Author Topic: Expedition 54 Thread  (Read 30181 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Expedition 54 Thread
« on: 06/28/2016 12:15 PM »
http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=3513

The crews of the ISS began to "Water Survival"

 June 27, 2016

 Staff and contingent on the ISS expedition crews and instructors Cosmonaut Training Center started training for action after a spaceship landing on the water surface - the so-called "water survival."  Trainings are held on the basis of the 179th Emergency Center (Noginsk, Moscow region).  Preparation for the training and conduct of test and provide training team, which was composed of trainers, doctors, psychologists, divers, interpreters and other specialists Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, as well as representatives of NASA, ESA and JAXA.  Before passing the stage of practical training crews attended theoretical disciplines of the course.

 Monday training on "Water Survival" held two full-time crew: ISS-53/54 ( Alexander Skvortsov and Ivan Wagner , Roscosmos, Scott Tingle , NASA) and the ISS-54/55 ( Sergey Ryazan , Roscosmos, Randolph Breznik , NASA; Norishige Kanai , JAXA).

 The crew of the ISS-53/54 now fulfilled the task of so-called "dry" training.  In her script, cosmonauts and astronauts carried out on land "dress rehearsal" evacuation of the lander.  The aim of the "dry" training is the psychological training of the crew to act in emergency situations after landing on water surface and development of skills of operator activity in the descent module.  In addition, the "survival" of the participants gain experience of interaction with the search and rescue services (MSS).  According to the sequence diagram, cosmonauts and astronauts work out the steps to remove the suit "Sokol KV-2", dressing inside lander in Flight Suits (PP-14), thermal protection suits (TCC-14) and the diving suit "Forel".

 During the "long" training, which will Skvortsov A., J. Wagner and C. Tingley tomorrow, the lander will be in the water.

 Evacuation during the "long" and "short" training

 Sergey Ryazan, Randolph Breznik and Norishige Kanai went "dry" training session on Friday, the first day of "survival", and today the ISS-54/55 has successfully coped with the "long" training.  Tomorrow they will have to work out the "short" training.  In her condition, after ditching the crew discovers a leak in the descent module, through which the water flows fast.  With little time to reserve CA flooding, cosmonauts and astronauts must:

 - Take the blocks portable emergency (NAE) and leave the SA;

 - To collect water in a group;

 - To work out actions for evacuation and interaction with the search and rescue service.

 The purpose of the "short" training - urgently, within 8 - 9 minutes in spacesuits "Sokol KV-2" to leave the lander.

 Source: Press Service of the CPC, the CPC photo

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #1 on: 07/09/2016 05:08 PM »
from http://www.gctc.ru/main.php?id=3517

Soyuz MS-07 crew portrait

Soyuz MS-06 crew portrait
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #2 on: 08/30/2016 02:53 PM »
Scott D. Tingle ‏@Astro_Maker 

L-12 Months.   ISS Expedition 54!   #AstronautTraining

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #3 on: 03/18/2017 01:09 AM »
Here's the updated 54 patch


Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #4 on: 03/18/2017 12:22 PM »
On the new patch the name of Anton Shkaplerov instead of Aleksandr Skvortzov is written.
This suggest that the crew of Soyuz MS-07 was changed.
Is there any conformation of the change?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #5 on: 03/18/2017 12:49 PM »
Is there any conformation of the change?

Yes.. the crew patch.
« Last Edit: 03/18/2017 12:50 PM by jacqmans »

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #6 on: 03/18/2017 05:42 PM »
And who will be new Soyuz MS-09 commander?

Offline Artyom.

Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #7 on: 03/19/2017 05:37 AM »
On the new patch the name of Anton Shkaplerov instead of Aleksandr Skvortzov is written.
This suggest that the crew of Soyuz MS-07 was changed.
Is there any conformation of the change?
Alexander Skvortsov has a small-scale health problems.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #8 on: 04/05/2017 07:44 PM »
Among cosmonauts during today Soyuz MS-04 crew departure were cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov 13th from the right, behind woman between Fisher and Yurchikhin!
---
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #9 on: 04/18/2017 07:03 PM »
Here is Norishige Kanai's mission JAXA patch (ISS EXP 54/55 2017/2018):
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #10 on: 06/10/2017 09:31 PM »
Expedition 54/55 Flight Engineer JAXA Astronaut Norishige Kanai portrait. This image was taken at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center / May 9, 2017. Copyright: JAXA/GCTC.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Olaf

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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #12 on: 08/16/2017 07:25 PM »
Joseph M. Acaba @AstroAcaba

Expedition 54 crew after we successfully completed final @Space_Station Emergency Scenarios Simulation.
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #13 on: 09/23/2017 03:14 PM »
https://www.facebook.com/djgarytitus/posts/10214296065941322

Quote
Good luck to Randolph native and BHR Class of 1983 alum Scott Tingle. I've enjoyed following his career...

Space Flight Update:

Our launch is now scheduled for December 17th at 03:20 AM east coast time.

For my friends in family in Boston, the locations that I was hoping to use for a launch viewing party will not be open during this early time. Darn the luck :-). If you are inclined to stay up, or decide to get up to watch the launch, you will be able to view the events on NASA TV (www.nasa.gov) real-time.

The launch of Soyuz MS-07 will carry Anton Shkaplerov, myself, and Norishige Kanai to the international space station. The rendezvous with the space station will be a 2-day rendezvous, and we expect to open the hatch on the 19th of December. This event will also be televised on NASA TV. We will spend approximately 4 months on the International Space Station conducting maintenance, science and outreach events. Our return to earth is currently planned for April 17th, although it is likely to change. I'll try and keep you updated as we get closer.

