Author Topic: Expedition 54 Thread  (Read 31660 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #100 on: 02/06/2018 03:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/02/2018
 

Russian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #44: Alexander Misurkin (as EV1) and Anton Shkaplerov (as EV2) performed RS EVA #44 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 8 hrs 13 min. During the EVA, the cosmonauts removed and replaced the [OHA] antenna high frequency receiver on Service Module (SM) aft.

Microbial Tracking-2:  A 53S crewmember completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated yesterday, today the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crewmember videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Operations: The crew continued to conduct CBEF configuration activities that began earlier this week by installing the mouse habitat unit interface to prepare the facility for the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Preparation for Plant Gravity Perception Operations: The experiment containers (ECs) on the EMCS rotors were replaced with new ECs to begin the 2nd of three Plant Gravity Perception experiment runs. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-6 (ACE-T-6) Operations: After dispensing oil on the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Confocal test target last week to initiate the ACE-T6 science runs, this week the crew cleaned the oil inside of the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container. The ACE-T-6 investigation studies the microscopic behavior of colloids in gels and creams, to provide new insight into fundamental interactions that can improve product shelf life. Colloids are suspensions of microscopic particles in a liquid, and they are found in products ranging from milk to fabric softener. Consumer products often use colloidal gels to distribute specialized ingredients, for instance droplets that soften fabrics, but the gels must serve two opposite purposes: they have to disperse the active ingredient so it can work, yet maintain an even distribution so the product does not spoil

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Pressurized Module (JPM) Rack Relocations:  Today the crew swapped the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station (ExPRESS) Rack-4 from JPM1F5 location and Zero-G Soft Rack (ZSR) from JPM1F6 location in preparation for Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) installation into the ZSR.  LSG will be delivered on H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) 7.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Quarterly Maintenance:  Today the crew performed ARED Quarterly maintenance. They inspected X-Rotation dashpots, cycled the main arm through the full range of motion, and greased the ARED Vibration Isolation System (VIS) rails and rollers and upper stop.  This is nominal periodic maintenance performed to keep the system operating nominally.

Television Camera Interface Converter (TVCIC): The crew attempted to remove and replace the attachment bolts on the TVCIC #002 in preparation for installation on a future EVA.  An inspection performed on the TVCIC in October 2017 identified noticeable wear on the bolt threads’ dry film lube indicating they are near their end of life.  During the activity today, the new bolts could not be located and the original bolts were re-installed.  Forward plan is under evaluation

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Repress: Ground controllers initiated a nitrogen repress from the NORS system. The crew terminated the repress by closing the nitrogen isolation valve and then removed and prepared the N2 recharge tank for return to the ground. A leak check of the N2 System confirmed the repress was successful.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew performed a checkout on the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER). During the activity, they measured the SAFER regulator pressure under flow and no-flow conditions, performed a leak check, and measured the relief valve opening and reseating pressure of the SAFER.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #101 on: 02/06/2018 03:59 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/05/2018
 

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Over the weekend, a 53S subject completed saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated last week, over the weekend and today the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Lighting Effects: A 52S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Color Discrimination Test.  The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)–1 Electronics Unit (EU) Operations: The crew installed the repaired EU into the MELFI-1 spare stowage location.  The MELFI-1 EU failed in August of 2017 and returned on SpaceX-12. The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures throughout a mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Over the weekend, the crew took images of Japan using the Nikon camera, and images of the Iberian Peninsula and Nile Delta using the RED camera. Today the RED camera was used to take images of the Himalayas and the snowfields of Asia and Kamchatka.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  To prepare for this week’s RR-6 operations, the crew participated in a crew conference, gathered equipment and cleaned the animal access unit. The crew also removed the mice and restocked both of the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Education Payloads Operations (EPO): To show children how astronauts conduct hygiene activities on the International Space Station (ISS), today the crew will demonstrate how astronauts clean themselves and wash their hair, highlighting the differences between doing these activities in zero-gravity on the ISS and in gravity on Earth. The video will also feature the European Space Agency’s mascot for young kids.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Valve Box Remote Controller (VB-RC) Installation:  Today the crew attempted to install the JEM A/L VB-RC.  Due to mechanical interference and alignment issues, they had to stand down on installation until ground teams are able to recommend a solution.  Once installed, this new system will enable additional capability for ground controllers to perform JEM A/L operations without crew intervention.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) R2 Upgrade:  Today ground controllers began the upgrade of the C2V2 system to version R2.  The C2V2 system is used to communicate with and control vehicles as they arrive and depart from the ISS.  This upgrade package is needed to interface with upcoming missions.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #102 on: 02/06/2018 05:47 PM »
Sorry for this stupid comment; but could you make a link to the NASA ISS On-Orbit Status Report Blog, in the future.
like this:
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/05/2018
From Februari 1th onward they have a dedicated link for each blog. Before it changed.
Thanks in advanced. And again sorry for this stupid comment.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #103 on: 02/06/2018 07:07 PM »
February 06, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-024
Idaho Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students from Boise State University and Timberline High School in Boise, Idaho, will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at noon EST Thursday, Feb. 8. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will travel to Timberline High School for the call to Expedition 54 astronauts Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei, and Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Acaba and Vande Hei arrived at the space station Sept.12 and will return to Earth this month. Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in April.

