Author Topic: New Shepard Discussion Thread  (Read 99403 times)

Offline high road

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #40 on: 12/24/2019 10:16 am »
Do others share the though:
 That manrating new Shephard will be more valuable for micro-gravity science, than for space tourism. ?
This idea has passed through my mind a few times.  Time will tell.  At the price point of a couple hundred thousand per person, I don't know if suborbital tourism will be anything more than a short lived fad.  If the price has to come down significantly, the big question is can anybody make money providing the service.  Nobody knows the answers with complete certainty.  I would not be surprised if micro-gravity experiments dominate the market.

What exactly would a human on board do that could not be done on a vomit comet?

I think that there will eventually be far more launches that only launch microgravity tests rather than thrill seekers. But even then, it's a pretty niche service.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #41 on: 12/24/2019 12:27 pm »
On a vomit comet / Zero-G parabolic microgravity simulation flight the experiments get 20-30x ~20sec of micro-gravity time. I think there are experiments that can't be completed in 20-30sec. These experiments could use the 2-3 min of microgravity time available on New Shepard.
But indeed parabolic flights are better when suitable. You also want to automate as much as possible, so the demand isn't very large.
« Last Edit: 12/24/2019 12:28 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline high road

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #42 on: 12/24/2019 01:57 pm »
Oh yes, there are definitely experiments that would benefit from NS' flight profile. And it should be cheaper than a full orbital flight, until there are rideshare opportunities on StarShip or somesuch. But my question was what use it would be to pay for and expose a human to up to 5g for a three minute experiment?

Online TrevorMonty

Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #43 on: 12/24/2019 05:00 pm »


Oh yes, there are definitely experiments that would benefit from NS' flight profile. And it should be cheaper than a full orbital flight, until there are rideshare opportunities on StarShip or somesuch. But my question was what use it would be to pay for and expose a human to up to 5g for a three minute experiment?

Rideshare of zeroG payloads on StarShip could be nice sideline for SpaceX. Even on satellite launches SS would be in zeroG for at least hour before next return window.

Offline JH

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #44 on: 12/24/2019 07:49 pm »
But my question was what use it would be to pay for and expose a human to up to 5g for a three minute experiment?

Millions of people pay to be exposed to 5 g every year. It's called a roller coaster.

Offline high road

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #45 on: 12/24/2019 11:47 pm »
Last time I checked, removing your safety belt is highly frowned upon in a roller coaster. So what would a human do to benefit the experiments while restrained in a seat, or what would he be able to do in a few minutes that's worth the risk of getting out of said seat?

I'm going to look up those g's on rollercoasters though. Should have some time over the holidays.

Edit: huh, even some of the ones I've been in myself are over 5g. Never would have guessed. I always thought a rocket launch would be way more extreme.
« Last Edit: 12/25/2019 11:40 am by high road »

Offline soltasto

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #46 on: 12/26/2019 02:54 pm »
Last time I checked, removing your safety belt is highly frowned upon in a roller coaster. So what would a human do to benefit the experiments while restrained in a seat, or what would he be able to do in a few minutes that's worth the risk of getting out of said seat?

I'm going to look up those g's on rollercoasters though. Should have some time over the holidays.

Edit: huh, even some of the ones I've been in myself are over 5g. Never would have guessed. I always thought a rocket launch would be way more extreme.

Well on a roller coaster you aren't subject to 5g all the time, but only on tight loops and turns, for a few seconds at mast. On a rocket the high g environment could last minutes.

Online Comga

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #47 on: 01/02/2020 08:23 pm »
What exactly would a human on board do that could not be done on a vomit comet?

Look out the window
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline high road

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #48 on: 01/03/2020 10:58 am »
What exactly would a human on board do that could not be done on a vomit comet?

Look out the window

exactly. So no added value for micro gravity research.

Offline b0objunior

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #49 on: 01/03/2020 11:43 am »
What exactly would a human on board do that could not be done on a vomit comet?

Look out the window

exactly. So no added value for micro gravity research.
What a strange comment, "What exactly would a human on board"

Offline Bubbinski

Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #50 on: 01/06/2020 05:54 pm »
Regarding the frequency allocation/licensing request for the next flight https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=96954&RequestTimeout=1000 when will it be approved or denied?
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Online Prettz

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #51 on: 01/06/2020 09:04 pm »
Do others share the though:
 That manrating new Shephard will be more valuable for micro-gravity science, than for space tourism. ?
This idea has passed through my mind a few times.  Time will tell.  At the price point of a couple hundred thousand per person, I don't know if suborbital tourism will be anything more than a short lived fad.  If the price has to come down significantly, the big question is can anybody make money providing the service.  Nobody knows the answers with complete certainty.  I would not be surprised if micro-gravity experiments dominate the market.
It's starting out as an experience only for the outlandishly rich, but I believe it always had to. Once passenger flights are happening, it's certainly within Blue's power to drive the per-flight costs far down.

And they can always build a much larger capsule and booster based around BE-4 and have inherently lesser per-seat costs. The engine's already there.

Offline ncb1397

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #52 on: 01/06/2020 10:25 pm »
Do others share the though:
 That manrating new Shephard will be more valuable for micro-gravity science, than for space tourism. ?
This idea has passed through my mind a few times.  Time will tell.  At the price point of a couple hundred thousand per person, I don't know if suborbital tourism will be anything more than a short lived fad.  If the price has to come down significantly, the big question is can anybody make money providing the service.  Nobody knows the answers with complete certainty.  I would not be surprised if micro-gravity experiments dominate the market.
It's starting out as an experience only for the outlandishly rich, but I believe it always had to. Once passenger flights are happening, it's certainly within Blue's power to drive the per-flight costs far down.

