Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-22 June/July 2021 (Splashdown 10 July 0329 UTC)  (Read 338844 times)

Offline Jansen

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« Last Edit: 04/02/2021 06:40 pm by Jansen »

Offline RamSatMentor

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Came here to learn what SORR stands for - thanks!
Confirming that RamSat (https://sites.google.com/view/ramsat/home), a 2U cubesat developed by the students of Robertsville Middle School, Oak Ridge, TN, has been delivered for integration as cargo on CRS-22. It is in a Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer with one other satellite.
« Last Edit: 04/02/2021 09:42 pm by RamSatMentor »

Offline Jansen

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More info on SORR for you:
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The SORR is a NASA ISS review where readiness for the launch and on-orbit operations of the Commercial Segment is reviewed with emphasis on the first flight element.  A comprehensive review of any open work items is conducted and assessed for risk of proceeding with flight operations.  Any open items are tracked as constraints for the FRR.  The Contractor shall provide support to NASA in assessing risk of any open work associated with the first element, and presentation materials as requested by NASA.

Offline Sesquipedalian

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https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/
SFN confirming KSC LC-39A.

It would be very surprising if any SpaceX CRS2 mission did not launch from LC-39A.  Cargo late load is done through the Crew Access Arm.

Offline Jansen

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It would be very surprising if any SpaceX CRS2 mission did not launch from LC-39A.  Cargo late load is done through the Crew Access Arm.

Generally yes, but not every mission necessarily requires late loading.

There was NASA documentation indicating that the launch was originally going to be from SLC-40.

Offline Comga

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It would be very surprising if any SpaceX CRS2 mission did not launch from LC-39A.  Cargo late load is done through the Crew Access Arm.

Generally yes, but not every mission necessarily requires late loading.

There was NASA documentation indicating that the launch was originally going to be from SLC-40.

... and a statement that NASA can still do late loading on the LC-40 TEL like they did for CRS-1.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline Jansen

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From Ben Cooper:
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Falcon 9 from pad 39A will launch the next Dragon resupply mission, CRS-22, on June 3 at around 1pm EDT

Offline Jansen

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https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/team-readies-solar-arrays-for-flight-to-station

Team Readies Solar Arrays for Flight to Station

NASA and Boeing workers lift solar arrays into flight support equipment on April 2, 2021, in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASAís Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 63- by- 20-foot solar arrays will launch to the International Space Station later this year.

They are the first two of six new solar arrays that in total will produce more than 120 kilowatts of electricity from the Sunís energy, enough to power more than 40 average U.S. homes. Combined with the eight original, larger arrays, this advanced hardware will provide 215 kilowatts of energy, a 20 to 30 percent increase in power, helping maximize the space stationís capabilities for years to come. The arrays will produce electricity to sustain the stationís systems and equipment, plus augment the electricity available to continue a wide variety of public and private experiments and research in the microgravity environment of low-Earth orbit.

Most of the station systems, including its batteries, scientific equipment racks, and communications equipment have been upgraded since humans began a continuous presence on the orbiting laboratory in November 2000. For more than two decades, astronauts have lived and worked on this unique orbiting lab, supporting scientific research that has led to numerous discoveries that benefit people on Earth and prepare for future Artemis missions to the Moon and beyond.

Photo Credit: NASA/Frank Michaux
« Last Edit: 04/10/2021 03:35 am by Jansen »

Offline jacqmans

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Offline rsdavis9

Are those going to fit in the trunk? They look pretty long?
With ELV best efficiency was the paradigm. The new paradigm is reusable, good enough, and commonality of design.
Same engines. Design once. Same vehicle. Design once. Reusable. Build once.

Offline woods170

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Are those going to fit in the trunk? They look pretty long?


Naturally they will fit in the trunk. Otherwise they wouldn't be going up to ISS on Dragon.

Boeing may be silly lately, but they are not THAT stupid.

Offline rockets4life97

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Are those going to fit in the trunk? They look pretty long?

The answer is the Dragon trunk is bigger than you thought.

Offline Comga

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Are those going to fit in the trunk?
They look pretty long?

The answer is the Dragon trunk is bigger than you thought.

This is obvious.
Does anyone have some dimensions?
(Sorry I am not in a position to search for them at the moment.)
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline rockets4life97

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Does anyone have some dimensions?

On space.com/dragon the dimensions provided are trunk volume 37m cubed and diameter of 4 m. Some napkin math solving for height of a cylinder gets you 2.94 m.


Offline Jansen

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Does anyone have some dimensions?
(Sorry I am not in a position to search for them at the moment.)

~20 feet long

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20190032191/downloads/20190032191.pdf
« Last Edit: 04/11/2021 05:18 pm by Jansen »

Offline Jansen

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Does anyone have some dimensions?

On space.com/dragon the dimensions provided are trunk volume 37m cubed and diameter of 4 m. Some napkin math solving for height of a cylinder gets you 2.94 m.

Except there is significant internal volume that is unusable, especially at the bottom.

Offline gongora

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Does anyone have some dimensions?
(Sorry I am not in a position to search for them at the moment.)

~20 feet long

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20190032191/downloads/20190032191.pdf

They're folded in half

Offline cohberg

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Does anyone have some dimensions?

On space.com/dragon the dimensions provided are trunk volume 37m cubed and diameter of 4 m. Some napkin math solving for height of a cylinder gets you 2.94 m.

Except there is significant internal volume that is unusable, especially at the bottom.

Per DOUG, D2's trunk is 3.56m

To note: the NanoRacks render above is with the D1 trunk (not D2's). Keep in mind that D2's trunk is longer [1][2]. With D2's trunk, there is plenty of vertical and horizontal clearance for the arrays.


Offline Jansen

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Online Elthiryel

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According to Next Spaceflight, booster 1067.1 is going to be used for this flight.

https://nextspaceflight.com/launches/details/109
GO for launch, GO for age of reflight

Tags: cubesat 
 

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