Author Topic: Expedition 54 Thread  (Read 32171 times)

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 12/23/2017 05:49 PM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?

This blog entry with this photo https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/12/21/crew-heads-into-holidays-with-bone-and-muscle-research/ was also removed.
 
It's available only attached file :(

Here's a slightly larger version

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 12/23/2017 05:55 PM »
Here's the missing blog article that contained the photo:

Crew Heads into Holidays with Bone and Muscle Research
Mark Garcia - December 21, 2017

Three veteran International Space Station crew members and three first-time astronauts will spend Christmas and New Year’s Eve orbiting Earth. They are continuing to research how living in space affects the human body and maintaining the orbital laboratory.

Veteran cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov is spending his third holiday season in space having served on two previous Expeditions. He recently arrived Dec. 19 with NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and JAXA astronaut Norishige Kanai. Greeting the new crew were Expedition 54 Commander Alexander Misurkin and NASA astronauts Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei. Misurkin and Acaba are in the middle of their second station mission and this is Vande Hei’s first mission.

Today, the station residents explored why bone and muscle atrophy occur in space and ways to prevent that loss to keep astronauts healthy.

Kanai collected and stored his breath and blood samples for the Marrow study to understand what is happening to his bone marrow and blood cells during spaceflight. Kanai later joined Acaba peering at synthetic bone cells through a microscope. The synthetic material is being incubated and then integrated with real bone cells potentially benefitting bone health on Earth and in space.

Vande Hei studied zebrafish today observing how their muscles adapt to the microgravity environment. The experiment seeks to identify chemical, protein and cellular activity taking place during muscle atrophy that may lead to new drugs and treatments.


Cupola image captionExpedition 54-55 Flight Engineer Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is inside the International Space Station’s seven-windowed cupola as the Earth passes 250 miles below.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 12/27/2017 08:19 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/22/2017
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections – Cell-Free Epigenome: With operator assistance, a 53S subject conducted blood sample collections to support the Cell Free Epigenome investigation. The blood samples were processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  In this study, blood samples are collected from astronauts and cellular genes are analyzed.  Blood carries molecular signals released from the cells inside the body. The results tell scientists how human body function during space flight.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the MSG with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container. After the bags were changed out, the cassettes were transferred back to the Bioculture System. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bio culture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Wide-field Camera Power/Data Cable Swap:  Today the crew replaced the damaged power/data cable to the LMM Wide-field Camera with the new cable that was flown on SpaceX-13. Ground controllers will begin checkouts later today.  The LMM wide-field camera is one of two primary science cameras in the new microscope configuration and will be used to support every payload investigation in the FIR. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

JEM Camera Robot:  Today the crew activated the JEM Camera Robot and captured video of it while it performed maneuvers through the module.  This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

APEX-05 Operations:  The crew photographed the four APEX-05 spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Nile Delta and the Iberian Peninsula. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Node 2 Nadir Bolt Inspection:  During recent berthing and unberthing activities, one of the bolts that secures a visiting vehicle to the Node2 Nadir port has shown anomalous loads.  Today, the crew inspected and photographed this bolt for evaluation of a possible R&R.  The CBM bolts can only be accessed from inside the habitable volume when a vehicle is berthed to that particular port, so this task is being performed during the SpaceX-13 berthed period.  When the onboard activity was completed, ground teams evaluated the imagery captured, and made the decision to replace the bolt.  That R&R activity will take place next week.

Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Flow Measurements:  Today the crew took airflow measurements in the IMV inlet for the Oxygen Generator System (OGS) Avionics Air Assembly (AAA) and in other locations in the USOS.  They used an expired Velocicalc measurement tool and a new calibrated Velocicalc for flow validation.

