Author Topic: SLS : Artemis I UPDATES: Kennedy LC-39B : 16 November 2022 (06:47 UTC)  (Read 596608 times)

Offline scientist

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Hello whitelancer,

from the 4 cubesats that you list as operational/ongoing, I only find any relatively recent update for EQUULEUS (https://twitter.com/EQUULEUS_en). Where can one find any recent information about the other 3 (more recent than November/December last year)?

Lunar IceCube success seems rather doubtful, according to https://spacenews.com/deep-space-smallsats-face-big-challenges/
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... in a Nov. 29 update, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center said that the mission team was “continuing its attempts to communicate with the CubeSat so that it can be placed into its science orbit in the coming days.” NASA has not provided an update since then, and the mission’s principal investigator at Morehead State University did not respond to a request for comment.

Offline Phil Stooke

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https://planet4589.org/space/jsr/back/news.819.txt

This links to Jonathan's Space Report, No. 819 (most recent one) with a good (if sad) summary of the cubesat situation. 

Offline whitelancer64

https://planet4589.org/space/jsr/back/news.819.txt

This links to Jonathan's Space Report, No. 819 (most recent one) with a good (if sad) summary of the cubesat situation.


Thank you, this is exactly the sort of thing I've been looking for for months. Updates from the various teams running the cubesats have been very irregular, with some not issuing any statements or updates at all. I fully accept any errors in my previous posts about them, as I consider his report to be definitive, as far as I'm concerned.

The full text of Jonathan's update (I added the italics for failed, and bold for active. Notes in [] added by me):

Artemis Cubesats
-----------------

Here's an update on the cubesats launched on the Artemis I mission.
It is really unfortunate that Ames, ASU, and Argotec,among others,
have still not made public detailed solar orbit parameters for their spacecraft.

Lunar IceCube:
             Failed Nov 18?
             Lunar flyby around 2000 km on Nov 21   
             Probably in solar orbit? No orbit data available

EQUULEUS:    Lunar flyby 5212 km on Nov 21
             Earth orbit on Nov 25: 60400 x 549300 km x 47.1 deg
             Distant lunar flybys on  Dec 18, Mar 10 
             Active, in Earth-Moon system
             Next lunar flyby May 27
             Then to 180000 x 1112000 x 17.2 deg Earth orbit.
             
OMOTENASHI:  Failed Nov 20(?).
             Lunar flyby 1880 km on Nov 21
             Depart Earth Hill Sphere on Dec 11 at 0714 UC
             In solar orbit 0.996 x 1.018 AU x 0.18 deg

BioSentinel: Lunar flyby 406 km on Nov 21 at 1540 UTC
             Left Earth Hill Sphere on Dec 12 at 1030 UTC
             Active, in solar orbit, orbit parameters not available
             
ArgoMoon:    Lunar flyby Nov 21, distance unknown
             Failed Nov 28, in 383000 x 2442000 km x 43.0 deg Earth orbit 
[Note: However, it had, as far as I know, completed its primary mission of maneuvering near the ICPS and taking images of the lunar surface]
             Perturbed to solar orbit around Jan 2023?
             Probably in solar orbit? No orbit data available
           
NEA SCOUT:   Failed Nov 16.
             Lunar flyby 736 km on Nov 21 at 1547 UTC
             Depart Earth Hill Sphere on Dec 13 at 1508 UTC
             In solar orbit 0.998 x 1.061 AU x 0.28 deg

LunaHMap     Lunar flyby 1351 km on Nov 21 at 1552 UTC
             Perturbed to solar orbit around Jan 2023?
             Thruster failed, primary mission abandoned, still in contact.
             Active, In solar orbit, No orbit data available

LunIR        Lunar flyby about 1000? km on Nov 21
             Failed sometime in Dec?
[Note: It did succeed in gathering spectroscopy data on the lunar surface during its flyby]
             Perturbed to solar orbit around Jan 2023?
             In solar orbit, No orbit data available

Miles        Failed Nov 16
             Lunar flyby about 1500 km? on Nov 21
             Perturbed to solar orbit around Dec 2023?
             In solar orbit, No orbit data available

CUSP         Failed Nov 17
             Lunar flyby about 1500 km? on Nov 21
             Perturbed to solar orbit around Dec 2023?
             In solar orbit, No orbit data available
« Last Edit: 05/17/2023 10:57 pm by whitelancer64 »
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

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...and now something different

Shuttle vs Artemis Liftoff Comparison - STS, Shuttle, Launch, Camera Views, NASA, STS-131, Orion



Quote
May 18, 2023  #shuttle #artemis #launch
Multiple camera side-by-side views comparing STS to SLS liftoff. These night launches are shown: STS-131 on April 5, 2010, and Artemis 1 on October 20, 2021.

