short news blurb: http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/news/story155.html

Thanks for the confirm, and thanks for the update on Stefan's FORTIS delay.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 11/20/2013 02:17 pm
Just read confirmation McCandliss launched and it was successful. The only info I have right now is "McCandliss Launch Success" on an internal website.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/21/2013 06:03 am
Just read confirmation McCandliss launched and it was successful. The only info I have right now is "McCandliss Launch Success" on an internal website.

Launch confirmed on "external" website: The FORTIS payload was successfully launched this morning to observe Comet ISON.  Launched on a Black Brant IX sounding rocket at 6:40:01 a.m. EST, November 20, the payload flew to an altitude of 172 miles before descending via parachute at White Sands.  Preliminary reports show that good data was obtained and the mission was a success.  Payload recovery is in progress.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/fortis.html#.Uo2v0Sep654

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/21/2013 06:11 am
Background info on the FORTIS (NASA 36.296 UG) Black Brant IX mission here:
http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/six-minute-journey-to-study-comet-ison/#.Uo2xvCep654
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/22/2013 07:37 pm
Just read confirmation McCandliss launched and it was successful. The only info I have right now is "McCandliss Launch Success" on an internal website.

Launch confirmed on "external" website: The FORTIS payload was successfully launched this morning to observe Comet ISON.  Launched on a Black Brant IX sounding rocket at 6:40:01 a.m. EST, November 20, the payload flew to an altitude of 172 miles before descending via parachute at White Sands.  Preliminary reports show that good data was obtained and the mission was a success.  Payload recovery is in progress.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/fortis.html#.Uo2v0Sep654



Great news!  Important mission, and StefanMcCandliss is a super nice guy.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/22/2013 07:42 pm
Navy Launches Four Missiles in Tests


SUNNYVALE, Calif., Sept. 24, 2013 – The U.S. Navy has conducted four successful test flights of the Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles built by Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT]. The U.S. Navy launched the unarmed missiles Sept. 10 and 12 in the Atlantic Ocean from a submerged Ohio-class submarine home-ported at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Georgia.

This event marked the 145th, 146th, 147th and 148th successful test flights of the D5 missile since design completion in 1989 – a reliability record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile.
 [...]

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2013/september/924-ss-FBM.html

The Facebook page of the Strategic Systems Program says that the sub for the September launches was the USS Tennessee.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 11/29/2013 05:06 pm
NASA 36.261UG VeSpR, a Boston University 35-cm ultraviolet telescope to obtain Lyman-alpha spectra of Venus which will
help in studies of the Venusian exosphere, was launched from White Sands on Nov 27  - I don't have the launch time yet.

   
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Lewis007 on 11/30/2013 06:57 am
NASA 36.261UG VeSpR, a Boston University 35-cm ultraviolet telescope to obtain Lyman-alpha spectra of Venus which will
help in studies of the Venusian exosphere, was launched from White Sands on Nov 27  - I don't have the launch time yet.


Launch of VeSpR was at 20:50 EST (Nov 26).
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/missions/profile.cfm?MCode=VeSpR&Display=ReadMore

More info:
http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1113013560/nasa-vespr-rocket-to-study-venus-atmosphere-112613/
http://www.bu.edu/csp/PASS/vespr/index.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 12/02/2013 02:21 pm
NASA 36.261UG VeSpR, a Boston University 35-cm ultraviolet telescope to obtain Lyman-alpha spectra of Venus which will
help in studies of the Venusian exosphere, was launched from White Sands on Nov 27  - I don't have the launch time yet.


Launch of VeSpR was at 20:50 EST (Nov 26).
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/missions/profile.cfm?MCode=VeSpR&Display=ReadMore

More info:
http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1113013560/nasa-vespr-rocket-to-study-venus-atmosphere-112613/
http://www.bu.edu/csp/PASS/vespr/index.html

All indications point towards comprehensive success (Other choices being partial success, or failure).

Here is a great picture of the payload coming back in from recovery.

