Author Topic: Blue Origin new execs - Bob Smith, Brent Sherwood etc retiring late 2023  (Read 28073 times)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1706400120537796742

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Two sources say that Bob Smith will 'retire' as chief executive of Blue Origin effective in December.

https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1706401128772932017

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In Smith's retirement note, he says, "Jeff will announce Blue's new CEO in a separate note shortly."

Edit to add:

https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1706405938968547783

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Hearing the same, per three sources - Bob Smith will step down as CEO at the end of the year.
« Last Edit: 10/20/2023 07:07 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/wapodavenport/status/1706403619061338511

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In an email to staff, he said, "Jeff and I have been discussing my plan for months and Jeff will announce Blue's new CEO in a separate note shortly." Says he'll step down Dec. 4  and stay on til Jan. 2.

Will be interesting to see who Jeff appoints. Key moment for the future trajectory of the company.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1706409134164168817

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Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith is leaving the company at the end of this year, according to a note obtained by CNBC.

Former Amazon SVP Dave Limp will replace Smith as the head of Jeff Bezosí space company. With @MorganLBrennan:

https://www.cnbc.com/2023/09/25/blue-origin-ceo-bob-smith-out-replaced-by-former-amazon-exec-dave-limp.html

Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Iím excited to share that Dave Limp will join Blue starting December 4th as CEO, replacing Bob, who has elected to step aside on January 2. The overlap is purposeful to ensure a smooth transition.

Before I provide some background on Dave, Iíd like to take the time to recognize Bob and the significant growth and transformation weíve experienced during his tenure. Under Bobís leadership, Blue has grown to several billion dollars in sales orders, with a substantial backlog for our vehicles and engines. Our team has increased from 850 people when Bob joined to more than 10,000 today. Weíve expanded from one office in Kent to building a launch pad at LC-36 and five million square feet of facilities across seven states.

Our mission has grown too Ė weíve flown 31 people above the KŠrmŠn Line, almost five percent of all the people who have been to space. Flight-qualified BE-4 engines are ready to boost Vulcan into orbit. New Glenn is nearing launch next year, and, with our recent NASA contract, we will land Americans back on the Moon, this time to stay. We have also engaged and inspired millions of children and educators through our Club for the Future efforts. Weíve made tremendous progress in building a road to space for the benefit of Earth, thanks to each of you and Bobís leadership.

Iíve worked closely with Dave for many years. He is the right leader at the right time for Blue. Dave joins us after almost 14 years at Amazon, where he most recently served as senior vice president of Amazon Devices and Services, leading Kuiper, Kindle, Alexa, Zoox, and many other businesses. Before Amazon, Dave had roles at other high-tech companies, including Palm and Apple. Dave is a proven innovator with a customer-first mindset and extensive experience leading and scaling large, complex organizations. Dave has an outstanding sense of urgency, brings energy to everything, and helps teams move very fast.

Please join me in welcoming Dave and thanking Bob. Through this transition, I know weíll remain focused on our customer commitments, production schedules, and executing with speed and operational excellence. I look forward to the many exciting and historic milestones ahead of us!

Jeff
« Last Edit: 09/25/2023 08:51 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Cheapchips

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Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Dave has an outstanding sense of urgency, brings energy to everything, and helps teams move very fast.
I really hope so!
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 07:23 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Mondagun

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Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Dave has an outstanding sense of urgency, brings energy to everything, and helps teams move very fast.
I really hope so!
Question: what concrete steps can a CEO take to help "move teams very fast" (without unacceptable loss of product quality)?
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 07:24 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline MaxTeranous

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Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Dave has an outstanding sense of urgency, brings energy to everything, and helps teams move very fast.
I really hope so!
Question: what concrete steps can a CEO take to help "move teams very fast" (without unacceptable loss of product quality)?

Doing the opposite of whatever Bob Smith was doing would probably do the trick.
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 07:25 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Rocket Rancher

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Get your design team back in the office to improve communication, reduce the time lag in decision making. Having a team together in the same space creates that special chemistry that no Teams meeting can create. It's old fashion teamwork.

Online Coastal Ron

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Ö but no experience in aerospace .

Not necessarily a bad thing, and as we saw with retiring Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith, having industry experience doesn't guarantee success.

Blue Origin needs a leader that will get the company onto a quicker pace of innovation and accomplishment - we'll have to see if Dave Limp is that person.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Robotbeat

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Ö but no experience in aerospace .

Not necessarily a bad thing, and as we saw with retiring Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith, having industry experience doesn't guarantee success.

Blue Origin needs a leader that will get the company onto a quicker pace of innovation and accomplishment - we'll have to see if Dave Limp is that person.
additionally, he does have experience with Kuiper.

And I agree. Iíd rather have someone with little aerospace experience (but at least some previous hardware project management experience) than someone with the wrong aerospace industry experience. Much of traditional aerospace has had such terrible incentive structures (see: Boeing) that being steeped in that culture would be a net negative.
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Offline cpushack

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Offline Yellowstone10

The jokes basically write themselves.

I also couldn't help but note:

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Under Bobís leadership, Blue has grown to several billion dollars in sales orders, with a substantial backlog for our vehicles and engines.

Yes, if you only take orders and don't actually fly missions, that does tend to grow your backlog...

Offline M.E.T.

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.



« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 02:07 am by M.E.T. »

Offline Tomness

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.
That's not Jeff's job,  that's now Dave's Job.

Offline Asteroza

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.

I dunno, if Jeff's movers are as fast as the rest of Blue Origin, Elon's not gonna need to buy housewarming presents for a while.

I could make a joke about less gradually fiercely and more fiercely gradual, but then I'd be a 3D printer...


But seriously, Bezos isn't CEO of Amazon anymore. Why isn't he taking the reigns? It's not like he would have trouble getting a security clearance.

Offline M.E.T.

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.
That's not Jeff's job,  that's now Dave's Job.

My cursory google research reveals that at the companies that collectively launch 80% of payload mass to orbit, the CEO and majority owner tend to be the same person.

Interestingly, this pattern is also evident at the companies that operate more than half of all operational satellites.

