Author Topic: Expedition 55 Thread  (Read 21017 times)

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 05/11/2018 12:01 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/10/2018

Lab Mass Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Loss of Comm: The Lab MCA experienced a loss of communication overnight. A power cycle was performed to bring it back online; before that could happen, however, the Pump Vacuum Pressure rose above the limit allowed for activation. A manual pump-out is required before reactivation can be completed. Specialists are working to schedule this task and restore MCA.

AstroPi: Today the crew transferred the AstroPi with the infrared camera from Node 1 to the Columbus module. This follows completion of the 2017-2018 European AstroPi Challenge during which student-developed software was executed on the AstroPi computers onboard the ISS.  AstroPis are augmented Raspberry Pi computers equipped with the mighty Sense Hardware Attached on Top (HAT) that measure the environment inside the ISS, detect how the station moves through space, and pick up the Earth’s magnetic field. One of the AstroPis has an infrared camera and the other has a standard visible spectrum camera.

At Home in Space:  The crew completed a questionnaire for the At Home in Space investigation. This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Recorded Public Affairs (PAO) Events: Today the crew recorded two deferred release downlink messages.  One message is for the Memorial tree planting ceremony at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in celebration of John Young scheduled on May 14.  The second message is for the retirement celebration of JSC Center Director Ellen Ochoa on May 17.

Educational Recording:  Drew filmed several demonstration of the Water Recovery System onboard the ISS.  STEMonstrations are education videos conducted by crewmembers aboard the space station. Crewmember use the camera to capture onboard demonstrations and talking points. The material is deferred release and will not be seen on live NASA TV. Once edited, the material will be used for educational products, NASA TV, and social media applications.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for next week’s US EVA 50 Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) Relocate, the crew used computer-aided simulations to review EVA procedures via Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) and the Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT).  They also used Virtual Reality to review procedures associated with the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER).  In addition to this training, the crew completed a checkout of the SAFER units, continued with Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Long Life Battery (LLB) charging operations, and configured various cameras used during EVA.

Eye Exams: Today the entire US crew performed routine eye exams using a Fundoscope. Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crewmembers eye health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

Robotic Operations:  Last night, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) in position to extract the failed Pump Flow Control Assembly (PFCS) also known as ‘Leaky’.  They extracted the PFCS and stowed it on the Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP) side 3.  After initial release, the SSRMS rebounded in the X and Y directions and contacted structure; survey of the P6 interface did not indicate any damage.  The Mobile Transporter (MT) was translated from Worksite 8 to Worksite 6 to complete last night’s operations.

It is going to be a busy night tonight outside the ISS.  Ground controllers in Houston will continue to configure the MSS for the PFCS EVA. The SPDM, will install PFCS ‘Leaky’ on the EOTP, after which the SSRMS will be moved to the EVA starting position. Later in the evening Ground controllers in Tsukuba, Japan will maneuver Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) from the Stowed Position to the Small Satellite Deploy Position in preparation for Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Demonstration (JSSOD)-8 satellite deploys tomorrow morning.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 05/12/2018 08:48 PM »
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/995363193190076416

Quote
O Canada! 🇨🇦 A superb picture of Canadian robots #Canadarm2 and Dextre flying over the Canadian Rockies as seen from the @Space_Station by Canadian– American astronaut @Astro_Feustel! Credit: NASA/A.J. Feustel

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DdA9jGQXkAIh9zT.jpg:large

---
SMS ;-).

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 05/13/2018 08:03 AM »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/25050/
Reboost at 22.07 UTC. Thrusters worked for 172 sec. No more information.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 05/14/2018 08:38 AM »
JEM-RMS was on the move in the last hours.
Could someone tell us what tasks have been accomplished? Thanks.
Some pictures

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 05/14/2018 02:35 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/11/2018

Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer 8 (J-SSOD#8):  Last night and this morning, Robotics Controllers in Tsukuba, Japan maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to the Small Satellite Deploy Position and deployed the Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Demonstration (JSSOD)-8 satellites.  The crew supported the activity as observes, taking photographs of the various small satellites as they were deployed from both JSSOD-8 launchers.

