Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : Starlink group 4-8 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 21 February 2022 (14:44 UTC)  (Read 37225 times)

Online zubenelgenubi

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Thread for the Starlink 4-8 group launch from Florida.

NSF Threads for Starlink 4-8: Discussion

Launch February 21, 2022 at 14:44 UTC (9:32 am EST) from CCSFS SLC-40 on booster 1058-11.  ASDS landing on A Shortfall of Gravitas is successful.

Payload 46 Starlink satellites to 53.2 degree inclination on SE trajectory.  Initial orbit of 325 x 337 km.  On the Starlink Group 4-5 webcast it was mentioned that the southeast trajectory is to increase the recovery weather availability for the booster and fairings during the winter months.

Quote
SpaceX is targeting Sunday, February 20 for a Falcon 9 launch of 46 Starlink satellites to low Earth orbit from Space Launch Complex (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The instantaneous launch window is at 11:13 a.m. EST, or 16:13 UTC, and a backup opportunity is available on Monday, February 21 at 9:32 a.m. EST, or 14:32 UTC.

The first stage booster supporting this mission previously launched Crew Demo-2, ANASIS-II, CRS-21, Transporter-1, Transporter-3, and five Starlink missions. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the A Shortfall of Gravitas droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. This is the fourth flight for both fairing halves supporting this mission.

Please use the Starlink Discussion Thread for all general discussion on Starlink.

Check the Starlink Index Thread for links to more Starlink information.

L2 SpaceX:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=60.0

From a previous mission's Press Kit:
Quote
Each Starlink satellite weights approximately 260 kg and features a compact, flat-panel design that minimizes volume, allowing for a dense launch stack to take full advantage of Falcon 9’s launch capabilities. With four powerful phased array and two parabolic antennas on each satellite ... At end of their life cycle, the satellites will utilize their on-board propulsion system to deorbit over the course of a few months. In the unlikely event their propulsion system becomes inoperable, the satellites will burn up in Earth’s atmosphere within 1-5 years, significantly less than the hundreds or thousands of years required at higher altitudes. Further, Starlink components are designed for full demisability.

Starlink is targeting service to near global coverage of the populated world by 2021. Additional information on the system can be found at starlink.com.
« Last Edit: 02/25/2022 07:29 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Cross-posts

NET February 1:
Starlink 4-8, Mission 1720, another one with the SE trajectory
2042-EX-ST-2021

Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated January 27:
Quote
Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on TBA.

NET February:
Next Spaceflight

SFN Launch Schedule, updated January 27: February

In my opinion, ASDS availability is the controlling parameter.  As long as A Shortfall of Gravitas is the only drone recovery barge available, launches are limited by the amount of time needed between successful booster landings--landing, return to Port Canaveral, booster unloading, ship refurbishment, crew rotation if needed, then sailing again for the recovery zone.

Just Read the Instructions has been undergoing repairs to damage inflicted after the first stage recovery on December 21.



Space Coast orbital launches in the immediate future:
2022 Launched:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

FAILURE
February 10 NET Dec 1 2021/NLT July 2022 NET Dec 2021 NET Jan 2022 Jan Jan 18 Jan TBD Jan 23 Jan 26? TBD Feb Feb 5 Feb 6 Feb 7 NET Feb 8 Feb 9 - VCLS Demo 2A: BAMA-1, INCA, QubeSat, R5-S1 (ELaNa 41) CURIE A, CURIE B - Rocket 3.3 (Astra) [LV0008] - Canaveral SLC-46 Kodiak LP-3B / Kwajalein - 20:00 18:00 to 21:00 Feb 5 19:10, 20:30 Feb 7 18:00, 18:50 20:00 to 21:00

February 21 NET Aug 2021 NET Dec 2021 TBD NET Q1 NET Feb 1 NET early Feb Feb 20 - Starlink 4-8 4-? group? (x46 x60 x53? x49) (flight 37 TBD) [v1.5 L8 v1.0 L34 L-TBD] - Falcon 9-141 (1058.11 ASOG S) - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A - 14:44:20 15:00 to 19:00 or 14:54 16:13:00 or 16:03
(mid-inclination Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

2022 Scheduled:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

March 1 Dec 2021 Dec 7, 2021 Jan 8 Feb 16 - GOES-T - Atlas V 541 AV-095 - Canaveral SLC-41- 21:38-23:38 21:33 to 23:33 TBD 21:40 to 23:40

March 3 NET Aug 2021 NET Jan TBD NETQ1 NET Feb NET Feb 15 early March - Starlink 4-9 4-? group? 4-? (x46 x60 x53? x49) (flight 39 TBD) [v1.5 L10 v1.0 L35 L-TBD] - Falcon 9-143 (1060.11 JRTI S) - Kennedy LC-39A / Canaveral SLC-40
(mid-inclination Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

NET early March NET Feb 25 - Starlink 4-10 (x46 x49) (flight TBD) [v1.5 L-TBD] - Falcon 9-144 (S) - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A
(mid-inclination Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

NET March 15 - Starlink 4-12 (x46 x49) (flight TBD) [v1.5 L-TBD] - Falcon 9 (S) - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A
(mid-inclination Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

March 30 Oct 2021 NET Jan Feb 21 Feb 28 Mar 31 - Axiom-1 (AX-1) Crew Dragon Endeavour? Resilience - Falcon 9 (S) - Kennedy LC-39A - 18:45 ~06:00 ~19:10?
(ISS flights: 22-26 minutes earlier/day)

Q1/NET H2 March Q3 2021 Q4 2021 end of 2021 Dec 2021 early Q1 Q1 or Q2 - O3b mPower 1, 2, 3 - Falcon 9 (S?) - Canaveral SLC-40 / Kennedy LC-39A

Changes on December 11th, 2020
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« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 04:34 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Possible first stages for Starlink 4-8: 1062.5 and 1058.11, with 1049.11 as a lesser possibility.

1049.11 appears to be held for the expendable O3b triplet launch from Florida coming up.  It hasn't been used for Starlink launches since it returned to FloridaI.

1062.5 could be held for Axiom-1.  1067.4 is being held for Crew-4.  1060.11 will probably not be available yet.

We on the outside do not know what the current disposition of B1069 is.  We have not yet seen 1053.3 with conversion work completed to single stick.

