Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10 Next
1
Sorry to break the conversation.... but.... does anyone know what is happening with the development of the landing barge for New Glenn?
Jacklyn was scrapped in favor of SpaceX-like droneship due to high cost
Thank you, but yeah, that is known... what is not known is the progress on the replacement of the former Stena Freighter, Jacklyn with a landing barge/droneship..

PS: I do not think that the  cost of Jacklyn was the problem, I think this issue was one of safety... having this large vehicle landing on a crewed ship, while still containing fuel that could be close to an explosive fuel/air mixture ...
2
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 68 Thread
« Last post by Rondaz on Today at 09:46 pm »
A multigenerational plant experiment, a study evaluating a treatment for biofilms, an investigation measuring microgravity’s effect on bacteria, and more were on this week’s @Space_Station science agenda.

https://twitter.com/ISS_Research/status/1601323461661450241
3
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 68 Thread
« Last post by Rondaz on Today at 09:42 pm »
Students in Charlevoix, Michigan, will hear from @NASA_Astronauts @astro_josh during a space-to-Earth call that will air live at 10:15am ET on Monday, Dec. 12, on NASA TV.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1601323876033892352
4
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 68 Thread
« Last post by Rondaz on Today at 09:40 pm »
Russian cosmonauts’ spacewalk scheduled for December 15.

On November 17, 2021, TASS and Roscosmos signed a memorandum of cooperation, according to which the agency's office was opened on the ISS. Cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin became the first special correspondent for TASS. His flight lasted 12 days.

9 DEC, 09:18

ISS, December 9. /TASS/. The International Space Station’s Russian crew members are scheduled to perform a spacewalk on December 15, TASS special correspondent, Roscosmos cosmonaut Dmitry Petelin reported on Friday.

Earlier, he said that together with his colleague Sergey Prokopyev he replaced the cooling system pumps in the Orlan-ISS spacesuits.

On December 25, the press service of Roscosmos said that cosmonauts Sergey Prokopyev and Dmitry Petelin had canceled preparations for a spacewalk due to malfunctioning of the cooling system’s pumps.

The CEO of the Zvezda research and production enterprise, Sergey Pozdnyakov, explained to TASS that the pumps’ operation was not stable enough. The company's specialists looked into the problem.

On November 17, 2021, TASS and Roscosmos signed a memorandum of cooperation, according to which the agency's office was opened on the ISS. Cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin became the first special correspondent for TASS. His flight lasted 12 days. Oleg Artemyev took over as the agency’s second special correspondent. The current contributor to the TASS news feed from the orbital outpost is Dmitry Petelin.

https://tass.com/science/1548741
5
ISS Section / Re: Expedition 68 Thread
« Last post by Rondaz on Today at 09:39 pm »
Cosmonauts on ISS replace spacesuits’ pumps ahead of future spacewalks.

On November 17, 2021, TASS and Roscosmos signed a memorandum of cooperation, according to which the agency's office was opened on the ISS.

9 DEC, 08:56

ISS, December 9. /TASS/. Russian members of the International Space Station’s crew have replaced the pumps on the Orlan-ISS spacesuits they use for extravehicular activity, TASS special correspondent, Roscosmos cosmonaut Dmitry Petelin reported on Friday.

He performed the repairs together with his colleague Sergey Prokopyev. The cosmonauts checked the pumps afterwards.

On December 25, the press service of Roscosmos said that cosmonauts Sergey Prokopyev and Dmitry Petelin had canceled preparations for a spacewalk due to malfunctioning of the cooling system’s pumps. A new date for the spacewalk will be set once the causes of the problem have been identified. The CEO of the Zvezda research and production enterprise, Sergey Pozdnyakov, explained to TASS that the pumps’ operation was not stable enough. The company's specialists will now look into the problem.

On November 17, 2021, TASS and Roscosmos signed a memorandum of cooperation, according to which the agency's office was opened on the ISS. Cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin became the first special correspondent for TASS. His flight lasted 12 days. Oleg Artemyev took over as the agency’s second special correspondent. The current contributor to the TASS news feed from the orbital outpost is Dmitry Petelin.

https://tass.com/science/1548729
6
I think we have had scheduled launch dates between ~28 Dec and ~31 Dec.

While 11Dec to 16 Dec is possible because Hakuto is RTLS, if both droneships are used on 16th (21:21 UTC) and 17th then I am not sure there is time for a droneship to be ready on 23rd and even that would involve maritime crew at sea on 25th. 24th seems unlikely due to travel restrictions which likely continue at least through 26th?

I am not ruling out one more launch from pad 40 after 16th Dec, but two launches seems highly improbable.
7
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-commits-to-future-artemis-moon-rocket-production

Quote
Dec 9, 2022
RELEASE 22-130

NASA Commits to Future Artemis Moon Rocket Production

NASA has finalized its contract with Boeing of Huntsville, Alabama, for approximately $3.2 billion to continue manufacturing core and upper stages for future Space Launch System (SLS) rockets for Artemis missions to the Moon and beyond.

Under the SLS Stages Production and Evolution Contract action, Boeing will produce SLS core stages for Artemis III and IV, procure critical and long-lead material for the core stages for Artemis V and VI, provide the exploration upper stages (EUS) for Artemis V and VI, as well as tooling and related support and engineering services.

In October 2019, NASA provided initial funding and authorization for Artemis III core stage work and targeted long-lead materials and cost-efficient bulk purchases. The finalization of this contract extends production activities and preparations for future work through July 2028. As part of the contract NASA may order up to 10 core stages and eight exploration upper stages total to support future deep space exploration missions.