Boise State University and Timberline High School were selected through a competitive process to host a call with the space station. Students have been preparing for the event by studying the station, astronaut biographies, and the current research and activities happening aboard the orbiting laboratory. About 300 high school and college students are expected to be at Timberline High School during the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Dan Hollar via email at [email protected] or phone at (208) 890-8309. Boise State University will host the event at Timberline High, 701 E. Boise Ave. in Boise. 

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #104 on: 02/07/2018 12:47 AM »
Космический бадминтон (Space badminton)


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #105 on: 02/08/2018 12:41 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/06/2018
 

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) R2 Upgrade:  Due to issues experienced yesterday while loading the C2V2 R2 upgrade, ground controllers were unable to complete the first day of R2 load operations.  The attempt to load the software today was again unsuccessful.  It was determined that a file mismatch was causing errors in the software load.  In order to correct this, a new general configuration file will need to be re-delivered.  The C2V2 system is used to communicate with and control vehicles as they arrive and depart from the ISS.  This upgrade package is needed to interface with upcoming missions.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the first of four consecutive days of RR-6 operations by setting up the refrigerated centrifuge and processing a series of blood samples from the rodents.  The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for frozen storage until they can be returned to the ground for testing.  The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions.  RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions. 

Veg-03 Initiation: The crew installed the root mat and plant pillows into the Veggie facility to initiate the fifth Veg-03 experiment run.  Veg-03 contains a total of six experiment runs with the fourth, 5th, and 6th sessions being the first of their kind because they contain a mixed harvest of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna, which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows.  Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space.  Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests.  Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Manifold #2 & #4 Bottle and Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Controller Replacements:  To control the airflow over the flame, today the crew removed and replaced one ACME controller while the ACME chamber insert was fully installed inside of the CIR combustion chamber.  After the ACME controller was replaced, the crew replaced the CIR manifold #2 and #4 bottles on the front of the optics bench.  CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.  This is for the ACME investigation, which is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR.  ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Two crewmembers performed MT-2 sample collection activities.  The 52S crewmember collected surface and air samples to characterize the different types of microbial locations on the ISS and the 53S crewmember collected saliva samples.  The samples will be placed inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew will capture images of Hawaii at night and using the RED camera, they will capture images of the Iberian Peninsula.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space.  The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

On Board Training (OBT), Emergency Simulation:  Today the crew will review procedures and prepare for tomorrow’s OBT, in which they will rehearse their responses to onboard emergencies.

68 Progress (68P) Leak Check:  Today ground controllers worked with the onboard crew to perform a leak check on 68P.  The onboard crew isolated the vehicle by closing hatches and the ground teams performed the leak check.  Progress leak checks were nominal and the hatches are now open with clamps installed.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #106 on: 02/10/2018 01:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/08/2018
 

Communications Issues:  This morning, communication with the ISS on Space to Ground (S/G) became intermittent.  A failed controller card at White Sands prevented the acquisition of the correct Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS).  Nominal communications were restored after the card was replaced.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the third day of RR-6 operations by conducting fixative swaps and processing a series of blood samples from the rodents. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for containment. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nano-channel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Plant Gravity Perception Operations European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS): The crew configured the EMCS Maintenance Work Area (MWA) then removed and stowed the EMCS seed cassettes from the experiment containers (ECs) of the previous experiment run. The crew then replaced the ECs on the EMCS rotors with new ECs and began the next Plant Gravity Perception experiment run. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Plant Habitat Water Refill: In support of the on-going Plant Habitat investigation, today the crew injected water into the distribution system. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS Rack and two International Sub-rack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

NeuroMapping: Two 52S crewmembers set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed their Flight Day150 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): A 53S subject performed saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew set up and configured the Light Meter hardware to obtain Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Protein Crystallization Research Facility (PCRF) Cable Replacement and Checkout: The crew conducted standard maintenance operations by relocating and conducting checkout activities for two PCRF maintenance units. The PCRF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility that investigates protein crystal growth in microgravity. The PCRF can accommodate six cell cartridges. Each cell cartridge can accommodate a motor drive and Peltier elements, from which activation and termination timing, as well as temperature profiles, can be freely designed by the investigator.