Sequences are presented at approximate real scale, and synchronized to the timing of Solid Rocket Booster ignition. Camera angles were also matched as possible. Audio from STS is played on the left channel, and from SLS on the right.

Sound and image cleanup,  remastering, and editing by RetroSpace HD.
« Last Edit: 05/18/2023 11:46 pm by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Offline yg1968

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« Last Edit: 05/30/2023 02:11 am by yg1968 »

Online catdlr

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and now for something underwhelming:

AFRL: NASA Sled Test

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Online catdlr

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Artemis vs Saturn V Liftoff Comparison - SLS, Apollo, Launch, Camera Views, NASA, Apollo 17

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Jun 8, 2023  #saturnv #artemis #launch
Multiple camera side-by-side views comparing SLS to Saturn V liftoff. Two-night launches are shown: Artemis 1 on October 20, 2021, and Apollo 17 on December 7, 1972

Sequences are presented at approximate real scale, and synchronized visually to the timing of Solid Rocket Booster ignition. Camera angles were also matched as possible. Audio from SLS is played on the left channel, and from Saturn V on the right.

Sound and image cleanup,  remastering, and editing by RetroSpace HD.

========================================

The Space Launch System (SLS) is an American super heavy-lift expendable launch vehicle in development by NASA. As the primary launch vehicle of the Artemis moon landing program, SLS is designed to launch the crewed Orion spacecraft on a trans-lunar trajectory. The first SLS launch was the uncrewed Artemis 1, which took place on 16 November 2022.

Saturn V is a retired American super heavy-lift launch vehicle developed by NASA under the Apollo program for human exploration of the Moon. The rocket was human-rated, with three stages, and powered with liquid fuel. It was flown from 1967 to 1973. It was used for nine crewed flights to the Moon, and to launch Skylab, the first American space station.

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

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https://twitter.com/spcplcyonline/status/1688982832717197313

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Free: still working to find root cause of uneven charring on Orion heat shield on Artemis I. We'll make right decision to keep crew safe. Reid Wiseman (commander) says they have strong trust in team.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1696582832276066413

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At the NAC science committee meeting, Suzanne Dodd of JPL shows this chart of the impacts of Artemis 1 on the Deep Space Network. The eight cubesat missions consumed nearly as much time as Orion itself; science missions and DSN maintenance lost lots of time.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1696595067077546316

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Dodd, on the Artemis 1 cubesats and their demand on DSN: don't know who thought it was a good idea to add them. Cubesats have a place, but not on the DSN on these missions.

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https://arstechnica.com/space/2023/08/nasas-artemis-i-mission-nearly-broke-the-deep-space-network/

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NASA’s Artemis I mission nearly broke the Deep Space Network
"I'm not sure who thought it was a good idea to put up CubeSats with Artemis I."

by Stephen Clark - Aug 30, 2023 6:12pm GMT

NASA officials sounded an alarm Tuesday about the agency's Deep Space Network, a collection of antennas in California, Spain, and Australia used to maintain contact with missions scattered across the Solar System.

Offline eeergo

Lovely transparency in this FOIA release (although sadly inferior -and much later- than the fantastic, super-detailed IFA reports we used to get for Shuttle):

Quote
ARTEMIS I - IN FLIGHT ANOMALIES

NASA has released the full list of In Flight Anomalies (IFAs) from the #Artemis1 mission to TLP Network via a Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA) request.