Space Headaches:  Two 53S crewmembers completed a weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation today. This investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improve the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Live Public Affairs (PAO) Event: This evening, Drew Feustel will receive an honorary Doctorate degree from the University of Purdue.  Feustel, along with Purdue Alumnus Scott Tingle, will also participate in Purdue’s commencement ceremony, sharing words with the recent graduates. 

Integrated Communications Unit (ICU) R4 Transition: This morning the crew installed a Gigabit Ethernet cable from ICU-1 to the JSL router and transferred the R4 software to the ICU-1 Kernal 1.  Later this evening, ground teams will load new firmware/coefficient files and begin a transition from Antenna Group (AG)-2, and ICU-2, to AG-1 and ICU-1.  This is the desired configuration for the SGTRC (Space to Ground Transmitter Receiver Controller) R&R scheduled during next week’s US EVA.  The intent of ICU R4 is to increase the return link bandwidth from 300 Mbps to 600 Mbps.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for next week’s US EVA 50 Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) Relocate, the crew utilized Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) Software to review crew translation paths and Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) movement during the EVA. Once complete with this simulation, the crew continued reviewing the EVA Systems Briefing Package before conducting a second EVA Procedures Conference with ground specialists.  A checkout of the Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly (REBA), used to power the glove heaters on the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs), concluded the list of today’s EVA prep activities.

Eye Exams: Today the entire US crew continued with a second day of routine eye exams using both Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Ultrasound hardware. Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crewmembers eye health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last night, the Robotics Ground Control team powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), with the “Leaky” Pump/Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS), on the LAB Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF).  The SSRMS then released the SPDM and maneuvered to the start position in support for the EVA scheduled next week. MSS performance was nominal

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 05/15/2018 08:39 AM »
JEM-RMS was on the move in the last hours.
Could someone tell us what tasks have been accomplished? Thanks.
Some hours ago JEM-RMS was on move too.
It looks like it put something (ExHAM ??) into the airlock.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 05/15/2018 02:49 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/14/2018

ISS Reboost: On Saturday, May 12th, at 05:07:00 pm CDT the ISS performed a nominal 2 minute and 52 second reboost using the 69P thrusters.  The purpose of the reboost was to set up proper phasing for the 53S landing in June and the 70P 2-orbit rendezvous in July.

Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #2:  The crew brought the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table into the JEM this morning and replaced the J-SSOD deployers with the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) Adapter on the Multipurpose Experiment Platform (MPEP).  They then returned the slide table to the Airlock and depressed and vented the Airlock.  Later today the crew will extend the slide table to the exterior of the ISS.  Tonight ground robotics controllers will use the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA) to transfer the HXP from the JEM External Facility to the Slide Table. On Wednesday the Slide Table will be brought back into the JEM and ExHAM samples will be exchanged before the HXP is returned to the JEM External Facility.

Veggie Passive Orbital Nutrient Delivery System (PONDS):  On May 9th the crew reported what appeared to be mold growing on some of the plants. Today the crew aborted the Veggie PONDS run, photographed the plants and harvested some of them for return to the ground for evaluation.  After removing the plants, the crew cleaned the Veggie PONDS hardware and set it up for drying.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food. Understanding how plants respond to microgravity and demonstrating reliable vegetable production on orbit are important steps toward that goal. Veggie PONDS uses a newly developed passive nutrient delivery system and the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS to cultivate lettuce and mizuna greens which are to be harvested on-orbit, and consumed, with samples returned to Earth for analysis.

