Author Topic: Expedition 55 Thread  (Read 21123 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Expedition 55 Thread
« on: 07/17/2017 09:37 AM »
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« Last Edit: 05/05/2018 01:11 AM by eeergo »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #1 on: 08/16/2017 07:39 PM »
Scott D. Tingle @Astro_Maker

#Expedition55 in its entirety, to include Lead Flight Director Gary Horlacher!   Поехали!

---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #2 on: 12/02/2017 07:24 AM »
November 30, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-140

First Space Station Crew of 2018 Available for News Conference, Interviews


NASA astronauts A.J. (Drew) Feustel and Ricky Arnold, and crewmate Oleg Artemyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will discuss their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference at 2 p.m. EST Thursday, Dec. 7, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The news conference will be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed on the agency’s website. The crew will be available for in person or remote media interviews afterward.

Feustel and Arnold will launch to the space station aboard the Russian Soyuz MS-08 spacecraft, commanded by Artemyev, in March 2018, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. This will be the second time in five months that two NASA astronauts will launch together on a Soyuz spacecraft to the station.

The trio will join the Expedition 55 crew, and return to Earth in August 2018 as members of Expedition 56. Arnold, a former classroom teacher, and Feustel will continue NASA’s Year of Education on Station initiatives to inspire educators and students. This will be Feustel’s third spaceflight, and he will serve as a flight engineer for Expedition 55 and commander for Expedition 56. This will be Arnold and Artemyev’s second spaceflights, and they will serve as flight engineers on Expeditions 55 and 56.

To request credentials to participate in person or to reserve an interview opportunity, U.S. reporters must contact Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 6. The deadline has passed for international media to attend in person.

Reporters who wish to participate by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom no later than 1:45 p.m. on Dec. 7. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using #askNASA.

During a planned six-month mission, the crew members will take part in about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Science conducted in the orbiting laboratory continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space.

Feustel is from Lake Orion, Michigan, and earned a doctorate in Geological Sciences specializing in seismology from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, in addition to degrees from Oakland Community College, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. NASA selected Feustel as an astronaut in 2000 and he has flown on two spaceflights. In 2009, Feustel served on space shuttle mission STS-125, the final servicing mission for NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Feustel also served on STS-134 to deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer to the International Space Station on the final flight of space shuttle Endeavour. Feustel has logged more than 29 days in space and spent more than 42 hours on six spacewalks.

NASA selected Arnold as an astronaut in 2004. The Maryland native worked in the marine sciences and as a teacher in his home state, as well as in countries such as Morocco, Saudi Arabia, and Indonesia. He accumulated 12 days, 19 hours and 29 minutes in space during STS-119, during which space shuttle Discovery delivered the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and a truss element for the space station. While aboard station, he conducted two spacewalks totaling 12 hours and 34 minutes.

Find the NASA astronauts’ full biographies at:

https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/

Follow Feustel on social media at:

https://twitter.com/Astro_Feustel

https://www.instagram.com/astro_feustel/

Follow Arnold on social media at:

https://twitter.com/astro_ricky

Learn more about the International Space Station and its crews at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #3 on: 12/13/2017 11:12 AM »
The ISS-55/56 preflight news conference took place last week, but for some reason NASA did not post this clip on its YouTube channel. Video coverage seems to go downhill, as the the ISS-54/55 preflight activities (e.g. final exams) were not covered either, but for these we have some alternatives, like Roscosmos and TsPK.

The ISS-55/56 preflight news conference was broadcast on NASA TV, and I did find it on NASA's Ustream page, but I cannot get the clip working (none of NASA's clips): playback does not start, and I can not record it either (I tried both Firefox and Chrome).

Am I the only one with this problem?
Note: the clips is on: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/110486498
General NASA Ustream page is: http://www.ustream.tv/nasahdtv/videos/2

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #4 on: 12/13/2017 09:09 PM »
I have the same ;-(((
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #5 on: 12/14/2017 11:16 AM »
I have the same ;-(((

I have contacted Ustream (IBM) and hopefully get an answer to solve this matter.