(http://i.imgur.com/MUAnznul.jpg) (http://imgur.com/MUAnznu.jpg)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 12/04/2013 10:07 pm
Rumor is the VEX-01 launch will be on Dec 12th. apparently the president will be present or do a teleconference.
btw, shouldn't we start a new suborbital thread? This is reply 1130.
Now it's official: The Sindicature is posting about it (http://www.sigen.gov.ar/novedaddetalle.asp?nro=4249).
And the no-nagevation zones:
Chart H-116
18:00ARG 2013-12-11 to 20:00ARG 2013-12-12 (21:00UTC to 23:00UTC)
35-36.33S 057-18.1W
35-34.54S 057-14.27W
35-37.35S 057-10.32W
35-30.16S 057-03.14W
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: kniklas on 12/10/2013 10:23 pm
I have started a separate discussion thread on sounding rockets cost - probably it is worth to give it a thought considering emerging trends in area of re-usability: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33369.msg1125142#msg1125142

Your thoughts and opinions are welcomed.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/17/2013 03:54 pm
The set of NASA Sounding rocket numbers has been extended: (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf)

50   ?
51   Black Brant XI-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant)
52   Black Brant XII-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant Nihka)

Anyone an idea, which rocket configuration got 50.xxx ?

Gunter


To complete block51's list, here is the full set of NASA sounding rocket code numbers

 1   Aerobee 100 
 2   Arcon
 3   Nike Asp
 4   Aerobee 150
 5   Iris 
 6   Aerobee 300 (Aerobee-Sparrow)
 7   Argo E-5 Jason  (not flown)
 8   Argo D-4 Javelin (HJ Nike Nike Altair)
 9   Skylark
10   Nike Cajun
11   Journeyman (Sergeant-Lance-Lance-Altair)
12   Special Test
13   Nike Aerobee  (Aerobee 170)
14   Nike Apache   
15   Arcas
16   Astrobee 1500  (Aerojet Jr-Alcor)
17   Aerobee 350  (Nike/AJ60-91)
18   Nike Tomahawk
19   Black Brant IVA 
20   Bullpup Cajun
21   Black Brant VB/C
22   Black Brant IIIB
23   Astrobee D
24   M56A1  (A r i e s)
25   Astrobee F
26   Aerobee 200A
27   Nike Black Brant (BB8)
28   Nike Malemute
29   Terrier Malemute
30   Orion
31   Nike Orion
32   Nike Javelin
33   Taurus Orion
34   Taurus Tomahawk
35   Terrier Black Brant Nihka (BB10)
36   Terrier Black Brant (BB 9)
37   Viper 3A
38   Taurus Nike Tomahawk
39   Black Brant XI
40   Black Brant XII
41   Terrier Imp. Orion
42   Terrier Lynx
43   Talos-Taurus-Oriole
44   Talos-Oriole
45   Terrier-Oriole (Oriole II)
46   Terrier-Imp.Malemute
47   Terrier Oriole Nihka (Oriole IIIA)
48   Talos Terrier Oriole (Oriole III)
49   Talos Terrier Oriole Nihka (Oriole IV)

The NASA "12" special test series has included tests using rockets in the above list as well as Aerobee, Nike, Terrier and Taurus booster stages with dummy sustainers, and the Mesquito, Strypi, and Strypi 7AR rockets.
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/17/2013 04:31 pm
VAFB ICBM TEST LAUNCH:
VIDEO TITLE: Minuteman III GT 210GM W3880 Launch
VIDEO DESCRIPTION: Published on Dec 17, 2013
An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 4:36 a.m. here Tuesday from Launch Facility-04 on north Vandenberg.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlbV5NsLOjY
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/17/2013 04:39 pm
VAFB ICBM TEST LAUNCH:
VIDEO TITLE: Minuteman III GT 210GM W3880 Launch
VIDEO DESCRIPTION: Published on Dec 17, 2013
An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 4:36 a.m. here Tuesday from Launch Facility-04 on north Vandenberg.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlbV5NsLOjY
Preliminary confirmed successful in reaching its target area in the Pacific Theatre.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/17/2013 04:53 pm
VAFB ICBM TEST LAUNCH:
VIDEO TITLE: Minuteman III GT 210GM W3880 Launch
VIDEO DESCRIPTION: Published on Dec 17, 2013
An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test at 4:36 a.m. here Tuesday from Launch Facility-04 on north Vandenberg.
Preliminary confirmed successful in reaching its target area in the Pacific Theatre.
Fourth Minuteman III this year.  Most since 2008.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: marshal on 12/18/2013 12:06 am
Why USAF said the missile send satellites into polar orbit ?

