Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion  (Read 19855 times)

Offline gongora

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CRS-14 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-14 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-14:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launch NET April 2, 2018 on Falcon 9 from SLC-40.



External cargo: ASIM, RRM3, PFCS



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: Today at 02:21 AM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #1 on: 11/24/2017 11:34 PM »
Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM)

ASIM Page at Terma (prime contractor)

http://www.asim.dk/

ASIM on Twitter
Quote
[Tweet from Nov. 24, 2017]
Passed Qualification and Acceptance Review successfully. @Terma_Global will pick-up ASIM in Tortona Monday and ship the flight model to @NASAKennedy.

[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.

ASIM is an advanced observatory to be mounted on the outside of the European Columbus module at ISS.

Once the observatory is in operation, ASIM will observe and photograph the large electrical discharges from thunder clouds in the area between the earth’s atmosphere and space – the layers called the stratosphere and mesosphere. These spectacular electrical discharges, known as red sprites, blue jets, haloes, and elves, were observed for the first time in 1989. There is great scientific interest in a closer study, and while staying at ISS in September 2015, Astronaut Andreas Mogensen made a series of spectacular recordings of the huge lightning phenomena.

The Danish technology company Terma is technical lead on the observatory, while Torsten Neubert, chief consultant at DTU Space, is scientific lead on this exciting program led by ESA in collaboration with the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI). Terma and DTU Space have both played a key role in the development of the advanced instruments included in the observatory.

"It has been an exciting challenge for Terma. This is the first time that we have been the technical main contractor on such a large space project, and thus responsible for the development and completion to the European Space Agency (ESA). With ASIM, the Danish space community has proven its expertise and the high scientific and technical level that it masters", says Carsten Jørgensen, Senior Vice President of Terma’s Space business.

According to Kristian Pedersen, Director of DTU Space, ASIM proves Danish international leadership – both within space science and technology:

"Danish space exploration is important to Denmark. With ASIM, we show that Denmark has technological and scientific competencies at a high international level, and that we at DTU, through collaboration with Danish industry, are at the forefront within important space applications. In addition, we hope that the program will help to attract more young people to studies in natural science. We need these engineers in future."

At an event at Terma in Herlev today, ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen unveiled a 1:1 model of the 314 kg observatory with a total value of DKK 350 million. Andreas Mogensen's participation in the event at Terma has been arranged in collaboration with ESA and the Danish Board of Education and Research.



« Last Edit: 11/24/2017 11:54 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #2 on: 11/25/2017 12:07 AM »
Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3)

RRM3 page at GSFC (This page has lots of pictures, animations, explanations, etc.)
Quote
Mission Overview

RRM3 builds on the first two phases of International Space Station technology demonstrations that tested tools, technologies, and techniques to refuel and repair satellites in orbit. RRM3 will demonstrate innovative methods to store, transfer and freeze standard cryogenic fluid and xenon in space.

The mission is scheduled to launch to the space station in early 2018 aboard the SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services Mission 14 (CRS-14). It has a projected two-year life on the space station, though NASA intends to accomplish RRM3's objectives within the first year. RRM3 is developed and operated by the Satellite Servicing Projects Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, under direction of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate.

RRM3 Primary Objectives

1. Perform cryogenic liquid methane transfer
2. Perform xenon gas transfer

RRM3 Secondary Objectives

1. Maintain cryogen fluid mass for six months via zero boil-off
2. Demonstrate and validate the Compact Thermal Imager - An instrument that utilizes available room on RRM3 to observe Earth to detect smoke and fires, as well as measure crop transevaporation.
3.Complete Machine Vision Tasks -In-space assessment of fiducials (decals) with unique patterns that enhance machine vision algorithms and aid in autonomous rendezvous and tool positioning.

[NASA Apr. 3, 2017] NASA Robotic Refueling Mission Departs Station (overview of RRM program to date)


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #3 on: 11/26/2017 05:50 AM »
Launch date is 13 March.


[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #5 on: 11/28/2017 07:36 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 07:38 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jpo234

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #6 on: 11/28/2017 09:08 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

That ...thing going up to the ISS doesn't look like a Dragon at all. If anything it looks like a Cygnus...
« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 09:09 AM by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline JamesH65

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #7 on: 11/28/2017 03:52 PM »
CRS-14 will be carrying new SD cards and wireless dongle HW for the AstroPi mission. https://astro-pi.org/

Got some stuff I did going up! Hopefully....