1051.12, 1063.4, and 1071.1 are on the west coast (Hawthorne? or Vandenberg).

My >guess< regarding Static Fire or not would be:
No Static Fire, for either 1062.5 or 1058.11.

Edit Feb 18: First stage is 1058.11.

Edited
« Last Edit: 02/18/2022 10:12 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline crandles57

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Nextspaceflight seems to have ordered 4-9 before 4-8. Is this likely and/or based on any reason?

The FCC STAs have 4-8 from 1 Feb and 4-9 from 15 Feb so that doesn't seem to support it.


1062 flew 6 Jan, 1058 flew 13 Jan, so not a great deal of turnaround time though no need to beat record 27 days.

Running out of boosters so a slower launch cadence in Feb? Or maybe they are forced into using 1049 again before its final flight?

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Nextspaceflight seems to have ordered 4-9 before 4-8. Is this likely and/or based on any reason?

The FCC STAs have 4-8 from 1 Feb and 4-9 from 15 Feb so that doesn't seem to support it.


1062 flew 6 Jan, 1058 flew 13 Jan, so not a great deal of turnaround time though no need to beat record 27 days.

Running out of boosters so a slower launch cadence in Feb? Or maybe they are forced into using 1049 again before its final flight?
It's just that it was ordered this way, maybe because of NET February, but for the moment the same order of launching is followed.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Nextspaceflight seems to have ordered 4-9 before 4-8. Is this likely and/or based on any reason?

The FCC STAs have 4-8 from 1 Feb and 4-9 from 15 Feb so that doesn't seem to support it.


1062 flew 6 Jan, 1058 flew 13 Jan, so not a great deal of turnaround time though no need to beat record 27 days.

Running out of boosters so a slower launch cadence in Feb? Or maybe they are forced into using 1049 again before its final flight?

Don't read into the launch order. It's just a consequence of the code behind the scenes.
Rocket Enthusiast and Manager for Next Spaceflight.

Online zubenelgenubi

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No specified launch date(s) yet...
Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated January 31, after the CSG-2 launch:
Quote
Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on February/March TBA.
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No specified launch date(s) yet...
Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated January 31, after the CSG-2 launch:
Quote
Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on February/March TBA.
After the two releases tomorrow there will be a small break of a few weeks, so in February and Marchwe will have few releases, maybe two Starlink missions in February.
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Re: SpaceX F9 : Starlink group 4-8 : Florida : February 2022
« Reply #8 on: 02/04/2022 06:38 pm »
Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated February 3:
Quote
The next SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another Starlink batch on February.
Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on February/March TBA.
No specified launch date(s) yet...
Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated January 31, after the CSG-2 launch:
Quote
Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on February/March TBA.

SFN, SpaceX launches third Falcon 9 rocket mission in three days, February 3
Quote
SpaceX plans to launch more Starlink missions in late February from Florida and California.
« Last Edit: 02/05/2022 03:38 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Updated February 7:
https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

Starlink Group 4-8 is scheduled for February 20th within a four-hour period of 15:00 UTC to 19:00 UTC. Two instantaneous opportunities will be chosen later.
Same source: launch from SLC-40
« Last Edit: 02/08/2022 02:04 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline txgho

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Any indications of a higher release point given the fate of 4-7?
Some noise on the geomag storm activity expanded the outer layer of atmosphere to reach the initial orbit level of 4-7.
Space weather reporting indicates this was not an exceptionally strong storm but it coincides with a weaker global magnetic field and reduced deflection to the upper atmosphere.
Not seeing any gov sources publishing but I am not looking for gov sources.

Online Alexphysics

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We won't know anything about that until SpaceX releases the pre-launch TLE's for this mission

Offline lenny97

Ben Cooper:
Quote
Falcon 9, February 20 @ about 10am or 1pm EST (pad 40).

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Ben Cooper:
Quote
Falcon 9, February 20 @ about 10am or 1pm EST (pad 40).
Two backup times are mentioned, at 1 and 2 o'clock, probably a mistake.

Quote
Falcon 9, February 20 @ about 10am or 1pm EST (pad 40)


The next SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another Starlink batch from pad 40 on February 20 likely around 10am or 2pm EST.
« Last Edit: 02/14/2022 02:36 pm by Conexion Espacial »
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« Last Edit: 02/15/2022 01:32 pm by Conexion Espacial »
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Offline Ken the Bin

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NGA notices:

My calculated launch times:
 Date   Primary  Secondary
Feb 20  ~14:54   ~~16:31
Feb 21  ~14:32   ~~16:09
Feb 22  ~14:11   ~~15:48
Feb 23  ~13:49   ~~15:26
Feb 24  ~13:27   ~~15:04
Feb 25  ~13:06   ~~14:43

Note: SFN has 16:13 as the secondary time for Feb 20.  I have 16:31.  I've made sure that I didn't transpose digits, but the disagreement is why I'm less confident about my secondary times.  If 16:13 turns out to be correct, then subtract 18 minutes from all of my secondary times to get the correct values.