Vascular Echo:  Earlier today a 53S subject collected blood samples for the Vascular Echo investigation. Using the CardioLab Portable Doppler (PDOP), the crewmember donned the femoral probe and performed a 1-minute exercise followed by a resting period during which data was collected. Vascular Echo examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR): The crew replaced CIR manifold bottles today to support the ongoing microgravity combustion research operations in the CIR. They also replaced a seal as part of routine CIR maintenance. The Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) experiments being performed in the CIR include five independent studies of gaseous flames.  The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Cygnus OA-9 Capture On-board Training (OBT):  Today the crew reviewed the OA-9 mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures, and interfaces necessary for monitoring and commanding to the Cygnus vehicle.  Once completed, they participated in a conference with ground specialists to discuss the overall capture training plan and reviewed the Backaway and Capture Cue Cards.  OA-9 is scheduled to arrive at the ISS on 24-May.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R): Today the crew Removed and Replaced (R&R) the WHC Urine Receptacle and Insert Filter. After the R&R, the crew performed a functionality test with nominal results.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for Wednesday’s US EVA 50 Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) Relocate, the crew completed additional EVA tool configuration and performed an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3003 and 3006 water recharge and ullage dump.

Public Affairs (PAO) Event: Today the crew participated in an educational event with the Tulsa Air and Space Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Participants in the Live Downlink were Oklahoma students in 5-12th grades that competed in an essay contest. Student essays described what they would ask an astronaut and how that question relates to their own life on earth.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 05/16/2018 02:34 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/15/2018

Tropical Cyclone: The crew configured the camera settings in the Cupola to support the capture of a series of photographs of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The images will be used to create 3 dimensional images of the craters that have formed as a result of the volcanic eruptions.

Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #2: Last night ground robotics controllers used the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Small Fine Arm to transfer the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) from the JEM External Facility to the Slide Table. Later this week, the Slide Table will be brought back into the JEM and ExHAM samples will be exchanged before the HXP is returned to the JEM External Facility.

Two Phase Flow (TPF): This morning the crew deactivated the TPF experiment equipment in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) for the experiment run completed overnight. The Two-Phase Flow experiment investigates the heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling in the microgravity environment. This experiment provides a fundamental understanding of the behaviors of bubble formation, liquid-vapor flow in a tube, and how heat transfers in cooling systems. Two-phase flow employs a sample cooling loop using perfluorohexane, often used in coolants for electronics, to establish flow rate and heating power in different conditions.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): Today the crew retrieved eight RaDI-N detectors from a US Laboratory module location and handed them over to a Russian crewmember for processing. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) investigation measures neutron radiation levels in the ISS.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for tomorrow’s US EVA 50 Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) Relocate, the crew printed off their suit cuff checklists and finalized their EVA tool configurations. Once completed, the crew performed an audit of their EVA tool configuration and reviewed the EVA briefing package which includes a detailed timeline of their scheduled activities and procedures for dealing with off-nominal situations.  The crew also participated in a conference with ground EVA specialists and discussed their review of the briefing packet.  The crew is scheduled to egress the airlock at 7:15 AM CDT tomorrow morning.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Checkout: This afternoon, the crew performed a successful checkout the C2V2 Portable Computer System (PCS) Command Panel in support of the upcoming Orbital-ATK Cygnus (OA-9) mission.  The test verified crew command capability between ISS and a simulated Cygnus vehicle and is required ahead of the scheduled launch of OA-9 on 20-May.  OA-9 will be the first Orbital vehicle to utilize the newer C2V2 system for approach and capture.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 05/17/2018 02:05 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/16/2018

US EVA 50 Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) Relocate: Today Drew Feustel (EV-1) and Ricky Arnold (EV-2) executed US EVA #50. The following tasks were accomplished during the EVA:

A swap of the Pump/Flow Control Subassemblies (PFCS) between the Enhanced ORU Transfer Platform (EOTP) and External Stowage Platform (ESP)-1 locations
Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the Camera Port #13 (CP13) External Television Camera Group (ETVCG)
R&R of the degraded Space to Ground Transmitter Receiver Controller (SGTRC)
Installation of the S1 forward and aft RGB T-handles
S1-FHRC strut preps
ELC2 spare DCSU MLI removal and MLI skirt tie backs
The Phase Elapsed Time (PET) for US EVA #50 was 6h 31m.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: This afternoon & evening, robotics controllers are performing post-EVA operations to unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) with the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).  Once the SPDM is unstowed, the MT will be translated from Worksite (WS) 6 to WS 8 in preparation for tomorrow night’s transfer and install of the spare Pump Flow and Control Subsystem (PFCS) from the SPDMs Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP) to the P6 long spacer.  These activities will allow ground controllers to gain insight into the PFCS to perform a firmware update and a Flow Control Valve (FCV) functional checkout.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 05/18/2018 01:54 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/17/2018

Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #2:  The crew opened the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) inner hatch and extended the Airlock slide table into the JEM. They detached and stowed samples for return to the ground from the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP).  The ExHAM is a cuboid mechanism equipped with a fixture on the upper surface for grappling by the JEM Remote Manipulator System Small Fine Arm, and components on the under surface for attaching the ExHAM to the handrail on the JEM EF.

Team Task Switching:  A crewmember completed a Team Task Switching survey today.  When crew members are often required to switch their attention between tasks, performance on each of the tasks can be affected.  The objective of the Team Task Switching investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crew members have difficulty in switching tasks and determine the impacts of these switches, in order to both reduce any negative consequences and improve individual and team motivation and effectiveness.

Cygnus On-board Training: Today, the crewmembers scheduled to capture OA9 (Cygnus) performed a Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. OA9 is currently on track to launch on May 20th and be berthed to ISS on May 24th.

Post-Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Crew Activities:  Today the crew performed Post-EVA medical evaluations, airlock reconfigurations, and a water recharge on the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) used during the EVA.  They also conducted an EVA debrief with ground specialists.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight, robotics controllers supported post-EVA operations by unstowing the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) with the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and translating the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite (WS) 6 to WS 8. Today, ground controllers used the MSS to transfer and install of the spare Pump Flow and Control Subsystem (PFCS) to the P6 long spacer.  After the PFCS has was transferred, the ground robotics team began a series of follow-on tasks to get the MSS ready for OA-9 capture and berthing on Thursday, May 24.

Post-Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware Checkouts: Once the ground robotics flight controllers completed relocating the spare PFCS to the P6 long spacer, ground controllers were able to regain insight into the PFCS and perform a firmware prefresh. A checkout of the ammonia Flow Control Valve (FCV) is planned for tomorrow. Ground controllers were also able to verify proper functionality of the new Space to Ground Transmitter Receiver Controller (SGTRC) and the Camera Port #13 (CP13) External Television Camera Group (ETVCG).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 05/21/2018 04:43 PM »
May 21, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-083

California Students to Link Up with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students from Pacoima and San Fernando, California, will have the opportunity to talk with astronauts on the International Space Station on Tuesday, May 22, as part of NASA’s Year of Education on Station. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space calls will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

NASA astronauts Ricky Arnold and Scott Tingle will answer questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans and conducting science in space.

The event will connect K-12 students from California with the two Expedition 55 astronauts at 11 a.m. EDT Tuesday from the Vaughn Next Century Learning Center. Media interested in attending should contact Gretchen McCartney at [email protected] or 818-393-6215. The event will take place at the learning center, 11505 Herrick Ave., Pacoima.

Linking teachers directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These in-flight education downlinks are an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network's Tracking and Data Relay Satellites.

In addition to the educational event, Arnold and fellow NASA astronaut Drew Feustel will be interviewed by WISH-TV in Indianapolis and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Network at 10:20 a.m. Wednesday, May 23. The interview will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 05/21/2018 06:29 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/18/2018

Orbital-ATK 9 (OA-9) Launch: OA-9 launch from the Wallops Flight Facility is set for Monday 21-May at 08:39 GMT (3:39 CT).  OA-9 capture and berthing to the ISS continues to be planned Thursday 24-May.

Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #2:  Today the crew attached new samples to the ExHAM#2, which is attached to the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table.  The Slide Table was returned to the Airlock and it was depressurized.  Tomorrow, ground controllers will use the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Small Fine Arm to transfer ExHAM#2 from the Slide Table to the JEM Exposed Facility handrail.

Multi-Use Variable-G Platform (MVP): As part of the ongoing validation of the MVP, the crew installed adherent cell modules into the MVP.  MVP is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others.  It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity. Each carousel hosts 6 separate removable experiment modules on each carousel. Video and still imagery, including microscopy, can be included. The platform also provides temperature and humidity controls and monitors and records oxygen and carbon dioxide levels.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM): The crew ingressed the BEAM and collected surface and air samples for microbial analysis. They also recovered a BEAM Wireless Temperature System A sensor by replacing the battery pack.  BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

NeuroMapping: A 53S crewmember set up the Neuromapping hardware today and performed his flight day 150 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it takes for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation includes use of structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Human Research Program (Biochemical Profile, Repository, Cell Free Epigenome and Medical Proteomics):  54S crewmembers collected blood and urine samples this morning for their flight day 60 sessions of the Biochem Profile, Repository, and Cell Free Epigenome investigations.

The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results; which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. The repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
The JAXA Cell Free Epigenome investigation tests blood samples collected from astronauts and cellular genes are analyzed.  Blood carries molecular signals released from the cells inside the body. The analysis results provide insights to scientists on how human bodies function during space flight.
Multi-Omics: Upon wakeup, a 54S crewmember collected a saliva sample and placed it into a MELFI and completed a questionnaire. The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Final Post-Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware Checkout: Yesterday, ground controllers were able to repower the newly relocated spare Pump and Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) that was installed out on the P6 truss long spacer after US EVA 50. Once powered, the team was able to establish communications the PFCS firmware controller and perform a precautionary firmware refresh. Today the ground performed a final checkout of the PFCS ensuring proper functionality of the ammonia Flow Control Valve (FCV).

Joint Station LAN (JSL) Node 2 Router Port Reconfiguration: Today the crew performed an activity to reassign the US Lab and Node 2 Joint Station LAN (JSL) router ports to match the JSL v11.0 software configuration. As part of the activity, the crew re-cabled Ethernet cables behind the JSL interface panel and changed Lab JSL router power chain to connect the JSL router and firewalls to the same power source.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight, robotics controllers completed relocation of the Pump Flow and Control Subsystem (PFCS) to the P6 long spacer and began the follow up tasks required to get the MSS ready for OA-9 capture on Thursday, May 24. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) were translated on the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Work Site (WS) 8 to WS 4 where the SPDM was stowed on the Mobile Base Station (MBS) #2 and the SSRMS was walked off to the Node 2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF). The Node 2 PDGF is the SSRMS base location used for capturing ISS visiting vehicles that are berthed to either the Node 2 or Node 1 Nadir CBMs.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 05/22/2018 03:02 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/21/2018

Orbital-ATK 9 (OA-9) Launch: OA-9 launched from the Wallops Flight Facility this morning at 08:44:06 GMT (3:44 CT).  The Cygnus solar arrays have been deployed nominally.  OA-9 capture and berthing to the ISS is planned for Thursday 24-May.

Atomization:  This morning a crewmember set up and activated the Atomization hardware in the Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR). The Atomization experiment investigates the disintegration processes of a low-speed water jet for various jet issue conditions in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to validate the new atomization concept by observing the process using a high speed camera. The knowledge gained can be applied to improve various engines utilizing spray combustion.

Human Research Program (Biochemical Profile, Repository and Cell Free Epigenome):  A 54S crewmember collected blood and urine samples for his Flight Day 60 session of the Biochem Profile, Repository, and Cell Free Epigenome investigations.  A 53S crewmember collected urine samples for his return next month to include 14-day session of the Biochem Profile and Repository investigations.