Offline Star One

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #8 on: 11/28/2017 08:38 PM »
BBC news article and video about the RemoveDebris mission.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41973646

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : ~March 2018
« Reply #9 on: 11/29/2017 05:37 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : February? 2018
« Reply #10 on: 11/30/2017 09:26 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.
The page,which shows the February date, is dated 10/14/2017, so not really up-to-date.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : February? 2018
« Reply #11 on: 12/04/2017 11:49 AM »
Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : February? 2018
« Reply #12 on: 12/04/2017 03:50 PM »
They found the perfect truck to take the ESA payload to the Cape  ;D

Tweet from Terma:
Quote
ASIM is ready for the CRS-14 mission to the International @Space_Station . Today ASIM left the integration facilities in Milan and is on its way to Dallas, Texas http://bit.ly/2BfLsTZ

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM released from US customs in Dallas. Picked up and en route to @NASAKennedy.

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM arrived and offloaded at @NASAKennedy. Ready for unpacking and check-out processing.

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : February? 2018
« Reply #13 on: 12/04/2017 04:28 PM »
EnduroSat is being listed for that launch:

http://one.endurosat.com/#!/launch

This could very well be the third satellite of Bulgaria, after Bulgaria 1300 in 1981 and BulgariaSat-1 in 2016.

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : February? 2018
« Reply #14 on: 12/04/2017 05:39 PM »
Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

Whoops.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018
« Reply #15 on: 12/13/2017 11:17 AM »
Quote
Presents came early this year @NASAKennedy: unpacking the high-altitude thunderstorm observer @ASIM_Payload for testing – launching to @Space_Station next year. Shiny!

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/940917300353433601

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018
« Reply #16 on: 12/18/2017 01:34 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.  It will be delivered in a box to the ISS where it will be unpacked by the astronauts and attached to a slide table for deployment using the Japanese Experiment Module Robotic Manipulator System, developed by JAXA.   

Once in orbit the ADR experiments on board the spacecraft will be performed.  In the first of two capture experiments a net will be discharged at one of the deployed target cubesats to demonstrate net capture in space.  The second capture experiment will see a harpoon launched at a deployable target plate made of representative satellite panel materials – the first harpoon capture in orbit.  The third experiment involves vision-based navigation by deploying the second cubesat and demonstrating rendezvous navigation using cameras and a LiDaR.  Finally, the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft will deploy a large dragsail to speed de-orbit, where it will burn up as it enters Earth’s atmosphere.   

Professor Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of SSTL commented “Since the beginning of the space era, orbital debris has progressively been building up and there are now almost 7,000 tons of it around the Earth. It is now time for the international space community to begin to mitigate, limit and control space junk and I am very pleased that the RemoveDEBRIS consortium is leading the way with an innovative ADR mission which I hope will be a precursor to future operational ADR missions.” 

“This is an excellent example of what can be achieved when Industry and Academia are working together to tackle real problems” said Prof G Aglietti, Director of the Surrey Space Centre, and current Principal Investigator for the project.

The RemoveDEBRIS mission, which started in 2013 and at peak times has had more than 60 people assigned to the mission, is led by the Surrey Space Centre and draws on the expertise of some of Europe’s most prominent space companies and institutions.
 
Mission & Consortium coordination - Surrey Space Centre (UK)
Satellite system engineering - ASF (France)
Platform & Avionics – SSTL (UK)
Harpoon – Airbus (UK)
Net – Airbus (Germany)
Vision Based Navigation – CSEM (Switzerland)/INRIA/Airbus (Toulouse)
Cubesat dispensers – Innovative solutions in space (Holland)
Target cubesats – Surrey Space Centre (UK)/STE
Dragsail – Surrey Space Centre (UK)
The project is co-funded by the European Commission and the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n°607099.
 
ENDS

http://www.sstl.co.uk/Press/SSTL-ships-RemoveDEBRIS-mission-for-ISS-launch

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018
« Reply #17 on: 12/18/2017 02:09 PM »
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.

That will not help Dragon's pressurized cargo density  :)

Online Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #18 on: 12/27/2017 06:53 PM »
Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #19 on: 12/27/2017 07:03 PM »
Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

39A will launch most/all CRS and all gov missions (including NASA and DoD) once FH-1 is off the pad and they do some pad checkouts. There might be a few commercial launches from there every now and then if a certain period of time is packed with a bunch of planned flights or if 40 is down for inspections/repairs.
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Offline mn

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #20 on: 12/27/2017 07:26 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Online Lars-J

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #21 on: 12/27/2017 10:19 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
« Last Edit: 12/27/2017 10:20 PM by Lars-J »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #22 on: 12/28/2017 06:31 AM »
They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.

Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #23 on: 12/28/2017 08:52 AM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
The real answer is that it very much depends on their licensing situation for launches from the FL pads.  Zuma is a bad general example for switching because the end-user for that payload is USG (presumably for defense/intel).  So, while the launch was being treated as a commercial launch for licensing, the speed with which it was able to get a new license for a launch from SLC-40 is not at all indicative of what is "normal". 