Seems like a growing trend.
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 03:52 am by M.E.T. »

Online dglow

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Bergerís writeup on Ars Technica includes two perfect subheadings:

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Not great, Bob
and

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Alexa, put something into orbit

Online meekGee

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Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Dave has an outstanding sense of urgency, brings energy to everything, and helps teams move very fast.
I really hope so!
Question: what concrete steps can a CEO take to help "move teams very fast" (without unacceptable loss of product quality)?
It really depends on whether there's a company-wide cultural problem, or just some bad decisions that need to be corrected (including hiring decisions).

The obvious example: Musk and the first iteration of Starlink.

Generally speaking though, cultural problems are notoriously difficult if not impossible to solve.

As a manager, whenever you force a decision, the problem becomes yours. Musk seems to have an infinite capacity for taking on problems, and I'm not talking about his personal life.

I don't think Jeff does. He's obviously super capable, but when it came to aerospace, he decided to delegate and let chips fall where they may. Amazon 20 years ago was his baby. BO is not getting the same kind of love.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2023 02:36 pm by meekGee »
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Offline deltaV

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https://www.crunchbase.com/person/david-limp says
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David has B.S. degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics from Vanderbilt University and a M.S. degree in Management from Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.

His degrees in CS, Math and Management are all likely to be useful as a Blue CEO. The one major thing that's missing is understanding the physical world, but with his math background and the basic physics classes he presumably took at some point he'll probably do OK learning physics and engineering on the job. In summary I find his education acceptable.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Bergerís writeup on Ars Technica includes two perfect subheadings:

Quote
Not great, Bob
and

Quote
Alexa, put something into orbit

I think the key quote from the article is:

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As a space reporter, I have spoken with dozens of current and former Blue Origin employees, and virtually none of them have had anything positive to say about Smith's tenure as chief executive. I asked one current employee about the hiring of Limp on Monday afternoon, and their response was, "Anything is better than Bob."

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Moderator:
I split/merged a few humor-only posts here: Launch, Land, and Relaunch Party Thread.
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 11:25 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Online Purona

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?


Offline kevinof

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Hmmm. Not sure I would concur with that assessment.

Sometimes all a manager (boss, ceo etc) has to do is set direction, make decisive decisions and remove any roadblocks - Then step out of the way and let the teams charge ahead. You hire smart people to do the right thing - so set the parameters and let them do it.

I've known great managers who get this and are hugely successful, and I've known many of the other kind with all the paper qualifications in the world and make lousy managers and breed apathy and stagnation.


https://www.crunchbase.com/person/david-limp says
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David has B.S. degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics from Vanderbilt University and a M.S. degree in Management from Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.

His degrees in CS, Math and Management are all likely to be useful as a Blue CEO. The one major thing that's missing is understanding the physical world, but with his math background and the basic physics classes he presumably took at some point he'll probably do OK learning physics and engineering on the job. In summary I find his education acceptable.

Online ThatOldJanxSpirit

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One thing we can be certain about is that  Bezos is passionate about achieving a crewed lunar landing. I think it unlikely it is coincidence that discussions about Bobís departure commenced around the time Blue was awarded HLS Appendix P.

Limp is Bezosí trusted man, installed to undertake a specific task. Things may get ugly and expensive, but I suspect weíll see the end to aimless meandering and the start of a laser focus on delivering HLS.

Online meekGee

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This much is certain: If there was any good will left, then Smith would have been allowed to stay until New Glenn makes a respectable showing.

It's his project, it will be unveiled, and normally you'd make the transition then.
« Last Edit: 09/26/2023 04:03 pm by meekGee »
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Offline Tomness

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.
That's not Jeff's job,  that's now Dave's Job.

My cursory google research reveals that at the companies that collectively launch 80% of payload mass to orbit, the CEO and majority owner tend to be the same person.

Interestingly, this pattern is also evident at the companies that operate more than half of all operational satellites.

Seems like a growing trend.

That's Gwen not E.

Online dglow

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This much is certain: If there was any good will left, then Smith would have been allowed to stay until New Glenn makes a respectable showing.

It isnít about goodwill, Jeff just doesnít want to wait that long.

Offline Robotbeat

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.
That's not Jeff's job,  that's now Dave's Job.

My cursory google research reveals that at the companies that collectively launch 80% of payload mass to orbit, the CEO and majority owner tend to be the same person.

Interestingly, this pattern is also evident at the companies that operate more than half of all operational satellites.

Seems like a growing trend.

That's Gwen not E.
Gwynne is the President. Elon is the CEO.
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Offline joek

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This much is certain: If there was any good will left, then Smith would have been allowed to stay until New Glenn makes a respectable showing.
It isnít about goodwill, Jeff just doesnít want to wait that long.

So why now has it become a matter of "Jeff just doesnít want to wait that long"?

Lots of room for speculation. Maybe Bezos had an epiphany while gazing at the stars? Maybe the HLS mission has put a hard date on Blue delivering? Maybe his Amazon compadre's read him the riot act about the need for additional launch capability for Kuiper (vs. using That Other Company)? Maybe someone put a nice KPI/scorecard in front of Bezos which showed Blue's progress over the last 20 years vs. That Other Company?

Hard to tell the genesis of this decision, or why it is occurring now. But when faced with facts, everyone, executives especially, have to answer: If not me, who? If not now, when?

Bezos answered. Whether it was the right decision remains to be seen. But as virtually anyone who has been involved in bleeding-edge efforts can attest, a decision is virtually always better than no decision--if you are willing to admit that decision may be wrong, and rapidly learn and correct. We'll see if Bezos, Limp, and Blue et. al. take that to heart.

Online meekGee

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This much is certain: If there was any good will left, then Smith would have been allowed to stay until New Glenn makes a respectable showing.

It isnít about goodwill, Jeff just doesnít want to wait that long.
Probably. 

A friend told me one time that once a decision is made to remove a CEO, it just cannot happen soon enough.

Oh well.

Let's see if DL issues an opening statement about the state of affairs and near-term plan, or whether they choose to continue in silence.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2023 04:17 am by meekGee »
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Offline woods170

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?

That takes at least seven years, as proven by F9 (reuse dev started in 2010, first actual reuse was in 2017).

New Glenn development started full development in 2014, with reuse factored into the design from the Get-Go (unlike Falcon 9). First flight is now scheduled for 2024. Earliest reuse is thus also 2024, at the very earliest.
So, Blue is likely taking at least 10, but possible 11 years, to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle.

