Author Topic: Vulcan VC2S 1st launch - Peregrine Lander - CCSFS SLC-41 - NET mid-December 2023  (Read 243816 times)

Online Robert_the_Doll

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 585
  • Florida
  • Liked: 877
  • Likes Given: 356
Amazing that the photographer was able to capture nearly identical views, almost two years apart, of the flight and pathfinder Vulcan cores as they were being lifted vertical. Lots of interesting, subtle differences on the cores and their respective sets of BE-4s:


Offline LouScheffer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3254
  • Liked: 5874
  • Likes Given: 771
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1618298532187803661

Quote
A thing of beauty… #CountdowntoVulcan
The picture shows a collection of wires taped to the outside of the booster.  Presumably these are instrumentation that will not be included in the final version.  Does anyone know that they are for?  Measuring forces/deflections/temperatures as they raise and/or fuel the rocket?  And I'd assume they would be removed before flight, or can taped items survive supersonic flight?

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
Some more photos from ULA

Offline whitelancer64

*snip tweet*

Quote
A thing of beauty… #CountdowntoVulcan
The picture shows a collection of wires taped to the outside of the booster.  Presumably these are instrumentation that will not be included in the final version.  Does anyone know that they are for?  Measuring forces/deflections/temperatures as they raise and/or fuel the rocket?  And I'd assume they would be removed before flight, or can taped items survive supersonic flight?

Almost certainly they are indeed wires to extra sensors / intrumentation for this rocket.

There are likely tens of thousands of sensors of many different kinds all over this rocket, so it would be really difficult to speculate what exactly they might be. You are likely in the right ballpark. Possibly they are only for the ground test series prior to the launch.

That kind of tape job would never hold up to launch forces and I would guess that it is temporary, just to hold it in place during transportation, with the wiring either to be relocated or removed entirely long before the actual launch.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 36863
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 20184
  • Likes Given: 412

The picture shows a collection of wires taped to the outside of the booster.  Presumably these are instrumentation that will not be included in the final version.  Does anyone know that they are for?  Measuring forces/deflections/temperatures as they raise and/or fuel the rocket?  And I'd assume they would be removed before flight, or can taped items survive supersonic flight?

Likely LOIS (Lift Off Instrumentation System) type instrumentation.   It would be hardwired and have an extension.  It would operate during ignition, liftoff and X feet of flight before it rips off.

Online Robert_the_Doll

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 585
  • Florida
  • Liked: 877
  • Likes Given: 356
https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1618421751423336448?cxt=HHwWgIDU5cKA5fUsAAAA

Quote
Check out more photos from today's #VulcanRocket LVOS activities! #CountdowntoVulcan

Offline Starshipdown

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 231
  • Space
  • Liked: 301
  • Likes Given: 282

The picture shows a collection of wires taped to the outside of the booster.  Presumably these are instrumentation that will not be included in the final version.  Does anyone know that they are for?  Measuring forces/deflections/temperatures as they raise and/or fuel the rocket?  And I'd assume they would be removed before flight, or can taped items survive supersonic flight?

Likely LOIS (Lift Off Instrumentation System) type instrumentation.   It would be hardwired and have an extension.  It would operate during ignition, liftoff and X feet of flight before it rips off.

I was thinking the same thing myself. However, we have to keep in mind that Cert-1 Vulcan still has to go through fueling tests and then a static firing. They may keep the LOIS to record launch parameters or they may remove it when the rocket rolls back following the static fire.

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15139
  • Liked: 8033
  • Likes Given: 1269
I see ULA is calling this the "Cert-1" stack.  How will the flight vehicles and/or missions be numbered?  It was "AC-n" for Atlas Centaur and "AV-n" for Atlas 5.  Will it be "VC-n" or some-such for Vulcan?

 - Ed Kyle

Offline Newton_V

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 820
  • United States
  • Liked: 759
  • Likes Given: 124
I see ULA is calling this the "Cert-1" stack.  How will the flight vehicles and/or missions be numbered?  It was "AC-n" for Atlas Centaur and "AV-n" for Atlas 5.  Will it be "VC-n" or some-such for Vulcan?

 - Ed Kyle

I've mostly seen V-001, V-002, etc. but an occasional VC- (which I don't this is correct)
Configuration naming is VC0S, VC2S, VC4L, etc., where S is short (51 ft) PLF and L is long (70)

Offline Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1693
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 457
  • Likes Given: 199
I see ULA is calling this the "Cert-1" stack.  How will the flight vehicles and/or missions be numbered?  It was "AC-n" for Atlas Centaur and "AV-n" for Atlas 5.  Will it be "VC-n" or some-such for Vulcan?