here :

Minute Man III test missile launches from Vandenberg

/ Published December 17, 2013

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched at 4:36 a.m. during an operational test Dec. 17, 2013, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The 30th Space Wing manages Department of Defense space and missile testing, and placing satellites into polar orbit from the West Coast, using expendable boosters. Col. Keith Balts, the 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Yvonne Morales)

http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/223/Article/467762/minute-man-iii-test-missile-launches-from-vandenberg.aspx
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/18/2013 01:58 am
Why USAF said the missile send satellites into polar orbit ?

here :

Minute Man III test missile launches from Vandenberg

/ Published December 17, 2013

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched at 4:36 a.m. during an operational test Dec. 17, 2013, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The 30th Space Wing manages Department of Defense space and missile testing, and placing satellites into polar orbit from the West Coast, using expendable boosters. Col. Keith Balts, the 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Yvonne Morales)

http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/223/Article/467762/minute-man-iii-test-missile-launches-from-vandenberg.aspx
reread it again and more closely. It is talking about what the wing is tasked with for the DoD. In this instance the video is about this mornings suborbital missile (ICBM) test.

To make it easier to understand:
The 30th Space Wing manages Department of Defense space and missile testing, and placing satellites into polar orbit from the West Coast, using expendable boosters.

The 45th Space Wing manages Department of Defense space and missile testing, and placing satellites into LEO, HEO, GEO and other orbits from the East Coast, using expendable boosters.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 12/18/2013 02:02 am
Why USAF said the missile send satellites into polar orbit ?

here :

Minute Man III test missile launches from Vandenberg

/ Published December 17, 2013

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched at 4:36 a.m. during an operational test Dec. 17, 2013, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The 30th Space Wing manages Department of Defense space and missile testing, and placing satellites into polar orbit from the West Coast, using expendable boosters. Col. Keith Balts, the 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Yvonne Morales)

http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/223/Article/467762/minute-man-iii-test-missile-launches-from-vandenberg.aspx
They are saying, or trying to say, that the 30th Space Wing is responsible for multiple tasks, which include the management of both missile testing and of launches to polar orbit from Vandenberg AFB.  Minuteman III is, of course, a missile system that does not perform orbital launches.  Four Minuteman III suborbital missile tests flew from Vandenberg this year, along with two GBI suborbital tests.  There were also five orbital launches from Vandenberg this year, performed by Atlas 5, Delta 4, Pegasus, and Falcon 9 launch vehicles.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/18/2013 01:13 pm
The set of NASA Sounding rocket numbers has been extended: (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf)

50   ?
51   Black Brant XI-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant)
52   Black Brant XII-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant Nihka)

Anyone an idea, which rocket configuration got 50.xxx ?

Gunter


To complete block51's list, here is the full set of NASA sounding rocket code numbers
...
39   Black Brant XI
40   Black Brant XII
 
The NASA "12" special test series has included tests using rockets in the above list as well as Aerobee, Nike, Terrier and Taurus booster stages with dummy sustainers, and the Mesquito, Strypi, and Strypi 7AR rockets.
 

Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

Enough to give them a whole new pair of numbers?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/18/2013 01:17 pm
And also, in 2015 we see the planned launches - for USA SMDC - of 12.080DR and 12.081DR.
The '12' is a generic test label, so it would be good to know what vehicle it refers to this time.

The '50' may have been reserved for some vehicle that was planned but then cancelled
(like '7', the Jason which was flown by USAF but not by NASA).
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/18/2013 02:30 pm
Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

The Honest John second stage motors have been replaced with Terrier Mk.70
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/18/2013 02:46 pm
Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

The Honest John second stage motors have been replaced with Terrier Mk.70

Huh. For the Terrier Black Brant they didn't give a new number for this change - the BB IX Mod 1 which has been flying since the 1990s mixed in under the NASA 36.xxx label.

(I'm sure you agree that it would be nice to get someone at Wallops to go back and tell us which NASA 36.xxx flights
were Terrier Mk 70 and which were Terrier Mk 12 !!!  I wonder if that info would be available if I went to visit there...)
 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/18/2013 03:18 pm
Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

The Honest John second stage motors have been replaced with Terrier Mk.70

Huh. For the Terrier Black Brant they didn't give a new number for this change - the BB IX Mod 1 which has been flying since the 1990s mixed in under the NASA 36.xxx label.