Offline Robert_the_Doll

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?

That takes at least seven years, as proven by F9 (reuse dev started in 2010, first actual reuse was in 2017).

New Glenn development started full development in 2014, with reuse factored into the design from the Get-Go (unlike Falcon 9). First flight is now scheduled for 2024. Earliest reuse is thus also 2024, at the very earliest.
So, Blue is likely taking at least 10, but possible 11 years, to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle.

There needs to be some context added, however:

- New Glenn went from a medium-lift, hydrogen-oxygen rocket powered by 5 BE-3s to a much, much larger rocket , methane-oxygen powered by 7 BE-4s. It is only matched by Falcon Heavy (three Falcon 9 cores), and does this with a single-stick configuration.

- Said BE-4s went from 500,000 lbf to 550,000 lbf to meet ULA and U.S. Military requirements.

- The second stage was altered from methane-oxygen powered by a vacuum-optimized BE-4 to hydrogen-oxygen powered by two BE-3Us.

- The goal for Blue Origin is to not only launch successfully, but to land and recover the first stage successfully on the first attempt!

So, we can see that we are looking at a much larger launcher with New Glenn that does very different things, and is attempting successful the first time around. Using Falcon 9 only can give us a lower limit.

Online dglow

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?

That takes at least seven years, as proven by F9 (reuse dev started in 2010, first actual reuse was in 2017).

New Glenn development started full development in 2014, with reuse factored into the design from the Get-Go (unlike Falcon 9). First flight is now scheduled for 2024. Earliest reuse is thus also 2024, at the very earliest.
So, Blue is likely taking at least 10, but possible 11 years, to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle.

There needs to be some context added, however:

- New Glenn went from a medium-lift, hydrogen-oxygen rocket powered by 5 BE-3s to a much, much larger rocket , methane-oxygen powered by 7 BE-4s. It is only matched by Falcon Heavy (three Falcon 9 cores), and does this with a single-stick configuration.

- Said BE-4s went from 500,000 lbf to 550,000 lbf to meet ULA and U.S. Military requirements.

- The second stage was altered from methane-oxygen powered by a vacuum-optimized BE-4 to hydrogen-oxygen powered by two BE-3Us.

- The goal for Blue Origin is to not only launch successfully, but to land and recover the first stage successfully on the first attempt!

So, we can see that we are looking at a much larger launcher with New Glenn that does very different things, and is attempting successful the first time around. Using Falcon 9 only can give us a lower limit.

Okay, but let's not beat around the bush. New Glenn's schedule is what it is because BE-4 development took longer than anticipated.

As for landing on the first attempt, I think we'll all be happy and relieved if the launch alone is successful.

Offline Mondagun

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As for landing on the first attempt, I think we'll all be happy and relieved if the launch alone is successful.
Agreed. Look at how many tries SpaceX needed to land their booster in one piece for the first time. It could be of course that Blue Origin has managed to poach some experts from SpaceX. This would give them a head start, but New Glenn is still a different beast from Falcon 9 and not all lessons-learned from Falcon 9 are going to be applicable one-to-one.

Also, even if the first launch itself is successful, you're by no means in the home stretch. Other launch vehicles have shown that certain design weaknesses or Manufacturing, Assembly, Integration and Test (MAIT) process weaknesses may come back to bite you even after you already have multiple successful launches under your belt. Falcon 9 flew successfully for the first 18 times before suffering a Rapid Unscheduled Dissassembly (RUD) on its 19th flight. Vega flew successfully for the first 14 times before failure on its 15th flight.

As CEO of a launch vehicle company you're a bit like president Nixon during the first attempted landing on the Moon: just like Nixon, you need to have two speeches prepared. One for success and another one for failure. Let's see what Limp has to say after the success or failure of the first launch (and landing) of New Glenn. Personally I've always thought that how a leader handles failure tells you a lot more about his/her character than how he/she handles success, but that aside.
« Last Edit: 09/28/2023 01:16 am by Mondagun »

Offline Nomadd

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Is Jeff Bezos going to sleep on the assembly line and move his primary residence to a 2-bedroom house at the launch facility?

If so, then great, they have a reasonable shot at matching the required sense of urgency.
3 bedroom counting the converted garage. 4 counting his girlfriend's coverted art studio/previous church sale
storage facility/proof that lighting fixtures don't work very well hooked in series building.
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.

Online meekGee

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?

That takes at least seven years, as proven by F9 (reuse dev started in 2010, first actual reuse was in 2017).

New Glenn development started full development in 2014, with reuse factored into the design from the Get-Go (unlike Falcon 9). First flight is now scheduled for 2024. Earliest reuse is thus also 2024, at the very earliest.
So, Blue is likely taking at least 10, but possible 11 years, to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle.
I don't know that first reuse was planned for 2024 - I thought only recovery was planned.
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Offline Robotbeat

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New Glenn started development earlier, like 2010 or so. Thereís public imagery of the vehicle in 2011.

At that time it used BE-3 and was called by a different name.

New Glenn passed System Requirements Review in 2012.
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Offline woods170

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I have an idea. maybe you guys have unrealistic expectations on how long it would actually take to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle system. thoughts?

That takes at least seven years, as proven by F9 (reuse dev started in 2010, first actual reuse was in 2017).

New Glenn development started full development in 2014, with reuse factored into the design from the Get-Go (unlike Falcon 9). First flight is now scheduled for 2024. Earliest reuse is thus also 2024, at the very earliest.
So, Blue is likely taking at least 10, but possible 11 years, to develop a semi reusable launch vehicle.
I don't know that first reuse was planned for 2024 - I thought only recovery was planned.

Blue intends to refly the first recovered booster. They also plan the first launch of New Glenn to be recovered. By extension that means Blue intends to refly the first New Glenn flight article.

Offline woods170

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New Glenn started development earlier, like 2010 or so. Thereís public imagery of the vehicle in 2011.

At that time it used BE-3 and was called by a different name.

New Glenn passed System Requirements Review in 2012.

But that was not New Glenn as it is being built right now. The final major DAC changes to the design were not wrapped up until 2014. Only then did Blue start full development of the vehicle that is intended to have its maiden launch next year.