 - Ed Kyle

I've mostly seen V-001, V-002, etc. but an occasional VC- (which I don't this is correct)
Configuration naming is VC0S, VC2S, VC4L, etc., where S is short (51 ft) PLF and L is long (70)
The numbers 2 and 4 in VC2S and VC4L denote the number of solid rocket boosters for the Vulcan. The letter at the end of the Vulcan configuration designation represents the length of the payload fairing shroud. Why the VC2S booster configuration was chosen for the first Vulcan launch, I'm not sure.

Offline lightleviathan

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 131
  • Liked: 119
  • Likes Given: 37
The numbers 2 and 4 in VC2S and VC4L denote the number of solid rocket boosters for the Vulcan. The letter at the end of the Vulcan configuration designation represents the length of the payload fairing shroud. Why the VC2S booster configuration was chosen for the first Vulcan launch, I'm not sure.

The first Atlas V launch was a 401 config. It makes more sense to test the lowest power version, and also, Peregrine probably doesn't need the extra performance of a VC4S.

Offline GWR64

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1705
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1547
  • Likes Given: 972
Could the VC0S config (no SRMs) have been another option for Peregrine?

No, the Vulcan is supposed to be tested with boosters.
additionally:
Quote
This inaugural mission, known as Certification-1, will deliver two Kuiper prototype broadband satellites into low Earth orbit, send the Astrobotic Peregrine commercial lunar lander to reach the Moon, and carry a Celestis Memorial Spaceflight Payload into deep space.
https://blog.ulalaunch.com/blog/vulcan-centaur-the-countdown-to-the-first-certification-flight-is-on
[January 13]
« Last Edit: 01/29/2023 07:40 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
https://twitter.com/scarlson816/status/1619836135014027264

Quote
The @astrobotic Peregrine lunar lander looking mighty fine this afternoon through the clean room windows @MoonshotMuseum!

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1620057443811180545

Quote
I thought I should catch you up before we finish stacking the upper stage today. First: recap of going vertical with the booster. #CountdowntoVulcan #ToryTimelapse

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1620058147648933889

Quote
And second, the 18.8 foot tall interstage… #CoundowntoVulcan #ToryTimelapse

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1620083469761249285

Quote
Last week, the interstage was attached to #VulcanRocket! The hollow barrel segment connects the Vulcan stages and encloses the twin RL10 upper stage engines during the boost phase of flight. #CountdowntoVulcan

More photos on Flickr: flic.kr/s/aHBqjAnDaZ

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 42910
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 73245
  • Likes Given: 32897
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1620104782345080867

Quote
Now that is a beautiful sight!  #CountdowntoVulcan

Offline robby

  • Member
  • Posts: 1
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 14
I've mostly seen V-001, V-002, etc. but an occasional VC- (which I don't this is correct)
Configuration naming is VC0S, VC2S, VC4L, etc., where S is short (51 ft) PLF and L is long (70)

Just a rather small nit, but I believe the S is for Standard rather than Short, according to the ULA page, https://www.ulalaunch.com/rockets/vulcan-centaur.

Offline Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1693
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 457
  • Likes Given: 199
https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1620083469761249285

Quote
Last week, the interstage was attached to #VulcanRocket! The hollow barrel segment connects the Vulcan stages and encloses the twin RL10 upper stage engines during the boost phase of flight. #CountdowntoVulcan

More photos on Flickr: flic.kr/s/aHBqjAnDaZ
More concrete progress in putting together components for the Vulcan VC2S rocket that will conduct the Vulcan rocket's long awaited maiden launch.

Offline russianhalo117

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8626
  • Liked: 4497
  • Likes Given: 768
I've mostly seen V-001, V-002, etc. but an occasional VC- (which I don't this is correct)
Configuration naming is VC0S, VC2S, VC4L, etc., where S is short (51 ft) PLF and L is long (70)
The V-xxx number is the mission number. The short serial numbers (tail numbers for each cryogenic stage will normally equal the mission number unless stage shuffling occurs).
The typical short format starts with the payload manifest then the VCXX configuration designation identification followed by the V-xxx number. Note that the PLF's where S is standard (51 ft) PLF and L is long (70), our the initial baseline product launch options (Standard was previously the Medium PLF during VC R&D). At a TBD later date other PLF lengths i.e. XS, Short and custom will be made available upon customer request with advanced long lead notice with customer supporting the initial production cost. As for Centaur there is the baseline Standard and Long DEC-V as product launch options. The Short and Extra Long DEC-V versions will be released upon will be made available upon customer request with advanced long lead notice with customer supporting the inital production cost. Note that the SEC-V versions have been shelved until further notice.
SEC-V = Single Engine Centaur-V (Shelved)
DEC-V = Dual Engine Centaur-V (Active Production)
TEC-V = Three Engine Centaur-V (Shelved, Trade Study)
FEC-V = Four Engine Centaur-V (Shelved, Trade Study)

Edited the format to correct for a dyslexic moment
« Last Edit: 01/30/2023 09:45 pm by russianhalo117 »

 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1