The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results; which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. The repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
The JAXA Cell Free Epigenome investigation tests blood samples collected from astronauts and cellular genes are analyzed.  Blood carries molecular signals released from the cells inside the body. The analysis results provide insights to scientists on how human bodies function during space flight.
Probiotics: Today a crewmember collected saliva samples and stowed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  He also completed a questionnaire. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts in a closed microgravity environment.  The results of this investigation may be used to support improvements in crew members’ intestinal microbiota and their immune function on long-duration space missions.

OA-9 Robotics Onboard Training:  Earlier today, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS in support of the crew’s Cygnus Offset Grapple practice.  During the Off Set Grapple activity, the crew used the PMM FRGF as the target to practice grapple approaches, maneuvering the SSRMS over the pin and practice pulling the trigger when they are in the grapple envelope. After the Offset Grapple training, the crew performed a Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback.

OA-9 Arrival Preparations: In preparation for OA-9 capture and berthing on Thursday, the crew deployed, and perform a checkout of, the Centerline Berthing Camera System (CBCS) on the Node 1 Nadir hatch. Video from the CBCS will be used to aid Flight Controllers during Visiting Vehicle mating operations.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Tether Inspections and Tool Configuration: Today the crew began the tool configurations necessary to support the upcoming US EVA #51 Node 2 EWC. They also inspected their 85ft Safety Tethers, Waist Tethers, and D-ring Extenders for structural integrity. The Node 2 EWC EVA is currently planned for June 14th.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 05/23/2018 02:11 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/22/2018

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME):  The crew replaced the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) manifold bottles this morning. To prepare for the second part of the CLD Flames investigation the crew configured the ACME Chamber Insert, replaced the igniter tip, and replaced two ACME controllers.  The ACME experiment series being performed in the CIR includes five independent studies of gaseous flames.  The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Kubik 6:  The commissioning for ESA’s Kubik 6 facility continued today.  The crew set up the Kubik 6 in the Columbus module, adjusted the sensor signal and calibrated the temperature sensors.  They then installed the Foam Carriers in Kubik 6.  Kubik is a small controlled-temperature incubator or cooler used to study biological samples in a microgravity environment.  It is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

Atomization:  Today the crew set up and activated Atomization hardware in the Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).  The Atomization experiment investigates the disintegration processes of a low-speed water jet for various jet issue conditions in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to validate the new atomization concept by observing the process using a high speed camera. The knowledge gained can be applied to improve various engines utilizing spray combustion.

Human Research Program (Biochemical Profile, Marrow, Vascular Echo, and Repository): 53S crewmembers collected urine samples for their Return minus 14-day session of the Biochem Profile, Marrow, Vascular Echo and Repository investigations.  Collecting of blood samples has been delayed because of an issue with activating the Refrigerated Centrifuge (RC).  The alternate centrifuge will be used.  Troubleshooting plans are in work by the team.  A 54S crewmember collected urine samples for his Flight Day 60 session of the Biochem Profile and Repository investigations.

The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results; which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.
Vascular Echo examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.
Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. The repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
NeuroMapping: A 53S crewmember set up the Neuromapping hardware today and performed his Flight Day 150 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it takes for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation includes use of structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

OA-9 Robotics Onboard Training:  Today the crew scheduled to capture OA-9 performed a second Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session a reviewed their Cygnus Attached Phase procedures. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: Today the crew conducted Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) maintenance and EVA tool configurations in preparation for the upcoming US EVA #51 Node 2 EWC.  Following the EMU Cooling Loop Scrubs, the crew took water samples from the cooling loops, performed and iodination of EMU Ion Filters, and tested the water samples for conductivity. The Node 2 EWC EVA is currently planned for June 14th.

