Author Topic: Expedition 54 Thread  (Read 26885 times)

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #20 on: 12/10/2017 12:38 AM »
kanai_press-kit(pdf)

Offline theonlyspace

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #21 on: 12/11/2017 01:50 PM »
Is there a English translation version of the press kit?

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #22 on: 12/14/2017 05:45 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 7: Astronaut Kanai at countdown for launch



Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #23 on: 12/14/2017 08:16 AM »
ISS config. after Soyuz MS-05 departure.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #24 on: 12/14/2017 02:17 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/13/2017
 

51 Soyuz (51S) Undock and Landing Preparations:  The crew completed packing the cargo for return on 51S.  Randy Bresnik handed over command of the ISS to Alexander Misurkin. Following the Change of Command, the new Commander’s Soyuz crew became prime for emergencies.  Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy, and Paolo Nespoli will undock from the ISS at 11:13 pm CST and will land at 2:37am CST tomorrow.  Following undock, the ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 53S on December 19.

JAXA Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) #13 Retrieval: Two canister bags containing protein samples were removed from the JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2) and handed over to a Russian crewmember for return on the 51S vehicle. The samples have been stowed in J-FROST2 for processing since their arrival on 68P.  PCG #13 contains protein samples prepared by Japanese and Russian researchers from universities, national research institutes, and the private sector. The purpose of this activity was to obtain high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment at 20 degrees C for about 9 weeks. The results obtained by JAXA PCG #13 contribute to the development of drugs for multidrug-resistant bacteria, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy and periodontitis. They will also aid in the development of a blood substitute and biosensor.

Echo Commissioning:  The crew retrieved and setup the Echo hardware in the Columbus module to allow ground teams to perform a commissioning session on the main and backup hard disks for the Echo unit. The purpose of the ECHO investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system, equipped with motorized probes to be controlled by flight controllers on the ground. Additionally, this investigation supports the commissioning of the Echo instrument, which is planned for use with the Vascular Echo experiment on ISS in the future.

Lighting Effects Operations: After providing a sleep log entry to support the two-week sleep shift session, a 52S crewmember setup the Visual Performance Test hardware and performed a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The crewmember then configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained light meter readings from specified locations before downlinking the data. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections – Functional Immune: Today blood and saliva samples were collected from two 52S crewmembers and a 51S crewmember which concludes a five day Functional Immune session that began over the weekend. The samples support the mid-mission HRP compliment for the 52S crewmembers and the return minus zero day (R-0) compliment for the 51S crewmember. The Functional Immune investigation analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember completed his return minus seven day (R-7) FMS session, which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured images and video footage of the Coast of Namibia, the Nile River, and the Tasmania Bass Strait. This investigtation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches: The 52S crewmembers completed a weekly questionnaire for the Space Headaches investigation.  This experiment collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Cable Arm Rope Replacement: The crew performed a scheduled replacement of the ARED cable rope arm today, with no issues.  The new cable arm rope will stretch to its final configuration through several exercise sessions before bar exercises are performed.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #25 on: 12/17/2017 12:27 PM »
ISS config. after  Dragon-13 capture:

(Progress MS-06 is missing!?)
---
SMS ;-).

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #26 on: 12/17/2017 01:13 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #27 on: 12/18/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/15/2017
 

51 Soyuz (51S) Undock and Landing:  The 51S crew Randolph Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy and Paolo Nespoli undocked from the ISS at 11:13 pm CST on Wednesday evening and landed at 2:37am CST on Thursday.  Ryazanskiy has arrived back in Moscow and Bresnik and Nespoli have arrived back in Houston.  The ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 53S on December 19.

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Launch: SpX-13 launched today from Kennedy Space Center at 9:36 am CST. In addition to supplies and equipment for crewmembers, the vehicle will deliver investigations and instruments for several science experiments that will be conducted on ISS.  Dragon capture is scheduled for December 17th at 5:00 am CST.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: Upon wakeup a 52S crewmember collected a saliva sample and place it into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) before completing a questionnaire. The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Lighting Effects: A 52S subject provided a sleep log entry before conducting a series of three Cognition tests and four urine sample collections throughout the day. The samples were stowed in the MELFI for freezing until their return and analysis. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Space Headaches: A crewmember completed a weekly questionnaire for the Space Headaches investigation.  This experiment collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured daytime images and video footage from Ireland to Moscow. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Inspection and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Installation:  The crew performed an inspection of Lab and Node 1 looking for sources of elevated fungal levels.  No obvious sources were identified.  They installed 6 new HEPA filters in the Lab and installed 4 of the filters removed from the Lab in Node 1, replacing the previously installed charcoal filters.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #28 on: 12/18/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/17/2017
 

53 Soyuz (53S) Launch: 53S launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome this morning with Anton Shkaplerov, Scott Tingle, and Norishige Kanai.  Docking to the Mini Research Module-1 (MRM-1) module is scheduled for 02:42 AM CST on December 19 with hatch opening at ~4:15 AM CST.