Quote from: NGA
150627Z FEB 22
NAVAREA IV 166/22(11,26).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   201424Z TO 201731Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   211402Z TO 211709Z, 221341Z TO 221648Z,
   231319Z TO 231626Z, 241257Z TO 241604Z
   AND 251236Z TO 251543Z FEB IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-37-52N 080-36-51W, 28-36-00N 080-21-00W,
      27-59-00N 079-12-00W, 27-55-00N 079-15-00W,
      28-30-10N 080-32-53W.
   B. 25-59-00N 076-00-00W, 26-40-00N 075-09-00W,
      25-37-00N 073-53-00W, 24-53-00N 074-44-00W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 251643Z FEB 22.
Quote from: NGA
150609Z FEB 22
HYDROPAC 400/22(GEN).
SOUTHWESTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
SOUTH ATLANTIC.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   201613Z TO 201858Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   211551Z TO 211836Z, 221530Z TO 221815Z,
   231508Z TO 231753Z, 241446Z TO 241731Z
   AND 251425Z TO 251710Z FEB IN AREA BOUND BY
   35-59S 050-22W, 35-28S 049-58W,
   37-16S 045-27W, 45-17S 028-19W,
   47-50S 020-18W, 49-51S 011-01W,
   51-05S 000-43E, 50-46S 014-54E,
   50-33S 021-34E, 46-52S 039-17E,
   43-19S 050-25E, 44-37S 051-06E,
   54-16S 018-06E, 54-22S 004-06E,
   54-22S 000-43E, 54-28S 004-31W,
   53-15S 013-27W, 51-14S 023-03W,
   47-53S 033-10W, 42-56S 042-53W,
   39-07S 048-08W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 251810Z FEB 22.
Quote from: NGA
150555Z FEB 22
HYDROLANT 448/22(GEN).
SOUTH ATLANTIC.
SOUTHWESTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   201613Z TO 201858Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   211551Z TO 211836Z, 221530Z TO 221815Z,
   231508Z TO 231753Z, 241446Z TO 241731Z
   AND 251425Z TO 251710Z FEB IN AREA BOUND BY
   35-59S 050-22W, 35-28S 049-58W,
   37-16S 045-27W, 45-17S 028-19W,
   47-50S 020-18W, 49-51S 011-01W,
   51-05S 000-43E, 50-46S 014-54E,
   50-33S 021-34E, 46-52S 039-17E,
   43-19S 050-25E, 44-37S 051-06E,
   54-16S 018-06E, 54-22S 004-06E,
   54-22S 000-43E, 54-28S 004-31W,
   53-15S 013-27W, 51-14S 023-03W,
   47-53S 033-10W, 42-56S 042-53W,
   39-07S 048-08W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 251810Z FEB 22.

Online zubenelgenubi

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Cross-post; my personal opinion is that SFN transposed the minute digits of the secondary launch time.  (Edit: my opinion was wrong.)
https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/
Quote
Feb. 20 • Falcon 9 • Starlink 4-8
Launch times: 1454 or 1613 GMT (9:54 or 11:13 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with another batch of Starlink internet satellites. [Feb. 14]



On February 15, I noticed A Shortfall of Gravitas is listed as the ASDS:
Next Spaceflight

Edited
« Last Edit: 02/17/2022 08:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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ASOG is leaving Port Canaveral
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Offline Ken the Bin

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L-3 weather forecast.  80% 'Go' for February 20.  90% 'Go' for February 21.  Upper-Level Wind Shear risk and Booster Recovery Weather risk are both Low-Moderate for Feb 20.  Booster Recovery Weather risk is Low-Moderate for Feb 21.  All other Additional Risk Criteria are Low.

Note: Based on the time of the validity period, it appears that SpaceX is targeting the Secondary time on February 20.

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Next Spaceflight lists the secondary launch time on February 20 as the only launch time.
11:13 am EST = 16:13 UTC

Note: Based on the time of the validity period, it appears that SpaceX is targeting the Secondary time on February 20.
« Last Edit: 02/17/2022 08:06 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Departure! Doug is outbound for the Starlink misson on Sunday. Supporting fairing recovery and droneship operations.

Heading ~640km downrange to join A Shortfall of Gravitas and tug Zion Falgout.

The behaviour of ASOG droneship has been a bit strange since it left Port yesterday.... been sailing dead slow and not-always in the right direction...

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1494441686466015237
« Last Edit: 02/17/2022 10:27 pm by Rondaz »

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We won't know anything about that until SpaceX releases the pre-launch TLE's for this mission

And here they are the pre-launch TLE's. 46 satellites and the launch profile will be with two burns going into a 325x337km orbit.

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1494572041470550016

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https://twitter.com/baserunner0723/status/1494673941218185220

Quote
#Starlink Group 4-8 L-2 forecast
2/20: 90% GO; primary risks: liftoff winds, cumulus clouds w/ low-mod upper lvl wind and booster recovery risk
24hr delay: 90% GO; primary concern: cumulus clouds w/ moderate booster recovery risk

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We won't know anything about that until SpaceX releases the pre-launch TLE's for this mission

And here they are the pre-launch TLE's. 46 satellites and the launch profile will be with two burns going into a 325x337km orbit.

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1494572041470550016

Looks like they're launching 3 fewer satellites to a higher orbit than normal. Probably to avoid another 4-7 fiasco caused by the geomagnetic storm.

Offline ZachS09

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To add onto T.S. Kelso’s tweet, this mission will utilize two M-Vac burns; the second one being at apogee followed by a deorbit burn on the second orbit.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

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Weather forecasts for a pair of launches this weekend.

75% GO for Antares and Cygnus NG-17, Saturday at 12:40 PM EST from Wallops.

80% GO for Falcon 9 and Starlink Group 4-8, Sunday at 11:13 AM EST from SLC-40, Cape Canaveral.

https://twitter.com/TGMetsFan98/status/1494503646079459328

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"Press kit" with OCR

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B0158 will be in charge of launching the mission, its eleventh flight.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Online zubenelgenubi

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Next Spaceflight

B0158 will be in charge of launching the mission, its eleventh flight.
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
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Offline scr00chy

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Quote
This is the fourth flight for both fairing halves supporting this mission.

https://www.spacex.com/launches/sl4-8/

Offline Rondaz

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Targeting Sunday, February 20 at 11:13 a.m. EST for a Falcon 9 launch of 46 Starlink satellites to low Earth orbit from SLC-40 in Florida. Weather for liftoff is currently 90% favorable but team is keeping an eye on recovery weather..

https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1494808667622760450


Offline Rondaz

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SOUTHERLY TRAJECTORY LAUNCH ALERT

This Sunday, SLD 45 will support the Starlink 4-8 launch, which will feature a southerly trajectory.
This means launch hazard areas will contain different locations than previous launches & will be larger than normal for your safety.

https://twitter.com/SLDelta45/status/1494824051830837249

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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L-1 forecast still 90% GO

Offline Rondaz

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#Starlink Group 4-8 L-1 forecast 2/20: 90% GO; primary risks: liftoff winds, cumulus clouds w/ low-mod upper lvl wind and booster recovery risk 24hr delay: 90% GO; primary concern: cumulus clouds w/ moderate booster recovery risk

https://twitter.com/baserunner0723/status/1495066205165699074

Offline ZachS09

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Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

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Next Spaceflight

B0158 will be in charge of launching the mission, its eleventh flight.
May be B1058...

Not may be, it is.

See press kit linked above : "The first stage booster supporting this mission previously launched Crew Demo-2, ANASIS-II, CRS-21, Transporter-1, Transporter-3, and five Starlink missions."