(I'm sure you agree that it would be nice to get someone at Wallops to go back and tell us which NASA 36.xxx flights
were Terrier Mk 70 and which were Terrier Mk 12 !!!  I wonder if that info would be available if I went to visit there...)
 
Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

The Honest John second stage motors have been replaced with Terrier Mk.70

Huh. For the Terrier Black Brant they didn't give a new number for this change - the BB IX Mod 1 which has been flying since the 1990s mixed in under the NASA 36.xxx label.

(I'm sure you agree that it would be nice to get someone at Wallops to go back and tell us which NASA 36.xxx flights
were Terrier Mk 70 and which were Terrier Mk 12 !!!  I wonder if that info would be available if I went to visit there...)
 

For the BB IX 36.xxx label all versions use a Terrier (either Mk.12 or Mk.70)

For the BB XI-A / XII-A versions, the Honest John has been replaced with a Terrier, therfore it is not only a different version of one motor, but a completely different motor.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/18/2013 03:28 pm
For the Black Brant XI-A and XII-A versions there is some info in the NASA Sounding Rockets Annual Report 2013 (page 36)

http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Sounding%20Rockets%20Annual%20Report%202013_sm.pdf
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/18/2013 11:59 pm
Quote

For the BB XI-A / XII-A versions, the Honest John has been replaced with a Terrier, therfore it is not only a different version of one motor, but a completely different motor.

D'oh.  I am slow today - too much late night coding. Thanks for pointing that out twice, I needed it . :-)
I had forgotten the old ones were Talos-Taurus, not Talos-Terrier.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 12/19/2013 11:34 am
The set of NASA Sounding rocket numbers has been extended: (http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/BlueBook.pdf)

50   ?
51   Black Brant XI-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant)
52   Black Brant XII-A (Talos Terrier Black-Brant Nihka)

Anyone an idea, which rocket configuration got 50.xxx ?

Gunter


To complete block51's list, here is the full set of NASA sounding rocket code numbers
...
39   Black Brant XI
40   Black Brant XII
 
The NASA "12" special test series has included tests using rockets in the above list as well as Aerobee, Nike, Terrier and Taurus booster stages with dummy sustainers, and the Mesquito, Strypi, and Strypi 7AR rockets.
 

Good question - also, what is the diff between  the BB XIA XIIA and the original BB XI, BB XII ?
Maybe block51 can tell us?

Enough to give them a whole new pair of numbers?

I can't speak to the 50.xxx series (I can't find any info that says it exists, but I'll ask around), but the 51.xxx and 52.xxx rockets are pretty straight forward.

The 2nd stage of the 39.xxx and 40.xxx vehicles is called a Tarus. Well, the Taurus is actually the motor from the Honest John missile (MGR-1B specifically). It is a very old motor with the last one being made in 1965 (per wikipedia, also that date agrees with what I've heard). The 51.xxx and 52.xxx are the same as the 39.xxx and 40.xxx with a different second stage. The second stage has been replaced with a Mk. 70 Terrier motor. With exception of the new hardware needed to interface between the stages, the new motor is the only difference.

An interesting sidebar: The spin motors that are used on every one of NASA's sounding rockets are harvested from the Honest John motors, which has 4 of them per motor.

Edit: Oops, I didn't read to the next page! I'll make up for it with a mega high resolution version of that sounding rocket stable picture!


Edit 2: I like the separate thread idea! I can ramble on about all kinds of fun NASA sounding rocket design stuff!
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Skyrocket on 12/19/2013 11:46 am
May i suggest, that the NASA sounding rocket designation topic is separated from this thread and moved to a thread of it's own. Perhaps an Admin can help.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/19/2013 04:57 pm
May i suggest, that the NASA sounding rocket designation topic is separated from this thread and moved to a thread of it's own. Perhaps an Admin can help.
I informed them so help should be on the way for your issue.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/20/2013 02:38 am
May i suggest, that the NASA sounding rocket designation topic is separated from this thread and moved to a thread of it's own. Perhaps an Admin can help.
I informed them so help should be on the way for your issue.

