Author Topic: CZ-5 - Tianwen-1 TW-1 Mars mission - Wenchang - July 23, 2020 (04:41 UTC)  (Read 70567 times)

Offline Dalhousie

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Yup, and the name will be used for future Chinese planetary exploration missions as well.

So it will be a generic name like Pioneer,  Mariner, Zond, etc.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Insertion orbit looks kind of strange. After the insertion burn, it looks like it performs a 90° turn at apogee to go into a polar orbit.
« Last Edit: 04/25/2020 12:29 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Hungry4info3

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Mars Express did something similar. Perhaps the approach trajectory is for delivering the lander to the target landing site.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Mars Express did something similar. Perhaps the approach trajectory is for delivering the lander to the target landing site.

Here's the story showing the Mars Express trajectory going from an equatorial orbit to a polar orbit.

https://spaceflightnow.com/mars/marsexpress/031230marsexpressorbit.html
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/aj_fi/status/1254311385191907328

Quote
A 70-metre diameter parabolic antenna reflector was hoisted and installed in Tianjin on April 25, to support the Tianwen-1 Mars mission. The GRAS-4 project was carried out by the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).
https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/gRYtMYPaYTKVCzXeG477uA

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/aj_fi/status/1254731594197340161

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Footage of the hoisting of the 70-metre diameter parabolic antenna in Tianjin to support China's Tianwen-1 Mars mission. Footage: NAOC.

Offline PM3

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"NET July 23" is not a published launch date but just a guess: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=5060.msg1969450#msg1969450. Should be changed to NET July or July-August 2020 in the thread title. I don't see any more precise published launch window.

The other two 2020 Mars missions have windows from 14 July to 3 August and from 17 July to 5 August.
« Last Edit: 04/29/2020 07:41 am by PM3 »
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/aj_fi/status/1261550036107829248

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Tianwen-1 Mars mission update: Cargo ships Yuanwang-21 & 22 have collected the Long March 5 rocket components from Tianjin & today set sail for Hainan. The Mars spacecraft arrived at Wenchang satellite launch centre on April 10.

Offline eeergo

Sad news of a premature, ill-timed (if there's ever a proper time) death very much related to this mission:

https://twitter.com/AJ_FI/status/1263457389023571968
-DaviD-

Offline ZachS09

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Does this mean a delay due to Weixing’s death?
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline Phil Stooke

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It's very unfortunate, but there is no reason for it to delay anything.  He was a scientist, nothing to do with the preparations for launch.

Offline baldusi

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Besides, this is a planetary mission that must hit the launch window. Delays are either none or 26 months.

Offline otter

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China to launch Mars probe between July, August

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-06/02/c_139108416.htm

Offline spacexplorer

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The other two 2020 Mars missions have windows from 14 July to 3 August and from 17 July to 5 August.
After reading your message I did some search and I creasted a "Mars 2020 Summary Thread" :-)
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=51343.msg2101542#msg2101542

Offline starbase

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Liftoff targeted for ~4:00 UTC on July 23.

Quote
Confirmed Tianwen-1 launch date on 23rd July at noon. backup windows on 24th,25th. Now Tianwen-1 and LM-5Y4 status are green and preparation is smoothly.
https://twitter.com/LiuyiYiliu/status/1281271236497215488
bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Offline newfrontiers

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[zubenelgenubi: Attach files to the post.  Do not embed them.
Also, if you embed an image by linking to it, and the website later removes that image--it's gone.]

[zubenelgenubi: Who are these people?]
« Last Edit: 07/10/2020 02:51 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline eeergo

-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

Excellent thread in Twitter by CosmicPenguin about Tianwen-1's instruments that I'm copying here:

https://twitter.com/Cosmic_Penguin/status/1283801101439873024

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It seems that there hasn’t been any detailed specifications of the scientific instruments of the now-about-to-be-rolled-to-launch-pad of the Chinese Tianwen-1 Mars Orbiter and PRCMarsRover missions in English from anywhere I have seen - at least till now!
Thanks to cathirame I finally get a detailed specifications list that I have crudely translated into English! Bear in mind that my UG physics were bad and the Chinese scientific terms used are a little bit different from my familar translations so the translation is crude.
Source: LI Chunlai, LIU Jianjun, GENG Yan, CAO Jinbin, ZHANG Tielong, FANG Guangyou, YANG Jianfeng, SHU Rong, ZOU Yongliao, LIN Yangting, OUYANG Ziyuan. Scientific Objectives and Payload Configuration of China's First Mars Exploration Mission[J].
Journal of Deep Space Exploration, 2018, 5(5): 406-413. doi: 10.15982/j.issn.2095-7777.2018.05.002

Firstly, here are the specifications of the 7 instruments of the TW-1 Mars Orbiter:
1. Medium Resolution Camera
Imaging wavelength: Visible Light
Color: Standard RGB
Image Resolution: < 100 m at 400 km altitude
Image swath: >= 400 km at 400 km altitude
Pixel Resolution: >= 4096 x 3072

