Author Topic: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe (aka Solar Probe Plus) - SLC-37 - August 4, 2018  (Read 43743 times)

Online zubenelgenubi

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Delta Mariner was designed for 3 CBCs.
Quote
The Mariner can carry up to three common booster cores, which are as long as a 737 airline fuselage each.
http://www.ulalaunch.com/united-launch-alliance-continues.aspx

The 2 side Delta IV-H core stages EFT-1 Orion flight were delivered separately from the center core, as well.  Why, if there is capacity for all 3 core stages?
« Last Edit: 08/03/2017 08:06 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Online russianhalo117

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Delta Mariner was designed for 3 CBCs.
Quote
The Mariner can carry up to three common booster cores, which are as long as a 737 airline fuselage each.
http://www.ulalaunch.com/united-launch-alliance-continues.aspx

The 2 side Delta IV-H core stages EFT-1 Orion flight were delivered separately from the center core, as well.  Why, if there is capacity for all 3 core stages?
Priority Atlas CCB in the middle slot onboard.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Final Rocket Components Arrive in Florida for Parker Solar Probe
Posted on September 1, 2017 at 3:06 pm by Anna Heiney.

All components of the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket that will launch NASA’s Parker Solar Probe have arrived for prelaunch processing at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The Port Common Booster Core of the Delta IV Heavy for the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) Mission is offloaded from the Mariner and transported to the Horizontal Integration Facility. The rocket’s second stage arrived Saturday, Aug. 26, along with the third and final common booster core, which will complete the first stage. The hardware was delivered by ship to Port Canaveral, then transported by truck to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 37.

The Parker Solar Probe will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.

This entry was posted in Parker Solar Probe on September 1, 2017.

Caption for 1st photo:
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A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy common booster core arrives at the Horizontal Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for preflight processing. The Delta IV Heavy will launch NASA’s upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission.
Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston

Caption for 2nd photo:
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The Port Common Booster Core of the Delta IV Heavy for the Parker Solar Probe Mission is offloaded from the Mariner ship for transport to the Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 37.
Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky.

Caption for 3rd photo:
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Sunrise is reflected in the side of the Mariner ship and in the water of Port Canaveral below.
Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston
« Last Edit: 09/02/2017 01:09 AM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online catdlr

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September 20, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-108
Media Invited to View NASA Spacecraft That Will Touch Our Sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will be humanity’s first-ever mission to explore the Sun’s outer atmosphere. Media are invited to see the spacecraft and learn about the mission from noon to 2 p.m. EDT Monday, Sept. 25, at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, where the probe is being built.

The spacecraft will be in full flight configuration, complete with its revolutionary heat shield, and members of the engineering and science teams conducting this historical mission will be available for interviews.

Media who would like to attend must register with APL by sending an email with name, affiliation and cell phone number to [email protected] no later than 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 22. Instructions on attendance will be provided upon registration.

Due to facility limitations, the number of participants is limited, and the event is open only to U.S. citizens. The event will take place in a clean room. Attendees should allow additional time for cleaning of cameras and equipment by APL staff.

The spacecraft, about the size of a small car, will launch in mid-summer 2018. It will travel directly through the Sun's atmosphere about four million miles from our star's surface – facing heat and radiation unlike any spacecraft in history – and make critical observations to answer decades-old questions about how stars work. Mission data ultimately will improve forecasts of major space weather events that affect life on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space.

To learn more about the mission, visit: 

https://www.nasa.gov/solarprobe

-end-

Picture source: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/psp.jpg
Tony De La Rosa

Online catdlr

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Parker Solar Probe Gets its Revolutionary Heat Shield: Time Lapse

NASA.gov Video
Published on Sep 26, 2017


In this time-lapse video taken on Sept. 21, 2017, the thermal protection system – the heat shield -- for NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft is shown during installation at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. This 4.5-inch thick, eight-foot diameter shield protects the spacecraft and its instruments against the intense heat and energy of the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the corona, through which the spacecraft will fly on a mission of extreme exploration. The thermal protection system is made of a carbon-carbon composite material with a special outer coating that will reach temperatures of nearly 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. The heat shield was placed on the probe for a test of alignment as part of integration and testing, but it will soon be removed.  Both spacecraft and shield will continue separate testing processes and then be re-integrated just before launch in summer 2018.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLmSU6rJUtw?t=001

Tony De La Rosa


Offline AS_501

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To anyone in the know:  Is the probe designed to withstand a major CME?  Thanks.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISIS): Design
of the Energetic Particle Investigation

Describes the instruments on the then "Solar Probe Plus", and the environment they are designed to operate in.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Parker Solar Probe Successfully Completes Pre-Environmental Testing Review
Posted on 10/13/2017 10:50:13

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, the first mission to fly into the Sun’s corona, has successfully completed a review that approves the beginning of the spacecraft’s environmental testing.

A review panel of engineers from NASA and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, where the spacecraft was designed and is being built, declared on September 29 that Parker Solar Probe has passed required performance tests and can move into environmental testing.