Try Zero-Gravity Preparation: To prepare for next week’s Try Zero-Gravity experiment, today the crew reviewed reference videos and prepared items for the experiment. Try Zero-Gravity (Try Zero-G) allows the public, especially kids, to vote for and suggest physical tasks for JAXA Astronauts to demonstrate the difference between 0-G and 1-G for educational purposes. Some of tasks include putting in eye drops, performing push-ups on the ceiling, arm wrestling, and flying a magic carpet.   

Education Payloads Operations (EPO) – Recycling Air and Water: Today the crew recorded a video to explain to children why and how water and air are recycled onboard the ISS. It is very expensive to launch mass to space and because there is not enough space onboard to store new water and air, they must be constantly recycled. The video also featured the European Space Agency’s mascot for young kids.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew captured images of Japan and with the RED camera, they captured images of the Namib Desert. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Helmet Light Inspection and Installation:  Today the USOS crew inspected and reinstalled EMU helmet lights that were removed and loaned to the Russian crew for their Extravehicular Activity (EVA), which was performed last Friday.  The lights were installed on EMUs 3004 and 3003 for use on a future USOS EVA.  EMU 3003 will be used for USOS EVA 48, currently planned for February 15th.

Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) Commissioning: Yesterday evening, Robotic Ground Controllers performed new Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) commissioning steps.  This consisted of performing LEE B checkouts, maneuvering the Space Station Remote Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to capture the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) with LEE-B, verifying SPDM power up on LEE-B on both the SSRMS Prime and Redundant Payload Power Strings.  They also switched the SSRMS base from LEE-A to LEE-B and back to LEE-A.  At the completion of these steps, the Robotic Ground Controllers released LEE-B from MBS PDGF4 and maneuvered to a park position in preparation for USOS EVA 48.

Offline Artyom.

Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #107 on: 02/10/2018 08:02 AM »
Preparation for the docking of the Progress MS-08 cargo spacecraft.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #108 on: 02/10/2018 04:00 PM »
February 09, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-027

Texas Educators to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Pre-service teachers from Houston, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:35 a.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 13. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The teachers-in-training will travel to the University of Houston-Downtown, for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbiting laboratory, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth later this month.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station (YES), which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

The STEM on Station team has been working with pre-service teachers at the University of Houston-Downtown as part of YES. In a science methods course, students have been designing simple experiments that could be performed by astronauts on the space station. Some 150 teachers and students are expected to be on-site at UH- Downtown for the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Mike Emery via email at [email protected] or phone at 713-226-5806. The University of Houston-Downtown will host the event at One Main Street, Houston.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline jcm

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #109 on: 02/11/2018 03:45 PM »
There's a new debris orbit being tracked, 1998-067NN  43206.  This is in ADDITION to the electronics box that
got jettisoned in the Russian EVA, which is 1998-067NM 43203.

My calculations suggest it separated from ISS late on Feb 5, but I don't entirely trust that, and it's possible
it's associated with the EVA.  Anyone got any ideas?
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline deruch

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #110 on: 02/12/2018 11:40 AM »
There's a new debris orbit being tracked, 1998-067NN  43206.  This is in ADDITION to the electronics box that
got jettisoned in the Russian EVA, which is 1998-067NM 43203.

My calculations suggest it separated from ISS late on Feb 5, but I don't entirely trust that, and it's possible
it's associated with the EVA.  Anyone got any ideas?

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=44785.msg1781851#msg1781851 

If you follow to the Youtube link in that post by flyright, there's definitely something that flies off.  Could be it.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2018 11:40 AM by deruch »
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #111 on: 02/14/2018 08:46 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/09/2018
 

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the fourth day of RR-6 operations where they conducted fixative swaps and processed a series of blood samples from the rodents. The samples from today’s activities were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for containment. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks Vuze (One Strange Rock) Camera Mounted Operations: The crew setup the NanoRack Vuze camera and recorded 3-Dementional 360 degree videos of the Cupola inside of the ISS. The mounted camera captured a “day in a life” style footage as the crew went about their nominal tasks throughout the ISS. National Geographic Channel–Virtual Reality Educational Video for Television Series–“One Strange Rock” (One Strange Rock Virtual Reality) is a 10-part series that transports a virtual reality camera to the ISS for recording of a National Geographic special on the Earth as a natural life-support system. Crew aboard the ISS record a series of virtual reality pieces for incorporation into a larger documentary about natural history and the solar system. Each episode features a different crew member and addresses different topics using next generation virtual reality technology to raise awareness about the Earth system and the space program.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th Veg-03 experiment run earlier this week, today the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 plant pillow, and initiated the 6th experiment run to ultimately conduct two Veg-03 grow outs at the same time. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Lighting Effects Visual Performance Test at a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) Setting: A 52S and 53S subject conducted a Visual Performance Test by turning all non-GLA light sources off and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated last week, the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Robonaut: The crew prepared and stowed Robonaut in preparation for return on SpaceX-14. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.

Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL) CO2 Sensor Calibration: Today the crew setup the CO2 Meter in the SABL for a CO2 sensor calibration. SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has a temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images from Ireland to Moscow in the daytime. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #112 on: 02/14/2018 08:46 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/12/2018
 

69 Progress (69P) Launch Abort:  Over the weekend, the planned launch of 69P did not occur.  The vehicle issued an abort command shortly before launch and successfully shut down the launch sequence.  The root cause is under investigation, and the forward plan is in work.  The next available launch opportunity is tomorrow morning, Tuesday, February 13th at 2:13am CST.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Following four consecutive days of RR-6 operations last week, over the weekend the crew completed the final set of fixative swaps and cleaned the access units. The RR-6 hardware was removed from Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) this morning, and MSG is now ready for re-installation of Transparent Alloys so that payload can continue its science runs begun prior to RR-6 operations.  The RR-6 mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated two weeks ago, the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth over the weekend. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Over the weekend, the crew took images of the Caribbean and the Iberian Peninsula. Today the RED camera was used to take images of Central America to the Caribbean, New Zealand, the Amazon, and the southern tip of Baja. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th and 6th Veg-03 experiment runs last week, today the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 plant pillow. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations:  This morning, the crew completed a review of the robotics procedures for the upcoming USOS EVA and then completed a training session using the Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT).  They also performed a review of the EVA activities using the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software.  This afternoon, they performed tool configuration, camera battery charging, GoPro camera charging, and a conference with the EVA ground controllers.  EVA #48 is currently scheduled for February 15th.

Soyuz 52S Packing:  The crew started packing USOS cargo for return on 52 Soyuz (52S).  Some of the USOS cargo will be retrieved at the landing site for immediate return to the US.  This cargo is packed with special labelling for ease of retrieval.  There will be additional packing as items become available.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #113 on: 02/14/2018 08:49 AM »
February 12, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-002

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students from Highland Village, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The students will travel to Briarhill Middle School for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.
         
Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth later this month.

Students have been preparing for this downlink by studying the solar system, universe, gravitational effects on plants and animals, plotting space station coordinates, calculating distances to various planets, planning what to pack for a journey to Mars using surface and volume formulas, and using ratios/proportions to paint a life size version of the International Space Station on their football field. About 1,000 students and teachers are expected to be at Briarhill for the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Liz Haas via email at [email protected] or phone at 469-948-8041. Briarhill Middle School will host the event at 2100 Briarhill Blvd in Highland Village.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #114 on: 02/14/2018 03:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/13/2018
 

69 Progress (69P) Launch:  69P launched from the Baikonur, Kazakhstan this morning at 2:13am CST and achieved nominal insertion with all antennas and solar arrays deployed.  Due to orbital phasing, this will be a 34-orbit rendezvous profile.  69P docking is scheduled for Thursday morning at 4:43am CST.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject began a two-week long sleep session by providing daily sleep log entries to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Transparent Alloy: The crew set up the Transparent Alloy hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume and installed the Transparent Alloy cartridges to begin the payload investigation. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment are to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th and 6th Veg-03 experiment runs last week, today the crew thinned the plants as needed to one plant per pillow and added water to the small plant pillows. This is first time the Veg investigation has conducted two plant grow outs at the same time. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Education Payloads Operations (EPO) – Try Zero-Gravity: The crew participated in a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) EPO event by demonstrating Try Zero-Gravity experiments proposed by Asian countries. Try Zero-Gravity (Try Zero-G) allows the public, especially kids, to vote for and suggest physical tasks for JAXA Astronauts to demonstrate the difference between 0-G and 1-G for educational purposes. Some of tasks include putting in eye drops, performing push-ups on the ceiling, arm wrestling, and flying a magic carpet.   

