Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 v.1.1 - TürkmenÄlem 52E - April 2015 - DISCUSSION THREAD  (Read 174795 times)

Offline TrueBlueWitt

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Was it just me.. Or did this launch seem like slowest ascent yet?

Heavy bird and full S2 prop load.

Easy to see how uprated [email protected]% off the pad could seriously cut grav losses on this type of flight.

Online AncientU

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A moment of reflection on this launch from the thread's first page:

Holy cow!  :o

Quote
SpaceX Falcon 9 to launch Thales-built telecom satellite for Turkmenistan in late 2014, contract originally intended for Chinese Long March.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/346329718649393152


Indeed, unexpected.

That will be 20th item in SpaceX launch manifest between now and end of 2014. Best of luck to Turkmens but I wouldn't hold my breath for an actual launch in stated time.

Forecast two years ago (i.e., before the first v1.1 GTO flight) for 4Q2014; launched April 2015...
an empirical measure of the SpaceX 'time dilation factor' that was subject of so much ridicule a couple years ago.
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Online abaddon

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Was it just me.. Or did this launch seem like slowest ascent yet?

Heavy bird and full S2 prop load.

Easy to see how uprated [email protected]% off the pad could seriously cut grav losses on this type of flight.

The difference in payloads sizes is absolutely dwarfed by the mass of the stage and fuel load.  In fact, the missing legs mass twice what this payload did.  And S2 always has a full prop load.

So yeah, it's just you ;).

Offline Jim

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Heavy bird and full S2 prop load.


The second stage always carries the same amount of prop.

Offline Lars-J

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could it be just different lighting conditions?

Turbine exhaust and sun angle were two things I hoped it might be.  Whatever it was, it looked like a leak to me.

Dang it, watching SpaceX launches, I become a quivering ball of nerves.   ;D

I did not see anything that was out of the ordinary... Purely an effect caused by lighting conditions, IMO.

Offline llanitedave

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Was it just me.. Or did this launch seem like slowest ascent yet?



People were saying this on the CRS-6 launch as well.  I think it's a trick of the memory.
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Offline Lar

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That will be 20th item in SpaceX launch manifest between now and end of 2014. Best of luck to Turkmens but I wouldn't hold my breath for an actual launch in stated time.

Forecast two years ago (i.e., before the first v1.1 GTO flight) for 4Q2014; launched April 2015...
an empirical measure of the SpaceX 'time dilation factor' that was subject of so much ridicule a couple years ago.


Wait, who's ridiculing? Or who was? I'm the hugest of huge fan boys and the time dilation factor is real. Everything takes longer than SpaceX optimistic announcements say it will. The question becomes is that factor a given forever? Is it improving?  Will it someday shrink to zero-ish?

Questions for another thread for sure but worth pondering while you think about where to post the replies :)
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline Lars-J

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Was it just me.. Or did this launch seem like slowest ascent yet?



People were saying this on the CRS-6 launch as well.  I think it's a trick of the memory.

Yes. The F9 always seems slow coming of the pad compared to most Atlas V flights (the last one really shot off the pad), so that colors the comparison.

Online edkyle99

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A bit of trivia.  Falcon 9 has now already flown from SLC 40 as many times (17) as Titan IV!  Titan IV was at (S)LC 40 from 1994 to 2005, including the final Cape Titan launch.  Of course Titan IV also flew from (S)LC 41, and both sites hosted Titan III-series launches as well.  There were 38 Titan III series launches from (S)LC 40 during 1965-92.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 04/28/2015 08:16 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline DrLucky

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could it be just different lighting conditions?

Turbine exhaust and sun angle were two things I hoped it might be.  Whatever it was, it looked like a leak to me.

Dang it, watching SpaceX launches, I become a quivering ball of nerves.   ;D

I did not see anything that was out of the ordinary... Purely an effect caused by lighting conditions, IMO.

I did a lot of squinting, too; it seemed off to me.  I observed what I took to be a flutter in the engine bell, plus a prominent vapour emission from the neck of the engine going up and to the right.

Eventually I decided that I hadn't seen the sun directly behind the exhaust before (or at least recently), and that the 'flutter' was actually an effect of the camera or my eye or video compression responding to the exhaust occluding the sunlight, causing rapid brightness variations.  I stared at some of the flanges on the hardware away from the engine, and they seemed to be fluttering, too, which they clearly couldn't be.

The prominent vapour was probably the usual vapour backlit.

I remember during the S1 ascent, after the trajectory flattened, that the camera was nearly washed out by the sun, which I don't recall before.

Combination of time of day plus the due-east launch for the 27 degree inclination, I guess?
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* - Not a real doctor.  Nor particularly lucky, come to that.

Offline saliva_sweet

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LOX cam was missing on this flight. I wonder if it has served its purpose and won't be coming back.

Offline deruch

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Was it just me.. Or did this launch seem like slowest ascent yet?

Heavy bird and full S2 prop load.

Easy to see how uprated [email protected]% off the pad could seriously cut grav losses on this type of flight.

The difference in payloads sizes is absolutely dwarfed by the mass of the stage and fuel load.  In fact, the missing legs mass twice what this payload did.  And S2 always has a full prop load.
All four legs together mass ~2100kg, payload mass 4707kg.  The word you're looking for is "half".  But regardless, the difference of a few tonnes either way to a fully fueled vehicle is not at all noticeable.
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

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