Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-22 June/July 2021 (Splashdown 10 July 0329 UTC)  (Read 338583 times)

Offline hektor

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Is the vehicle known ?

Online vp.

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Dragon C209

Offline Jansen

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https://fcc.report/ELS/Space-Explorations-Technologies/0583-EX-ST-2021

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This application uses information from previous grant 1489-EX-ST-2020. This STA is necessary for Dragon2 capsule command and recovery for the upcoming SpaceX CRS mission to the International Space Station. The launch and re-entry licensing authority is the FAA. Launch is also to be coordinated with the Eastern Range. On-orbit rendezvous with the ISS is to be coordinated with NASA.

Offline Jansen

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https://fcc.report/ELS/Space-Exploration-Technologies-Corp/0582-EX-ST-2021

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This application uses information from previous grant 1390-EX-ST-2020. This STA is necessary for Dragon2 capsule telemetry, tracking, and command, for the upcoming SpaceX CRS mission to the International Space Station. The launch and re-entry licensing authority is the FAA. Launch is also to be coordinated with the Eastern Range. On-orbit rendezvous with the ISS is to be coordinated with the NASA.

Offline Norm38

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According to Next Spaceflight, booster 1067.1 is going to be used for this flight.

https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/109

Is there a specific NASA requirement for this flight (solar arrays) that calls for a new booster?  Or is that just how it worked out?  They could use B1061-3 instead since NASA hasn't approved -3 flights for crew yet.  SpX-21 launched on a -4 booster.

I'm curious if anyone has heard anything.
« Last Edit: 04/30/2021 02:04 pm by Norm38 »

Offline Jansen

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https://twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1386525198766145541

Based on the NASA CRS2 workflow, it should be heading to KSC pretty soon.
« Last Edit: 04/30/2021 02:52 pm by Jansen »

Offline gemmy0I

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According to Next Spaceflight, booster 1067.1 is going to be used for this flight.

https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/109

Is there a specific NASA requirement for this flight (solar arrays) that calls for a new booster?  Or is that just how it worked out?  They could use B1061-3 instead since NASA hasn't approved -3 flights for crew yet.  SpX-21 launched on a -4 booster.

I'm curious if anyone has heard anything.
My (totally unofficial) guess is that the driving factor is not CRS-22 but a different mission. Since the start of the CRS-2 contract, it's evident that NASA has contractually agreed to a more flexible booster assignment process for CRS missions that allows SpaceX to select and certify boosters that have flown multiple times and for non-NASA missions. The cautious "booster must be new or have flown only once before on a NASA-scrutinized mission" process now seems to be reserved for crew missions - and probably for high-value uncrewed missions, like the DART probe which is a one-of-a-kind spacecraft that needs to hit a tight launch window.

DART was originally intended to fly on 1063.2, which had flown Sentinel-6 for NASA as its .1. But since DART has been delayed to its secondary launch window in November, 1063 was shipped to the Cape and is presumed to be entering the Starlink/commercial rotation there to replace the loss of 1059 on landing. Assuming that NASA is still holding the DART booster to the cautious "new or .2 with previous flight scrutinized" standard (which is likely written into the contract for the mission), the choice to redirect 1063 for other missions forces SpaceX to introduce a new booster, as they have no others in the fleet right now with just one flight.

My guess is that the plan is to fly CRS-22 on 1067.1 and then ship it west to fly DART as 1067.2. The timeline works out with plenty of margin, and it lets SpaceX put the new booster (that I'm surmising they have to build in order to fulfill the DART contract) to work right away instead of having it sit in a hangar until November. Since they need pretty much all the current fleet for Starlink, using 1067.1 for CRS-22 allows them to avoid diverting a booster from the Starlink rotation for that mission. Note also that there is SXM-8 - a commercial mission which is likely allowed to use any non-leading-edge booster - in June which will likely draw from the main rotation.