Online ThatOldJanxSpirit

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From the CNBC article:

https://www.cnbc.com/2023/09/28/blue-origin-sierra-space-orbital-reef-space-station-in-limbo.html

ďTwo of those sources pointed CNBC to a shift in Blue Originís interests after the company won a $3.4 billion NASA contract to build a crew lunar landerĒ

Iím sticking to my opinion that Dave Limp is Bezosí hatchet man with a singular mission to deliver HLS and, by extension, New Glenn. Resources will be focused on this core programme. Everything else will have to watch out.

Offline kevinof

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Hope you are right - They need focus, focus ,focus on the core programme and stop the "shotgun" approach where they want to do everything and then some.

Get to orbit, then work on ops and recovery and get really good at it, then the lander. Everything else is canned, parked or very very long term - and that should include NS (bin it).

From the CNBC article:

https://www.cnbc.com/2023/09/28/blue-origin-sierra-space-orbital-reef-space-station-in-limbo.html

ďTwo of those sources pointed CNBC to a shift in Blue Originís interests after the company won a $3.4 billion NASA contract to build a crew lunar landerĒ

Iím sticking to my opinion that Dave Limp is Bezosí hatchet man with a singular mission to deliver HLS and, by extension, New Glenn. Resources will be focused on this core programme. Everything else will have to watch out.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1711423442698821933

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Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith tells employees that Brent Sherwood, head of the company's Advanced Development Programs, will retire next month and be replaced by Pat Remias. confirms @reuters report last week:

https://www.reuters.com/technology/space/bezos-blue-origin-sees-split-space-station-partnership-sources-2023-10-02/

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Pat Remias will succeed Sherwood as Blue's Vice President of Space Systems Development, Smith says in a company-wide email, lauding Sherwood for the moon lander win, Orbital Reef, and other things: "a new space mobility platform was formulated and formed into a growing business"

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.

Offline Zed_Noir

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.
Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.
Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.
Either way, Bezos is taking a direct interest in Blue for a bit. Support from the owner can give Dave extra leverage to make changes

Online tgr9898

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Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.
Either way, Bezos is taking a direct interest in Blue for a bit. Support from the owner can give Dave extra leverage to make changes

Jerry Jones & Daniel Synder say "Hold our beers"

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Offline Zed_Noir

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.
Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.
Either way, Bezos is taking a direct interest in Blue for a bit. Support from the owner can give Dave extra leverage to make changes
You are missing my subtle hint that Berger is writing nonsense. Limp is there to do as Bezos dictates, not to worry about the feelings of the employees.
« Last Edit: 10/12/2023 11:33 pm by Zed_Noir »

Online meekGee

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.
Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.
Hatchet men are temporary by nature - they clear out unwanted growth, so a different person who specialized in growing can do his thing.  Different skill sets.

What an elaborate metaphor!
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Offline Eric Hedman

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https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1712202112245927955

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There seems to be some hope at Blue Origin that Dave Limp will be a good leader of the company. He is trusted by Bezos, so if he listens to employees Limp will be in a position to effect positive (and needed) change.
Or to impolitely put it. Limp is a hatchet man for Bezos, when Bezos need to get something done that is faltering. A hatchet man usually have their marching orders direct from the boss.
Either way, Bezos is taking a direct interest in Blue for a bit. Support from the owner can give Dave extra leverage to make changes
You are missing my subtle hint that Berger is writing nonsense. Limp is there to do as Bezos dictates, not to worry about the feelings of the employees.
If he is any good he will do both.  Otherwise his hatchet work will destroy the best capabilities of the company along with cutting out the deadwood.

Offline Asteroza

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Thing is, it's hard to differentiate the deadwood. You've got a lot of old guys there too. They are expensive, but are also some of the last people with actual hands-on experience as well. How can you tell the difference between someone on cruise control to retirement, and some old guy who used to be awesome but is past his peak?

People don't forget what management does to their older employees. You burn that trust, you are never getting it back.

Offline jimvela

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Thing is, it's hard to differentiate the deadwood. You've got a lot of old guys there too. They are expensive, but are also some of the last people with actual hands-on experience as well. How can you tell the difference between someone on cruise control to retirement, and some old guy who used to be awesome but is past his peak?


(Speaking as someone who is closer to retirement than new to the work force.)

Those aren't the only two options for older workers.  Many of us old farts were and ARE awesome, with enough experience to be effective and enough interest to remain productive. 

Offline LouScheffer

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How can you tell the difference between someone on cruise control to retirement, and some old guy who used to be awesome but is past his peak?
The same older person can be either on cruise control or awesome, depending on the circumstances.  If the goal is un-inspiring, or the co-workers not invested, or the management does not convey/create urgency, then they can well be on cruise control.   But if the vision is clear, the co-workers are working hard, and the management is supportive, an older (usually guy) can be awesome as before.  And they carry with them a mental model of stuff that seemed sensible and has been tried, but did not work.  This avoidance of dead ends (or at least knowledge of why they failed and what should/could be done differently) can help immensely.

One difference, in my experience, is that if the goal is great but the system screwed up, a younger employee will often work like a maniac to try to change the system.  An older employee (especially one that was once a part of a unified effort) will often say "Nah, that's too much work" and slip into cruise control.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1715429567270203789

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Blue Origin's SVP of operations Mike Eilola is leaving the company Nov 3 "for personal reasons," CEO Bob Smith told employees today. It's the third executive departure to be announced in less than a month and signals a pretty sweeping company reorg

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/bezos-blue-origin-sees-third-executive-departure-amid-internal-restructuring-2023-10-20/

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Over on the Blue Origin Reddit a lot of (assumed) employees are sharing their thoughts on this.

Doesn't sound like he'll be missed much.

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It seems that a lot of the exec team won't be missed, if this comment is representative

Quote
Would you expect anything less from the senior leaders at Blue? Absolute shit show any time they make a decision. When I started there were 2 VPs and now there are over 30 and each one wants to check some obscure box that absolutely does nothing to march us towards NG-1. And you canít get a straight answer out of any of them at their AMA. frakking word salads is all you get. The SVPs arenít any better. Eiola has a reserved spot in OLS for Gods sake and Iíve seen him park there once in the last six months. I donít know how the hell Plunket hasnít been fired yet. Jarrets about the only cool one since Scott left. Honestly I think theyíve inserted these thick layers of management to protect themselves from being the fall guy imo. And then there is Bob and what can I say other than frakking sorbet.