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I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Online zubenelgenubi

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Cross-post:
http://www.launchphotography.com/Launch_Viewing_Guide.html
[update February 19]
Quote
The next SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another Starlink batch from pad 40 on February 21 at 9:44am or 11:03am EST. Upcoming launches include more batches of Starlink satellites on March TBA.
= 14:44 and 16:03 UTC
« Last Edit: 02/19/2022 09:27 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline soltasto

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Updated "press kit" capture with OCR

Offline Ken the Bin

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Here are the new cancel-and-replace NGA notices for the postponement:

Quote from: NGA
200124Z FEB 22
NAVAREA IV 182/22(11,26).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   211402Z TO 211709Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   221341Z TO 221648Z, 231319Z TO 231626Z,
   241257Z TO 241604Z AND 251236Z TO 251543Z FEB
   IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-37-52N 080-36-51W, 28-36-00N 080-21-00W,
      27-59-00N 079-12-00W, 27-55-00N 079-15-00W,
      28-30-10N 080-32-53W.
   B. 25-59-00N 076-00-00W, 26-40-00N 075-09-00W,
      25-37-00N 073-53-00W, 24-53-00N 074-44-00W.
2. CANCEL NAVAREA IV 166/22.
3. CANCEL THIS MSG 251643Z FEB 22.
Quote from: NGA
200135Z FEB 22
HYDROPAC 434/22(GEN).
SOUTHWESTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   211551Z TO 211836Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   221530Z TO 221815Z, 231508Z TO 231753Z,
   241446Z TO 241731Z AND 251425Z TO 251710Z FEB
   IN AREA BOUND BY
   35-59S 050-22W, 35-28S 049-58W,
   37-16S 045-27W, 45-17S 028-19W,
   47-50S 020-18W, 49-51S 011-01W,
   51-05S 000-43E, 50-46S 014-54E,
   50-33S 021-34E, 46-52S 039-17E,
   43-19S 050-25E, 44-37S 051-06E,
   54-16S 018-06E, 54-22S 004-06E,
   54-22S 000-43E, 54-28S 004-31W,
   53-15S 013-27W, 51-14S 023-03W,
   47-53S 033-10W, 42-56S 042-53W,
   39-07S 048-08W.
2. CANCEL HYDROPAC 400/22.
3. CANCEL THIS MSG 251810Z FEB 22.
Quote from: NGA
200141Z FEB 22
HYDROLANT 492/22(GEN).
SOUTH ATLANTIC.
SOUTHWESTERN INDIAN OCEAN.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   211551Z TO 211836Z FEB, ALTERNATE
   221530Z TO 221815Z, 231508Z TO 231753Z,
   241446Z TO 241731Z AND 251425Z TO 251710Z FEB
   IN AREA BOUND BY
   35-59S 050-22W, 35-28S 049-58W,
   37-16S 045-27W, 45-17S 028-19W,
   47-50S 020-18W, 49-51S 011-01W,
   51-05S 000-43E, 50-46S 014-54E,
   50-33S 021-34E, 46-52S 039-17E,
   43-19S 050-25E, 44-37S 051-06E,
   54-16S 018-06E, 54-22S 004-06E,
   54-22S 000-43E, 54-28S 004-31W,
   53-15S 013-27W, 51-14S 023-03W,
   47-53S 033-10W, 42-56S 042-53W,
   39-07S 048-08W.
2. CANCEL HYDROLANT 448/22.
3. CANCEL THIS MSG 251810Z FEB 22.

Offline Rondaz

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[email protected] has slipped the #Starlink Group 4-8 launch to 2022-02-21 at 14:32:30 UTC with deployment set for 15:38:14.860 UTC. Pre-launch SupTLEs on CelesTrak have been updated to reflect the change:

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1495321773830643716

Offline scr00chy

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[email protected] has slipped the #Starlink Group 4-8 launch to 2022-02-21 at 14:32:30 UTC with deployment set for 15:38:14.860 UTC. Pre-launch SupTLEs on CelesTrak have been updated to reflect the change:

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1495321773830643716

Weird, SpaceX website still says 14:44 UTC.

Offline Rondaz

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#Starlink Group 4-8 L-1 forecast 2/21: 90% GO; primary risks: cumulus clouds w/ low-mod booster recovery risk 24hr delay: 90% GO; primary concern: cumulus clouds w/ upper lvl wind risk..

https://twitter.com/baserunner0723/status/1495408749179195397

Offline Rondaz

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A Shortfall of Gravitas droneship has finally made it to the landing zone for the Starlink mission, 640 km downrange.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1495531028370309124
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:08 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline ZachS09

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https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/02/21/falcon-9-starlink-4-8-live-coverage/

Spaceflight Now lists the exact launch time as 14:44:20 UTC (9:44:20 AM EST).
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:09 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline daveglo

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Skies at the Cape are clear, nothing on radar.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:09 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline RocketLover0119

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T-36 minutes. Tanks are venting for prop load.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:09 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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T-35 minutes. Launch auto sequence has started.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:09 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Under 20 minutes. SpaceX is live.

« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline Rondaz

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It's a good morning for a lanch! In just over an hour, a Falcon 9 will liftoff from SLC-40 for Starlink 4-8, continuing to build out
@SpaceX's Starlink satellite constellation.

https://twitter.com/derekiswise/status/1495753692473171970
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Rondaz

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SpaceX is counting down toward the Starlink Group 4-8 launch, set for 9:44 AM EST (14:44 UTC) this morning!

Article by Trevor Sesnic (@124970MeV):

https://twitter.com/TGMetsFan98/status/1495760394106945536
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:11 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline RocketLover0119

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10 minutes.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:11 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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4 minutes. Strongback retracting.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:11 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Under 90 seconds.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:11 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Launch!!
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:12 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Staging.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:12 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Fairing deploy.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:12 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Online LouScheffer

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Looked like a longer than usual delay between MECO and staging (but might be video lag).  And stage 2 startup looked a little rough.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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Goodyear Blimp watching the launch from Ponce Inlet.  Sorry cell phone picture.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk

« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline RocketLover0119

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Entry burn.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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Stuck it!
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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And SECO! Deploy will confirmed later on socials due to lack of ground station coverage.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:06 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline Rondaz

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#Starlink Group 4-8 from ~35 miles inland me for @Space_Explored..

https://twitter.com/baserunner0723/status/1495774175998496769
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:06 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Greg Hullender

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:06 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline RocketLover0119

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.

Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:06 pm by zubenelgenubi »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline Herb Schaltegger

Looked like a longer than usual delay between MECO and staging (but might be video lag).  And stage 2 startup looked a little rough.

It looked like there was at least a 2-3 second lag between the audio and video feeds. When the commentator called “Liftoff!”, the on-screen clock was at T+2 seconds, rolling to +3 before he finished the word. So the sync seemed worse than normal, which probably explains it.

I just rewatched staging and MVac startup a couple times and it looked normal/nominal (“Norminal” as John I. would say). But I guess we’ll see if this crop of sats match their pre-launch TLEs after deployment.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:05 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Online LouScheffer

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Looked like a longer than usual delay between MECO and staging (but might be video lag).  And stage 2 startup looked a little rough.

It looked like there was at least a 2-3 second lag between the audio and video feeds. When the commentator called “Liftoff!”, the on-screen clock was at T+2 seconds, rolling to +3 before he finished the word. So the sync seemed worse than normal, which probably explains it.

I just rewatched staging and MVac startup a couple times and it looked normal/nominal (“Norminal” as John I. would say). But I guess we’ll see if this crop of sats match their pre-launch TLEs after deployment.
Comparing to the Jan 6 mission (also Starlink to the south), the MECO-staging gap was much longer this time.  On Jan 6, MECO was at 2:39 and staging immediately at 2:40, or 2:41.  On this mission, MECO was at 2:29, but staging not until 2:39. The gap was 10 seconds using either audio only, or video only, so I don't think it's a lag artifact.  Maybe this was a higher performance booster, and they cut off early after reaching the desired values (or using all the fuel they can use and still leave enough for the entry and landing burns).

For the second stage, I think you are right.  I noticed the five or so initial pulsations at 2:51 (this mission) but they also appear on the Jan 6 mission.  So likely nothing unusual.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:05 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.
Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.
There is some frost collecting on top of the gas generator exhaust duct. If the question is about the nozzle itself then it is just a result of some of it being in direct sunlight while the rest is in shadow (but receiving plenty of reflected light). Just like with embers in a campfire daylight can be strong enough to partially mask the glow, i.e. resulting in a dull grey look despite actually giving of just as much light as at nighttime.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:05 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline edkyle99

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S2 appeared to do a 6 min 8 sec burn, which was 4 seconds longer than the "press kit" listing, but I'm not reading much into that just now because the "press kit" often seems to be an approximation.  If she restarts, no problem.  Press kit said 2:43 to 8:47.  Webcast showed 2:47 to 8:55.  The webcast includes lag, but the delta should be accurate, maybe.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:05 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online Norm38

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Was this a new reentry profile or just something I hadn't noticed before?  I don't recall the booster entry angle being so large that the horizon can be seen.  Usually the booster is pointed straight down.  Are they trying out different angles of attack and cross range?
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:04 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Greg Hullender

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.
Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.
There is some frost collecting on top of the gas generator exhaust duct. If the question is about the nozzle itself then it is just a result of some of it being in direct sunlight while the rest is in shadow (but receiving plenty of reflected light). Just like with embers in a campfire daylight can be strong enough to partially mask the glow, i.e. resulting in a dull grey look despite actually giving of just as much light as at nighttime.
Yes, this was on the engine bell while it was firing, so it clearly couldn't have been frost. The "white stuff" covered about 90% of the  bell, extending all the way to the opening. The edge was irregular, which probably means it was a shadow, but I couldn't think what would be making a shadow with that shape. It's a good opportunity to point out to him that although the bell glows bright red from the heat, the sun is much, much hotter and brighter, so it overwhelms the engine glow. Assuming that's the correct explanation.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:04 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Rondaz

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At 9:44am (ET) and under a beautiful blue sky, #SpaceX launched a #Falcon9 rocket sending 46 #Starlink satellites to orbit.

It's a nice start of the week for the Space Coast.

https://twitter.com/Mike_Seeley/status/1495778996814061575
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:04 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Rondaz

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Starlink 4-8 launches with booster 1058 which has now completed 11 flights.

Me for @SuperclusterHQ..

https://twitter.com/JennyHPhoto/status/1495776387587788800
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:04 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Rondaz

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Falcon 9 rises over Cocoa Beach launching 46 more Starlink satellites.

Booster B1058 became the 2nd booster to launch for an 11th time, only 632 days after its first flight on DM-2.

https://twitter.com/spacecoast_stve/status/1495783664894021632
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:03 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline SimonFD

Was this a new reentry profile or just something I hadn't noticed before?  I don't recall the booster entry angle being so large that the horizon can be seen.  Usually the booster is pointed straight down.  Are they trying out different angles of attack and cross range?

Normal AFAIK. I see it every time there's a downrange ASDS landing. Maybe you're remembering the RTLS landings which would be straight(ish) down.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:03 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Polaroid

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.

Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.

I'm sorry that the 11-year-old had a question you find annoying.

We will all strive to be better.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 05:13 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline envy887

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.
Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.
There is some frost collecting on top of the gas generator exhaust duct. If the question is about the nozzle itself then it is just a result of some of it being in direct sunlight while the rest is in shadow (but receiving plenty of reflected light). Just like with embers in a campfire daylight can be strong enough to partially mask the glow, i.e. resulting in a dull grey look despite actually giving of just as much light as at nighttime.
Yes, this was on the engine bell while it was firing, so it clearly couldn't have been frost. The "white stuff" covered about 90% of the  bell, extending all the way to the opening. The edge was irregular, which probably means it was a shadow, but I couldn't think what would be making a shadow with that shape. It's a good opportunity to point out to him that although the bell glows bright red from the heat, the sun is much, much hotter and brighter, so it overwhelms the engine glow. Assuming that's the correct explanation.

Can you post a screen capture?
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:02 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline srcln

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Was this a new reentry profile or just something I hadn't noticed before?  I don't recall the booster entry angle being so large that the horizon can be seen.  Usually the booster is pointed straight down.  Are they trying out different angles of attack and cross range?