Dragon LiOH Removal:  Today, the crew removed the LiOH filter bag from Dragon.  The LiOH filter bag provided CO2 removal for the live cargo during Dragon free flyer operations.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Operations:  After extensive evaluation yesterday, including imagery and test grapples, engineering teams have cleared the SSRMS for operations.  Operations to remove payloads from the Dragon trunk and install them in their final locations on the outside of ISS will begin next week as planned.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 12/27/2017 08:19 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/25/2017
 

APEX-05 Operations:  Over the weekend, the crew photographed all of the APEX-05 petri plates, which includes twenty petri plates in the Veggie facility and four spares secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo-grid on the maintenance work area. Today the crew took additional images of the four spare petri plates.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Space Headaches: Two 53S crewmembers completed daily questionnaires to support a week-long ESA Space Headache session which started onboard Soyuz prior to docking. The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: Using the MSG laptop screen as a workaround for the non-functional video monitor, the crew completed microscopy and fixation operations of Synthetic Bone Biocells from Habitat B.  The crew also completed a media exchange for Habitat C. Synthetic Bone uses BioCells from Habitats A, B, and C to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

Dragon Cargo Transfer:  Today the crew completed the planned Dragon cargo unloading operations, with the exception of a few locations that contain items that aren’t immediately needed and will be removed at a later time.  In the coming days, the crew will begin packing and loading the cargo that will be returned on Dragon.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 12/27/2017 08:22 AM »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 12/28/2017 09:23 AM »
ISS configuration after Progress MS-06 departure.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 12/28/2017 10:20 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/26/2017
 

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, the crew removed the mice and restocked the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Amyloid Sample Transfer: To prepare for incubation activities tomorrow, today four Amyloid samples were retrieved from the -95 degree Celsius Dewar of the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and installed into the +2 degree Celsius Dewar of the MELFI.  Amyloid fibril is the protein aggregation that is known to be associated with various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. To develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. In this study, aiming to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation, we will prepare the high-quality homogeneous amyloid fibrils using microgravity environment, and bring back the samples to characterize the fibrillation process and intermediate structure by NMR and electron microscopic analyses.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change-Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the MSG with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container. After the bags were changed out, the cassettes were transferred back into the Bioculture System. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Space Test Program – H5 (STP-H5) Innovative Coatings Experiment (ICE): The crew photographed ICE material strips on STP-H5 from the Cupola and Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) windows.  The harsh radiation and extreme temperatures of space can corrode the paint and coatings that protect spacecraft exteriors, potentially damaging a spacecraft’s hull. Optical coatings are also important for robotic and human navigators, who would rely on specialized markings to capture or repair spacecraft. The STP-H5 ICE investigation studies new coatings for use on spacecraft in low Earth orbit, determining their stability after 2 years in space.  Photographs are taken at 60-day intervals.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of Italy and the Nile Delta. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP)-3: The crew pressurized the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) and performed a leak check today in preparation for return of the slide table and the (NREP)-3 into the JEM.  The Cavalier Space Processor, a passive remote sensor with onboard processing capability, will be installed on the NREP-3, which will be attached to the JEM External Facility next week.  NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Node 3 Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Maintenance:  The crew removed and replaced the WHC urine receptacle and insert filter. This was nominally planned periodic maintenance.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: This afternoon, Ground Controllers will translate the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 4 (WS4) to WS6 in preparation for Dragon external cargo activities scheduled for the next few days.  Once the MT is positioned at WS6, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) will be configured for external Dragon cargo operations.  They will unstow Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and setup for Total & Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) extraction from the Dragon trunk. They also will perform a Dragon Trunk Camera checkout and Dragon Trunk cargo survey.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 12/29/2017 06:04 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/27/2017
 

67 Progress (67P) Undock: This evening, 67P is scheduled to undock from the Service Module (SM) aft port at 7:03 PM CST.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: Four Arthrospira experiment containers were removed from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab.  Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-2 Experiment Container (EC) Transfers: After being stowed in the STaARS facility for over 170 hours at 25 degrees Celsius, the crew transferred the STaARS BioScience-2 ECs from the facility into a +4 degrees Celsius Glacier.  BioScience-2 encompasses two experiments, Experiment Grimm and Experiment Ulrich, which is performed by three investigation teams, all utilizing the same hardware, but processing different biological samples. The principle aim of Experiment Grimm is to investigate how thyroid carcinoma cells react, when they are exposed to real microgravity. The expected information may help to improve in vitro cancer studies such as antitumor drug or transendothelial migration tests. Experiment Ulrich will investigate microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, the most important effector cells of the immune system, which are responsible for attacking and killing bacteria and other foreign and pathogenic intruders in the human body. The aim of the experiment is to analyze surface molecules, which are required for recognition of bacteria and cell-cell-communication, and to investigate the cytoskeletal architecture after several days in microgravity.