For Parker Solar Probe, this means the probe will be subjected to a series of challenging simulations of launch and space operations that will ensure the spacecraft is up to the difficult task of exploring the extreme environment of the Sun’s atmosphere – the corona. The spacecraft will first be bolted to a vibration table at APL, which will simulate the violent physical forces of launch; Parker Solar Probe will be lifted skyward on a Delta IV-Heavy launch vehicle, the largest in the world currently in operation. The spacecraft has already completed mass properties testing, which is important for mating to the launch vehicle and for maneuvering and attitude control.

In early November, the spacecraft will travel a short distance to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, where it will be subjected to acoustic, thermal cycling, and vacuum testing that will make sure the probe can withstand the sound generated at launch and the dramatic swings of hot and cold that it will be subjected to following launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, in summer 2018.

“It’s a testament to the hard work and diligence of the Parker Solar Probe team that we successfully completed our review, and we’re excited to move forward into environmental testing,” said Andy Driesman of APL, the Parker Solar Probe project manager. “We’re looking forward to completing these tests, and then heading to Florida to begin the preparations for next year’s launch.”

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft will explore the Sun’s outer atmosphere and make critical observations that will answer decades-old questions about the physics of stars. The resulting data will also improve forecasts of major eruptions on the sun and subsequent space weather events that impact life on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space. The mission is named for Eugene N. Parker, whose profound insights into solar physics and processes have guided the discipline.

http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Show-Article.php?articleID=49

Photo caption:

Quote
Engineers and technicians prepare the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft for mass properties testing. This marks the beginning of environmental testing, a series of physical tests that will ensure the probe can withstand the rigors of launch and temperature fluctuations of space operations.
Credit: NASA/JHUAPL

Online catdlr

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Parker Solar Probe Moves to Goddard | Time Lapse

NASA.gov Video
Published on Nov 13, 2017

Time-lapse video shows the packing up and moving of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1S98c1kQTg?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Online catdlr

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Lasers Fired At NASA's Parker Solar Probe


NASA Goddard
Published on Dec 6, 2017

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is in the midst of intense environmental testing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, in preparation for its journey to the Sun. These tests simulate the noise and shaking the spacecraft will experience during its launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, scheduled for 2018.

Parker Solar Probe’s integration and the testing team must check over the spacecraft and systems to make sure everything is still in optimal working condition after experiencing these rigorous conditions – including a check of the solar arrays, which will provide electrical power to the spacecraft.

Parker Solar Probe will explore the Sun's outer atmosphere and make critical observations that will answer decades-old questions about the physics of stars. The resulting data will also help improve how we forecast major eruptions on the Sun and subsequent space weather events that can impact life on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space. The mission is named for Eugene N. Parker, whose profound insights into solar physics and processes have helped shape the field of heliophysics.

Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Joy Ng (USRA): Producer
Sarah Frazier (ADNET SYSTEMS): Writer
Lee Hobson (APL): Videographer

Music credit: 'Push Away' by Andrew Michael Britton [PRS], David Stephen Goldsmith [PRS], Mikey Rowe [PRS] from Killer Tracks.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12795

If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viRjerxUYJ4?t=001


Tony De La Rosa

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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#TFW you get photo bombed by the #DeltaIV Heavy that will launch @ParkerSunProbe. Thanks to the @SEDSSpaceVision attendees who toured ULA's Cape Canaveral facilities in November.

https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/939250761707524098

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Here’s a little orbital mechanics InfoG on the Parker Solar Probe’s ride to the Sun. Majestic Delta Heavy. #PSP

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/972830168799617024?s=21

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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A C3 of 60 km²/s² works out to 5.68 km/s from LEO (dv = sqrt(2*vo+C3)-vo, where vo =7.8 km/s).
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online catdlr

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March 21, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-050
Media Invited to View NASA Spacecraft That Will Touch the Sun

Media are invited to view NASA’s Parker Solar Probe
 spacecraft at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, March 28, at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The spacecraft will embark this summer on a daring trek, traveling closer to the Sun than any spacecraft in history.

The Sun is the only star that can be studied up close. In addition to helping solve how stars throughout the universe drive heat, radiation, energy and particles out into space, data from the spacecraft will help scientists better understand how this constant solar outpouring can create hazardous space weather events near Earth. Space weather can impact not only astronauts living and working in space, but also interfere with satellites and radio signals.

Media attending the event will have an opportunity to interview the mission team as well as view the spacecraft from outside the cleanroom where it is undergoing final testing before it ships to NASA’s Kennedy Space Flight Center in Florida for a scheduled July 31 launch.

Media representatives need to RSVP online by 5 p.m. Monday, March 26 at:

http://bit.ly/2p8Kh5d

Media may contact Haley Reed at [email protected] or 301- 286-3131 for further information.

Parker Solar Probe is part of NASA’s Living with a Star (LWS) Program to explore aspects of the Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society. LWS is managed by Goddard for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, manages the mission for NASA. APL designed and built the spacecraft, and also will operate it.

-end-
Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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The second stage of a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy is being mated to the common booster core inside the Horizontal Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Delta IV Heavy will launch NASA's upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission in July 2018. The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun's atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.

Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Offline Targeteer

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http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Show-Article.php?articleID=72

https://www.facebook.com/ParkerSolarProbe/?hc_ref=ART_joXLJDGaLAoPw1chGvEdIO1-_Rzp5EBoSqkMjDkn_2dk6bhD3h4EsgsUTIGHHsg&fref=nf

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has arrived in Florida to begin final preparations for its launch to the Sun, scheduled for July 31, 2018.

In the middle of the night on April 2, the spacecraft was driven from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to nearby Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. From there, it was flown by the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing to Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, where it arrived at 10:40 a.m. EDT. It was then transported a short distance to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, where it will continue testing, and eventually undergo final assembly and mating to the third stage of the Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle.

Parker Solar Probe is humanity’s first mission to the Sun. After launch, it will orbit directly through the solar atmosphere – the corona – closer to the surface than any human-made object has ever gone. While facing brutal heat and radiation, the mission will reveal fundamental science behind what drives the solar wind, the constant outpouring of material from the Sun that shapes planetary atmospheres and affects space weather near Earth.

“Parker Solar Probe and the team received a smooth ride from the Air Force C-17 crew from the 436th,” said Andy Driesman, Parker Solar Probe project manager from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. “This is the second most important flight Parker Solar Probe will make, and we’re excited to be safely in Florida and continuing pre-launch work on the spacecraft.”

At Astrotech, Parker Solar Probe was taken to a clean room and removed from its protective shipping container on Wednesday, April 4. The spacecraft then began a series of tests to verify that it had safely made the journey to Florida. For the next several months, the spacecraft will undergo comprehensive testing; just prior to being fueled, one of the most critical elements of the spacecraft, the thermal protection system (TPS), or heat shield, will be installed. The TPS is the breakthrough technology that will allow Parker Solar Probe to survive the temperatures in the Sun’s corona, just 3.8 million miles from the surface of our star.

“There are many milestones to come for Parker Solar Probe and the amazing team of men and women who have worked so diligently to make this mission a reality,” said Driesman. “The installation of the TPS will be our final major step before encapsulation and integration onto the launch vehicle.”

Parker Solar Probe will be launched from Launch Complex-37 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The two-hour launch window opens at approximately 4 a.m. EDT on July 31, 2018, and is repeated each day (at slightly earlier times) through August 19.

Throughout its seven-year mission, Parker Solar Probe will explore the Sun's outer atmosphere and make critical observations to answer decades-old questions about the physics of stars. Its data will also be useful in improving forecasts of major eruptions on the Sun and the subsequent space weather events that impact technology on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space. The mission is named for University of Chicago Professor Emeritus Eugene N. Parker, whose profound insights into solar physics and processes have guided the discipline. It is the first NASA mission named for a living individual.


Parker Solar Probe is part of NASA’s Living With a Star Program to explore aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society. Living With a Star is managed by the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Johns Hopkins APL designed, built, and manages the mission for NASA. Instrument teams are led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.; Princeton University in New Jersey; and the Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

United Launch Alliance of Centennial, Colorado, is the provider of the Delta IV launch service for Parker Solar Probe. NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP), based at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manages the agency’s efforts to commercially provide rockets for specific missions. LSP also directs the overall launch effort including overseeing development and integration of the rocket with the spacecraft.

To learn more about Parker Solar Probe, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe



Media Contacts

Dwayne Brown

NASA Headquarters, Washington

202-358-1726
[email protected]

Geoff Brown

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
240-228-5618

[email protected]

Karen Fox

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
301-286-6284

[email protected]
« Last Edit: 04/08/2018 02:11 AM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Star One

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NASA studying sensor issue with Parker Solar Probe

Quote
As those preparations continue, officials are studying problems with devices known as platinum resistance thermometers that are part of the spacecraft’s thermal control system. Those devices have suffered a higher-than-expected failure rate, according to a presentation at an April 5 meeting of NASA’s Heliophysics Advisory Committee.

The thermometers are lightweight, highly sensitive temperature sensors used to help provide feedback to the spacecraft’s cooling system and solar arrays, NASA spokesman Dwayne Brown said April 9. “We put all spacecraft through a rigorous test program to make sure all systems are working as designed and it is normal for a test program to uncover issues.”

“The team is looking very carefully at whether any change is needed,” Peg Luce, acting director of NASA’s heliophysics division, said at the meeting. The issue, she said, was debated “quite significantly” at a review last week to approve the shipment of the spacecraft to Florida, including whether to delay that shipment to study the problem.

“There are certain, possible fixes if we need to fix something that could be done at the Cape, so the decision was to go ahead and ship,” she said.

http://spacenews.com/nasa-studying-sensor-issue-with-parker-solar-probe/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Here's the Delta 4 Heavy just before its rollout onto the pad yesterday. This is @ParkerSunProbe's ride to space! #space @ulalaunch @torybruno

https://twitter.com/dr_thomasz/status/986221567049981954

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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@Delta_IV_Heavy What a beautiful beast you are. Cant wait for #solarprobe! She looks great @ulalaunch @torybruno! @NASA @NASASun @NASASocial #ULA #Space #RocketScience

https://twitter.com/delta_iv_heavy/status/987685572784414721

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