You hadn't noticed before.  As a comparison, see the Starlink 4-6 launch in January which has the same view at T+7:20 -
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:25 pm by srcln »

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Deployment of 46 Starlink satellites confirmed

https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1495792065602543629

Offline RocketLover0119

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Tracking dish at Starbase has a lock on stage 2 right now.  :)
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[email protected] adjusted the pre-launch state vectors late last night (~midnight local time) for today's launch of #Starlink Group 4-8 from Cape Canaveral at 14:44:20 UTC. Pre-launch SupTLEs are updated now on CelesTrak:

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1495795165994586112

Online gsa

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Our 11-year-old foster son watched the launch with us over breakfast this morning, and he had a question I couldn't answer. I'll let him write it in his own words:

"On the second stage engine was the white stuff a shadow or something else?"

To clarify that a little, there seem to have been two camera views of the second-stage engine, and in one of those views, it looked as though most of the engine was covered with milk (or frost). We speculated that that side was in direct sunlight, but we didn't know for sure.
Good question! That’s just excess frost/ice build up. Nothing to worry about, and is a very common thing to see actually.
There is some frost collecting on top of the gas generator exhaust duct. If the question is about the nozzle itself then it is just a result of some of it being in direct sunlight while the rest is in shadow (but receiving plenty of reflected light). Just like with embers in a campfire daylight can be strong enough to partially mask the glow, i.e. resulting in a dull grey look despite actually giving of just as much light as at nighttime.
Yes, this was on the engine bell while it was firing, so it clearly couldn't have been frost. The "white stuff" covered about 90% of the  bell, extending all the way to the opening. The edge was irregular, which probably means it was a shadow, but I couldn't think what would be making a shadow with that shape. It's a good opportunity to point out to him that although the bell glows bright red from the heat, the sun is much, much hotter and brighter, so it overwhelms the engine glow. Assuming that's the correct explanation.
The engine bell is quite reflective. So yes, it was reflected sunlight. As for a shape of a shadow, it was cast by the stage itself. The rocket flew almost directly towards the sun, you could see it very well at the time of staging. Then, when it followed its trajectory, the sun begun to illuminate the bell.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 03:47 pm by gsa »

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https://twitter.com/sldelta45/status/1495800961578774534

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Congratulations to the members of SLD 45 and SpaceX on this morning’s successful Starlink 4-8 launch. Every space launch we support keeps our team up to speed on valuable skills that are critical in maintaining our assured access to space.

Offline alugobi

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Ok, no more 11 year olds get to watch launches.

Or maybe the annoyed adults could just watch the webcast and not read the forum.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 05:14 pm by zubenelgenubi »

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Quote
Again, it’s a recurring frequent question asked on almost every mission. I completely understand if it’s people unfamiliar with space that ask this question, but TBH, it’s getting annoying to me.
Ok, no more 11 year olds get to watch launches.

Or maybe the annoyed adults could just watch the webcast and not read the forum.
Also this time the question wasn't about frost build up. But you are totally right.

Offline RedSky

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Anyway... here's an screencap of what they were talking about.  As you watch around that time, you see it move... clearly direct sunlight washing out the red glow of the engine bell.


Online zubenelgenubi

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Moderator:
OK, so frequently asked questions annoy some members, and are accepted by other members as teaching opportunities.

Noted.

Let it go.

Added:
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 04:20 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Greg Hullender

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Anyway... here's an screencap of what they were talking about.  As you watch around that time, you see it move... clearly direct sunlight washing out the red glow of the engine bell.
Yep. After the suggestion to take some screen caps, we rewatched the video, and when we saw the "white stuff" progress across the bell, it was instantly clear we were seeing sunlight washing out the glow. That made for another good teaching moment, of course. (E.g., we should have done that before posting a question.)

Thanks to everyone for taking this seriously and giving good answers.

On the topic of "asking irritating questions," I'm afraid that's a known design issue with 11-year-old boys. :-)

Offline Herb Schaltegger


On the topic of "asking irritating questions," I'm afraid that's a known design issue with 11-year-old boys. :-)

And 11-year-old girls, too. ;) I raised a brace of them to go along with The Boy … All safely adults now, and benevolently indulgent of their rocket-nerd father.

Good on you for letting your kiddo watch the launch and learn cool stuff.
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So the recent nasaspaceflight article https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2022/02/starlink-group-4-8/ mentioned a higher initial orbit -around 325km- for this batch, but SpaceX 2nd stage telemetry on the livestream had an altitude of 211km after 1st SECO, and it wasn't rapidly changing.  The SpaceX press release had a 2nd second stage burn of 1 second.  Those don't seem to add up.  What am I missing?
« Last Edit: 02/21/2022 08:09 pm by IWanda »

Offline Orbiter

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So the recent nasaspaceflight article https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2022/02/starlink-group-4-8/ mentioned a higher initial orbit -around 325km- for this batch, but SpaceX 2nd stage telemetry on the livestream had an altitude of 211km after 1st SECO, and it wasn't rapidly changing.  The SpaceX press release had a 2nd second stage burn of 1 second.  Those don't seem to add up.  What am I missing?

I believe they were in an initial ~215x325 km orbit that was circularized at apogee.
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Offline IWanda

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Not trying to be argumentative, just trying to understand since my orbital mechanics skills are virtually nil.
215 x 325 is still roughly a 90 minute orbit (right?), so I'd expect to go from perigee (215) to apogee (325) in 1/4 of that time, or about 22.5 minutes, needing about 5km/minute to get to perigee (simple linear estimation).  Reviewing the video had the 2nd stage climbing from 208 to 212 fairly evenly from 7:09 to 7:53.  Altitude actually falls back to 211 at 8:42 and remains there thru SECO and end of feed.  The timing of 2nd firing of second stage (+56min) doesn't seem to correspond to a rough time for perigee.  Extending my gut feel even further into speculation, just a 1 sec burn to circularize a 215 x 325?  Probably should think of the e as 6370+215 x 6370+325, but still.  Anyone have a rule of thumb on what kind of delta v that circularization is? Obviously the satellites are there, so SpaceX can do the math.

