Author Topic: SLS Artemis IV progress  (Read 15831 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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SLS Artemis IV progress
« on: 10/11/2022 06:09 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasa_marshall/status/1579894057433645056

Quote
The forward skirt for #Artemis IV's @NASA_SLS rocket is moving on to the next stage of production at #NASAMichoud . 🚀

The hardware houses flight computers, cameras, and avionics systems for the SLS rocket.

Learn more HERE>> https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/index.html

Offline cplchanb

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #1 on: 10/12/2022 03:19 pm »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #2 on: 11/22/2022 01:40 am »
Additional images of manufactured components for the SLS rocket earmarked for the Artemis IV launch can be found here:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=54243.msg2338963#msg2338963

Offline AS_501

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #3 on: 11/22/2022 02:05 am »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
Based on Artemis 1, the bigger concern may stacking the Artemis-IV SRBs too early before a bona fide launch window can be set.
Launches attended:  Apollo 11, ASTP (@KSC, not Baikonur!), STS-41G, STS-125, EFT-1, Starlink G4-24, Artemis 1
Notable Spacecraft Observed:  Echo 1, Skylab/S-II, Salyuts 6&7, Mir Core/Complete, HST, ISS Zarya/Present, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis, Dragon Demo-2, Starlink G4-14 (8 hrs. post-launch), Tiangong

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #4 on: 11/22/2022 02:46 am »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
Based on Artemis 1, the bigger concern may stacking the Artemis-IV SRBs too early before a bona fide launch window can be set.
NASA's tentative targeting of 2027 for the launch of Artemis 4 is fluid and is subject to change depending on how smoothly progress is made in final assembly of the SLS rocket planned for the Artemis 2 mission but also whether the ML-2 mobile launch platform is ever completed, given that Artemis 4 will be the first flight of the SLS Block 1B version. Some people think that it would have been better off if a TEL-like vehicle had been designed for the SLS Block 1B rather than ML-2 given the cost overruns and weight issues plaguing the ML-2 itself because a TEL-type mobile launcher for the SLS Block 1B would travel a bit faster than the ML-1 or ML-2.

Offline jadebenn

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #5 on: 11/22/2022 02:53 am »
You would have to completely ditch the VAB and crawlers to do a TEL. It's not a simple matter.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #6 on: 11/22/2022 03:09 am »
You would have to completely ditch the VAB and crawlers to do a TEL. It's not a simple matter.
The Mobile Launcher used for the SLS is indeed the slowest-ever mobile launch platform for an SLV, reaching a top speed of 1 mile per hour. The unsuccessful N1 rocket was transported to its launch pad by a railroad-based vehicle.

Offline DanClemmensen

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #7 on: 11/22/2022 03:36 am »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
I think the rocket was stacked on the mobile launcher. The pieces may sit in a warehouse, but the mobile launcher must be complete before they can actually build (stack) the rocket. In effect, it's already in a "deep teardown" state until it begins stacking.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #8 on: 11/22/2022 02:34 pm »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
I think the rocket was stacked on the mobile launcher. The pieces may sit in a warehouse, but the mobile launcher must be complete before they can actually build (stack) the rocket. In effect, it's already in a "deep teardown" state until it begins stacking.
The Artemis IV mission, as I've explained already in this thread, is a long way off in terms of a tentative launch window, so I agree that the ML-2 may have to be either completed or redesigned with wheels rather than caterpillar tracks.

Offline Hog

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #9 on: 11/22/2022 03:12 pm »
You would have to completely ditch the VAB and crawlers to do a TEL. It's not a simple matter.
The Mobile Launcher used for the SLS is indeed the slowest-ever mobile launch platform for an SLV, reaching a top speed of 1 mile per hour. The unsuccessful N1 rocket was transported to its launch pad by a railroad-based vehicle.
It's still not a simple matter to switch from CTs(Crawler Transporters) to TE(Transporter Erectors). When the 2 always fully fueled, SLS boosters alone make up  3,200,000lbs/1,451,495kg of the entire Artemis-1 stack weight of over 3,500,000 pounds/1,587,573kg, that sort of weight is something that the N-1 TE simply didn't have to deal with.

Top speed loaded can be 1mph, though that speed was not reached during loaded Arty-1 crawler ops.  IIRC The top loaded speed was 0.837mph.  Unloaded the CT/ML combos move much faster-approx. 2mph.
We all know that the Soviet N-1 was rail based and that US Saturn through SLS are crawler based, basically the result horizontal vs. vertical integration.
The difference in speed between the TEs and CTs are inconsequential.  The weight issue is from the Stage and a half to orbit using solid boosters configuration, the combined weight is eating into NASA's safety margin.