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #6 on: 12/16/2017 08:14 AM »
It seems NASA has changed its YouTube video channel; the "old one" is still maintained but used for short videos (???), and the videos I'm interested in are now on "NASA Video."

The ISS-55/56 press conference can also be found here.



Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #7 on: 02/20/2018 11:02 AM »
Quote
The ISS-55/56 crews are ready to operate at the station

https://www.roscosmos.ru/24722/

« Last Edit: 02/20/2018 11:03 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #8 on: 02/20/2018 07:31 PM »
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/sets/72157679671299912

The six-member Expedition 55 crew poses for an official crew portrait

iss055-s-002 (Oct. 6, 2017) --- The six-member Expedition 55 crew poses for an official crew portrait at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. In the front row (from left) are Scott Tingle of NASA, Commander Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. In the back row (from left) are NASA astronauts Ricky Arnold and Andrew Feustel and Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev.

iss055-s-001 (Oct. 10, 2017) --- The official mission insignia of the Expedition 55 crew.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #9 on: 02/28/2018 02:33 AM »
ISS Configuration after Soyuz MS-06 undocking (and start of Expedition 55)
« Last Edit: 02/28/2018 02:35 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #10 on: 03/02/2018 07:55 AM »
March 01, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-039

California, Arizona Students to Speak with Astronauts on Space Station

Two astronauts living and working aboard the International Space Station will talk live with students in Arizona and California on Friday, March 2. The separate Earth-to-space calls will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students from H.L. Suverkrup Elementary School in Yuma, Arizona, will talk to Expedition 55 astronauts Scott Tingle of NASA and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency at 10:30 a.m. EST. Media interested in attending the event should contact Trina Seigfried at 928-246-3565 or [email protected] The event will take place at 1590 S Ave.

At 12:15 p.m., Tingle and Kanai will get a call from students at Monta Loma Elementary School in Mountain View, California. To attend this event, media should contact Shelly Hausman at [email protected] or 650-796-8304. The event will take place at 60 Thompson Ave.

The students will have a unique opportunity to pose questions directly to astronauts about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space. They’re preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and the current research and activities happening aboard the station. In addition, the Suverkrup students have added their names to NASA’s InSight Mars lander Names to Mars program and are preparing for a virtual field trip to the Red Planet.

These in-flight education downlinks are an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Astronauts living on the orbiting laboratory are able to participate in these educational calls, and communicate 24 hours a day with the Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, through the agency Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #11 on: 03/02/2018 12:55 PM »
Press release, 2 March 2018

Collaboration between space and Earth - Astronaut Scott Tingle controls DLR robot Justin from space

The operator orbits Earth at an altitude of 400 kilometres, while the assistant works on the ground. During the 'SUPVIS Justin' experiment, those who send and receive commands conduct a long-distance relationship. Aboard the International Space Station
(ISS) on 2 March 2018, United States astronaut Scott Tingle selected the required commands on a tablet, while the robot Justin of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) performed the necessary work on a solar
panel in a terrestrial laboratory in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany, as instructed. Engineers at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics had fitted their robot with the necessary artificial intelligence so that it could perform these subtasks autonomously
and without detailed individual commands. “The robot is clever, but the astronaut is always in control," says Neal Lii, the DLR project manager. In August 2017, the experiment was successfully carried out for the first time as part of the METERON Project
(Multi-Purpose End-to-End Robotic Operation Network), together with the European Space Agency (ESA). In the second test run, the tasks have now become more demanding for both the robot and the astronaut. 

Robot with artificial intelligence

For the experiment, the robot Justin was relocated to Mars as a worker – visually at least – in order to inspect and maintain solar panels as autonomously as possible – task by task – and to provide the orbiting astronaut with constant feedback for
the next stages of work. "Artificial intelligence allows the robot to perform many tasks independently, making us less susceptible to communication delays that would make continuous control more difficult at such a great distance," Lii explains. "And
we also reduce the workload of the astronaut, who can transfer tasks to the robot." To do this, however, astronauts and robots must cooperate seamlessly and also complement one another.