Itís the teams below the director level that are making it happen with senior leaders being the blockers or throwing wrenches into well oiled machines because they want to check that box.

And thatís why youíre going into the office meow.

Offline TrevorMonty



How can you tell the difference between someone on cruise control to retirement, and some old guy who used to be awesome but is past his peak?
The same older person can be either on cruise control or awesome, depending on the circumstances.  If the goal is un-inspiring, or the co-workers not invested, or the management does not convey/create urgency, then they can well be on cruise control.   But if the vision is clear, the co-workers are working hard, and the management is supportive, an older (usually guy) can be awesome as before.  And they carry with them a mental model of stuff that seemed sensible and has been tried, but did not work.  This avoidance of dead ends (or at least knowledge of why they failed and what should/could be done differently) can help immensely.

One difference, in my experience, is that if the goal is great but the system screwed up, a younger employee will often work like a maniac to try to change the system.  An older employee (especially one that was once a part of a unified effort) will often say "Nah, that's too much work" and slip into cruise control.

I can relate to cruise control statement. After your've bang your head against brick wall often enough with no change, cruise control or leave are two options to stay sane.

Online matthewkantar

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It seems that a lot of the exec team won't be missed, if this comment is representative

Quote
Would you expect anything less from the senior leaders at Blue? Absolute shit show any time they make a decision. When I started there were 2 VPs and now there are over 30 and each one wants to check some obscure box that absolutely does nothing to march us towards NG-1. And you canít get a straight answer out of any of them at their AMA. frakking word salads is all you get. The SVPs arenít any better. Eiola has a reserved spot in OLS for Gods sake and Iíve seen him park there once in the last six months. I donít know how the hell Plunket hasnít been fired yet. Jarrets about the only cool one since Scott left. Honestly I think theyíve inserted these thick layers of management to protect themselves from being the fall guy imo. And then there is Bob and what can I say other than frakking sorbet.

Itís the teams below the director level that are making it happen with senior leaders being the blockers or throwing wrenches into well oiled machines because they want to check that box.

And thatís why youíre going into the office meow.

30 VPs sounds like a lot, but I am not an org chart scientist. From the text above, sounds like B.O. has been an opportunity to sop up a billionaireís $$$ while he is looking the other way. Sad.

Offline jimvela

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From the text above, sounds like B.O. has been an opportunity to sop up a billionaireís $$$ while he is looking the other way. Sad.

Anytime an organization continues to receive full funding without worry of delivering any product, the organization will develop this way.
There isn't any existential motivation to get anything done.
It's always the funding entities' fault.  No different here.

Offline D_Dom

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I am remembering the dot comm industry growing without regard to traditional sound business plans, ultimately challenging brick and mortar retail establishments. Not without bumps in the road of course. Blue feels somewhat familiar to me.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2023 09:37 pm by D_Dom »
Space is not merely a matter of life or death, it is considerably more important than that!

Online Coastal Ron

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I am remembering the dot comm industry growing without regard to traditional sound business plans, ultimately challenging brick and mortar retail establishments. Not without bumps in the road of course. Blue feels somewhat familiar to me.

What, you mean like the internet startup "Pets.com"?  ;)
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1737849573287313747

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In his first all-hands with staff earlier this month, Blue Origin's new CEO Dave Limp made speeding up New Glenn development and production of its powerful BE-4 engine top priorities, and suggested software and AI should play bigger roles in manufacturing

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/bezos-taps-amazon-vet-speed-up-space-company-blue-origin-2023-12-21/

Offline Eric Hedman

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30 VPs sounds like a lot, but I am not an org chart scientist. From the text above, sounds like B.O. has been an opportunity to sop up a billionaireís $$$ while he is looking the other way. Sad.
After Frank Borman retired from NASA, he became the CEO of Eastern Airlines.  One of his first moves was to fire 125 VPs.  When they were gone and everything kept running the same (already a seriously messed up company), he wondered what they actually had done in their jobs.  I suspect the 30 VPs at Blue is probably 5 or 6 times more than they need.

I also have to wonder, how did Jeff Bezos let this happen.  The companies I have dealt with over the years that are the most successful tend to have a very lean management team.  Bezos should know better.

Online whitelancer64

30 VPs sounds like a lot, but I am not an org chart scientist. From the text above, sounds like B.O. has been an opportunity to sop up a billionaireís $$$ while he is looking the other way. Sad.
After Frank Borman retired from NASA, he became the CEO of Eastern Airlines.  One of his first moves was to fire 125 VPs.  When they were gone and everything kept running the same (already a seriously messed up company), he wondered what they actually had done in their jobs.  I suspect the 30 VPs at Blue is probably 5 or 6 times more than they need.

I also have to wonder, how did Jeff Bezos let this happen.  The companies I have dealt with over the years that are the most successful tend to have a very lean management team.  Bezos should know better.

Blue Origin has a lot of subdivisions, each with several projects going on. There is probably an S/VP for each project.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline AU1.52

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I am still surprised Jeff did not have himself become CEO.

Offline Zed_Noir

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I am still surprised Jeff did not have himself become CEO.
Maybe later after Mr. Limp swings the ax for reduction of executive and workforce headcounts. Usually it is better for the ax wielder to not stay too long as CEO after the axing.

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1737849573287313747

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In his first all-hands with staff earlier this month, Blue Origin's new CEO Dave Limp made speeding up New Glenn development and production of its powerful BE-4 engine top priorities, and suggested software and AI should play bigger roles in manufacturing

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/bezos-taps-amazon-vet-speed-up-space-company-blue-origin-2023-12-21/
AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

And had he become CEO two years ago, it would have been Block Chain?

ABCD - Always Be Counting Down

Offline jimvela

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

Rudderless and clueless.  Not a good combo.
Problem lies one up from the CEO.

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Offline seb21051

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The job of a *REAL* CEO is to set direction and make it happen, not make tentative suggestions. This doesn't sound like a very decisive and ship-righting move. I worry for BO, JB's statements to Lex Fridman notwithstanding.

I'll be watching the employee sentiments here and on Reddit with great interest.