Mobile Launch Platform and
Space Shuttle...........................................12.6 million pounds
Mobile Launcher Platform ........................9.87 million pounds
ML-1.................................Approximately 11.3 million pounds
Artemis I launch vehicle .....Approximately 3.5 million pounds
Load Capacity .................Able to transport 18 million pounds
(or the weight of more than 20 fully loaded 777 airplanes
Source: NASA
« Last Edit: 11/22/2022 03:22 pm by Hog »
Paul

Offline Hog

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #10 on: 11/22/2022 03:20 pm »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
I think the rocket was stacked on the mobile launcher. The pieces may sit in a warehouse, but the mobile launcher must be complete before they can actually build (stack) the rocket. In effect, it's already in a "deep teardown" state until it begins stacking.
The Artemis IV mission, as I've explained already in this thread, is a long way off in terms of a tentative launch window, so I agree that the ML-2 may have to be either completed or redesigned with wheels rather than caterpillar tracks.
emphasis mine
What other choice is there?  Dan is stating that the ML must be completed before ANY stacking ops can begin.  You are the only person I've read about thinking a TE(Transporter Erector) is a viable solution over Crawler Transporter(CT).
Paul

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #11 on: 11/22/2022 03:56 pm »
Considering that ML2 had been significantly delayed what are the chances that this rocket will be completed years ahead of time and just sit dormant in a warehouse to gather dust? Do they have a shelf life before it needs a deep teardown for inspection?
I think the rocket was stacked on the mobile launcher. The pieces may sit in a warehouse, but the mobile launcher must be complete before they can actually build (stack) the rocket. In effect, it's already in a "deep teardown" state until it begins stacking.
The Artemis IV mission, as I've explained already in this thread, is a long way off in terms of a tentative launch window, so I agree that the ML-2 may have to be either completed or redesigned with wheels rather than caterpillar tracks.
emphasis mine
What other choice is there?  Dan is stating that the ML must be completed before ANY stacking ops can begin.  You are the only person I've read about thinking a TE(Transporter Erector) is a viable solution over Crawler Transporter(CT).
As I've said, Bechtel at the moment is taking its time working out some weight-related quirks with the ML-2, knowing that the SLS Block 1B won't be available for a few years, even though umbilical hardware has already arrived for eventual incorporation into the ML-2.

As a side note, something caught my eye regarding this SpaceNews news item about Artemis 4:
Quote
The Artemis 4 schedule will also depend on the readiness of the I-Hab module, being developed by Europe and Japan, and the SLS Block 1B itself.

Offline yg1968

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Offline eeergo

Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #13 on: 02/07/2023 08:58 am »
More (non-HLS, thankfully SLS is the slow, long pole ::) ) hardware for EM-IV.
-DaviD-

Offline yg1968

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #14 on: 02/10/2023 02:38 am »
Quote from: NASA Orion
Transport time!🚚

The pressure vessel for #Artemis IV is ready to ship from Michoud Assembly Facility to @NASAKennedy, where it will become the third Orion spacecraft to carry crew to the Moon

https://twitter.com/NASA_Orion/status/1623436225360318465

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #15 on: 02/10/2023 03:58 am »
Quote from: NASA Orion
Transport time!🚚

The pressure vessel for #Artemis IV is ready to ship from Michoud Assembly Facility to @NASAKennedy, where it will become the third Orion spacecraft to carry crew to the Moon

https://twitter.com/NASA_Orion/status/1623436225360318465
Wow. Surprising to see the pressure vessel for the Orion spacecraft earmarked for Artemis IV getting ready for shipment to Kennedy Space Center regardless of that mission being a long way off.

Offline cplchanb

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #16 on: 02/12/2023 01:44 pm »
Quote from: NASA Orion
Transport time!🚚

The pressure vessel for #Artemis IV is ready to ship from Michoud Assembly Facility to @NASAKennedy, where it will become the third Orion spacecraft to carry crew to the Moon

https://twitter.com/NASA_Orion/status/1623436225360318465
Wow. Surprising to see the pressure vessel for the Orion spacecraft earmarked for Artemis IV getting ready for shipment to Kennedy Space Center regardless of that mission being a long way off.

Just goes to show that if they really wanted to they could speed up construction significantly.  Most of the delays is all due to mismanagement, funding and bureaucratic red tape

Offline Jim

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #17 on: 02/12/2023 02:07 pm »

Just goes to show that if they really wanted to they could speed up construction significantly.  Most of the delays is all due to mismanagement, funding and bureaucratic red tape

wrong on two of those items

Offline yg1968

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #18 on: 02/12/2023 09:37 pm »

Just goes to show that if they really wanted to they could speed up construction significantly.  Most of the delays is all due to mismanagement, funding and bureaucratic red tape

wrong on two of those items

Mismanagement is right but funding and bureaucratic red tape are wrong?

Online VSECOTSPE

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Re: SLS Artemis IV progress
« Reply #19 on: 02/14/2023 02:17 am »

The slow schedule has been due to, among other things, mismanagement and red tape but not funding.  The program got more budget than it requested every year.
« Last Edit: 02/14/2023 02:21 am by VSECOTSPE »

 

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