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Capture and Berthing: SpX-13 rendezvous and capture were successfully completed today at 11:02 AM CST using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The crew monitored Dragon’s approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation. During capture the Latch End Effector (LEE) snare cable tension went above the expected value, and before resuming nominal operation the Robotics Ground Controllers commanded the LEE mechanism to reduce this tension to the expected range. Dragon was berthed at 7:30 AM CST by ground controllers.  Vestibule outfitting, vehicle ingress and removal of the center stack began following capture.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #29 on: 12/19/2017 09:03 AM »
ISS config. updated

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #30 on: 12/19/2017 11:55 AM »
Press release, 19 December 2017

Smart phone-sized experiments on the ISS - German research on the International Space Station involving immune cells, neurons and cancer cells 


On 15 December at 16:36 CET (10:36 local time), the US Dragon CRS 13 capsule was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) from Cape Canaveral (Florida) by a Falcon 9 rocket. On board were three cell-culture experiments by scientists at the
Otto von Guericke University in Magdeburg and the University of Hohenheim, funded by the Space Administration of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR). The biological samples will be installed in smart-phone-sized
experiment containers in the STaARS 1 research facility in the Destiny module of the ISS. They will remain in microgravity for 30 days and return to Earth in the Dragon capsule in mid January 2018, when they will be examined in the laboratory.

What happens to the immune system in space?

The human immune system is weakened during prolonged stay in space. Preliminary tests on the ISS have shown that immune cell activity is affected by changes in gravity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this are still not
fully known. Macrophages are the immune system’s front line of defence. These scavenger cells, which are a type of white blood cell, are responsible for attacking and destroying bacteria and other pathogens in the human body.

Scientists suspect that the reason behind the immune system's impairment is a disturbance of the cytoskeleton – the flexible inner framework structure of a cell – in the macrophages or a reduction in molecules on the cell surface. Therefore, scientists
at the University of Magdeburg aim to record long-term changes in the macrophages caused by microgravity. "Research under microgravity conditions over a prolonged period is only possible on the International Space Station," explains DLR Project manager
Michael Becker. "In the long term, the acquired knowledge will help develop countermeasures and drugs against immunodeficiency disorders. These will not only be helpful for astronauts on long-term missions in space, but also for patients on Earth."

Cancer research in microgravity

The focus of the second experiment by cell biologists from Magdeburg is on investigating thyroid cancer cells. Previous experiments have shown that in microgravity special cancer cells form a spherical group of tumour cells, called three-dimensional
multi-cellular spheroids. The effect of biochemical substances on spheroid growth, in particular, is best researched in microgravity, as gravitational forces are cancelled out under these conditions. The biochemical substances will be analysed at the
scientists’ laboratory in Magdeburg when the cells return. In addition to gene activation and deactivation, the main focus will be on investigating changes in all cell proteins to discover important signalling pathways. Knowledge of these molecular
processes will help to develop tumour-fighting measures and specific cancer drugs.

How do neurons adapt to microgravity?

For the third experiment, the team of scientists from the University of Hohenheim is exploring the effects of microgravity on neurons. Preliminary investigations have shown that the cytoskeleton of neurons is impaired by changes in gravity. This cytoskeleton
not only plays an important role in shaping the cell, but it also functions as an internal transport system for the exchange of information, such as communication between the neurons themselves.

The cytoskeleton is anchored in the cell membrane using special proteins and is jointly responsible for neuron excitability. This ISS experiment focuses on these anchor proteins. Scientists want to investigate whether these proteins change or deform
under microgravity. Additionally, the experiment is examining the changes in the distribution of so-called channel proteins. These protein molecules are used to transport ions in the cells and are therefore also essential for neuron excitability. Scientists
hope to gain knowledge regarding the development of neurons in microgravity, which is primarily relevant for astronauts on long-term missions in space.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #31 on: 12/19/2017 03:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/18/2017
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 52S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. This entry supports a two week long sleep shift session that began GMT 340 and ends tomorrow. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Zebrafish Muscle 2 Operations: Following the successful arrival of SpaceX-13, the crew performed the first day of Zebrafish activities by retrieving six Zebrafish experiment units (EUs) from the Zebrafish transport bags and dividing them into 3 groups (A, B, and C). Each group contains two Zebrafish EUs. The crew then conducted the fixation for the EUs of Group A and placed them into Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The EUs for Group B were then stowed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) 1G centrifuge and Group C was stowed in the CBEF Micro-G centrifuge. The results from today and next three days of Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