Human-machine team

To begin with, scientists made the human and machine team handle a few standard tasks, which had already been practised in advance on the ground and also performed by Justin from the ISS. But subsequent assignments went well beyond mechanical tasks.
The solar panels were covered with dust – this would be a problem for a planetary mission on Mars, for example, which astronauts and robots would have to overcome. The panels also were not optimally directed towards the sunlight. When operating solar
panels for a Martian colony, this would soon result in the energy supply becoming weaker and weaker. 

Tingle, who was viewing the working environment on the Red Planet through Justin's eyes on his tablet, quickly realised that Justin needed to clean the panels and remove the dust. And he also had to realign the solar components. To do this, he could
choose from a range of abstract commands on the tablet. "Our team closely observed how the astronaut accomplished these tasks, without being aware of these problems in advance and without any knowledge of the robot's new capabilities," says DLR engineer
Daniel Leidner. The new tasks also posed a challenge for Justin. Instead of simply reporting whether he had fulfilled a requirement or not, as in the initial test run in August 2017, this time he and his operator had to 'estimate' the extent to which
he had cleaned the panels, for example. In the next series of experiments in summer 2018, the German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst will take command of Justin – and the tasks will again become slightly more complicated than before because Justin will
have to select a component on behalf of the astronaut and install it on the solar panels.

The astronaut's partner 

"This is a significant step closer to a manned planetary mission with robotic support," says Alin Albu-Schäffer, head of the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics. In such a future, an astronaut would orbit a celestial body – from where he or
she would command and control a team of robots fitted with artificial intelligence on its surface. "The astronaut would therefore not be exposed to the risk of landing, and we could use more robotic assistants to build and maintain infrastructure,
for example, with limited human resources." In this scenario, the robot would no longer simply be the extended arm of the astronaut: "It would be more like a partner on the ground."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #12 on: 03/02/2018 02:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/01/2018
 

Plant Gravity Perception (PGP): Today the crew removed the Plant Gravity Perception seed cassettes from Experiment Containers (ECs) on the two European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) rotors and stowed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). They also replaced the ECs on the rotors with ECs for the next Plant Gravity Perception experiment run. For this investigation, normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, are germinated to support the study of the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide insight into the plants’ adaptation to a microgravity environment and supports efforts to grow plants for food on future space missions.

Veg-03:  The crew took photographs to document plant growth for the VEG-03 investigation.  Photos of the plants are taken about every 3 days.  The crew also watered the plants. Veg-03 supports the proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and planting pillows. Future long duration space missions, including those to Mars, will require a fresh food supply grown in space to supplement crew diets.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS):  Today the crew captured images of the Australian desert. EIISS supports creation of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with high resolution cameras on the ISS.  The pictures are also integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Node 3 Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Verification Gas Assembly (VGA) Remove and Replace (R&R): Today the crew replaced the MCA VGA, a life-limited component requiring periodic replacement. The MCA is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on board the ISS. Following the maintenance, the MCA was pumped down to vacuum and the crew and ground teams reconfigured the MCA for nominal operations.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Emergency Book Replacement:  Today the crew replaced the hard copy Emergency-1c books which included updated Ammonia (NH3) response procedures.  Tomorrow the crew will review the new procedures during an On-Board Training (OBT) session.

Latching End Effectors A (LEE A) Survey – Yesterday, ground teams performed an Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) walkoff to Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture -4 (PDGF-4) and performed a high definition camera survey of the LEE A snare cables.  Once the survey had been completed, they performed a checkout of the LEE A mechanisms. MSS performance was nominal during yesterday’s activities.

Latching End Effectors B (LEE B) Survey – Ground teams are currently performing a SSRMS walkoff to MBS PDGF-3 and will perform a LEE B survey with high definition cameras later today.