Amyloid Sample Transfer: The Amyloid samples were retrieved from the +2 degree Celsius Dewar of MELFI, installed in the measurement experiment unit and then attached to the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) where they were incubated for 6 hours. After the incubation was complete, the experiment units were detached from the CBEF and the samples were removed and stowed in the MELFI at -95 degrees Celsius. Amyloid fibril is the protein aggregation that is known to be associated with various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. To develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. In this study, aiming to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation, we will prepare the high-quality homogeneous amyloid fibrils using microgravity environment, and bring back the samples to characterize the fibrillation process and intermediate structure by NMR and electron microscopic analyses.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 53S subject completed his Flight Day (FD)-15 blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Microbial Tracking-2:  A 52S subject completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

APEX-05 Operations:  The crew photographed the spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo-grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from a Russian crewmember, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the RaDI-N experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation will be conducted by measuring neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the New Guinea River Inlets. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot Activation:  Today the crew relocated the JEM Camera Robot Target Marker. They also activated the JEM Camera Robot and set the position in the JEM before taking video using the camera.

Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM) Gas Trap Manual Valves Reconfiguration: The crew set the Thermal Control Assembly Low Temperature Loop (TCA L) Gas Trap Manual Valves for Gas Trap operations.  They also activated the heater for Gas Trap.

Dragon Cargo Transfer:  Today the crew completed the planned Dragon cargo operations.  In the coming days, the crew will continue packing and loading the cargo that will be returned on Dragon.

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 12/29/2017 07:02 AM »
Xmas time aboard the ISS (two pics and video - see attachment).
Source: Roscosmos VK page

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 12/31/2017 11:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/28/2017
 

67 Progress (67P) Undock: 67P undocked from the Service Module (SM) aft port at 7:03 PM CST on Wednesday evening.  The Deorbit burn was completed at 10:10 PM CST.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05):  The crew harvested thale cress from all 20 Petri plates in which the plants have been growing in the Veggie facility for the APEX-05 experiment.  They took close-up photos of each plate and inserted samples from the plants into fixation tubes, which were placed into cold stowage.  The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants are grown from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS.  They are harvested and frozen samples are returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Amyloid: The crew retrieved the second set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS are returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.  It is expected that this study will provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. 

MagVector: Today the crew set up a cable to transfer data from the 7-day MagVector #15 run #15 that was completed today. This European Space Agency investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor provide insight into ways that the Earth’s magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research may help improve future ISS experiments and offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the Australian desert today.  This investigation creates a series of videos showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Swap and Commercial Resupply Services (CRS)-2 Feasibility Assessment:  The crew will review an overview of the EMU swap plan. EMU 3004 launched to ISS on Dragon in the Short EMU (SEMU) Launch Enclosure (SLE) and EMU 3010 will be returning.  The crew will transfer the SLE with EMU 3004 to Node 1 and remove the EMU.  They will swap the Vent Port and Battery Connector Covers between EMU 3004 and 3010. The SLE will be reinstalled into Dragon using new upper mounting pins and then EMU 3010 will be installed into the SLE in the Dragon cabin.  The hatch for CRS-2 will be too small to allow the SLE to be transferred to Node 1, so EMU rotations will need to occur in the CRS-2 Dragon cabin.  Performing the installation of EMU 3010 into the SLE in the Dragon cabin will build confidence and provide feedback for performing the swaps on CRS-2.

Simplified Aid for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Rescue (SAFER) Swap: SAFER 1016, on orbit has expired and SAFER 1018 was delivered on Dragon.  The crew will unpack SAFER 1018, install the battery, and perform a checkout.   They will pack SAFER 1016 for return on Dragon.

Node 2 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Bolt R&R:  The crew will removed the failed CBM Powered Bolt 1-3 on the Node 2 Nadir Bulkhead and will replace it with a new bolt.  The bolt showed anomalous signature during SpaceX-12 berthing and was masked for the SpaceX-13 berthing.

Offline EgorBotts

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 01/01/2018 11:42 AM »
Could someone explain to me or point to a link describing the main tasks of the next Russian EVA (Russian EVA 44) ?

