Author Topic: What are some uses for the simulated gravity that can be used on New Shepard?  (Read 1077 times)

Offline Red_dragon

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On the blue origin website, it says that the new shepherd's capsule can spin in space for artificial gravity. In the example they gave, moon gravity could be applied to the payloads. What are some scientific experiments that could benefit from this?
« Last Edit: 01/11/2024 11:57 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline StarryKnight

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I don't know any specific payloads. But this capability can be useful in testing a mechanical or fluid transfer device that is too light to test in 1 G. The test can only be for a few minutes, though. If it can double the spin rate, it can get to 1/3 G to simulate Mars surface experiments.
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Offline whitelancer64

A similar partial-g environment can be done on the "vomit comet" aircraft, but only for about 20 seconds or so at a time. The primary use case for partial-g New Shepard flight would be to test out something small that needs or benefits from having a minute or two of partial-g test time.

There's a lot of things that could benefit from such testing, gas and fluid transfer in a life support system designed for the Moon, for example, or anything that might behave differently at lunar gravity compared to Earth gravity.

Basic science experiments could be fluid and gas and particle mixing / stratification, which can be computer-simulated but there is very little real-world partial-g experimental data for such models to be based on. I'd like to see a fire propagation experiment run in partial-g, something similar to what was flown in space on Cygnus. We could learn a lot about things like that from just a few minutes of data.
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Offline Comga

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Red Dragon: Where did you find this slide?
Provenance says a lot that just posting a slide leaves out.

It does say two interesting things:
First, it says "Our newest capability allows New Shephard to spin up to a stagle rate of rotation,..."
So at the time, Blue was working on adding capabilityies to NS. 
NS seems to have been remarkably static, even in aspects that could be evolving.
I only khow of one other change from the failure, and it's not clear what change they were making or why.

Secondly, it says: it says "Our first mission with this new upgrade is scheduled for late 2022."
If the capability has been available for more than a year, and no one has used it or announced a plan to use it, which would necessitate saying what why it is useful, that sort of answers the question.
It's not really sufficiently useful to justify the cost.

Red Dragon: Did such a flight happen?
I dont' recall that.
Given that you started this, why don't you try to see if it has flown by researching all the past flight
Heaven knows there are not a lot of them to look up, and only a handful of flights without passengers.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline tbellman

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Red Dragon: Where did you find this slide?
Provenance says a lot that just posting a slide leaves out.

I'm not Red Dragon, but that is a screencap from the New Shepard payloads page on the Blue Origin web site.

Quote from: Comga
Secondly, it says: it says "Our first mission with this new upgrade is scheduled for late 2022."
If the capability has been available for more than a year, and no one has used it or announced a plan to use it, which would necessitate saying what why it is useful, that sort of answers the question.
It's not really sufficiently useful to justify the cost.

It does say not just the the capability would fly late 2022, but that NASA had a payload for it.  "For this debut flight with NASA, we’ll be targeting 11 rotations per minute to provide more than two minutes of continuous lunar gravity."  However, the only uncrewed New Shepard flight in 2022, was the ill-fated NS 23, which as far as I can tell did not have any partial gravity experiment, so said NASA payload would have been targeted for some later flight.  But the only flight after NS 23 so far is NS 24, one month ago, and I don't think there was any partial gravity experiment on that either.  And NS 25 has not been announced yet.

But Blue Origin has obviously missed updating that particular piece of information on their web page.

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