Exploration Ground Systems (EGS)

- ECS ICPS/AFT Purge System Anomaly

- Artemis I Post Launch Debris Seen In Imagery

- Artemis I Post Launch ML/Pad Damage

- Post Launch FOD Items from ML/Pad Walkdowns

- Temporary ICPS/FWD and ICPS/AFT Purge Pressure Excursions

- Incorrect Exposure Settings on 32 of 33 high speed film cameras

- High H2 Concentrations in LH2 TSMU Post Launch

- High speed digital 30-P1 camera stopped functioning pre-launch

- High speed digital 30-P3 camera had interlacing/ghosting and incorrect timing

Flight Operations Directorate (FOD)

- Extended Loss of Orion Data During Change from Uncoded to Coded Telemetry

- Loss of Goldstone Support GMT 338 (December 4th)

- ICMP Ping Intermittent Drop Outs

- Loss of Orion Forward Link Following Handover to PDL

- TDRS 275 Unable to Lock to Orion DG1M3 Coherent Telemetry

- SM/OSA SAJ fairing hinge plate delamination

- SM Propulsion pressure regulation unit anomaly

- SAJ Panel #1 missing RTV and possible loose RTV

- SM Helium latch valve position driver anomaly

- NAV Channel 1 Unexpected Velocity Step Function

- CAR Software Sending IG Rate Commands After Brake Engage Command

- SM Prop Helium Valve Position Indicator Issues

- C2b Battery Temperature Sensor Out of Family

- SM PDE1B in Standby Mode after PCDU1B event (undetected by Prop FDIR)

- Aux Leak Detection

- SM RCS Thruster Pulsing

SLS Rocket CS = Core Stage

- Unexpected Cryogenic Level Sensor System (CLSS) Loss of Comm Caution

- Flight Termination System (FTS) Shelf 1A/1B Vibration

- Flight Termination System (FTS) Shelf 4 Vibration

- Intertank Skin Vibration

- FTS System Tunnel Vibration

- Unexpected Debris Liberated from Booster Throat Plug

- CS-HazGas-004 CS LH2 Umbilical Carrier Plate Cavity Concentration Anomaly

Debris:

- Core Stage Engine Blanket Outer Layer

- CS LH2/IT Flange Closeout TPS

- CS Pressurization Line Bracket Closeout TPS

- CS Feedline Bracket Closeout TPS

- CS Sensor Island Closeout TPS

Note the level of detail to even the apparently more trivial anomalies, in contrast to handwaving them away because they "give bad image" or are "inconsequential to the mission". Wish something like this was the minimum standard in the industry - a wealth of learning opportunities for the interested public and other professionals alike.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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For the 1 year anniversary:


Offline hektor

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Online catdlr

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Relive NASA Artemis 1's epic launch to the moon on its anniversary

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A well-done short documentary with behind-the-scenes camera set-up and short interviews with NASA employees.  I also included the music used in this movie.

Artemis 1 in Motion Picture

with Kudos to:  Nic Ansuini and EverydayAstronaut

Quote
Nov 19, 2023
After too long, I've finally decided to put a short reel together of some of the shots I got during Artemis 1. This is just a peek into what it was like to be there for this launch, and I hope you, like me, can see the historical importance of capturing these moments. I still have much to learn and I'm still honing the blade every day. I'd like to thank EverydayAstronaut for making it possible for me to have this time at NASA, it's incredible what the team has accomplished, and I'm proud to say I was an (albeit small) gear in the big machine. I'd also like to thank Nic Ansuini for always being right by my side, ready to take on any challenge. It has helped immensely to have you as a part of these projects. Whether it's an idea I need to bounce off of another brain or a version of this reel I need someone to proofread, you always take the time to help. Finally, I'd like to thank the people who have helped me grow in this industry so far. I have a long way to go, but it wouldn't have been possible if this community wasn't so supportive. I hope you enjoy this brief reel.



« Last Edit: 11/26/2023 10:24 am by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

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Artemis-1 Launch Cinematic 4K (FULL VOLUME) No Music (NASA's SLS Rocket)

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Oct 17, 2023
By popular demand and to celebrate the 1 year anniversary, I've made an Artemis-1 cinematic launch video with no music. Just raw, solid rocket booster power. Using some of the best, slow-motion footage from NASA, combined with carefully edited sound design, I've tried to make the best launch video for rocket purists who just want to feel the power of the Space Launch System.