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 01/01/2018 01:50 PM »
Could someone explain to me or point to a link describing the main tasks of the next Russian EVA (Russian EVA 44) ?

http://tass.ru/opinions/interviews/4757149
In the last part of this interview A. Shkaplerov is speaking about this EVA, but it is only in Russian.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 01/01/2018 02:14 PM »
Google translation:

Quote
You have to accomplish a spacewalk during the flight. What is the planned program?

- The main task of the output is to change the electronic unit at the antenna of the retransmission system "Luch". There is such a satellite antenna in the Russian segment that was delivered to the ISS along with the Zvezda service module during the assembly of the station. Then it was assumed that in the nearest future, satellite retransmitters "Ray" will appear and through them we will have a direct connection with the Earth. But, unfortunately, these were the 2000s and funding was inadequate, satellites were not created.

This antenna idled in space for 17 years, and although it physically works, but the element base there is already outdated. The satellites of the Luch system created today operate on a new element base. Therefore, in order to make the entire retransmission system for the ISS work, it is necessary to change the electronic unit on the antenna - the subscriber relay equipment.

The difficulty lies in the fact that when this service module was launched with the antenna, no one thought that it would have to change this unit in space. Therefore, we are going to have a very difficult and jeweled work: we will have to unscrew tens of bolts in thick gloves of the spacesuit, dismantle the block and put a new one. For this, three types of instruments were invented. We will unscrew one, if it does not go - the second, again not - the third. And earlier, during the previous exits, no one has tried to work in the place where the antenna is. I hope that we will do everything and we will have our onboard-to-Earth connection via the Luch retransmission system (currently the Russian segment uses the NASA retransmission system when the ISS is out of line of sight from Russia - TASS comment).

Probably, let's start some microsatellites

Also there are additional works during this exit. In particular, it will be necessary, if time is enough, to disconnect and dismantle the measuring blocks from the experiment "Furnishings" with subsequent disposal by the method of throwing away from the ISS, to take some samples off the cladding of the station.

Probably, we will start some microsatellites. They are launched in a certain direction with their hands, and it is necessary that they do not rotate. I plan to go to outer space on February 2.

"How do you like the new spacesuit?"

- In the new spacesuit added automatic temperature control - it's like in cars climate control. Earlier it was necessary to manually make it warmer or colder, depending on which side of the station is at the exit: on the sunny or shady. Now this is all done by the automation, which redistributes the water streams inside a special thermoregulating water suit, put on you under a spacesuit.

In the new spacesuit the material of the hermetic shell changed - it seems to have become tougher, well, it needs to go out and work, then I can make a conclusion.

« Last Edit: 01/01/2018 02:15 PM by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 01/03/2018 02:53 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/29/2017
 

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: The crew completed microscopy operations for Synthetic Bone and then took a sample from each well on the Synthetic Bone Multiwell BioCell and exchanged the fluids with media in each well.  The samples were placed in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  This experiment uses facilities aboard the ISS to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space.  Sets of bone cell cultures are grown with different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for analysis.

Biological Research In Canisters Light Emitting Diode (BRIC-LED):  The crew performed actuation on the BRIC-LED-001 canisters today.  The BRIC-LED-001 investigation demonstrates the use of light emitting diodes as a lighting source in BRIC hardware and evaluates its use in growing plants in a closed system. Arabidopsis thaliana plants are grown for 10 days onboard the ISS at ambient temperature, with light provided by this new lighting source.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  A crewmember completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation today. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Marrow: Upon waking this morning a crewmember collected breath and ambient air samples. The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the India-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau, Europe/Italy in winter conditions and the Nile delta.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches: Two crewmembers completed daily questionnaires today to support a week-long ESA Space Headaches session which started in the Soyuz vehicle prior to docking to the ISS. The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Dragon External Cargo Operations:  Overnight, Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and reconfigured the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM1) to grasp and rotate the SPDM Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP). They then maneuvered the SPDM and Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to use SPDM OTCM1 to grasp and extract the Total & Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) payload from the SpaceX-13 Dragon Trunk and to stow it on the SPDM EOTP. Finally, the SPDM and SSRMS were configured to a park position. Operations were nominal.