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Controller Replacement:  To control the airflow over the flame, the crew removed and replaced an ACME controller. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.  The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Operations: The crew continued CBEF configuration activities that began two weeks ago by reconfiguring the video cables to support the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew captured images of Thailand boats and with the RED camera, they captured images of the east coast of the Unites States, the Iberian Peninsula, and the Galapagos to Caribbean. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Soyuz (52S) Return Cargo Packing: Today, the crew started packing the cargo that will be returning on 47S. The remaining packing will be completed prior to undocking.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Hardware Replacement: The crew replaced the CEVIS Ergometer, Inertial Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (IVIS) Boxes, and CEVIS Display Cable due to the end of Braking Band life within the Ergometer. After the replacement of the hardware, the crew performed a successful checkout of CEVIS.

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Tank Installation and Repressurization:  Today the crew attached a new oxygen tank to NORS and initiated a repressurization of the ISS with gas from that tank.  NORS is a system to attach nitrogen or oxygen tanks to the station through the joint airlock plumbing system for resupply of station.  Tanks are launched on cargo vehicle flights and installed by the crew as needed.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #115 on: 02/15/2018 10:24 AM »
Feb. 15, 2018: International Space Station Configuration. Four spaceships are parked at the space station including the Progress MS-07 and 08 resupply ships and the Soyuz MS-06 and MS-07 crew ships.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/visiting-vehicle-launches-arrivals-and-departures

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #116 on: 02/15/2018 03:59 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/14/2018
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Plant Gravity Perception Operations European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS): The crew replaced the EMCS Thermal Control System (TCS) cold spot sponge before replacing the Experiment Containers (ECs) on the EMCS rotors with new ECs to begin the next Plant Gravity Perception experiment run. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Manifold #2 Bottle Replacement: The crew removed and replaced a CIR manifold #2 bottle on the front of the optics bench. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity. This is for the ACME investigation which is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): The crew continued to track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated two weeks ago, by taking photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Tropical Cyclone: The crew configured the camera settings in the Cupola to take untended images of the Category 3 Typhoon Gita, near the South Pacific island nation of Tonga. The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Amazon River, the Gulf of Thailand, and the Baja Peninsula. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Columbus Mass Memory Unit (MMU) Memory Card Replacement: Today, the crew replaced one of the Memory Cards to restore internal redundancy in MMU2. To gain access to MMU2, the crew rotated the Human Research Facility 1 (HRF-1) rack and performed the memory card replacement.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #117 on: 02/16/2018 03:03 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/15/2018
 
69 Progress (69P) Docking:  This morning the 69P vehicle docked to the SM aft port of the ISS.  Rendezvous and docking both completed successfully in the automated mode with a preliminary docking capture time of 4:38:43 AM CST. 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Caribbean and the Baja Peninsula. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparation:  Today the USOS Crew completed final Equipment Lock configuration and tool checks in preparation for Friday’s EVA.  Detailed reviews of Cuff Checklists, the EVA Briefing Package, Detailed Timeline, Tool Configuration Summary, Sharp Edge Briefing, and SSU Systems Briefing Package completed EVA preparation.  Scheduled egress from the Joint Airlock is tomorrow morning at 6:10 AM CST.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #118 on: 02/17/2018 07:35 AM »
February 16, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-033

Minnesota Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students in central Minnesota will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:35 p.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 20. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The event is being hosted by the College of Saint Benedict (CSB), in St. Joseph, Minnesota, and Saint John’s University (SJU), located in nearby Collegeville, Minnesota. Students from five area middle and high schools will travel to SJU for the call to Expedition 54 astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbital outpost, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Vande Hei, an SJU alumnus, arrived at the space station on Sept.12 and will return to Earth later this month. Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in June.

Students across the participating school districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and incorporating rockets and space station-focused physics lessons into the curriculum, as well as hosting an Engineering Design Competition. About 200 people are expected to be on-site at the university during the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Michael Hemmesch via email at             [email protected] or phone at 320-363-2595. CSB & SJU will host the event at 2850 Abbey Plaza in Collegeville.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #119 on: 02/17/2018 07:36 AM »
February 16, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-034

New Mexico Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station


Students from six schools in Alamogordo, New Mexico, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11 a.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 21. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Middle and high school students will travel to Alamogordo High School for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbital outpost, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in June.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History (NMMSH) has collaborated with the Alamogordo Public School and the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for this event. NMMSH is a state museum chartered to educate the people of New Mexico and visitors in the history, science and technology of space.

Students have been preparing for the event by forming teams to design and build simple apparatuses or experiments involving fluid management, combustion, or crystal growth to compare performance in a 1g vs simulated microgravity environment. Some 1,500 students and teachers are expected to be on-site at Alamogordo High School during the downlink with 4,000 more watching virtually in school auditoriums throughout Alamogordo Public Schools.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Cathy Harper via email at [email protected] or phone at (575) 437-2840. NMMSH will host the event at Alamogordo High School, 103 Cuba Avenue in Alamogordo.   

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network's Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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