Channel 1A Lithium-Ion Battery Capacity Test – Yesterday, ground teams began a capacity test on the power channel 1A Li-Ion batteries.  During this three-day capacity test, each of the three Li-Ion batteries in channel 1A will be discharged until the first cell is less than or equal to 3.0 V to acquire capacity data. This data provides insight into the actual battery amp hours available and is part of nominal maintenance.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #13 on: 03/03/2018 11:26 AM »
March 02, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-040

Massachusetts Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

 
Students from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMass Dartmouth) will speak with NASA astronaut and alumnus Scott Tingle, who is living and working aboard the International Space Station, at 12:30 p.m. EST Tuesday, March 6. The 20 minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students from the university, and area K-12 schools, will make the call to the Expedition 55 flight engineer, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, doing science in space, and how to apply their degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers.

Media interested in attending the event should contact John Hoey at 508-999-8071 or [email protected] The event will take place in the main auditorium of the Campus Center at UMass Dartmouth, located at 285 Old Westport Road.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Astronauts living on the orbiting laboratory are able to participate in these educational calls, and communicate 24 hours a day with the Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, through the agency Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

Get videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #14 on: 03/06/2018 10:07 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/02/2018
 

Node 3 Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Calibration Failure: Yesterday, the crew successfully replaced the N3 MCA Verification Gas Assembly (VGA) as part of regularly scheduled maintenance. During calibration, however, data was off-nominal and the planned full calibration failed to complete.  Teams continue to work a forward plan to restore full N3 MCA functionality.

SUPVIS-Justin:  The crew set up cameras and Haptics hardware for ESA’s SUPVIS-Justin investigation and then completed the investigation protocol operations.  SUPVIS-Justin, part of the Meteron program, aims to demonstrate that an astronaut on an orbiting space station can command a robot via a tablet PC to perform complex tasks on a planetary surface. The SUPVIS-Justin experiment includes an extended supervised autonomy concept: the crew gives high level commands to the robot, which then uses its local intelligence and decision-making capability to execute a task independently, according to pre-programmed algorithms. In this sense, the responsibility of decision-making is shared between the crew and the robot.

Veg-03:  The crew watered the plants growing for the VEG-03 investigation today.  Veg-03 supports the proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long duration space missions, including those to Mars, will require a fresh food supply grown in space to supplement crew diets.

NanoRacks Rock Candy:  The crew photo-documented each Rock Candy pouch, showing any visible sugar crystal growth in each. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using nearly identical flight kits flown and operated onboard the ISS. With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

On-Board Training (OBT) Ammonia (NH3) Emergency Response Procedure Review: Today the crew reviewed changes to the NH3 emergency response procedures. Ammonia is a toxic chemical used in the ISS External Active Thermal Control Subsystem (EATCS) and leakage into the ISS cabin is one of the major emergency response scenarios the ISS crew review while on-orbit.

Latching End Effectors B (LEE B) Survey: Overnight, ground controllers performed a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) walkoff from Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture-4 (PDGF-4) to MBS PDGF-3.  They performed a video and imagery survey of the LEE-B snare cables using the P1 Lower Outboard (LOOB) External High Definition Camera (EHDC).  Once the survey was completed, the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS into position for operations to grapple and unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) planned for March 7, 2018 (GMT 66).

Channel 1A Lithium-Ion Battery Capacity Test: Today ground teams will conclude a capacity test on the power channel 1A Li-Ion batteries.  During this three-day capacity test, each of the three Li-Ion batteries will be discharged until the first cell is less than or equal to 3.0 V to acquire capacity data. This data provides insight into the actual battery amp hours available and is part of nominal maintenance.