Online Coastal Ron

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The job of a *REAL* CEO is to set direction and make it happen, not make tentative suggestions. This doesn't sound like a very decisive and ship-righting move. I worry for BO, JB's statements to Lex Fridman notwithstanding.

I'll be watching the employee sentiments here and on Reddit with great interest.

Though, what a CEO says in public, and what they do with their management team, may not be exactly the same.

Public statements are meant to accomplish a goal, usually to promote public or customer trust in the company, and that is what CEO Dave Limp seemed to be doing. Asserting they will move faster, and look at things Blue Origin had not been officially looking at.

What CEO Dave Limp charges his team to do SPECIFICALLY could be different.

Not that we have a choice, but I'm willing to wait and see what happens in the next few months...  :D
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Asteroza

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1737849573287313747

Quote
In his first all-hands with staff earlier this month, Blue Origin's new CEO Dave Limp made speeding up New Glenn development and production of its powerful BE-4 engine top priorities, and suggested software and AI should play bigger roles in manufacturing

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/bezos-taps-amazon-vet-speed-up-space-company-blue-origin-2023-12-21/
AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

And had he become CEO two years ago, it would have been Block Chain?

Now to be fair, the there's a lot of AI in advanced generative CAD stuff now, particularly 3D printing. nTopology and Hyperganic are doing neat work in minimum surface area heat exchangers that frankly look organic in appearance with their hierarchical structures.

Online meekGee

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https://twitter.com/joroulette/status/1737849573287313747

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In his first all-hands with staff earlier this month, Blue Origin's new CEO Dave Limp made speeding up New Glenn development and production of its powerful BE-4 engine top priorities, and suggested software and AI should play bigger roles in manufacturing

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/bezos-taps-amazon-vet-speed-up-space-company-blue-origin-2023-12-21/
AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

And had he become CEO two years ago, it would have been Block Chain?

Now to be fair, the there's a lot of AI in advanced generative CAD stuff now, particularly 3D printing. nTopology and Hyperganic are doing neat work in minimum surface area heat exchangers that frankly look organic in appearance with their hierarchical structures.

That organic looking surface optimization stuff is a lot older than the recent generative AI that is now shoved into everything.

AWS (Limp's previous job) got caught flatfooted on that. Its competitors (Google and MS) have it since they've been working on it for a decade. AWS didn't, and for the first time ever are feeling and looking vulnerable.

I know for a fact that they're doing very expensive emergency hiring trying to stand up a response.

That's the background to Limp's statement.

I don't think he knew much about AI before the recent AI craze happened or about rocketry before this new job.

He's at BO IMO to fix the organizational problems people have mentioned.

AI is not their salvation or at all relevant...
« Last Edit: 12/22/2023 11:33 am by meekGee »
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New Battle Cry:

Celeriter Ferociter.
« Last Edit: 12/23/2023 03:39 am by seb21051 »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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New Battle Cry:

Celeriter Ferociter.

"Fast and Furious" for those people, like me, who don't speak Latin. :-)
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline deltaV

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

I get the impression that many aerospace engineers don't view software engineers as "real engineers", don't respect them as equals, don't pay them very well, and don't hire the best. (Not hiring the best presumably reinforces the belief that software engineers aren't good.) Musk, in contrast, started his career with several software companies and has tried to do significant software-intensive innovation such as self-driving Teslas. Amazon (Limp's previous employer) has succeeded while paying more attention to software than most of their retailer competitors seem to. So it seems perfectly plausible to me that more and better software, including AI, has helped SpaceX and could be good for Blue Origin if done well. (However software is unlikely to be the main change that Blue needs.)

Online meekGee

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

I get the impression that many aerospace engineers don't view software engineers as "real engineers", don't respect them as equals, don't pay them very well, and don't hire the best. (Not hiring the best presumably reinforces the belief that software engineers aren't good.) Musk, in contrast, started his career with several software companies and has tried to do significant software-intensive innovation such as self-driving Teslas. Amazon (Limp's previous employer) has succeeded while paying more attention to software than most of their retailer competitors seem to. So it seems perfectly plausible to me that more and better software, including AI, has helped SpaceX and could be good for Blue Origin if done well. (However software is unlikely to be the main change that Blue needs.)

I wasn't speaking of software in general. Software is important. I wasnl speaking about "AI".

AI is a very  vaguely defined term, but recently it's used to refer to generative systems like chat GPT or Lammie or their ilk.

None of that is the reason BO stumbled so badly in the past nor is it their salvation in the coming years. But it just might be big enough of a distraction to keep them stumbling.

AI won't provide a sensible roadmap, or a way to motivate people, or new ideas that weren't in the consensus already.

For it to come up in the first all-hands, instead of a crystal clear "We need to focus on one objective and get it done or go home" - that's not good.

Maybe something like "If anyone here has an idea that can make NG fly earlier (or less later), this is my direct email."  If you gonna mimic, mimic the important stuff.
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Oh Ye of Little (AI) Faith. Bing Chat had some excellent advice for the new BO Leadership:

"Elon Muskís Five Rules for Creating a Successful Company:

1. Work super-hard, like every waking hour, especially if youíre starting a company from scratch.

2. Make sure your product or service is great, not just slightly better, than the existing competitors in the market.

3. Attract and join great people who are talented, hardworking and focused on the same vision.

4. Focus on signal over noise, meaning spend money and effort on things that make the product or service better, not on advertising or other distractions.

5. Take risks now, when you have fewer obligations, and do something bold that you wonít regret.

Elon Muskís 5-Step Engineering Protocol:

1. Make the requirements less dumb. The requirements are definitely dumb; it does not matter who gave them to you.

2. Try very hard to delete the part or process. If parts are not being added back into the design at least 10% of the time, not enough parts are being deleted.

3. Simplify and optimize the design. This is the most common error of a smart engineer ó to optimize something that should simply not exist.

4. Accelerate cycle time. Youíre moving too slowly, go faster! But donít go faster until youíve worked on the other three things first.

5. Automate. But only do this after you have followed the first four steps.

Remember, these are just potential strategies. The effectiveness of these approaches would depend on a variety of factors, including the specific circumstances of the company and the broader industry context."