Regarding 1061, I suspect that SpaceX may continue to hold it for crew missions as part of a process to expand the envelope of what they're certified to fly crew on. During the Crew-2 press conferences, it was stated (I believe by Steve Stich, NASA's Commercial Crew program manager) that the current approval is for new or once-NASA-flown boosters for crew, but that the door is open for SpaceX to go through the process to certify more than that, just as they did to get as far as they are now. That sounds to me like a clear indication that SpaceX is, in fact, actively pursuing certification for crew on .3's and beyond. I wouldn't be surprised if we see 1061.3 fly either Crew-3 or Inspiration4. (Inspiration4 in particular would not be subject to NASA certification, but would be a great opportunity for SpaceX to use as an exhibit in the certification process, since NASA will be watching the mission closely.)

Looking at the manifest, I see that there are a few other missions scheduled for June/July which could throw wildcards into these assumptions. There's NROL-87 from Vandenberg and NROL-85 from the Cape in June, with SARah 1 from Vandenberg and Transporter-2 from the Cape in July. The NROLs and perhaps SARah will probably require new boosters. It's also likely that some of those missions will slip to later dates (SARah has slipped repeatedly for years, and NROLs are always mysterious). So who knows what impact those will have on booster plans. :)

One other possibility would be to use 1067.1 for CRS-22, and then 1067.2 for Crew-3 (with 1061.3 for Inspiration4). In that case DART could perhaps fly on the .2 of one of the new boosters that will need to be introduced at Vandenberg this summer, e.g. for NROL-87 or SARah 1.

Offline gongora

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The only SpaceX flights expected from Vandy this year are Worldview Legion Flight 1, DART, and maybe some Starlink.

Offline gemmy0I

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The only SpaceX flights expected from Vandy this year are Worldview Legion Flight 1, DART, and maybe some Starlink.
Good to know. I was looking at the Reddit manifest which has NROL-87 and SARah 1 listed for June and July 2021. I'm not surprised to hear that SARah 1 isn't expected this year, since major schedule slips are practically its middle name, but that's interesting that an NRO mission would be punted by a full half-year this late in the game.

If NROL-85 (a Cape mission listed as June 2021 on the Reddit manifest) holds, then that's presumably a new booster introduced at the Cape. That gives two logical possibilities with regard to 1067:

1. CRS-22 on 1067.1, DART on 1067.2
2. CRS-22 on 1067.1, Crew-3 on 1067.2, NROL-85 on 10XX.1, DART on 10XX.2

Offline Jansen

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NROL missions on a commercial contract are able to use mid level boosters, like NROL-108.

Starting to drift a bit though, so let’s move it to the manifest discussion if you want to discuss further.

Offline jacqmans

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May 03, 2021
MEDIA ADVISORY M21-052

NASA Invites Media to Next SpaceX Cargo Launch to Space Station

Media accreditation is open for the launch of the next SpaceX delivery of NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station.

SpaceX’s 22nd Commercial Resupply Services mission – the second cargo resupply mission on the company’s upgraded version of its Dragon spacecraft – is targeted to launch Thursday, June 3, on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at Kennedy. Credentialing deadlines are as follows:

International media residing in the United States must apply by Thursday, May 6.
U.S. media must apply by Wednesday, May 12.
All media accreditation requests should be submitted online at:

https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

Media with special logistics requests for Kennedy, such as space for satellite trucks, tents, or electrical connections, must contact Jerry Bernfeld at: [email protected] by Wednesday, May 12.

For questions about accreditation, please email: [email protected] For other questions, please contact Kennedy’s newsroom at 321-867-2468.

Among the investigations arriving inside the Dragon’s pressurized capsule will be a variety of research experiments, including an experiment that could help develop better pharmaceuticals and therapies for treating kidney disease on Earth, as well as a study of cotton root systems that could identify varieties of plants that require less water and pesticides, and two model organism investigations. One study will look at bobtail squid as a model to examine the effects of spaceflight on interactions between beneficial microbes and their animal hosts. Another will examine tardigrades' adaptation to the harsh environment of space, which could contribute to long-term problem solving for vaccine production, distribution, and storage on Earth. Investigators also will test a portable ultrasound technology, and the first two of six new roll-out solar arrays, based on a design tested on the orbiting laboratory in 2017, will arrive in Dragon’s unpressurized spacecraft trunk.