Maybe we should have a whole separate Suborbital section in the International area with multiple threads.
Missiles, US sounding rockets, other sounding rockets, designations, etc
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: russianhalo117 on 12/20/2013 02:50 am
May i suggest, that the NASA sounding rocket designation topic is separated from this thread and moved to a thread of it's own. Perhaps an Admin can help.
I informed them so help should be on the way for your issue.

Maybe we should have a whole separate Suborbital section in the International area with multiple threads.
Missiles, US sounding rockets, other sounding rockets, designations, etc
I remember Chris Bergin or someone else here told me that there was a forum rule about how many threads on same subject would be needed to require a separate section, but I do not remember the number at this time.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/21/2013 02:31 pm
Argentina launched a rocket from Chamical/CELPA on Dec 18 at 0742 local (1042 UTC?).
It is thought to have reached 49 km, so top edge of the stratosphere.
http://www.aeroespacio.com.ar/index.php/fuerza-aerea/405-la-fuerza-a%C3%A9rea-argentina-lanz%C3%B3-el-cohete-%E2%80%9Cexperiencia-centenario%E2%80%9D.html
http://interdefensa.argentinaforo.net/t7398p45-experiencia-centenario-cohete-sonda-evaluador-tecnologico-universitario

The rocket is called 'EXPERIENCIA CENTENARIO' - it has a diameter of 28 cm, the same as the Rigel/Canopus
rockets that Argentina launched in the 1970s, so I suspect there is some hardware heritage there.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Olaf on 12/24/2013 09:40 am
Today there was a launch of a RS-24 "Yars" from Plesetsk.
http://ria.ru/defense_safety/20131224/986114981.html
English version
http://en.ria.ru/military_news/20131224/185893612/Russia-Test-Fires-New-Yars-Ballistic-Missile-.html
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 12/27/2013 10:11 pm
http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/12/another_topol_launch_from_kapu.shtm

Topol launch Dec 27
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Steven Pietrobon on 12/28/2013 04:24 am
You missed the "l" at the end of your link.

http://russianforces.org/blog/2013/12/another_topol_launch_from_kapu.shtml
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: block51 on 01/02/2014 12:58 pm
High resolution, most up to date NASA sounding rocket "stable" picture.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/03/2014 05:45 pm
Israel conducted a successful non-intercept test of an Arrow III ABM earlier today. The missile reportedly launched from Palmachim and flew for 10 minutes, including manoeuvres while outside of the atmosphere. Not sure what time the launch took place, but from the time reports came out, probably in the morning UTC.

http://rt.com/news/israel-arrow-interceptor-test-123/
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/03/2014 06:05 pm
Israel conducted a successful non-intercept test of an Arrow III ABM earlier today. The missile reportedly launched from Palmachim and flew for 10 minutes, including manoeuvres while outside of the atmosphere. Not sure what time the launch took place, but from the time reports came out, probably in the morning UTC.

http://rt.com/news/israel-arrow-interceptor-test-123/

So, this was an anti-satellite test?
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/03/2014 06:23 pm
Israel conducted a successful non-intercept test of an Arrow III ABM earlier today. The missile reportedly launched from Palmachim and flew for 10 minutes, including manoeuvres while outside of the atmosphere. Not sure what time the launch took place, but from the time reports came out, probably in the morning UTC.

http://rt.com/news/israel-arrow-interceptor-test-123/

So, this was an anti-satellite test?

Anti-missile, but with no target
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 01/07/2014 11:24 pm
India successfully test-fires nuclear-capable missile

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/sci/2014-01/07/c_133026120.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/08/2014 12:59 am
India successfully test-fires nuclear-capable missile

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/sci/2014-01/07/c_133026120.htm

Apogee of 43.5 km according to this:
http://zeenews.india.com/news/nation/nuke-capable-prithvi-ii-missile-successfully-test-fired-from-odisha_902078.html

Not sure how that squares with some of the previous launches - Jonathan has some in his lists with apogees of around 100km - if this test was successful I'm surprised to see it so much lower.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Torlek on 01/08/2014 05:07 am
They were probably just flying a depressed trajectory.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/12/2014 03:16 am
India successfully test-fires nuclear-capable missile

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/sci/2014-01/07/c_133026120.htm

Apogee of 43.5 km according to this:
http://zeenews.india.com/news/nation/nuke-capable-prithvi-ii-missile-successfully-test-fired-from-odisha_902078.html

Not sure how that squares with some of the previous launches - Jonathan has some in his lists with apogees of around 100km - if this test was successful I'm surprised to see it so much lower.

tl;dr: "100 km" is a guess.

