Author Topic: SpaceX FH - STP-2 - LC-39A - June 25, 2019 - 02:30 EDT - UPDATES  (Read 144007 times)

Online Alter Sachse

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2019-036A 23.99° 99.14 min 710x725 km
2019-036B 24.00° 99.13 min 710x725 km
2019-036C 23.99° 99.11 min 708x724 km
2019-036D 24.00° 99.13 min 710x724 km
2019-036E 24.00° 99.12 min 709x724 km
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Online OneSpeed

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The first image is the boost phase of the STP-2 telemetry, with what looks like a single side booster engine shutdown event. The second image is an overlay of the Arabsat-6A and STP-2 telemetry for comparison.

Offline LouScheffer

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Some computed values for the STP-2 launch:

Center core cutoff at 11083 km/hr ( = 3079 m/s) at altitude of 123 km and time 3:34. Staging speed is therefore 99 m/s more then Arabsat 6, which was 2980 m/s.   Re-entry burn starts at 9:43, so coast was 6:10 or 370 seconds.

Assuming re-entry burn at 60 km, we can solve for vertical component of velocity by solving 123,000 + v*t - 9.8/2*t^2 = 60,000, where t = 370 seconds.  We find a vertical velocity at cutoff of 1643 m/s.  Given the overall speed of 3079 m/s, horizontal speed is 2604 m/s.  Coasting at this speed, in 370 seconds the stage covers 963 km, so all is consistent.  (The rest is launch to sep, and entry to landing).

Peak altitude is 261 km at 167.5 seconds after staging.  The energy per kg that must be lost by the stage in landing is g*h + 1/2*v^2, and is 5,946,000 joules/kg.   For comparison, Arabsat (103 km, 2970 m/s) was 5,449,000 joules/kg.  So this landing was 9% more energetic.  More significant, most likely, are (a) less fuel left for slowing down, as more was used for boost, and (b) a steeper angle of re-entry from the much more lofted trajectory.

Offline abaddon

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SpaceX Webcast is up:

Offline ugordan

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The first image is the boost phase of the STP-2 telemetry, with what looks like a single side booster engine shutdown event.

There was a 2nd load-limiting shutdown as well and you can notice it at around T+139 in your graph, too. It's fairly obvious in the ground tracking camera view precisely at T+2:17 in the webcast. Based off of BECO visuals, the onboard cameras and telemetry were 2 seconds behind that ground view and sure enough, at T+2:19 you can see visual evidence of the booster attachments relaxing a bit.

Offline wannamoonbase

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Some computed values for the STP-2 launch:

Center core cutoff at 11083 km/hr ( = 3079 m/s) at altitude of 123 km and time 3:34. Staging speed is therefore 99 m/s more then Arabsat 6, which was 2980 m/s.   Re-entry burn starts at 9:43, so coast was 6:10 or 370 seconds.

Assuming re-entry burn at 60 km, we can solve for vertical component of velocity by solving 123,000 + v*t - 9.8/2*t^2 = 60,000, where t = 370 seconds.  We find a vertical velocity at cutoff of 1643 m/s.  Given the overall speed of 3079 m/s, horizontal speed is 2604 m/s.  Coasting at this speed, in 370 seconds the stage covers 963 km, so all is consistent.  (The rest is launch to sep, and entry to landing).

Peak altitude is 261 km at 167.5 seconds after staging.  The energy per kg that must be lost by the stage in landing is g*h + 1/2*v^2, and is 5,946,000 joules/kg.   For comparison, Arabsat (103 km, 2970 m/s) was 5,449,000 joules/kg.  So this landing was 9% more energetic.  More significant, most likely, are (a) less fuel left for slowing down, as more was used for boost, and (b) a steeper angle of re-entry from the much more lofted trajectory.

Maybe we just saw the outside of the envelope for the Land/Land/ASDS FH launch profile.  3 ASDS landings would have likely provided more fuel to recover the center core. 

The SpaceX fleet may need to get larger.  Given the success of the FH, I won't be surprised to see some more FH launches booked.
Wildly optimistic prediction, Superheavy recovery on IFT-4 or IFT-5 (Welp a little early on IFT-4, but still have a shot at 5)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/af_smc/status/1143590299228344321

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All satellites are on orbit and have made contact! 🛰👏👏👏

#STP2 #SpaceStartsHere #SMC #SummerofLaunch19

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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More great photos by Ben Cooper

https://twitter.com/launchphoto/status/1143591419816357892

https://twitter.com/launchphoto/status/1143591454511632384

https://twitter.com/launchphoto/status/1143591595306115072

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First few shots: Last night's Falcon Heavy launch of STP-2 carrying 24 sats for the US Air Force, NASA and others. This view shows the interaction of the first stage exhaust plume with the two side boosters after they separated and began their engine burns to return to the Cape.


Offline Targeteer

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44344    DSX                           2019-036F   316.41min   42.20deg   12012km  5994km      
44345    FALCON HEAVY R/B   2019-036G   ROCKET BODY   316.41min   42.20deg   12009km   5997km
44346    OBJECT H   2019-036H   TBA           96.27min   28.53deg   853km   307km   
44347    OBJECT J   2019-036J   TBA      96.25   28.53   851           306
44348    OBJECT K   2019-036K   TBA           96.24   28.54   851           305   
    
« Last Edit: 06/26/2019 01:09 am by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jabe

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« Last Edit: 06/26/2019 01:24 am by jabe »

Offline RocketLover0119

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"The Starship has landed"

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SpaceX - Falcon Heavy - 1st Night Launch - STP2 06-25-2019


USLaunchReport
Published on Jun 25, 2019

Filmed in all 4K using Blackmagic raw and ProRes. Filming thru 1-18in and 1-7in telescopes. Along with a 1400mm Canon  Box Camera.  Difficult to film in 99% humidity.



It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

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Photos released by SpaceX taken by Ben Cooper

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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More from Elon on why centre core was on the limit:

twitter.com/sptlightvids/status/1143684967278379008?s=21

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If we were to save more Delta V for the centre core landing, would the second stage have spare Delta V enough to complete the STP-2 mission? Cause then the core wouldn't have crash landed......I guess

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1143686587877691392

Quote
Yes, but we couldn’t take a chance on 2nd stage failing it’s 4th maneuver. This mission was more complex than anything I’m aware of in history of rockets. RIP center core, you did your duty well.

Offline jpo234

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« Last Edit: 06/26/2019 09:23 am by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Online Alter Sachse

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2019-036L 24.00° 99.09 min   708x722 km
2019-036M 24.00° 99.10 min   706x725 km
2019-036N 23.98° 99.12 min   703x730 km
2019-036P 24.17° 131.21 min 790x3561 km
2019-036Q 23.93° 99.15 min   680x756 km
2019-036R 28.52° 96.14 min    300x847 km
2019-036S 28.54° 96.14 min    307x841 km
2019-036T 28.53° 96.19 min    300x852 km
2019-036U 28.48° 96.20 min    309x844 km
2019-036V 23.98° 99.10 min    702x729 km
One day you're a hero  next day you're a clown  there's nothing that is in between
        Jeff Lynne - "21century man"

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Offline ericnelson7

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I flew down the edge of the restricted airspace at 3500 feet and got this snapshot with a 50mm. Even if I'd put more time into taking the picture than flying my plane, there's no way to recreate the view of a night launch!

There was only one other aircraft out there a mile further west at 5500; has anyone seen any other aerial shots of the launch?

Offline gongora

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