TangoLab-1 and 2 Payload Card Placement: The crew performed several payload card placements into both of the TangoLab-1 & 2 facilities. The crew placed two of the payload cards that arrived on SpaceX-13 into slots 2 and 3 of the TangoLab-1.  The payload in slot 6 of TangoLab-2 will be moved to slot 1 of TangoLab-1. The TangoLab-1 and TangoLab-2 lockers are reconfigurable general research facilities designed for microgravity research and development (R&D) and pilot manufacturing aboard the International Space Station (ISS). TangoLab-2 is similar to TangoLab-1 with the primary difference being an upgraded fan system which allows for a greater heat rejection capability. This upgrade enables payloads with greater power draw and lower temperature requirements to use the facility.

Cell Science Validation Locker (Bioculture System) Installation: The Bioculture System was removed from the SpX-13 vehicle and installed into EXPRESS Rack 7 of the ISS by the crew. The Bioculture System is a space biological science incubator for use on the International Space Station (ISS), with the capability of transporting active and stored experiments to ISS. This incubator supports a wide diversity of tissue, cell, and microbiological cultures and experiment methods to meet any space flight research experiment goals and objectives.  The facility enables variable duration and long-duration cellular and microbiological experiments on ISS to meet the scientific needs of academic and biotechnology interests.

Dragon Cargo Transfers:  The crew continued with cargo transfers from the Dragon Center Stack.  In addition, the Double Coldbags were retrieved and unpacked.  Eight Double Coldbags were unpacked into Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL), MELFI, JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2), General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (Glacier) and ambient locations.  After the science was removed from the Double Coldbags, the Ice Bricks and Double Coldbags were temp stowed to dry out.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #32 on: 12/19/2017 05:49 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #33 on: 12/20/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/19/2017
 

53S Docking:  53 Soyuz launched on Sunday, December 17th, and arrived at the ISS early this morning.  The Soyuz brought Anton Shkaplerov, Scott Tingle, and Norishige Kanai, and docked at 2:39 AM CST with hatch opening at 4:55 AM CST.  This begins the 54-6 stage, and returns the ISS crew to its nominal complement of 6.  Following the docking, the crew conducted an ISS Safety Briefing where they reviewed emergency response for each of the Soyuz crews and then reviewed the emergency equipment locations.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 52S subject completed the two-week long sleep shift session that began on GMT 340, by providing daily sleep log entries to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6): Today the rodent transporters were moved from the SpaceX-13 vehicle to the US Lab to transfer the rodents to the habitats. The crew prepared the habitats by removing the lixit caps and checking the water flow to each side of all four habitats, before installing the rodent huts and food bars.  The animals from both transporters were transferred 10 at a time from the transporter to the habitats, after the crew performed health checks on the rodents.  The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-2 Experiment Container Installation: The crew installed the BioScience-2 experiment containers into the STaARS facility and then powered on the facility in EXPRESS Rack 6. BioScience-2 encompasses two experiments, Experiment Grimm and Experiment Ulrich, which is performed by three investigation teams, all utilizing the same hardware, but processing different biological samples. The principle aim of Experiment Grimm is to investigate how thyroid carcinoma cells react, when they are exposed to real microgravity. The expected information may help to improve in vitro cancer studies such as antitumor drug or trans-endothelial migration tests. Experiment Ulrich will investigate microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, the most important effector cells of the immune system, which are responsible for attacking and killing bacteria and other foreign and pathogenic intruders in the human body. The aim of the experiment is to analyze surface molecules, which are required for recognition of bacteria and cell-cell-communication, and to investigate the cytoskeletal architecture after several days in microgravity.

Space Headaches: Two 53S crewmembers completed the third day of a week-long ESA Space Headache session which started onboard Soyuz prior to docking.  The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #34 on: 12/21/2017 11:46 AM »
https://twitter.com/Tungsten_Flight/status/943545294251352071
Quote
#ISS currently in a no shade period. If you trace the white ground track relative to the nighttime area, you see ISS is never in darkness. Very cool. Has to do with beta (angle of ISS orbital plane to sun) +proximity to winter solstice. Dark returns on Dec 25.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #35 on: 12/21/2017 04:01 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/20/2017
 

Zebrafish Muscle 2: Following the fixation and stowing of experiment units (EUs) from Group A earlier this week, today the crew performed fixation on the EUs from Groups B and C and then stowed them in the refrigerator of the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The results from Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