Edit:- It might also be interesting to contrast the Lex Fridman interviews of Jeff Bezos with those of Elon, especially the latest, #4.
« Last Edit: 12/26/2023 08:08 pm by seb21051 »

Offline Steve G

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If Blue purchases ULA, I would expect that Tory Bruno would not take over completely, but focus on Launch Vehicle development, and stick with Vulcan and New Glenn. That's double the responsibility he has now so enough on his plate. Dave Limp would be in charge of all the other Blue projects such as Blue Moon and Orbital Reef. And that alone is a big plate.

Online abaddon

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

Rudderless and clueless.  Not a good combo.
Problem lies one up from the CEO.
You might be surprised what a big talking point AI is in tech right now.  Coming from Amazon his comment doesnít surprise me in the least.

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If Blue purchases ULA, I would expect that Tory Bruno would not take over completely, but focus on Launch Vehicle development, and stick with Vulcan and New Glenn. That's double the responsibility he has now so enough on his plate. Dave Limp would be in charge of all the other Blue projects such as Blue Moon and Orbital Reef. And that alone is a big plate.

CEO's should not be directly in charge of any project. Their job is the run the company, not projects within the company.

I would hope that Tory Bruno would stay if ULA is bought by Blue Origin, and I do think he would be good to put in charge of all launch related projects.

As for everything else, Dave Limp should find someone that has large hardware development experience, and can put together a team that moves quickly.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Online meekGee

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

Rudderless and clueless.  Not a good combo.
Problem lies one up from the CEO.
You might be surprised what a big talking point AI is in tech right now.  Coming from Amazon his comment doesn’t surprise me in the least.
Not the least bit surprised, on both counts...

It's still not what BO needs though.
« Last Edit: 12/28/2023 04:31 pm by meekGee »
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Offline Eric Hedman

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

Rudderless and clueless.  Not a good combo.
Problem lies one up from the CEO.
You might be surprised what a big talking point AI is in tech right now.  Coming from Amazon his comment doesnít surprise me in the least.
I think this emphasizing AI right now will lead down the path to many blind alleys.  This is still in the trailblazing stage and while I am certain there will be some great successes with AI in engineering and manufacturing, there will also be many failed efforts in learning how to use it.  If it is a big focus at Blue instead of fixing known fixable problems, it doesn't bode well for getting the ship back on course anytime soon.  I don't think AI fixes the lack of focus, the top heavy management structure and the culture of no urgency.

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AI.  Because that's what was missing?!

Rudderless and clueless.  Not a good combo.
Problem lies one up from the CEO.
You might be surprised what a big talking point AI is in tech right now.  Coming from Amazon his comment doesnít surprise me in the least.
I think this emphasizing AI right now will lead down the path to many blind alleys.  This is still in the trailblazing stage and while I am certain there will be some great successes with AI in engineering and manufacturing, there will also be many failed efforts in learning how to use it.  If it is a big focus at Blue instead of fixing known fixable problems, it doesn't bode well for getting the ship back on course anytime soon.  I don't think AI fixes the lack of focus, the top heavy management structure and the culture of no urgency.
Ok, true story.

I was working at a start-up, and there was an Investor tour. Anyone who's worked in this world knows how that goes: all hands on deck (plus some other ones), dress like a grown up, look busy and serious, etc.

This potential investor was actually representing one of the big telecom companies.  This was 2-3 years ago.

So the boob shows up, a proper silver-haired baboon, he is touring the facility with a purposeful demeanor, flanked by his entourage, when he stops not too far from my cube, takes a deep breath, and asks our VP marketing who was leading the tour "so...  What's the value proposition for the consumer?".

There's this awkward silence since, well, now you ask? And, haven't you listened to anything? but then one of our execs, who generally has no function in the company that we have been able to discern, pipes up: "5G", she says.

5G?!?!?!   WTF does that have to do with our product even?!  We're not even in the same Galaxy!

However, that seemed to have done the trick. The visitor is clearly satisfied, there's a chorus of head nods from his entourage, and the patty moves along.

Us, in cubicle land, we were left with a lesson in corporate communications.  Malkovich Malkovich?

So yeah.  AI AI.
« Last Edit: 12/31/2023 09:47 pm by meekGee »
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Offline TrevorMonty

Regardless of what you think of the "boob", who has 6-7 figure salary and who is just another cog in machine.

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Regardless of what you think of the "boob", who has 6-7 figure salary and who is just another cog in machine.
There are a lot of people in the world that make (or have) more money than I do. Also a lot of people that make or have less. So?  The former are no better than I am, and I am no better than the latter.

But, empty suits that talk corporate BS are a sign of corporate stagnation, regardless of how many digits are in their salary. I could care less about that telecom corp, but I still care about rocketry and am annoyed seeing such suits there.

Not much more to it. And besides, this is not a ULA matter.
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They asked ChatGPT what BO needs and it said AI

 ;)

Offline russianhalo117

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They asked ChatGPT what BO needs and it said AI

 ;)
Many within considered them interim to begin with and their departures our lining up with the expected ULA divestment sale NET target window set ny their parent companies.

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I've probably had a bit too much wine due to this weekend's college football, but I'm going to weigh in anyways.
This AI discussion resonates with me.

Can AI help?  Yes, in cases where it has been trained to look for the "thing" that's critical.
Will it "always" be helpful in spaceflight?  I don't think so.

What I think many people miss in Human Space Flight, is that going to space is a lot like Cave Diving.  Everything must be simple, reliable, and redundant.  That gets you through certification.  The issue with AI, is how do you explain to the grey beards that the AI said "X" design was the best?  Do YOU understand it?  Can YOU justify it?  SpaceX did not get where they are on AI, they did it by asking "what's just good enough" to get the job done.  That's typically a simple solution.  One that's easy to explain.  That's not a generalization, I know firsthand.

I'm sure there are many things AI is good at.  I'm not sure that spaceflight is one of them.  What spaceflight needs, is a balance of reasonable thinking, along with some good analysis.  Not too much of either.

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"Is saying that Blue Origin should focus on AI in the next two years just a matter of repeating buzzwords?"

Quote from: bard
You're right to raise the concern about simply repeating buzzwords when suggesting Blue Origin focus on AI. Here's a deeper analysis:

Yes, there's a risk of buzzword bingo:

* Hype cycle: AI is undeniably popular right now, and sometimes buzzwords like "AI revolution" overshadow actual value and feasibility. Claiming Blue Origin "needs" AI without specific goals or context could fall into this trap.
* Misunderstanding needs: Blindly suggesting AI adoption without understanding Blue Origin's current challenges and future vision might seem like just jumping on a bandwagon.