There is at least one Prithvi target launch in 2007 with a quoted apogee of 110 km. The other flights that I have
listed as "100 km?" are guesses based on the range, and indeed it's possible that 40-50 km apogee is the regular
apogee. I erred on the higher side to keep them visible in the list of things that  may have reached space, but welcome
any accurate information - and it looks like I should consider downgrading them.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: catdlr on 01/14/2014 11:40 pm
NASA postpones rocket launches from Wallops

Credit WTOP and Associated Press.

http://www.wtop.com/120/3541800/NASA-postpones-rocket-launches-from-Wallops
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/15/2014 04:44 pm
NASA postpones rocket launches from Wallops

Credit WTOP and Associated Press.

http://www.wtop.com/120/3541800/NASA-postpones-rocket-launches-from-Wallops

Launched at 09:09 UTC (04:09 local) this morning.
http://hamptonroads.com/2014/01/three-rockets-launched-wallops-island
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: antriksh on 01/20/2014 10:50 am

Agni-IV missile successfully test firedhttp://www.thehindu.com/news/national/agniiv-missile-successfully-test-fired/article5596563.ece (http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/agniiv-missile-successfully-test-fired/article5596563.ece)

 Agni-IV reaching a height of about 850 km and achieving its full range of 4,000 km. It weighs 17 tonnes and is 20 metres long.  two stages of solid propulsion. The payload, with a re—entry heat shield can withstand temperature of more than 3000 degree Celsius


(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/p350x350/1601529_522806691149994_736214004_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/20/2014 04:11 pm
Does anyone know the record for highest altitude suborbital rocket flight?  When China did its near-GEO altitude suborbital launch last year there was mention of it being the highest since 1976.

 - Ed Kyle
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/20/2014 08:03 pm
Does anyone know the record for highest altitude suborbital rocket flight?  When China did its near-GEO altitude suborbital launch last year there was mention of it being the highest since 1976.

 - Ed Kyle

If failed orbital launches count, Pioneer 1 reached about 140,000 km.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: edkyle99 on 01/20/2014 09:16 pm
Does anyone know the record for highest altitude suborbital rocket flight?  When China did its near-GEO altitude suborbital launch last year there was mention of it being the highest since 1976.

 - Ed Kyle

If failed orbital launches count, Pioneer 1 reached about 140,000 km.
Yes, that would count.  According to my references, Pioneer 1 had a 113,854 km apogee and a 43 hour, 17 minute long flight that began on October 11, 1958.  Pioneer 3, launched by a Juno II, also fell short but reached 108,702 km during a nearly 30 hour flight after a December 6, 1958 launch. 

For Pioneer 3, the difference between its suborbital trajectory and its planned solar orbit was its first stage cutting off only 3.6 seconds early.  This shows that these missions were very close to the fine line between suborbital and escape.  I wonder what the theoretical max suborbital apogee could be - and if anyone beat Pioneer 1.

 - Ed Kyle 
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: William Graham on 01/20/2014 09:22 pm
I wonder what the theoretical max suborbital apogee could be - and if anyone beat Pioneer 1.

I'd assume the theoretical maximum would be the edge of Earth's sphere of influence. Not sure what it would take to get there without reaching escape velocity though.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/24/2014 02:52 am
The claimed record, and highest deliberate suborbital attempt, was Blue Scout Jr O-1 in 1961, at 225000 km. However telemetry was lost prior to final stage burn so it's extremely dubious that it really got that high.

Pioneer 1 was the next highest.

You could go to the edge of the effective sphere of influence at about 1.5 million km, if you aimed perfectly
vertically - straight line orbit with zero sideways velocity and a very very carefully judged vertical velocity just below escape velocity
(and well away from the Moon)

In practice it'd be very hard to control the apogee accurately, small velocity changes would make a big difference in that range

Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 01/24/2014 02:58 am
Here are my candidates for high altitude suborbital launches, in order of claimed apogee in km (final column)
(values should be not too far off except for Kunpeng-7 and Blue Scout Jr O-1)

[Edit:] Sorry - I forgot the Luna failure of Apr 1960 which is claimed in some sources to have done a Pioneer-1-like high altitude flight.