It likely won't matter at all for GTO launches because SpaceX should have licenses for both pads that will cover multiple launches of that type without a need to specify the specific payload/mission.  The challenge would only be for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another because with the exception of Iridium or CRS launches, SpaceX hasn't gotten licenses that allow for multiple launches to LEO.  The advantage for GTO is that they are all launching on a 90deg. azimuth whereas for LEO each launch is going to a different inclination and so launches on a different azimuth. 

My guess is that for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another will require at least 60 days for new licensing. 
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline speedevil

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #24 on: 12/28/2017 11:23 AM »
Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

From memory, it was asked that she and others supply actual proposals for change with a deadline that has passed by now.
I wonder if these are public yet.


Online Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #26 on: 01/06/2018 10:16 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 


Has RemoveDEBRIS arrived at KSC? If so, when? Any photos?
« Last Edit: 01/06/2018 11:16 PM by Yeknom-Ecaps »

Offline brujhar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #27 on: 01/11/2018 11:58 PM »
Hello guys,

Do you know the exact launch date of this mission?
I read on some sites that it would be on 03/13/2018 at 00:00 a.m.
 
Thank you

Online ZachS09

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #28 on: 01/11/2018 11:59 PM »
http://www.launchphotography.com/Delta_4_Atlas_5_Falcon_9_Launch_Viewing.html

SpX-14 will launch on March 5, 2018 at either 06:00 UTC or 07:00 UTC (1 AM Eastern or 2 AM Eastern).
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #29 on: 01/12/2018 01:10 AM »
With CRS missions I wouldn't count on a particular date staying the same for the next two months.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #30 on: 01/16/2018 03:52 PM »
The SpaceflightNow schedule shows this moving to April 2.

Online vaporcobra

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #31 on: 01/24/2018 12:10 AM »
A hefty delay, although very likely a symptom of ISS scheduling instead of SpaceX schedule movement.

Also, crossposting from the Manifest thread:

Confirmation that 1382 is CRS-14, NET March 5, and includes a recovery attempt onshore (LZ-1).

https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=81987&RequestTimeout=1000
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=81985&RequestTimeout=1000

The NET is of course now outdated, according to SpaceflightNow.
I report on commercial space!

Offline cuddihy

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #32 on: 01/27/2018 06:18 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?

Online IanThePineapple

So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?

I think it goes up on CRS-16
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #34 on: 01/27/2018 06:34 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?
I think it goes up on CRS-16

Yes, Spaceflight 101's ISS Calendar shows it being installed in December, during SpX/CRS-16's visit.  They don't give a source, but I assume they are working from the ISS FPIP.

Edit: Is there a recent public source (beyond SF101's calendar) for IDA-3 being on the SpX/CRS-16 manifest?
SpaceNews, 16 July 2016:
Quote
NASA is developing a third IDA to replace the one lost in last year’s launch failure. That third adapter is tentatively scheduled to launch on SpaceX’s CRS-16 cargo mission in 2018, said Kirk Shireman, NASA ISS program manager, during a July 13 briefing at the ISS Research and Development Conference in San Diego.
The stand down following Amos-6 could have delayed SpaceX CRS missions sufficiently for it to have been scheduled at some point on CRS-14 (was it?), but other issues may have shifted it back to CRS-16.
« Last Edit: 01/27/2018 07:13 PM by kdhilliard »

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #35 on: 01/27/2018 07:28 PM »
IDA takes the whole trunk.  We know there are other external payloads scheduled on SpX-14 and SpX-15.

Offline catdlr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #36 on: 02/04/2018 11:56 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQtSSyu175A?t=001

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Offline Svetoslav

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #37 on: 02/09/2018 08:01 AM »
EnduroSat is being moved from this flight to Cygnus on may.

Offline Roy_H

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #38 on: 02/09/2018 06:50 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.
"If we don't achieve re-usability, I will consider SpaceX to be a failure." - Elon Musk

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #39 on: 02/09/2018 07:20 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.

Well, two separate problems... rendezvous, and dealing with the junk when you get there... adds significantly complexity to include rendezvous if you are just trying to validate the second step...

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #40 on: 02/09/2018 07:30 PM »
What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.
One step at a time.  RemoveDEBRIS has no propulsion.  Safety issues would make it nigh-impossible to keep something with propulsion inside the ISS.

Also, there are other missions that have tested noncooperative rendezvous.  RemoveDEBRIS is mostly testing technologies for what to do after the rendezvous.

1. Net: Deploy a CubeSat and then hit it with a net at 7m distance.
2. Vision Based Navigation: Deploy another CubeSat and image it using a camera and LIDAR.
3. Harpoon: Hit a target at a range of 1.5m.
4. Dragsail: An inflatable dragsail is included on the main platform.