And they can always build a much larger capsule and booster based around BE-4 and have inherently lesser per-seat costs. The engine's already there.

Company officials at Virgin Galactic have actually said that the customer base is a mix of both wealthy people and some relatively normal people that just put a mortgage on their house or something. I guess if it was on your bucket list and the bucket is coming up...It wouldn't be a good financial decision but people have done similar things to pay for Everest climbs.

Offline niwax

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #53 on: 01/06/2020 11:25 pm »
Do others share the though:
 That manrating new Shephard will be more valuable for micro-gravity science, than for space tourism. ?
This idea has passed through my mind a few times.  Time will tell.  At the price point of a couple hundred thousand per person, I don't know if suborbital tourism will be anything more than a short lived fad.  If the price has to come down significantly, the big question is can anybody make money providing the service.  Nobody knows the answers with complete certainty.  I would not be surprised if micro-gravity experiments dominate the market.
It's starting out as an experience only for the outlandishly rich, but I believe it always had to. Once passenger flights are happening, it's certainly within Blue's power to drive the per-flight costs far down.

And they can always build a much larger capsule and booster based around BE-4 and have inherently lesser per-seat costs. The engine's already there.

Company officials at Virgin Galactic have actually said that the customer base is a mix of both wealthy people and some relatively normal people that just put a mortgage on their house or something. I guess if it was on your bucket list and the bucket is coming up...It wouldn't be a good financial decision but people have done similar things to pay for Everest climbs.

That depends on how charitable you are towards the Virgin sales team. Branson has shown a certain Ö optimism in regards to their service. There have been complaints from people who hadn't mortgaged their entire house or been that close to the bucket when they were supposed to have flown and Virgin decided what part of the cost was covered by the "down payment".
Which booster has the most soot? SpaceX booster launch history! (discussion)

Offline ncb1397

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #54 on: 01/07/2020 10:41 pm »
That depends on how charitable you are towards the Virgin sales team. Branson has shown a certain Ö optimism in regards to their service. There have been complaints from people who hadn't mortgaged their entire house or been that close to the bucket when they were supposed to have flown and Virgin decided what part of the cost was covered by the "down payment".

The statements were after they went public, meaning representations about the current depositors that turn out to be false could be an SEC violation.

You can see the statement here at ~4:30...


Mike Moses has had a pretty distinguished career at NASA as a shuttle flight director and I am not aware of any controversies regarding his public service. Beyond that, it isn't exactly an extraordinary claim that requires commensurate evidence.
« Last Edit: 01/07/2020 10:44 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #55 on: 01/10/2020 04:32 pm »
<snip>
It's starting out as an experience only for the outlandishly rich, but I believe it always had to. Once passenger flights are happening, it's certainly within Blue's power to drive the per-flight costs far down.

And they can always build a much larger capsule and booster based around BE-4 and have inherently lesser per-seat costs. The engine's already there.

Using a BE-4 seems impractical for landing a larger booster due to excessive thrust of the BE-4. Maybe using a cluster of BE-3s is more practical.

Online Prettz

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #56 on: 01/12/2020 12:19 am »
<snip>
It's starting out as an experience only for the outlandishly rich, but I believe it always had to. Once passenger flights are happening, it's certainly within Blue's power to drive the per-flight costs far down.

And they can always build a much larger capsule and booster based around BE-4 and have inherently lesser per-seat costs. The engine's already there.

Using a BE-4 seems impractical for landing a larger booster due to excessive thrust of the BE-4. Maybe using a cluster of BE-3s is more practical.
Maybe, but then again it wouldn't have the mass fractions of an orbital booster. And it would probably not be a straight BE-4 as it exists now; maybe a tweaked version, for instance, for longer lifespan. But I was thinking that regardless, it would be good to get away from hydrogen just for cost reasons.

Offline Bubbinski

Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #57 on: 01/21/2020 09:45 pm »
The Updates thread says the FCC application is now approved for Flight 13. Will flight 13 use New Shepard-4? And will it be the last uncrewed flight?
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Eric Hedman

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Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #58 on: 01/21/2020 10:04 pm »
The Updates thread says the FCC application is now approved for Flight 13. Will flight 13 use New Shepard-4? And will it be the last uncrewed flight?
Even after it starts flying with people onboard , it still might fly uncrewed from time to time if the capsule is full of experiments that don't need someone onboard to watch over them.

Offline Bubbinski

Re: New Shepard Discussion Thread
« Reply #59 on: 02/15/2020 06:28 pm »
Just checked the following NOTAM page (since PilotWeb isnít running)

 https://notams.aim.faa.gov/notamSearch/nsapp.html#/results

I checked for ZAB (Albuquerque). For Feb 16 there is a NOTAM mentioning rocket activity:


AIRSPACE UNMANNED ROCKET WI AN AREA DEFINED AS 2NM
RADIUS OF SAF350033 (3.7NM N E14) SFC-5000FT AGL 2002162030-200216

Is this New Shepard or something else? And if this isnít an upcoming New Shepard flight, is there any new info coming out on when the launch might be? (The FCC application is good till March 15th).

Iím thinking this probably isnít New Shepard but I donít quite know how to read this NOTAM so Iím not sure.


« Last Edit: 02/15/2020 06:36 pm by Bubbinski »
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

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