Public Affairs (PAO) Live Event: Today Arnold and Tingle participated in a live PAO event with the Vaughn Next Century Learning Center in San Fernando, California.  The audience for this event consisted of student representatives from all grade levels and ages across Vaughn’s TK-12 span and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 05/24/2018 03:41 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/23/2018
 

Human Research Program (Biochemical Profile, Marrow, Vascular Echo, and Repository):  53S crewmembers collected blood and urine samples for their Return minus 14-day session of the Biochem Profile, Marrow and Repository investigations.  One of the 53S crewmembers also started a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring session.  Blood samples are being processed in the alternate non-refrigerated centrifuge due to the issues experienced yesterday with the refrigerated centrifuge.   A 54S crewmember also collected urine samples for his Flight Day 60 session of the Biochem Profile and Repository investigations.
•The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results; which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.
•Vascular Echo examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. The repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Food Acceptability:  A crewmember completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire today. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

OA-9 Robotics Onboard Training:  This afternoon, the crew scheduled to capture OA-9 performed an additional Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session and continued their review of Cygnus Attached Phase procedures prior to tomorrow’s OA-9 capture and berthing. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback.

Orbital-ATK 9 (OA-9): This evening ground teams will prepare and inspect the Node 1 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) in preparation for OA-9 capture and berthing planned for tomorrow, May 24th, 4:20 am CT.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: Today the crew continued configuring EVA tools and equipment needed during the upcoming US EVA #51 Node 2 EWC planned for June 14th.  Additionally, the crew swapped Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) on the EMU Don/Doff Assembly (EDDAs) for upcoming EVA prep activities.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 05/24/2018 04:15 PM »
New ISS config. after Cygnus OA-9 berthing.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 05/29/2018 06:04 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/24/2018
 

Orbital ATK (OA)-9 Cygnus S.S. J.R. Thomson Rendezvous with ISS:  The crew successfully captured the S.S. J.R. Thompson with the Space Station Remote Manipulation System (SSRMS) at 4:29 am CDT. Once captured, the crew handed off control of the SSRMS to ground robotics controllers who maneuvered the Cygnus vehicle to the Node 1 nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) interface where it was securely bolted to the ISS. Once the CBM bolting operations were complete, the crew and ground teams worked together to perform Node 1 CBM vestibule pressurization followed by hatch opening and ingress at ~12:05 PM CT.

Tropical Cyclone: The crew configured the camera settings in the Cupola to support the capture of untended images of Cyclone Mekunu, which is expected to make landfall on the Aragian Peninsula tomorrow.  The Tropical Cyclone investigation is normally used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Human Research Program (Biochemical Profile, Marrow, Vascular Echo, and Repository):  A 53S crewmember collected blood samples for their Return minus 14-day session of the Biochem Profile, Marrow and Repository investigations this morning.  He also completed a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring session.  Blood samples are being processed in the new non-refrigerated centrifuge due to the issues experienced yesterday with the refrigerated centrifuge.
•The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results; which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.
•Vascular Echo examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. The repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 05/29/2018 06:05 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/25/2018
 

NanoRacks-Remove Debris (RemDeb):  The crew pressurized and performed a leak check of the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) and then extended the Airlock slide table into the JEM this morning. They then removed the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) Adapter and the Multipurpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) from the Slide Table.  These activities are the initial preparation steps for the launch of the RemDeb, planned for June 19th.  NanoRacks-Remove Debris demonstrates an approach to reducing the risks presented by space debris or “space junk”. Collisions in space may have serious consequences, but research has shown that removing the largest debris significantly reduces the chance of collisions. NanoRacks-Remove Debris uses a 3D camera to map location and speed of debris and then deploys a net to capture and de-orbit simulated debris that is up to 1 meter in diameter.  Ground experts will then analyze video of the demonstration runs.

Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Video Upgrade Equipment (VUE): Today, the crew replaced the VUE in the MSG that failed on March 1st.  In concert with the ground they then performed a video checkout to verify MSG VUE functionality.   

Multi-Use Variable-G Platform (MVP): As part of the ongoing validation of the MVP, the crew removed adherent cell modules that were installed in the MVP on May 18th.  MVP is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity. Each carousel hosts 6 separate removable experiment modules on each carousel. Video and still imagery, including microscopy, can be included. The platform also provides temperature and humidity controls and monitors and records oxygen and carbon dioxide levels.

TangoLab:  The crew swapped cards containing experiment cubes from the TangoLab-1 and -2 facilities today. TangoLab-1 and -2 are reconfigurable general research facilities designed for microgravity research and development and pilot manufacturing in the ISS.

Orbital ATK (OA)-9 Cygnus Ops: This morning, the crew continued transferring cargo, payloads, and trash between Cygnus and ISS. The day’s goal was to clear the inner core of stowage, creating a “corridor” within Cygnus for crew translation and to provide a workspace. The crew now has access to payloads and nearly all of the cargo inside the Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM), allowing them to begin unpacking bays and loading them with trash as soon as they are cleared.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #138 on: 05/29/2018 06:05 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/28/2018
 

Kubik 6:  After completing commissioning for ESA’s Kubik 6 facility the crew disconnected and stowed the Kubik 6.  Kubik is a small controlled-temperature incubator/cooler used to study biological samples in a microgravity environment.  It is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF):  The crew exchanged the sample cartridges in ELF and stowed the processed sample for return.  ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Barrios Protein Crystal Growth (PCG):  The crew mixed solutions in a crystallization plate.  Barrios PCG focuses on the successful transfer and mixing of different solutions into commercial off-the-shelf multiwell plates. Video of the growth of the protein crystals in the multiwell plates will be downlinked for evaluation.

Orbital ATK (OA)-9 Cygnus:  The crew completed a training session to practice emergency response actions that need to be taken with Cygnus attached.  They also continued with Cygnus cargo operations.

Soyuz (53S) Return Cargo Packing: The crew started packing the cargo that will return on 53S. The remaining packing will be completed prior to undocking.

External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) Disassembly:  The crew disassembled the ETVCG that was retrieved from Camera Port (CP)-13 during EVA #50 on May 16, 2018 and removed the Pan and Tilt Unit (PTU) with the Television Camera Interface Converter (TVCIC). The TVCIC was then removed and stowed.  The crew will install a new TVCIC on the PTU and then reassemble the ETVCG at a later date. The newly assembled ETVCG will be installed at Camera Port CP-3 during EVA #51.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #139 on: 05/30/2018 01:37 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/29/2018

Solidification Using Baffles in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA):  The crew set up the SUBSA hardware today and installed a calibration sample.  The objective of the SUBSA investigation is to advance understanding of the processes involved in semiconductor crystal growth. It offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C. Samples are contained in transparent quartz or ceramic ampoules with high definition video imaging available in real-time along with remote commanding of thermal control parameters.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS):  The crew decommissioned and removed ESA’s EMCS for return on the SpaceX-15 vehicle.  The EMCS Holding Structure will be temporarily stowed in the Cygnus vehicle.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  Today the crew collected saliva and body samples and placed them inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Orbital ATK (OA)-9 cargo status:  The crew is scheduled for ~8 hours of Cygnus Cargo operations today. The crew has completed 13.5 hours of cargo operations since last Friday.  Cargo specialist estimate approximately 16 hours of cargo operations remain to complete Cargo Message #1.  Cargo Message #1 will unload the Cygnus vehicle and load about 1/3 of the trash.     

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: This evening ground robotics controllers will ungrapple the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) from the OA-9 Cygnus spacecraft. Once complete, the SSRMS will backaway from the vehicle, complete a walkoff to Mobile Base System (MBS)-1, and stow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) in preparation for tomorrow‘s planned robotic surveys.

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