Offline cwr

Not trying to be argumentative, just trying to understand since my orbital mechanics skills are virtually nil.
215 x 325 is still roughly a 90 minute orbit (right?), so I'd expect to go from perigee (215) to apogee (325) in 1/4 of that time, or about 22.5 minutes, needing about 5km/minute to get to perigee (simple linear estimation).  Reviewing the video had the 2nd stage climbing from 208 to 212 fairly evenly from 7:09 to 7:53.  Altitude actually falls back to 211 at 8:42 and remains there thru SECO and end of feed.  The timing of 2nd firing of second stage (+56min) doesn't seem to correspond to a rough time for perigee.  Extending my gut feel even further into speculation, just a 1 sec burn to circularize a 215 x 325?  Probably should think of the e as 6370+215 x 6370+325, but still.  Anyone have a rule of thumb on what kind of delta v that circularization is? Obviously the satellites are there, so SpaceX can do the math.

I think your time from perigee to apogee should be 1/2 of the orbital period not 1/4.

Thanks

Carl

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Ah, yes.  The earth is at one of the foci of the ellipse.  Makes more sense.

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Ah, yes.  The earth is at one of the foci of the ellipse.  Makes more sense.

Ellipticity leads to a factor much bigger than the factor of 2.
For orbits not far from circular the altitude over time is roughly sinusoidal, like the height of the tip of a wall clock’s minute hand as it goes around in an hour.  Not linear or sharp, but smooth like shallow waves in a lake. It spends a lot of time near the top and bottom where it’s hardly rising or falling.
(And the real perigee and apogee are 215+6378=6593 km and 325+6378=6703 km from the center of the Earth, not that different.)
So the altitude rises slowly at first, which is all we get to see before the broadcast ends. It rises faster and faster until about half way “up”, then slows down until it’s briefly constant at apogee, before heading down in the same manner.
So that’s why very little altitude gain is seen after SECO 1.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online OneSpeed

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... Anyone have a rule of thumb on what kind of delta v that circularization is? ...

The ΔV can be calculated using the Vis-viva equation: v² = G * M * (2/r - 1/a)

I've written a simple tool that you can download from here: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=48496.msg1963477#msg1963477

E.g. for a perigee of 210km, and apogee of 325km, the ΔV requirement is 34m/s. At the end of the first S2 burn, the acceleration was over 40m/s², so a one second circularisation burn would be sufficient.

Also, I've attached a comparison of the Starlink 4-7 and 4-8 webcast telemetry, and you can see that the 4-8 S2 burn has slightly more loft. Also, the 4-8 S1 throttle bucket is earlier, and is flat bottomed rather than vee-shaped.
« Last Edit: 02/22/2022 05:37 am by OneSpeed »

Offline edkyle99

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Not trying to be argumentative, just trying to understand since my orbital mechanics skills are virtually nil.
215 x 325 is still roughly a 90 minute orbit (right?), so I'd expect to go from perigee (215) to apogee (325) in 1/4 of that time, or about 22.5 minutes, needing about 5km/minute to get to perigee (simple linear estimation).  Reviewing the video had the 2nd stage climbing from 208 to 212 fairly evenly from 7:09 to 7:53.  Altitude actually falls back to 211 at 8:42 and remains there thru SECO and end of feed.  The timing of 2nd firing of second stage (+56min) doesn't seem to correspond to a rough time for perigee.  Extending my gut feel even further into speculation, just a 1 sec burn to circularize a 215 x 325?  Probably should think of the e as 6370+215 x 6370+325, but still.  Anyone have a rule of thumb on what kind of delta v that circularization is? Obviously the satellites are there, so SpaceX can do the math.
Looks like it takes about 32 m/s delta-v impulse at apogee to circularize, give or take, from a 215 x 325 km orbit.  With that high-thrust engine pushing a payload and a mostly empty lightweight second stage, it doesn't take much time.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/22/2022 01:48 am by edkyle99 »

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Here's my little table:

T+min:sec      UTC      Event
00:00:00      14:44:20      Lift-off
00:01:03      14:45:23      Supersonic
00:01:13      14:45:33      MaxQ
00:02:29      14:46:49      MECO
00:02:39      14:46:59      Stage sep 1-2
00:02:48      14:47:08      SES-1
00:02:58      14:47:18      Fairing sep
00:06:54      14:51:14      Entry burn
00:07:13      14:51:33      Entry burn complete
00:08:24      14:52:44      Landing burn
00:08:47      14:53:07      Landing
00:08:56      14:53:16      SECO-1
(00:56:38)   15:40:58      SES-2
(00:56:39)   15:40:59      SECO-2
01:02:55      15:50:05      Starlink 4-8 deployment

Sources are TSKelso:
[email protected] adjusted the pre-launch state vectors late last night (~midnight local time) for today's launch of #Starlink Group 4-8 from Cape Canaveral at 14:44:20 UTC. Pre-launch SupTLEs are updated now on CelesTrak:

https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1495795165994586112
Which was used for lift-off and deployment.

SpaceX's official livestream:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=eiKOMCRymsw

And my eyes and ears. Parenthesis when no information was available from those sources, so I used the "press-kit."
Enjoy!
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Online LouScheffer

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Looked like a longer than usual delay between MECO and staging (but might be video lag).  And stage 2 startup looked a little rough.

Comparing to the Jan 6 mission (also Starlink to the south), the MECO-staging gap was much longer this time.  On Jan 6, MECO was at 2:39 and staging immediately at 2:40, or 2:41.  On this mission, MECO was at 2:29, but staging not until 2:39. The gap was 10 seconds using either audio only, or video only, so I don't think it's a lag artifact.  Maybe this was a higher performance booster, and they cut off early after reaching the desired values (or using all the fuel they can use and still leave enough for the entry and landing burns).
Now that OneSpeed has plotted the telemetry, it's clear the staging was perfectly normal.  So why did it seem odd on the webcast?  Here is the 6 January mission:

* 2:37 - acceleration drops to near zero
* 2:39 - MECO call
* 2:40 - stage separation confirmed, and visible on video
* 2:46 - second stage engine starts
* 2:49 - several flashes, then steady state

Whereas this mission:

* 2:30 - MECO call
* 2:36 - acceleration drops to near 0
* 2:40 - stage separation confirmed, and visible on video
* 2:46 - second stage engine starts
* 2:50 - several flashes, then steady state

So the reason the delay seemed long is because the MECO call happened 6 seconds early. And my earlier statement was wrong - if you look only at the video, the timing was normal. 