However, it's not entirely invalid:

* AI potential: AI has real potential to improve spaceflight capabilities in areas like autonomous control, propulsion optimization, and even in-space resource utilization. Ignoring this potential altogether would be remiss.
* Strategic consideration: For companies like Blue Origin, which aim for long-term space ambitions, exploring AI now could be a strategic move to gain a head start in developing crucial future technologies.

So, the key lies in avoiding buzzwords and focusing on:

* Specific applications: Instead of general statements, ask questions like "How can AI improve Blue Origin's current engine testing procedures?" or "What role could AI play in optimizing resource extraction on the Moon?"
* Strategic alignment: Consider how AI aligns with Blue Origin's long-term vision for lunar or Martian exploration. Does it unlock new possibilities or simply add complexity?
* Resource allocation: Be realistic about the resources required (expertise, infrastructure, funding) to effectively integrate AI within the next two years.

Therefore, saying "Blue Origin should focus on AI" might be imprecise, but the underlying question of "How can AI benefit their space ambitions?" is worth exploring. If the conversation moves beyond buzzwords and focuses on specific applications, strategic alignment, and resource considerations, it can be a valuable discussion about the future of Blue Origin and the role of AI in space exploration.

Remember, effective communication in complex domains like space technology requires more than just trendy terms. Let's strive for nuanced and informed discussions that move beyond the buzzword trap.

I believe Bard has made us all redundant.
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Offline TrevorMonty



"Is saying that Blue Origin should focus on AI in the next two years just a matter of repeating buzzwords?"

AI couldn't do a worst job than previous management.

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From a bob to a limp.

Offline Zed_Noir

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From a bob to a limp.
One should not make fun of an experienced corporate hatchetman. Who only gets called in as one of the last options. Especially with the coming pruning of the workforce and management at Blue Origin. Hopefully the future management structure at Blue Origin will be more compact with less layers.

Offline TheRadicalModerate

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If Blue purchases ULA, I would expect that Tory Bruno would not take over completely, but focus on Launch Vehicle development, and stick with Vulcan and New Glenn. That's double the responsibility he has now so enough on his plate. Dave Limp would be in charge of all the other Blue projects such as Blue Moon and Orbital Reef. And that alone is a big plate.

A common organizational pathology is to give a high-powered executive a subordinate position, but one that's responsible for the bulk of the company's strategy and revenue.  If you put Tory in charge of launchers, what's Limp's real value?  He's not a subject matter expert in any of Blue's lines of business, and Tory is perfectly capable of managing his own budget, development, ops, and sales.  Limp can give him a top-line budget number, but that's about it.

Honest, this didn't start out as a joke line:  Limp looks like a lame duck.  I wouldn't be surprised if Jeff hired him as a caretaker, so he could announce Smith's firing soon enough to give the company a needed morale boost.  But he'd be insane not to put Tory in charge if he gets the chance.

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A footnote from my favourite Ai, chatgpt: (This is obviously not news, just a summary)

|There has been a significant talent exodus from Blue Origin in recent months. Here are some of the key departures that have been reported:

New Shepard SVP Steve Bennett
Chief of Mission Assurance Jeff Ashby
Senior Director of Recruiting Crystal Freund
National Security Sales Director Scott Jacobs
New Glenn Senior Directors Jim Centore, Bob Ess, and Tod Byquist
New Glenn Senior Finance Manager Bill Scammell

These departures have been attributed to various factors, including dissatisfaction with the leadership of CEO Bob Smith and a push for all employees to return to the office1.

Itís also worth noting that the attrition rate at Blue Origin has reportedly exceeded 20% for 2021.

Please note that this information is based on the latest available data and the actual situation may have change

Offline TrevorMonty



A footnote from my favourite Ai, chatgpt: (This is obviously not news, just a summary)

|There has been a significant talent exodus from Blue Origin in recent months. Here are some of the key departures that have been reported:

New Shepard SVP Steve Bennett
Chief of Mission Assurance Jeff Ashby
Senior Director of Recruiting Crystal Freund
National Security Sales Director Scott Jacobs
New Glenn Senior Directors Jim Centore, Bob Ess, and Tod Byquist
New Glenn Senior Finance Manager Bill Scammell

These departures have been attributed to various factors, including dissatisfaction with the leadership of CEO Bob Smith and a push for all employees to return to the office1.

It’s also worth noting that the attrition rate at Blue Origin has reportedly exceeded 20% for 2021.

Please note that this information is based on the latest available data and the actual situation may have change

I can see how having to turn up to office and put in 40hr week would be a reason to move on for some. Never understood how manager can manage stuff when working from home.
Old job had team leader of another section working from home few days a week while good number of his staff were in the office.

Online meekGee

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A footnote from my favourite Ai, chatgpt: (This is obviously not news, just a summary)

|There has been a significant talent exodus from Blue Origin in recent months. Here are some of the key departures that have been reported:

New Shepard SVP Steve Bennett
Chief of Mission Assurance Jeff Ashby
Senior Director of Recruiting Crystal Freund
National Security Sales Director Scott Jacobs
New Glenn Senior Directors Jim Centore, Bob Ess, and Tod Byquist
New Glenn Senior Finance Manager Bill Scammell

These departures have been attributed to various factors, including dissatisfaction with the leadership of CEO Bob Smith and a push for all employees to return to the office1.

Itís also worth noting that the attrition rate at Blue Origin has reportedly exceeded 20% for 2021.

Please note that this information is based on the latest available data and the actual situation may have change
I thought chatGPT is only trained on a dataset that's like 2 years old
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Offline seb21051

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|I thought chatGPT is only trained on a dataset that's like 2 years old|

My bad; it was Bing Chat, which seems a lot more up to date, and allows one to select for accuracy.
« Last Edit: 01/02/2024 07:38 am by seb21051 »

Offline c4fusion

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I thought chatGPT is only trained on a dataset that's like 2 years old

Not anymore, itís now April of 2023 and supposedly will be updated far more regularly: https://www.businessinsider.com/open-ai-chatgpt-training-up-to-date-gpt4-turbo-2023-11?amp.

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