69Progress (69P) Trash Gather and Transfer: Today the crew gathered and transferred trash to the 69P vehicle for disposal later this month when 69P undocks on March 26, 2018.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #15 on: 03/07/2018 08:22 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/05/2018
 

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-Field) Flames:  The crew replaced the compensator module in the CIR Hi Bit-depth Multi-Spectral (HiBMS) Imaging package today.  This is in preparation for the upcoming ACME E-Field Flames investigation. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR.  ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  For E-Field Flames an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, which are naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for great simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less polluting and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Meteor:  This morning the crew installed the Meteor Small Camera Bracket and Meteor camera in the US Laboratory Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) and then activated the camera.  They then photographed the camera, lens settings and the position of the camera relative to the Lab window. The Meteor payload uses a visible spectroscopy instrument to observe meteors in Earth orbit and then analyze the images to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of meteoroid dust. The study of the meteoroid dust on-orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.   

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF):  Today the crew took photographs of Sample Cartridge 2 to allow the ground to determine if it has any damage.  This is in preparation for the upcoming ELF sample exchange planned for March 10th. The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Veg-03:  Over the weekend the crew took photographs to document plant growth for the VEG-03 investigation.  Photos of the plants are taken about every 3 days.  The crew also watered the plants over the weekend and today. Veg-03 supports the proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long duration space missions will require a fresh food supply grown in space to supplement crew diets.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from a Russian crewmember, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors on a Node 3 rack front today. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. Bubble detectors used as neutron monitors are designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Today the crew captured images of Southern California to the tip of Baja. EIISS captures a series of videos showcasing targets around the world as seen from the ISS. These videos will be integrated into a product for later release.

Lab Window Inspection: The crew performed an inspection of the Lab window to include still imagery and video, both with the external window shutter open and closed, to note any contamination or damage.  This inspection is routine maintenance performed once a year.

Node 3 (N3) Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning:  Today the crew cleaned the N3 deck IMV starboard fan inlet flow straighteners, inlet silencer and outlet silencer.  During the cleaning, the crew attempted to correct the configuration of the bellows-style flex ducts, which were collapsed and may have been contributing to the reduced airflow measured through the fan. The crewmember noted that the duct was deformed, attempted to correct it, and took photos for later engineering review.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #16 on: 03/08/2018 06:56 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/06/2018
 

Airway Monitoring:  In support of the European Space Agency (ESA) Airway Monitoring investigation, today the crew set up hardware in the US Laboratory for nitric oxide measurements to be taken tomorrow. Airway Monitoring aims to determine the pulmonary nitric oxide turnover in weightlessness and in combined weightless, hypobaric and hypoxic environments as well as determining the lung diffusion capacity for nitric oxide.  With dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere, this investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This will help to identify health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding such conditions.

Plant Habitat:  The crew positioned the Infrared Sensor Arm in the growth chamber of the Plant Habitat to test use of the sensor for measuring leaf temperatures of the growing Dwarf Wheat plants over the next week.  The Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that is being used to support plant bioscience research on the ISS in a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Veg-03:  The crew continued with the photo-documentation of plant growth for the Veg-03 investigation. They also watered the plants. Veg-03 supports the proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long duration space missions will require a fresh food supply grown in space to supplement crew diets.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Today the crew captured images of Cape Town, South Africa.  EIISS captures a series of videos showcasing targets around the world as seen from the ISS. The videos will be integrated into a product for later release.

Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) Video Upgrade Equipment (VUE) Troubleshooting: Today, ground controllers unsuccessfully attempted to repower the MSG-VUE.  The crew rerouted an Ethernet cable to connect directly with the MSG laptop computer, bypassing the VUE and allowing the Transparent Alloys payload to continue nominal file downlinks. A Failure Investigation Team (FIT) is currently scheduled on Thursday to work the forward plan.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pre-Treat Tank [E-K] Remove and Replace (R&R): The crew R&R the E-K tank as part of nominal WHC preventative maintenance.  Each tank contains five liters of pre-treat solution, a mix of acid, chromium oxide, and water, used for toilet flushing and required for nominal WHC operation. 