Ammonia Measurement Kits (AMK) Chip Changeout:  The Ammonia measurement system chips installed in the AMKs were set to expire at the end of the year. The crew replaced these in both kits with new chips that arrived on Orbital ATK 8 (OA-8).

SpaceX 13 (SpX-13) Dragon Cargo Ops:  The crew continued packing items for return on SpX-13.  As of Thursday, approximately 31 hours of cargo ops have been completed. SpX-13 is scheduled to unberth and return to earth on January 13, 2018.

53 Soyuz (53S) Unpack:  Today the crew completed unpacking and stowage of all United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) hardware that arrived on 53S.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 01/03/2018 02:54 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/02/2018
 

Amyloid: Over the weekend, the crew retrieved the third set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS will be returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. This study is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository):  On Saturday, a 53S subject completed his Flight Day (FD)15 urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Over the weekend, the crew removed two LMM APEX-05 petri plates from the MELFI and installed them into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants grow in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Cell Science Validation Bioreactor and Sample Bag Removal: Over the weekend, the crew removed the bioreactors and the sample bags from the Cell Science Validation cassettes in the Bioculture System facility and stowed them in the MELFI. Today the crew replaced the used gas supply with a new one to allow the Bioculture System to keep running the Cell Science Payload. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Over the weekend and today, a 52S subject completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, today the crew removed the mice and restocked the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot Operations: The crew disconnected the JEM Camera Robot USB power cable from the JEM Camera Robot and connected the USB power/data cable to the JEM Camera Robot to allow the ground team to perform a software update. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

Meteor Hard Drive Replacement: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Airlock Unstow Operations: The crew unstowed hardware from the Airlock which is not needed for the upcoming Extravehicular Activity (EVA)s, and prepared the Airlock to support EVA operations. They also charged ancillary Batteries in the Battery Stowage Assembly (BSA) for the EVAs.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Operations: Today, the crew removed the Short Extravehicular Mobility Unit (SEMU) from the Launch Enclosure (SLE) in order to remove the SEMU Soft Stow Covers and SOP Ancillary hardware. The crew also resized EMUs 3008, 3003, and 3004 in preparation for the upcoming EVAs later this month.

Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Water Sample Collection: The crew collected water samples from the PWD for in-flight analysis. This water sample collection activity will occur multiple times throughout the expedition and the number of water samples collected will vary each time. Analysis of the water samples collected during this activity will occur during separate activities later in the timeline.

Robotic Operations:  Over the weekend, ground robotics operators removed the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) from the SpX-13 Dragon trunk and installed it at Express Logistics Carrier (ELC)3 site 5.  Yesterday, robotics operations continued with the removal of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS) payload from the trunk and its installation on the Columbus External Payload Facility (EPF), at the Starboard Overhead X-Direction (SOX) site.  Last night, the RapidScat payload and its nadir adapter were removed from the Starboard Deck X-Direction (SDX) site of the Columbus EPF.  Later this evening, the two items will be stowed in the Dragon trunk.  This will complete Dragon trunk operations for this mission.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 01/03/2018 04:33 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/02/2018
 

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Operations: Today, the crew removed the Short Extravehicular Mobility Unit (SEMU) from the Launch Enclosure (SLE) in order to remove the SEMU Soft Stow Covers and SOP Ancillary hardware. The crew also resized EMUs 3008, 3003, and 3004 in preparation for the upcoming EVAs later this month.


Hmmm... I specifically heard that 3004 and 3006 are mounted in the airlock and nothing about 3008 or 3003.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 01/04/2018 02:11 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/3/2018
 

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a 53S crewmember instrumented himself with Thermolab Double Sensors and mount the Thermolab Unit to their belt, and began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: The crew removed four Arthrospira-B experiment containers from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab. Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira-B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: Today, the crew performed microscopy operations for Synthetic Bone and then took a sample from each well on the Synthetic Bone Multiwell BioCell and exchanged the fluids with media in each well.  The samples were placed in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Synthetic Bone uses BioCells from three habitats to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

