Author Topic: Epsilon launch - SPRINT-A, Sept.14, 2013 (0500UTC)  (Read 136170 times)

Online docmordrid

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« Last Edit: 09/15/2013 05:38 am by input~2 »
DM

Offline hop

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #1 on: 08/29/2009 10:08 pm »
The retirement of the M-V did leave them with quite a gap in capability, and GX doesn't appear to be going anywhere fast (and the move to an Atlas V CCB probably moves it further out of that weight class anyway)

Offline kch

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #2 on: 08/29/2009 10:17 pm »
So, $32 million each to produce and launch?  Makes Falcon 1e look pretty good (so far).  Still, good to have multiple launchers available (mutual backup etc.) -- hope it's successful.  :)

Offline savuporo

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #3 on: 08/31/2009 02:44 pm »
Pity that they wouldnt take this:

http://www.jaxa.jp/article/interview/no3/index_e.html
http://ina-lab.isas.jaxa.jp/about/index_e.html

and follow through to an operational vehicle.

Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline pm1823

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #4 on: 09/01/2009 12:46 am »
Hmmm.....

3 stage solid LV lofting 1.2t

http://www.satellitetoday.com/st/topnews/Details-of-New-Japanese-Cost-Cutting-Launch-Vehicle-Leaked_31916.html
Quote
Eventually, the new rocket may carry a landing vehicle for Japan’s Moon exploration project, targeted for 2020, the agencies said in the reports.

Is it a joke? And '3 stage solid'...'24 meters in length and 2.5 meters in diameter'... nice MX-class ICBM...


Offline zaitcev

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #5 on: 08/12/2010 04:15 pm »
Spaceflight Now obtained a comment from Yasuhiro Morita, the project's manager (scroll pass Hayabusa stuff):
 http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1008/11japan/
Apparently it's the upper 2 stages of M-V on top of SRB-A, with the corresponding loss of payload. No word as to how the roll control will be accomplished.
-- Pete

Offline Eerie

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #6 on: 08/12/2010 04:49 pm »
/Conspiracy on

This is an exercise in building an ICBM, right?

Offline edkyle99

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #7 on: 08/12/2010 05:37 pm »
/Conspiracy on

This is an exercise in building an ICBM, right?

People said the same thing about M-V.  Didn't happen.  Japan has a "no-ICBM" policy.

These smaller solid fuel rockets trace back to the ISAS (originally University of Tokyo) sounding rocket program, which grew from early "pencil rockets" to provide smallsat launch capability with the Lambda and Mu rockets from Kagoshima.  M-V was the last of that string and ISAS was folded into JAXA.  But there is still a desire in Japan to get back to what should be, essentially, the "smaller-cheaper-faster" science ideal.

 - Ed Kyle

Online Robotbeat

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #8 on: 08/12/2010 07:27 pm »
/Conspiracy on

This is an exercise in building an ICBM, right?

People said the same thing about M-V.  Didn't happen.  Japan has a "no-ICBM" policy.
...
Japan has a "no-war" policy in its Constitution, too, but it has plenty of warships, etc. For good or ill, constitutional policies like that often bend to the pragmatism of geopolitical reality.
« Last Edit: 08/12/2010 07:28 pm by Robotbeat »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Eerie

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #9 on: 08/12/2010 08:26 pm »
Well, I said exercise. They prove once again that they can have ICBM whenever they`ll want to. It is almost as good as having it.

Offline pberrett

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #10 on: 08/28/2010 01:03 pm »
Here's an idea

To increase the amount of payload the rocket can lift how about if JAXA were to cluster 9 of these Falcon 1s together as a single combined rocket?

Finding a name for the new rocket could be a problem however... :)

cheers Peter

Offline Jim

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #11 on: 08/28/2010 01:19 pm »
Here's an idea

To increase the amount of payload the rocket can lift how about if JAXA were to cluster 9 of these Falcon 1s together as a single combined rocket?

Finding a name for the new rocket could be a problem however... :)

cheers Peter

bad idea. It is not a parallel to the Falcon 9

Offline bolun

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #12 on: 09/16/2010 03:35 pm »
Epsilon Launch Vehicle´s brochure.

http://www.jaxa.jp/pr/brochure/pdf/01/rocket07.pdf

« Last Edit: 09/16/2010 03:37 pm by bolun »

Offline Fuji

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #13 on: 01/04/2011 12:12 am »
Yasuhiro Morita, A New Type of Launch Vehicle: A Rocket with Artificial Intelligence
http://www.jaxa.jp/article/interview/vol58/index_e.html

Good Interview :)
« Last Edit: 01/04/2011 12:14 am by Fuji »

Offline Danderman

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #14 on: 01/04/2011 03:26 am »
Back to the J1, the first attempt a while back to generate a small orbital vehicle out of an SRB. That program ballooned in cost until it was replaced by the J2, the first iteration of Galaxy Express, until that program ballooned in cost.

Offline kkattula

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #15 on: 01/04/2011 07:46 am »
Yasuhiro Morita, A New Type of Launch Vehicle: A Rocket with Artificial Intelligence
http://www.jaxa.jp/article/interview/vol58/index_e.html

Good Interview :)


So now they're building an ICBM with AI?

What could possibly go wrong?  ;)

Offline tul

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #16 on: 01/04/2011 04:12 pm »
Back to the J1, the first attempt a while back to generate a small orbital vehicle out of an SRB. That program ballooned in cost until it was replaced by the J2, the first iteration of Galaxy Express, until that program ballooned in cost.


The problem with the J-I was that it was based on the booster of the H-II. No wonder there was a cost problem. For the J2 or GX, the Atlas III first stage went out of production. Also it was a little bit megalomania to develop a LNG engine in just a few years.

I remember they said in another presentation that it takes 6 month to build an Epsilon rocket. However if there is only one launch per year, what will they do the other 6 months? (Wether or not USEF will use the Epsilon rocket is still in the air, I think)

Offline bolun

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #17 on: 10/08/2011 07:00 pm »
September 30, 2011 Updated

Static firing test for the upper stage sub-size motor

On September 30, JAXA performed the ground firing test of the sub-size motor (M-34SIM-3) for the Epsilon Launch Vehicle upper stage at the Noshiro Rocket Testing Center. The test mainly aims to verify the insulation material on the upper motor nozzle that is currently under development.

Through this test, we are steadily progressing with the Epsilon development while confirming the insulation function of the upper motor nozzle part based on the test results and maintaining and inheriting the already acquired solid motor static firing test technology.

http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/epsilon/topics_e.html

Offline Patchouli

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #18 on: 10/09/2011 11:35 pm »
I 'd say this rocket is more similar to Vega then Falcon 1.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vega_%28rocket%29

Offline bolun

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Re: JAXA's solid fuel "Falcon 1"
« Reply #19 on: 11/09/2012 09:34 pm »
October 15, 2012 Updated

Extension test of the second stage motor nozzle

The extension test of the second stage motor nozzle of the Epsilon Launch Vehicle was held at the Sagamihara Campus in late September.

This extension nozzle is a technology that was adopted for the kick motor of the M-3SII Rocket launched in 1989. The nozzle is extended by the force of a light-weighted spring shortened and installed inside the nozzle.

The test this time checked the spring and extension mechanism of the nozzle for M-34c, the renovated type from the nozzle for the third stage motor M34b of the M-V Launch Vehicle. The nozzle was verified to work properly through the test.

http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/rockets/epsilon/index_e.html

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