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPS) Inspection: The crew inspect and confirmed that the Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs), Portable Breathing Apparatuses (PBAs) and Pre-Breathe Masks are all free of damage to ensure functionality.  This is routine maintenance performed every 45 days.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging: The crew initiated a charging Autocycle of two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB) with data logging. Over the course of three days, the Autocycle will capture the battery health data required to determine if the expiration date of the LLBs can be extended by 10 months.

Public Affairs Office (PAO) Educational Event: Scott Tingle, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth alumnus, participated in an educational event with the university.  Scott answered a number of questions from Dartmouth students and faculty members.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #17 on: 03/08/2018 09:39 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/02/2018
...the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS into position for operations to grapple and unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) planned for March 7, 2018 (GMT 66)...
« Last Edit: 03/08/2018 09:40 AM by centaurinasa »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #18 on: 03/08/2018 10:09 AM »
What will be the next task of the SPDM?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 55 Thread
« Reply #19 on: 03/09/2018 07:00 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/07/2018
 

Airway Monitoring:  In support of the European Space Agency (ESA) Airway Monitoring investigation, today the crew completed calibration of the hardware in the US Laboratory and then completed two different measurement protocols; the low Nitric Oxide (NO) protocol which determines how much NO is exhaled with respiration, and the high NO protocol, which determines how much NO is diffused into the blood. The ISS provides a unique environment, allowing these measurements to be taken in weightless, hypobaric and hypoxic conditions. With dust particles present in the ISS atmosphere, this investigation studies indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze NO in exhaled air. This will help to identify potential health impacts and support maintenance of crewmember health during future human spaceflight missions, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in identifying and avoiding conditions that may result in airway inflammation.

Public Affairs Office (PAO) Educational Imagery Recording: Today the crew recorded a video to explain the importance of Earth observation from space and how the International Space Station is a global observation and diagnosis station.  This video will be one of a series of videos referred to as STEMonstrations, education videos conducted by crewmembers aboard the space station that will be used for educational products, NASA TV, and social media applications.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Today the crew captured images of the continental USA from coast to coast.  EIISS captures a series of videos showcasing targets around the world as seen from the ISS. These videos will be integrated into a product for later release.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Six-Month Maintenance: Today the crew completed the 6-month T2 inspection. During this task, the crew inspects the treadbelt slats and screws, cleans the treadmill drive shaft, greases forward and rear axles, vacuums inside the rack and around the treadmill, and inspects the bungee shackle key mount witness marks.  This is nominal periodic corrective maintenance.  An unmanned activation and checkout was completed.  Engineering reviewed the data from this checkout and T2 is a Go for operations.

Acoustic Monitor Recoding of T2 Audio: Today the crew also performed Acoustic Monitor recording of the unmanned activation and checkout protocol that is performed prior to and immediately following the T2 six-month maintenance. Two Acoustic Monitors were used to record audio of the T2 at each tread speed.

Airlock Bacteria Filter Remove and Replace (R&R): As part of routine ISS maintenance, the crew removed and replaced three expended Airlock Bacteria Filters located in the Aft Deck Standoff and clean the IMV Air Return screens of the Airlock Duct Selector Panel.

Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) Installation:  Today, the crew installed two SSLAs into the US Airlock. The SSLAs were designed to replace General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) to improve visual acuity and to provide a crew health countermeasure for circadian rhythms, sleep, alertness and performance. To accomplish these goals, SSLAs are designed to operate in 3 modes with 3 distinct spectrum. The different spectrum provide control of the blue portion of the light which impacts melatonin production in humans which impacts sleep.

Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) 1 Autostop: This morning MELFI 1 went into autostop. A power cycle was unsuccessful in recovering the unit. The crew transferred the contents of MELFI 1 to other cold stowage assets to allow the team time to review the signature and develop a forward plan. After transfers were completed, an additional power cycle of the unit was successful in recovering the Electronics Unit (EU). Dewar 3 is showing an invalid configuration and the Brayton motor remains powered off. Teams are investigating.

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