MagVector: Today the crew began the 7-day MagVector #16 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval: A USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment, and handed them to a Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning & Inspection: The crew removed the closeout panels at Node 3 to inspect a plastic sleeve coupling the IMV valve to the Node 3 ducting. Results from the inspection are being analyzed, and will be used to determine if any degradation of the coupling has occurred. BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assembly (CPA) Rotation and Closeout:  Today the crew modified the CPAs on Node2 Nadir, the port where the Dragon capsule is currently berthed.  The CPA mod kits were launched on OA-8, but the kits can only be installed on ports where a vehicle is currently attached.  Node1 Nadir was completed during the OA-8 mission, and Node2 Nadir was being completed today.  This modification will allow the CPAs to be rotated into the vestibule rather than requiring that the crew remove them completely after a vehicle arrives.  This will save both crew time and stowage space during a berthed mission.  The CPAs must be installed for proper CBM operation during berthing activities, but they obstruct the pathway into the vehicle once the hatch is opened, so they need to be moved out of the corridor prior to cargo operations.

Robotic Operations:  Last night, robotics ground controllers completed the SpaceX-13 mission’s final external robotic payload operations by installing RapidScat and its nadir adapter in the trunk.    The RapidScat payload had been removed from its mounting location outside of the Columbus module on Monday.  After the SpaceX-13 Dragon capsule departs the ISS, its trunk, with RapidScat in it, will separate from the return capsule and continue toward its destructive re-entry to the atmosphere.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 01/05/2018 09:59 AM »
January 04, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-002

Indiana Students to Speak with Astronauts on International Space Station

Primary school students in Indianapolis will speak live with astronauts living and working on the International Space Station at 12:15 p.m. EST Thursday, Jan. 11. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 54 astronauts Mark Vande Hei of NASA and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will talk to approximately 300 students and 30 teachers gathered at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The students and teachers have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and current research and activities aboard the space station.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Becky Wolfe at 317-334-4618 or [email protected] The Children’s Museum is located at 3000 North Meridian Street.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow NASA astronauts on Twitter at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

Videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station are available at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 01/05/2018 02:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/4/2018
 

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP)-3 Payload Swap:  Today crewmembers extended the JEM A/L slide table into the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM) and exchanged payloads on NREP by removing the External Platform Module 2 (Charge Injector Device), External Platform Module 4 (Dependable Microprocessor) before installing the External Platform Module 5 (Cavalier) on NREP. The slide table was retracted from the JPM side and the inner hatch was closed, and depressurization and ventilation was completed. The Cavalier experiment is a technology demonstration mission with a goal to provide hands on opportunities for working with flight hardware. NREP will remain inside the JEM Airlock until next week when it will be deployed to the JEM External Facility site #4. Cavalier is a 4U active payload that will remain on NREP for approximately six months. NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change-Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container and then transferred the cassettes back into the Bioculture System. Once the change out activities were completed, the crew removed the Life Science Ancillary Hardware (LSAH) hardware from the MSG to conclude the Cell Science Validation operations. The objective of this flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. The new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will also be demonstrated.  The validation of the Bioculture System performance in the space flight environment is a critical step to ensure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Lighting Effects:  A 53S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

At Home in Space:  A 53S crewmember completed an At Home in Space questionnaire today. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

ZBook Transitions:  Today the crew continued activities to transition the laptops onboard from the T61P model to the newer ZBook model.  Today’s transitions include SSCs 1 (in the Russian segment) and 22 (attached to T2).

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 01/06/2018 12:08 PM »
January 05, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-004

Puerto Rico Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station
 

Several hundred students from 30 schools across Puerto Rico will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:15 a.m. EST Friday, Jan. 12. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will travel to Manatí, Puerto Rico, for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, and will have an opportunity to ask questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Although Acaba is a native Californian, both of his parents were born in Puerto Rico. Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth in February.

Some 30 school districts from 12 cities participate in the Puerto Rico Institute of Robotics’ (PRIOR) network, which was selected through a competitive process to host a downlink with the station. PRIOR is a dynamic collaboration of educators, business leaders and representative from local government and the military, working to introduce and link students, teachers, and the community to the vast array of space, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) resources in their region.

Students from across the participating districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and the current research and activities happening aboard the station. More than 500 attendees are expected to be on-site at Manatí during the downlink event.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Wence Lopez via email at [email protected] or phone at 787-385-1200. Juan Aubin Cruz Coliseum will host the event at Coto Sur, Manatí, Puerto Rico.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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