2. High Resolution Camera
Image resolution: < 2.5 m (< 0.5 m in certain regions) multi-color; < 10 m (< 2.0 m in certain regions) panchromatic
Image swath: >= 9 km at 265 km altitude

3. Mars orbiter sub-surface radar
Radar frequency: 10-20 & 30-50 MHz
Transmitter power: >= 100 W
Receiver power: <= -87 dBm
Maximum detection depth: ~100 m for Martian sub-surface soil (εr = 3.0~4.0); ~1000 m for Martian polar ice layers (εr = 3.0)
Depth resolution: ~ 1 m

4. Mars mineralogy spectrometer
Wavelength bands: Visible Light - NIR band 0.45~1.05 μm; NIR-MIR band 1.00~3.40 μm
Spectral resolution: < 10 nm for Visible Light - NIR band; < 12 nm for 1.0~2.0 μm; < 25 nm for 2.0~3.4 μm

5. Mars magnetometer
Measurement range: +- 2000 nT
Noise level <= 0.01 nT/√Hz
Resolution: <= 0.01 nT
Precision: 0.1 nT

6. Mars ions and neutral particles analyser
Limit of Detection of low energy ions:
Energy range: 5 eV ~ 25 keV
delta-E/E: 15%
Mass: 1~ 70 amu
delta-m/m: 25%
POV: 90° x 360°
Angular resolution: 11.2° x 22.5°
Time resolution: 8s
Limit of Detection of low energy neutral particles:
Energy range: 50 eV ~ 3 keV
delta-E/E: 100%
Mass: 1 ~ 32 amu
POV: 15° x 160°
Angular resolution: 10° x 25°
Time resolution: 4s

7. Mars energetic particles analyser
Limit of Detection:
Energy range: 0.1 ~ 12 MeV (Electrons) / 2 ~100 MeV (Protons) / 25 ~ 300 MeV (Alpha Particles/Heavy Ions)
delta-E/E: 15%
Flux: 0 ~ 10^5 cm^-2 s^-1
Atomic Number: 1 <= Z <= 26 (H - Fe)
delta-m/m: <=25% (Z <= 9, 25 ~ 300 MeV & 10 <= Z <= 26, 100 ~ 300 MeV); <=60% (10 <= Z <= 26, 25 ~ 100 MeV)
POV: 60°
Time resolution: 4s (Electrons, Protons, Alpha Particles); 60s (Heavy Ions)

And here comes the 6 instruments on the yet-to-be-named @PRCMarsRover which will get a name via a planned public naming contest:
A. Terrain Camera
Imaging wavelength: Visible Light
Color: Standard RGB
Nominal imaging distance: 0.5 m ~ ∞
Pixel Resolution: 2048 x 2048

B. Multi-spectral camera
Imaging bands (/nm, Full Width At Half Maximum in brackets): 480 (20), 525 (20), 650 (12), 700 (15), 800 (25), 900 (30), 950 (50), 1000 (50)
Color: Multi-spectral
Nominal imaging distance: 1.5 m ~ ∞
Pixel Resolution: 2048 x 2048

C. Rover sub-surface radar
Channel 1:
Median frequency: 55 MHz
Working bandwidth: 40 MHz
Penetrating depth of Martian ice layers: ~1 m
Maximum detection depth: >=10 m for Martian sub-surface soil (εr = 3.0~4.0); >=100 m for Martian polar ice layers (εr = 3.0)
Channel 2:
Median frequency: 1300 MHz
Working bandwidth: 1000 MHz
Precision of layer thickness detection: ~cm
Maximum detection depth: >=3 m for Martian sub-surface soil (εr = 3.0~4.0); >=10 m for Martian polar ice layers (εr = 3.0)

D. Mars surface composition analyser
LIBS measurements: Detects 10+ elements; optimal working distance from sample 2~5 m (max. 10 m); imaging resolution <= 100 μrad (0.2 mm @ 2 m; 0.5 mm @ 5 m)
NIR measurments (850~2400 nm): spectral resolution <=12 nm; 130+ bands; POV >=1 mrad

E. Mars surface magnetometer
Measurement range: +- 2000 nT
Noise level <= 0.01 nT/√Hz
Resolution: <= 0.01 nT
Stability: <= 0.01 nT/°C
Sampling rate: 1/16/32/128 Hz
Range: +- 65000 nT

F. Mars meteorology instrument
Temperature -120~50 °C (precision 0.1 °C); Pressure 1~1500 Pa (precision 0.1 Pa); Windspeed 0~70 m/s (precision 0.1 m/s); Wind Direction 0°~360° (precision 5°); Sound detection 20 Hz~2.5 kHz/2.5~20 kHz (Sensibility >50 mV/Pa; Dynamic Range >=90 dB)

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

The LM-5 rocket is currently rolling out to the launch pad.
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Arrival at the launch pad:
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

 

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