Author Topic: New Glenn "Early Flight": Mars ESCAPADE updates and discussion  (Read 17395 times)

Online Solarsail

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Noting that they aren't aiming the New Glenn directly for Mars, I wonder if they could take another risk-reducing shortcut...  Say, a single engine burn ascent to high orbit.  Analogous to the Ariane 1 through 5, with HM-7 engines.  Those couldn't place their perigees above the equator, and yet they managed to accomplish planetary exploration with it.  Likewise JWST used a single engine burn from a slightly suborbital trajectory out to Sun-Earth L2.  JWST required very good precision from the Ariane, so a well characterized vehicle.  Maybe Escapade has enough dV margin to handle New Glenn being poorly characterized in performance, giving it an approximate apogee range and perigee / apogee ~28 degrees off of equatorial.  That might be a similar technical feat to Firefly Alpha's flight 2.

Offline trimeta

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The impression I've gotten from this thread and others is that the difference between the original August launch window and the new "a year from November" launch window is that the former was using the plan where New Glenn would insert the payload into an eccentric Earth orbit (with the payload itself breaking orbit months later after checkouts and additional burns), while the November launch window is with a direct trans-Mars injection from New Glenn. In other words, while the original plan may have been along the lines of what jimvela suggested, delays in New Glenn's maiden launch mean that NASA may be out of time to afford Blue Origin such risk-reducing measures.

Offline meekGee

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Is this enough confirmation to change the thread title to "First Flight"?
ABCD - Always Be Counting Down

Offline LouScheffer

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Noting that they aren't aiming the New Glenn directly for Mars, I wonder if they could take another risk-reducing shortcut...  Say, a single engine burn ascent to high orbit.  Analogous to the Ariane 1 through 5, with HM-7 engines.  Those couldn't place their perigees above the equator, and yet they managed to accomplish planetary exploration with it.
A direct ascent is unlikely to be helpful.  A planetary injection from an elliptical parking orbit requires the perigee to be above some specific spot on Earth.  With direct ascent, you get very little choice in the matter.  What is needed is a parking orbit, where you coast to the right spot and then inject into an elliptical orbit that ensures the returning perigee is in the spot you want for insertion.

The Ariane interplanetary missions worked around this by launching into a 1 year earth-crossing solar orbit.  They get the energy they need from the booster, and do the targeting using the Earth flyby a year later.  Working a year in advance, they can target this flyby to whatever injection point they want.  However, this adds an extra year of flight time to the mission.

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