My guess would be the person calling out MECO was anticipating what usually happens next.   I suspect this happens a lot - they are trying hard for real-time notification, and they don't want to improvise so they rehearse what they are going to say.  Usually it's only obvious when something does not go according to plan.  Notable examples have been when they say liftoff, and the rocket does not actually liftoff, or they proceed with the usual callouts when the rocket is clearly doing something different.
« Last Edit: 02/22/2022 02:49 pm by LouScheffer »

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Also, I've attached a comparison of the Starlink 4-7 and 4-8 webcast telemetry, and you can see that the 4-8 S2 burn has slightly more loft. Also, the 4-8 S1 throttle bucket is earlier, and is flat bottomed rather than vee-shaped.

Thanks OneSpeed, I was waiting for your post to settling the staging discussion once and for all, or at least provide better visualizations for it.

Can you also produce this comparison for booster stage entry and landing?  Some think that the entry was later than usual, that SpaceX was testing a more aggressive entry profile.
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Offline edkyle99

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Maybe the person who made the "MECO" call was spoofed by some ratty data or something.  It (the call, not the actual cutoff) did seem to come early.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/22/2022 07:09 pm by edkyle99 »

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... Can you also produce this comparison for booster stage entry and landing? Some think that the entry was later than usual, that SpaceX was testing a more aggressive entry profile.

Sure, the timings and accelerations are similar.

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https://twitter.com/TSKelso/status/1496213289474600961
Quote
CelesTrak has ephemeris-based SupTLEs for all 46 satellites from the #Starlink Group 4-8 launch of Feb 21. STARLINK-3456 is currently leading the pack for pass visualization purposes: https://celestrak.com/NORAD/elements/supplemental/ .

Offline Rondaz

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Estimating B1058 and ASOG droneship arrival at Port Canaveral around dawn on Friday 25th.

Doug should return the fairing from the Starlink mission around dawn on Thursday 24th.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1496560499261116416

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Offline Rondaz

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Offline Rondaz

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Early bird gets the worm. Doug coming into Port Canaveral. 2/24/22.

https://twitter.com/AvR_Digital/status/1496814558094241798

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ASOG and B1058 still tracking for an arrival early tomorrow morning.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1496961826210385923

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ASOG slowed overnight so won't arrive early this morning - still some distance offshore.

Thinking mid/late-morning/early afternoon right now.

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1497155661855141898

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« Last Edit: 02/25/2022 02:13 pm by Rondaz »

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https://twitter.com/JConcilus/status/1497229219549655041
Quote
The rocket approaches…@SpaceX Droneship A Shortfall of Gravitas and booster B1058 are in the Port Canaveral buoy line now.

EDIT:
twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1497234630843502592
Quote
A Shortfall of Gravitas with B1058 onboard is slowly making progress to Port Canaveral under tow by Zion Falgout. At this point I have no idea when they will actually be arriving.
https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1497239473146535939
Quote
Update: The first tug is heading out and arrival is imminent. Tune into the @NASASpaceflight Fleetcam for live views from @RustysInThePort.

http://nasaspaceflight.com/fleetcam
« Last Edit: 02/25/2022 03:07 pm by SPKirsch »

Offline Rondaz

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Offline Rondaz

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I believe this is the first fully-norminal Octagrabber deployment of 2022!

Welcome home B1058!

https://twitter.com/SpaceOffshore/status/1497248962688032797

Offline Rondaz

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Offline Rondaz

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Booster 1058 has returned to Port Canaveral onboard A Shortfall of Gravitas bringing the Starlink 4-8 mission to a close. This booster has joined the elite few that have completed eleven missions with the first being Demo-2.

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1497249456420495363

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Offline Rondaz

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B1058 is the only SpaceX booster with the NASA logo. Reason being was Demo-2 (B1058's maiden flight).

https://twitter.com/JennyHPhoto/status/1497254445754855433

Offline Rondaz

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Boosters everywhere! (To be fair, they'd normally be at the bottom of the ocean, so it's a very big deal to see them being reused).

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1497255184870875146

Offline Rondaz

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Humans look on as @SpaceX's B1058 booster returns to Port Canaveral, FL following its 11th flight..

https://twitter.com/ABernNYC/status/1497294180577599500

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A beautiful day to welcome back booster 1058-11. @SpaceOffshore
 
https://twitter.com/JennyHPhoto/status/1497285275361308675

Offline Rondaz

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B1058.11 returned to Port Canaveral today onboard ASOG. The booster was making its 11th flight & landing during the #SpaceX Starlink 4-8 mission making it only the 2nd booster to do so. Notice the legs on dock in the last pic from a earlier booster & the #NASA worm on the side.

https://twitter.com/GregScott_photo/status/1497291144518156290

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline Rondaz

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Friday night view of #SpaceX Falcon9 booster B1058-11: Eleven times launched, eleven times landed.

https://twitter.com/Mike_Seeley/status/1497573626106851328

Offline Rondaz

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Yesterday Booster 1058, The one that Bob & Doug to space returned back to Port Canaveral onboard SpaceX's newest droneship, A Shortfall of Gravitas!

https://twitter.com/TheCruiseJunkie/status/1497595945273409545

Offline Rondaz

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Ok, I saw B1058 on ASOG instead 🤩 !! My daughter and I re amazed

https://twitter.com/ihaddadene_samy/status/1498023741703479296

Offline Rondaz

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Caught my first booster at Port Canaveral. B1058-12 is looking amazing this morning.

https://twitter.com/Falcon_1e/status/1498691804128059399

Offline Rondaz

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Reusability on full display this morning: With one recovered #Falcon9 booster in port, #SpaceX sent 47 Starlink satellites to orbit atop another flight-proven Falcon9. Amazing.

https://twitter.com/Mike_Seeley/status/1499396781221711874

Offline Rondaz

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The transporter is on the way to Port Canaveral so that B1058 can take a ride to HangarX. Fun fact, this beast has the cutest honk.

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1499466518006009859

Offline Lewis007

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Offline Lewis007

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Offline Rondaz

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B1058 has completed 11 flights to date. This is the only booster with the NASA logos because its maiden flight was Demo-2 on May 30th, 2020.

https://twitter.com/JennyHPhoto/status/1499813172907102213

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