Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-22 June/July 2021 (Splashdown 10 July 0329 UTC)  (Read 338858 times)

Offline Jansen

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https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1395770615395672070

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🧑‍🚀✨Heads up, space explorers!

On Wed., May 26 at 1pm ET, we'll discuss the innovative science launching on the next @SpaceX resupply flight to the @Space_Station including research to help us better understand how to thrive in microgravity!

Read on: https://go.nasa.gov/3484zQp
« Last Edit: 05/21/2021 10:48 pm by Jansen »

Offline Jansen

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https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-invites-media-to-briefing-on-science-launching-to-space-station/

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NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, May 26, to discuss select science investigations launching on the next SpaceX commercial resupply flight to the International Space Station. From research on water bears that could help understand human stress factors in space to testing ultrasound technologies for medical use on future deep space missions, the launch will deliver experiments to benefit people on and off the Earth.

Audio of the teleconference will stream live online at:

https://www.nasa.gov/live

SpaceX is targeting 1:29 p.m. Thursday, June 3, for the launch of its Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This will be SpaceX’s 22nd Commercial Resupply Services mission and the second cargo resupply mission on the company’s upgraded version of its Dragon spacecraft.

To participate in the teleconference, media must contact Kathryn Hambleton at: [email protected] by 11 a.m. Wednesday, May 26, for dial-in information.

Participants in the briefing will be:

Jennifer Buchli, deputy chief scientist for NASA’s International Space Station Program Science Office, who will share an overview of the research being conducted aboard the space station and how it benefits exploration and humanity

Dr. Thomas Boothby, assistant professor of molecular biology at the University of Wyoming and principal investigator for Cell Science-04, which will examine how tardigrades – commonly called water bears – adapt to conditions in low-Earth orbit, which could advance understanding of the stress factors affecting humans in space

Dr. Jamie Foster, professor in the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science at the University of Florida and principal investigator for the ADSEP-UMAMI investigation, which will study bobtail squid as a model to examine the effects of spaceflight on interactions between beneficial microbes and their animal hosts

Dr. Jonathan Himmelfarb, principal investigator for the Kidney Cells-02 tissue chip experiment, which could help develop better pharmaceuticals and therapies for treating kidney disease on Earth

Kadambari Suri, integration manager for the Butterfly IQ Technology demonstration, which will test a portable ultrasound technology that could provide important medical capabilities for future exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit

Maurice Marnat, payload manager and system engineer at the Centre national d'études spatiales, who will discuss Pilote, a technology demonstration testing the effectiveness of remotely operating robotic arms and space vehicles, using virtual reality and haptics interfaces

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft also will carry crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory to support the Expedition 65 and 66 crew.

The space station is a convergence of science, technology, and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and enables research not possible on Earth, and has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, 242 people, as well as a variety of international and commercial spacecraft, have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future human missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.
« Last Edit: 05/21/2021 10:53 pm by Jansen »

Online Conexion Espacial

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List of Cubesats that will be sent to the ISS on the CRS-22 mission:

1.   Cubesat Alpha from Cornell University | (1 kg)
2.   Cubesat ARKSat 1 from the University of Arkansas | (1 kg)
3.   Cubesat BeaverCube from Massachusetts Institute of Technology | (4 kg)
4.   Cubesat CaNOP of Carthage College | (4 kg)
5.   Cubesat CAPSat from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
6.   Cubesat EagleSat 2 from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
7.   Cubesat PR-CuNaR 2 of the Interamerican University of Puerto Rico
8.   Cubesat RamSat from Oak Ridge Public Schools | (2 kg)
9.   Cubesat Stratus from Michigan Technological University
10.   Cubesat SPACE-HAUC from the University of Massachusetts Lowell | (4 kg)
11.   Cubsar SOAR from the University of Manchester
« Last Edit: 05/26/2021 01:49 am by Conexion Espacial »
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Online Conexion Espacial

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I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Online Conexion Espacial

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I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Online Conexion Espacial

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« Last Edit: 05/26/2021 01:49 am by Conexion Espacial »
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Offline RamSatMentor

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Images of RamSat integration in Nanoracks deployer, Houston, March 2021...

Offline theonlyspace

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Where are all these cube sats carried aboard the cargo dragon?  The trunk or inside cargo section?  How does this deployer work? Is the deployer located on the outside of the dragon?

Offline RamSatMentor

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@theonlyspace RamSat is carried in deployer as cargo. Stowed on ISS for later deployment (approx 16 June for us). Deployer mounted to sliding table, through JAXA airlock, grappled by arm, pointed slightly below and behind station, and deployed via force of a long spring coil. Will remain in orbit for 12-18 months before orbital decay and reentry.

Online Conexion Espacial

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In this video you can see how the cubesats are prepared inside the iss
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Online Conexion Espacial

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and in this video you can see how the cubesats are launched.

I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Offline RamSatMentor

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Have there been any pictures of the C209 capsule yet?  (Other than the view of iROSA in the trunk, which is awesome! )

Online Conexion Espacial

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Have there been any pictures of the C209 capsule yet?  (Other than the view of iROSA in the trunk, which is awesome! )

there is nothing yet
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Offline nalawod

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I'm guessing no RTLS on this one since I see nothing about it in this thread? I'm really wanting to see another one!

Offline Jansen

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I'm guessing no RTLS on this one since I see nothing about it in this thread? I'm really wanting to see another one!

ASDS recovery is expected due to the mass profile of iROSA.

Offline Robotbeat

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I'm guessing no RTLS on this one since I see nothing about it in this thread? I'm really wanting to see another one!

ASDS recovery is expected due to the mass profile of iROSA.
Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline cdebuhr

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I'm guessing no RTLS on this one since I see nothing about it in this thread? I'm really wanting to see another one!
To the best of my recollection (Use with caution - YMMV), while the old Dragons would do RTLS, the heavier D2/Cargo Dragons are substantially heavier, and do not allow for this.  Thus, ASDS recovery is now the norm for ISS missions.  If I am demonstrably wrong on this, someone please correct me!

Offline joek

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Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.
Power density for ROSA is about double (but no absolute mass numbers with respect to ISS); see https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/system/downloadable_items/715_Solar_Power_Tech_Report_FINAL.PDF.

Offline Jansen

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Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.

Each SAW is 2400 pounds. The iROSAs will shadow 2/3s of the SAWs, but are 20% lighter.

So ~1280 pounds each, or around 2560 pounds (1161.2kg) for both iROSAs.

NASA should be releasing more concrete figures this week.
« Last Edit: 05/24/2021 10:45 pm by Jansen »

Offline nalawod

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I'm guessing no RTLS on this one since I see nothing about it in this thread? I'm really wanting to see another one!
To the best of my recollection (Use with caution - YMMV), while the old Dragons would do RTLS, the heavier D2/Cargo Dragons are substantially heavier, and do not allow for this.  Thus, ASDS recovery is now the norm for ISS missions.  If I am demonstrably wrong on this, someone please correct me!
Dang it!  I think you're correct. If this is now the norm, our best (and probably only) hope of RTLS is for FH launches.

Tags: cubesat 
 

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