APEX-05 Operations:  APEX-05 petri plates were installed into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: During today’s scheduled microscope operations for BioCell Habitats A and B, microscope issues inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) prevented ground teams from viewing video footage of the growing bone cells from the BioCells. With the deferment of today’s fixation of BioCell Habitat A, the crew was able to accelerate one of tomorrow’s media exchanges to today. Ground teams will continue to resolve the issue with the microscopy video downlink and are rescheduling tomorrow’s activities.  Synthetic Bone uses BioCell habitats A, B, and C. The BioCell habitats will be used to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: Four Arthrospira experiment containers were retrieved from a Glacier and transferred to the Columbus module where they were assembled and installed into the Biolab Incubator.  The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

JAXA Low Temperature (LT) Protein Crystal Growth (PCG):  PCG samples were retrieved from the Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST) and then the crew initiated the crystallization of the samples before inserting them back into the FROST where crystallization is continuing at a temperature of 4 degrees Celsius. The samples will remain in the FROST until they are returned on SpX-13 for evaluation by ground teams. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to make high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

Dose Distribution Inside the ISS – 3D (DOSIS 3D): Passive radiation detectors were installed in the Columbus module in support of European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) DOSIS 3D investigation. This experiment uses several active and passive detectors to determine the radiation doses inside the ISS and provides documentation of the actual nature and distribution of the radiation fields. A concise three dimensional (3D) dose distribution map of all the segments of the ISS will be developed based on this data and data from JAXA and NASA monitoring devices.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Depress: The crew depressurized the JEM A/L and vented the remaining air in preparation for upcoming NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) activities.

Offline Zakrah

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #36 on: 12/21/2017 04:13 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/20/2017
...
APEX-05 Operations:  APEX-05 petri plates were installed into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis. 
...

Hiya NSF'ers...

A couple movies for you: APEX-05 petri plate insertion yesterday by astronaut Scott Tingle and day 1 photos today. The ISS went over our lab at the University of Wisconsin - Madison while Scott took the photos this morning. For more info about our experiment, you could ask me and/or check gilroylab.wordpress.com/experiment/

Happy holidays :)




Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #37 on: 12/22/2017 06:51 AM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?
« Last Edit: 12/22/2017 08:47 AM by Joachim »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #38 on: 12/22/2017 03:02 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/21/2017
 

Marrow: Upon wakeup a 53S crewmember collected breath and ambient air samples. With operator assistance, the subject collected blood samples to support the Marrow investigation. The blood samples were processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: During yesterday’s scheduled microscope operations for BioCell Habitats A and B, microscope issues inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) prevented ground teams from viewing video footage of the growing bone cells from the BioCells. With the deferment of the fixation of BioCell Habitat A, the crew was able to complete one of today’s media exchanges during yesterday’s operations. Ground teams worked to resolve the issue with the microscopy video downlink and rescheduled today’s activities.  This morning, using the MSG laptop screen as a workaround for the non-functional video monitor, the crew successfully completed the first microscopy of four Synthetic Bone Biocells, two each from Habitats A and B. Additionally, fixation of both Biocells from Habitat A was completed. The two Biocells from Habitat B were re-inserted into SABL for continued incubation and growth. The crew later continued Synthetic Bone operations by performing a media change for Habitat B.  Synthetic Bone uses BioCell habitats A, B, and C. The BioCell habitats will be used to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

MagVector: Today the crew performed setup activities and began the 7-day MagVector #15 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Zebrafish Muscle 2: After completing yesterday’s fixation operations for the experiment units (EUs) from Groups B and C, today the crew transferred the EUs from the refrigerator to the freezer of the MELFI. The EUs will remain in the MELFI freezer until they are returned on SpaceX-13. The results from Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

APEX-05 Operations:  Following yesterday’s installation of twenty APEX-05 petri plates into the VEGGIE facility to initiate the growth process, today the crew photographed the four spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) transfer to JEM Airlock (JEM A/L):  Overnight, JAXA ground teams removed NREP from JEM External Facility (JEM EF) Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) site 4 to the JEM A/L.  In early January, the crew will remove NREP from the JEM A/L, exchange samples on the platform, and then work with ground controllers to return NREP to EFU #4.

SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE) Survey:  After some anomalous data was observed during last weekend’s Dragon capture, Robotics ground controllers and the crew worked together to inspect the LEE for any potential damage induced.  Later in the day, ground controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to grapple the fixture on the PMM to gather loads data for further analysis.  Results are pending.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #39 on: 12/23/2017 04:48 PM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?

This blog entry with this photo https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/12/21/crew-heads-into-holidays-with-bone-and-muscle-research/ was also removed.
 
It's available only attached file :(
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SMS ;-).

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