I recommend listening with high-quality speakers or headphones for the full experience. Enjoy!

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/nasa_orion/status/1734325197145059632

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One year ago today, NASA’s Orion spacecraft reentered the atmosphere after completing a 1.4 million-mile, 25.5 day #Artemis I mission around the Moon. View the full length video here:

https://images.nasa.gov/details/art001m1203451716

Offline rdale

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The SLS Artemis I launch vehicle is the first of several planned Artemis launch vehicles, with a number of design differences from earlier NASA missions that incur liftoff debris risk to the mission. As a test vehicle, the Artemis I hardware also endured environments and tests not planned for future missions, which led to several additional factors contributing to an evolving liftoff debris risk to the SLS vehicle. This paper will summarize these risk factors and address the processes used to evaluate and communicate the risks to support a successful Artemis I launch. It will discuss how the evolving risks that were quantified and evaluated by a Cross-Program team of debris Subject Matter Experts to mitigate liftoff debris hazards and communicate updated risk to the SLS vehicle. This process was performed through the inaugural use of an SLS debris day-of-launch (DOL) standard operating procedure that will be used for subsequent Artemis missions.

This paper addresses the risk of liftoff debris, debris released by the vehicle or from the launch pad during liftoff through vehicle tower clear. Expected liftoff debris is well understood from previous NASA programs’ experience and from tests of materials, processes and functions that are known to release liftoff debris. These expected sources were assessed and cleared well ahead of launch day. However, given the ever-changing schedules and environments, processes were in place to evaluate any additional potential liftoff debris risks identified during launch countdown.

Although many of the Artemis vehicle hardware components are similar to those on the NASA Shuttle Program, there are important differences in the architecture of the Artemis I vehicle which require new assessments of liftoff debris risk for the Artemis missions. The more favorable Artemis crew module location and surfaces are far less vulnerable to debris impacts; however, the longer vehicle can result in higher liftoff debris impact energies to those components on the aft end of the vehicle. Additionally, the positional change of the RS-25 liquid engines to nearer the Booster nozzle exit plane along with the change in Booster throat plug design is a disadvantage to the overall liftoff debris risk which resulted in additional test and analysis efforts for evaluating the integrated vehicle debris risk.

In spite of the comprehensive tests and analyses of Artemis I expected liftoff debris, a number of additional tests/processes were completed prior to the Artemis I mission that were required to support a complete understanding of a new launch vehicle, but increased the risk of releasing liftoff debris. The hardware endured several additional cryogenic loading cycles, including the Green Run tests at Stennis Space Center, Wet Dress Rehearsals at Kennedy Space Center, and multiple launch attempts. Each of these cycles induced stresses in the thermal protection system (TPS) materials, increasing the risk of damage to and release of the TPS. Additionally, induced and weather environmental factors that could increase the likelihood of debris release were significant. Vibrations and stresses in the TPS were induced by a required roll-back to the Vehicle Assembly Building before Hurricane Ian to protect the vehicle from damage by high winds. Wind damage and potential internal stresses to several outer mold line materials on the integrated SLS vehicle and mobile launcher were caused by weathering Hurricane Nicole at Pad 39B the week before launch. A thorough imagery scan of the vehicle was performed after each event and the damage observed was repaired, removed, or assessed and the risk to the mission evaluated.

Mitigation of debris risk can occur by tests and analyses to show debris impacted components as damage tolerant, by new/improved processes for prevention of debris availability, or redesign. Risk mitigation processes for Artemis I-specific liftoff debris events and the development and use of the SLS debris day of launch (DOL) procedures that will be used for subsequent Artemis missions will be described.

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A Selection of Artemis-I Mission Support Lessons Learned: Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) Perspective

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During the media teleconference there was discussion of the heat shield charring and liberation of charred material, which apparently mostly took place during the re-ascent portion of the skip entry profile. Emphasis was placed on the wide margins remaining even with the liberation of charred material, and on the desire to fully update models to cover the experimental results correctly.
— 𝐬𝐝𝐒𝐝𝐬 —

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