Date                          Rocket type                 Flight                     Payload                 Launch Site              Apogee
1960 Oct  4 1523     Scout X-1                -      ST-2                 Radiation Probe        WI       LA3                 5600
1962 Mar 29 0727     Scout X-2                1C     ST-9                 P-21A                  WI       LA3                 6291
1961 Oct 19 1738     Scout X-1                -      ST-7                 P-21                   WI       LA3                 6855
2013 May 13 1258     DF-31                    ?      Kunpeng-7            -                      XSC      -                  10000
1976 Jun 18 1141     Scout D-1                -      S193C                GP-A                   WI       LA3A               10230
1963 Jul 30 1616:08  Blue Scout Jr            -      22-1/AD-622          OAR 22-1/AFCRL-1/21    CC       LC18A              11100
1965 May 12 1602:35  Blue Scout Jr            -      22-8 (OAR Probe 6)   OAR 22-8/AFCRL-335     CC       LC18A              13586
1965 Mar 30 1609:31  Blue Scout Jr            -      22-4 (OAR Probe 4)   OAR 22-4/AFCRL-35      CC       LC18A              16500
1965 Jun  9 1626:15  Blue Scout Jr            -      22-5 (OAR Probe 7)   OAR 22-5/AFWL-304      CC       LC18A              17533
1965 Apr  9 1810:37  Blue Scout Jr            -      22-9 (OAR Probe 5)   OAR 22-9/AFWL-14       CC       LC18A              25422
1960 Sep 21 1301:53  Blue Scout Jr            -      D-1                  HETS                   CC       LC18A              26700
1971 Sep 20 2331:00  Scout B                  -      S166C                BIC                    WI       LA3A               31479
1961 Dec  4 0400:16  Blue Scout Jr            -      O-2                  -                      PA       LC-A               44400
1958 Dec  6 0544:52  Juno II                  -      AM-11                Pioneer 3              CC LC5                     102200
1958 Oct 11 0842:13  Thor Able                -      130                  Pioneer 1              CC LC17                    113860
1960 Apr 15 1519     8K72                     -      L1-9                 E-3 No. 1 (Luna)       NIIP-5 LC1                 200000?
1961 Aug 17 1429     Blue Scout Jr            -      O-1                  HETS                   CC       LC18A             225000
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: albatros68 on 02/26/2014 06:53 pm
There is little information, but Argentina`s VEX1 might have been launched today with uncertain results
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: josespeck on 02/27/2014 04:23 pm
Bad:
http://puntaindioweb.com/el-cohete-despego-y-exploto.htm
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: jcm on 02/27/2014 07:21 pm
Bad:
http://puntaindioweb.com/el-cohete-despego-y-exploto.htm

So, to summarize: launched 2014 Feb 26  (morning local time in Argentina) from Punta Piedras, (about 35 26S 57 08W)
Reached 2 metres before exploding.  VEXI 1 is the rocket's name. - per wikipedia, planned apogee was 16 km,
a single stage propulsion test.
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: Satori on 02/27/2014 09:45 pm
Bad:
http://puntaindioweb.com/el-cohete-despego-y-exploto.htm

So, to summarize: launched 2014 Feb 26  (morning local time in Argentina) from Punta Piedras, (about 35 26S 57 08W)
Reached 2 metres before exploding.  VEXI 1 is the rocket's name. - per wikipedia, planned apogee was 16 km,
a single stage propulsion test.

The name is Vex 1A or sometimes VEx 1A (probably Vehiculo Experimental).

"Este prototipo tiene 4,5 metros de largo, pesa 2,8 toneladas, puede alcanzar una velocidad máxima de 828 kilómetros por hora y, a diferencia de los misiles, su motor funciona con combustible líquido."

Length - 4.5 meters
Weight - 2,800 kg
Maximum speed - 828 km/h
Liquid fuel propulsion
Title: Re: The suborbital thread!
Post by: baldusi on 02/27/2014 10:20 pm