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

Offline Greg Hullender

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #41 on: 02/11/2018 03:32 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?

Offline speedevil

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #42 on: 02/11/2018 04:21 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?
I assume the above poster meant 'inside the safety envelope of ISS' rather than actually inside ISS.

Even something that can only achieve 1m/s can bang into stuff or get wedged in parts of ISS structure and damage things.
'proving' it's safe would be very hard indeed.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #43 on: 02/11/2018 04:42 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?
I assume the above poster meant 'inside the safety envelope of ISS' rather than actually inside ISS.

Even something that can only achieve 1m/s can bang into stuff or get wedged in parts of ISS structure and damage things.
'proving' it's safe would be very hard indeed.

Was just about to post that plus the question of whether an ion drive even works in 1 atmosphere...  why bring it inside?
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Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #44 on: 02/11/2018 06:03 PM »
Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought the comment was about someone stating that this payload was moved from a Dragon resupply flight to a Cygnus flight.  And since this would make it pressurized cargo (needing to spend at least some amount of time inside both Cygnus and ISS, which are both fully "inside" in that context) it would then have to be moved outside somehow if it is to be deployed outside.

This is based on my understanding that Cygnus does not offer unpressurized cargo, as Dragon does, and that the comment about changes to manifest was referring to the debris mitigation test system.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #45 on: 02/11/2018 09:44 PM »
The comment about a payload moving involved a 1U cubesat. Both Cygnus and Dragon bring up cubesats as pressurized cargo all the time.

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #46 on: 02/12/2018 09:49 AM »
One step at a time.  RemoveDEBRIS has no propulsion.  Safety issues would make it nigh-impossible to keep something with propulsion inside the ISS.

Here's what NanoRacks' Kaber Deployer payload guide(.pdf) says:

Quote
4.5.9 Propulsion System

The propulsion system will need to be assessed for hazard potential.  NanoRacks will assist in the identification of hazards.  Mechanical hazards may be related to pressure containment, flow containment, leakage, etc.  Systems may also have hazard potential if inadvertent operation of the propulsion system in or around ISS could be catastrophic or critical.  Depending on hazard potential, both mechanical and electrical fault tolerance may be required.   Systems with toxic propellant may not be allowed onboard ISS but might be approvable if outside ISS.  Propellants with explosive potential may not be approvable.  Acceptable propellant type must be coordinated with NanoRacks and documented in the ICA.

Other sections talk about the necessary inhibits for interior payloads, etc.  So, having a fueled propulsion system on your satellite while it is still inside the ISS is perfectly possible depending on design.
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February 15, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-032
NASA Invites Media to Upcoming Space Station Cargo Launch


Media accreditation now is open for the launch of the next SpaceX delivery of supplies and equipment, including science investigations, to the International Space Station, currently targeted for no earlier than April.

A Dragon cargo spacecraft, previously flown on SpaceX’s eighth commercial resupply mission to the station for NASA, will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida.

Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at CCAFS and NASA’s neighboring Kennedy Space Center. Credentialing deadlines are as follows:

    International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4:30 p.m. EST Thursday, March 1, for access to CCAFS or 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 19, for access to Kennedy media activities only.
    U.S. media must apply by 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 23.


Highlights of space station research that will be facilitated by Dragon’s arrival are:

    The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, an Earth observatory that will study severe thunderstorms and their role in the Earth’s atmosphere and climate.
    An investigation that seeks to better understand how the lack of gravity affects a process used to produce high-performance products from metal powders. This research could lead to improved manufacturing techniques.
    Continuing research on growing food in space, as the Veggie Passive Orbital Nutrient Delivery System experiment tests a new way to deliver nutrients to plants.

Among the cargo that will enable National Laboratory research, which is managed by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, is a platform that will enable testing of materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, and investigations into the process of antibiotic release and technology for the evaluation of drug safety and effectiveness.

This is the 14th SpaceX mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. The space station has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, more than 220 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #48 on: 02/15/2018 11:48 PM »
Among the cargo that will enable National Laboratory research, which is managed by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, is a platform that will enable testing of materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space

Did the external payloads change, or is this something going up in the pressurized cargo?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #49 on: 02/16/2018 02:54 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #50 on: 02/16/2018 03:03 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home


ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/09/2018
 
Robonaut: The crew prepared and stowed Robonaut in preparation for return on SpaceX-14. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.
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Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #51 on: 02/20/2018 02:22 PM »
https://twitter.com/ASIM_Payload/status/965952257891229697
Quote
April 2nd #CRS14 instant launch window to ISS is at 20:30 UTC, i.e. 22:30 CEST in Europe and 16:30 EDT at Kennedy Space Center.

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