“NASA’s Space Launch System rocket is the only rocket capable of sending large cargos and soon, astronauts to the Moon,” said John Honeycutt, SLS Program manager. “The SLS core stage is the backbone of NASA’s Moon rocket, producing more than 2 million pounds of thrust at launch, and the addition of the exploration upper stage will enable NASA to support missions to deep space through the 2030s.”

The SLS rocket delivers propulsion in stages and is designed to evolve to more advanced configurations to power NASA’s deep space missions. Each SLS rocket configuration uses the same 212-foot-tall core stage to produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help propel the mega rocket off the launch pad.

For the first three Artemis missions, SLS uses an interim cryogenic propulsion stage with one RL10 engine to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon. Beginning with Artemis IV, the SLS Block 1B rocket configuration will be propelled by the more powerful EUS with larger fuel tanks and four RL10 engines to send a crewed Orion and large cargos to the Moon. All the structures for the rocket’s core stage and EUS are manufactured at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

The contract comes as NASA optimizes manufacturing capabilities as Boeing will use Kennedy Space Center in Florida to perform some core stage assembly and outfitting activities beginning with the Artemis III rocket. In tandem, teams will continue all core stage manufacturing activities at Michoud.

Teams continue to make progress assembling and manufacturing core stages for Artemis II, III, and IV. The Artemis II stage is scheduled to be completed and delivered to Kennedy in 2023. The engine section for Artemis III was recently loaded onto NASA’s Pegasus barge for delivery to Kennedy, where it will be outfitted and later integrated with the rest of the rocket.

With Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the lunar surface and establish long-term exploration at the Moon in preparation for human missions to Mars. SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft, along with the commercial human landing system and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, are NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration.

For more information about the Space Launch System, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/sls

-end-

Photo caption:

Quote
NASA and Space Launch System stages prime contractor Boeing are in various states of production on core stages for future Artemis missions. Together with its twin solid rocket boosters, the Space Launch System core stage will produce 8.8 million pounds of thrust to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft, astronauts, and supplies beyond Earth’s orbit to the Moon. A powerful upper stage will be incorporated into the rocket beginning with Artemis IV. NASA joined the Space Launch System rocket’s core stage forward assembly, seen here, with the 130-foot liquid hydrogen tank in March 2022.
Credits: NASA/Eric Bordelon
8
IXPE Celebrates 1 Year of Exploring the Cosmos

Beth Ridgeway Posted on December 9, 2022

One year ago, NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) lit up the early morning sky as it started its journey into space. The satellite was launched on a Falcon 9 rocket from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 9, 2021.

IXPE is the first satellite dedicated to measuring the polarization of X-rays from a variety of cosmic sources, such as black holes and neutron stars. Polarization is a property of light that gives scientists important information about cosmic objects. Before IXPE, X-ray polarization was rarely measured in space. In just one year, IXPE has conducted measurements no telescope has ever been able to make before.

Here’s a look at some of IXPE’s accomplishments in the first year of its mission:

IXPE unlocked the secrets of Cassiopeia A, a famous exploded star.
Findings from IXPE’s observation of neutron star Hercules X-1 surprised scientists.
IXPE revealed the shape and orientation of hot matter around a black hole.
Thanks to IXPE, scientists confirmed magnetars are highly polarized.
NASA’s IXPE helped solve a 40-year mystery around particle acceleration in a blazar, an active black hole that has a jet pointed toward Earth.

IXPE is just getting started. Its baseline mission duration is two years, so with at least one more year of exploration to go, the satellite is poised to make more exciting discoveries about the intricacies of X-ray polarization. Happy first anniversary, IXPE!

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ixpe/2022/12/09/ixpe-celebrates-1-year-of-exploring-the-cosmos/
9
Sorry to break the conversation.... but.... does anyone know what is happening with the development of the landing barge for New Glenn?
Jacklyn was scrapped in favor of SpaceX-like droneship due to high cost
10
IXPE Celebrates 1 Year of Exploring the Cosmos

Beth Ridgeway Posted on December 9, 2022

One year ago, NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) lit up the early morning sky as it started its journey into space. The satellite was launched on a Falcon 9 rocket from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 9, 2021.

IXPE is the first satellite dedicated to measuring the polarization of X-rays from a variety of cosmic sources, such as black holes and neutron stars. Polarization is a property of light that gives scientists important information about cosmic objects. Before IXPE, X-ray polarization was rarely measured in space. In just one year, IXPE has conducted measurements no telescope has ever been able to make before.

Here’s a look at some of IXPE’s accomplishments in the first year of its mission:

IXPE unlocked the secrets of Cassiopeia A, a famous exploded star.
Findings from IXPE’s observation of neutron star Hercules X-1 surprised scientists.
IXPE revealed the shape and orientation of hot matter around a black hole.
Thanks to IXPE, scientists confirmed magnetars are highly polarized.
NASA’s IXPE helped solve a 40-year mystery around particle acceleration in a blazar, an active black hole that has a jet pointed toward Earth.

IXPE is just getting started. Its baseline mission duration is two years, so with at least one more year of exploration to go, the satellite is poised to make more exciting discoveries about the intricacies of X-ray polarization. Happy first anniversary, IXPE!

https://blogs.nasa.gov/ixpe/2022/12/09/ixpe-celebrates-1-year-of-exploring-the-cosmos/

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10 Next
Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1