Each resupply mission to the station delivers scientific investigations in the areas of biology and biotechnology, physical sciences, and Earth and space science. Advances in these areas will help keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars. Space station research through the ISS National Laboratory also provides opportunities for other U.S. government agencies, private industry, and academic and research institutions to conduct microgravity research that leads to new technologies, medical treatments, and products that improve life on Earth.

This is the second SpaceX mission to deliver science investigations, supplies, and equipment for NASA under the agency’s second Commercial Resupply Services contract. Cargo resupply from U.S. companies ensures a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station, significantly increasing NASA's ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space. SpaceX has completed 21 cargo resupply missions to and from the space station, providing more than 100,000 pounds of supplies and approximately 80,000 pounds of return mass.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology, and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and enables research not possible on Earth. Humans have occupied the space station continuously since November 2000. In that time, 244 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and, eventually, to Mars.

For launch countdown coverage, NASA’s launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Offline Rondaz

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The media is invited to the launch of the next @SpaceX Cargo Dragon mission from @NASAKennedy on June 3.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1389232338119192588

Offline Jansen

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Offline gongora

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https://twitter.com/RedwireSpace/status/1390297859782811648
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The first pair of our iROSA solar arrays have officially been delivered to @BoeingSpace, following a series of successful deployment tests. The new arrays are set to launch to @Space_Station on the next SpaceX cargo resupply mission. (Camera with flash: @NASA) https://bit.ly/3ekTz8e

Offline Jansen

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Is this still a 30 day stay or is it stretching to 60 days? Its been a while since we had an updated FPIP (which last said CRS-23 was to be the first to extend to 60).

If 60, then its obviously tight to the new starliner NET.

It has always been 30 days. There haven’t been any indications that this would be extended to 60 days, especially since the SSEP payloads weren’t designed for that period.
« Last Edit: 05/06/2021 06:26 pm by Jansen »

Offline cohberg

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especially since the SSEP payloads weren’t designed for that period.

Good point. I was going to stay that Cygnus regularly stays over 30 days and carries SSEP payloads without issue but needed to remember that CRS-22's specific SSEPs that were designed long ago for 30 days.


Offline jacqmans

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Offline TJL

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Offline Jansen

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https://fcc.report/ELS/Space-Explorations-Technologies/0583-EX-ST-2021

Quote
This application uses information from previous grant 1489-EX-ST-2020. This STA is necessary for Dragon2 capsule command and recovery for the upcoming SpaceX CRS mission to the International Space Station. The launch and re-entry licensing authority is the FAA. Launch is also to be coordinated with the Eastern Range. On-orbit rendezvous with the ISS is to be coordinated with NASA.

Granted
https://apps.fcc.gov/els/GetAtt.html?id=273235

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1393365765433212932

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Last night after work, I drove into McGregor and you’ll never guess what I saw... @SpaceX’s Falcon 9 first stage booster, B1067! 🔥🚀🔥

Looked like it was packed, wrapped up, and ready to get on the road to Florida!

(*CRS-22 launch: NET June 3 at KSC! 🤩)

(...)

https://twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1393365781157658624

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If you recall, last month, B1067 looked much more like this...
Vertical! (And frequently rumbling and roaring 🔥🚀🔥)

#McGregorTX #SpaceXTests

twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1393365790645235714

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So, I drove into McGregor early this morning, and to my sudden surprise... ☕️🚛☀️

https://twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1393365990377988097

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The Falcon 9 first stage, B1067, is now on the road to the Space Coast for its upcoming launch of the Cargo Dragon - @Space_Station Resupply mission  🤩🚀🛰🌎✨
« Last Edit: 05/15/2021 04:36 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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