I hope you are all doing well!!
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SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #14 on: 10/03/2017 08:03 PM »
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/next-international-space-station-crew-available-for-news-conference-interviews

Quote
Oct. 3, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-116
Next International Space Station Crew Available for News Conference, Interviews

[attached photo]

NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and crewmates Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Norishege Kanai of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will discuss their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference.
Credits: NASA

NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and crewmates Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Norishege Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will discuss their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, Oct. 11 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The news conference will be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed on the agency’s website, and the crew will be available for in-person or remote media interviews afterward.

Tingle, Shkaplerov and Kanai will launch to the space station aboard the Soyuz MS-07 spacecraft on Dec. 17 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. They will join the station’s Expedition 54 crew, and return to Earth in April 2018 as members of Expedition 55. This will be the first spaceflight for Tingle and Kanai, and the third for Shkaplerov.

Reporters who wish to participate by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 no later than 1:45 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 11. To request credentials to participate in person or to schedule an interview, U.S. reporters must contact Johnson's newsroom by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 10. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.

During a planned four-month mission, the station crew members will take part in about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including missions past the Moon and Mars.

A U.S. Navy captain, Tingle grew up in Randolph, Massachusetts, and earned a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from Southeastern Massachusetts University in Dartmouth, now the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and a Master of Science in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Following graduate school, Tingle spent three years with the Aerospace Corp., in El Segundo, California, as a technical staff member in its Propulsion Department. He was commissioned as a U.S. Navy officer in 1991, and accumulated more than 4,500 flight hours in 51 types of aircraft, 750 carrier arrestments and 54 combat missions. Tingle was selected in July 2009 as one of 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. His training included scientific and technical briefings; intensive instruction in space station systems; spacewalks; robotics; physiological training; T-38 flight training; and water and wilderness survival training.

View Tingle’s full biography at:

https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/scott-d-tingle/biography

Follow Tingle on Twitter at:

@Astro_Maker

Follow Tingle on Instagram at:

@astro_maker

Learn more about the International Space Station and its crews at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #15 on: 10/13/2017 05:49 PM »
Quote
NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and crewmates Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Norishege Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) discussed their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference on Oct. 11 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Tingle, Shkaplerov and Kanai will launch to the space station aboard the Soyuz MS-07 spacecraft on Dec. 17 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. They will join the station’s Expedition 54 crew, and return to Earth in April 2018 as members of Expedition 55. During a planned four-month mission, the station crew members will take part in about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including missions past the Moon and Mars. This will be the first spaceflight for Tingle and Kanai, and the third for Shkaplerov.

---
SMS ;-).

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #16 on: 10/14/2017 06:12 AM »
The crewposter published by NASA in full size.

Online Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #17 on: 10/14/2017 06:59 AM »
A few pics of the preflight press conference were posted by NASA-ISS on Twitter

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #18 on: 11/03/2017 05:40 AM »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #19 on: 11/24/2017 07:45 PM »
The official portrait picture for Expedition 54/55 crewmember @Astro_Maker at NASA's Johnson Space Center.
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Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #20 on: 12/10/2017 12:38 AM »
kanai_press-kit(pdf)

Offline theonlyspace

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #21 on: 12/11/2017 01:50 PM »
Is there a English translation version of the press kit?

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #22 on: 12/14/2017 05:45 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 7: Astronaut Kanai at countdown for launch



Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #23 on: 12/14/2017 08:16 AM »
ISS config. after Soyuz MS-05 departure.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #24 on: 12/14/2017 02:17 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/13/2017
 

51 Soyuz (51S) Undock and Landing Preparations:  The crew completed packing the cargo for return on 51S.  Randy Bresnik handed over command of the ISS to Alexander Misurkin. Following the Change of Command, the new Commander’s Soyuz crew became prime for emergencies.  Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy, and Paolo Nespoli will undock from the ISS at 11:13 pm CST and will land at 2:37am CST tomorrow.  Following undock, the ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 53S on December 19.

JAXA Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) #13 Retrieval: Two canister bags containing protein samples were removed from the JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2) and handed over to a Russian crewmember for return on the 51S vehicle. The samples have been stowed in J-FROST2 for processing since their arrival on 68P.  PCG #13 contains protein samples prepared by Japanese and Russian researchers from universities, national research institutes, and the private sector. The purpose of this activity was to obtain high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment at 20 degrees C for about 9 weeks. The results obtained by JAXA PCG #13 contribute to the development of drugs for multidrug-resistant bacteria, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy and periodontitis. They will also aid in the development of a blood substitute and biosensor.

Echo Commissioning:  The crew retrieved and setup the Echo hardware in the Columbus module to allow ground teams to perform a commissioning session on the main and backup hard disks for the Echo unit. The purpose of the ECHO investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system, equipped with motorized probes to be controlled by flight controllers on the ground. Additionally, this investigation supports the commissioning of the Echo instrument, which is planned for use with the Vascular Echo experiment on ISS in the future.

Lighting Effects Operations: After providing a sleep log entry to support the two-week sleep shift session, a 52S crewmember setup the Visual Performance Test hardware and performed a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The crewmember then configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained light meter readings from specified locations before downlinking the data. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections – Functional Immune: Today blood and saliva samples were collected from two 52S crewmembers and a 51S crewmember which concludes a five day Functional Immune session that began over the weekend. The samples support the mid-mission HRP compliment for the 52S crewmembers and the return minus zero day (R-0) compliment for the 51S crewmember. The Functional Immune investigation analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember completed his return minus seven day (R-7) FMS session, which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured images and video footage of the Coast of Namibia, the Nile River, and the Tasmania Bass Strait. This investigtation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches: The 52S crewmembers completed a weekly questionnaire for the Space Headaches investigation.  This experiment collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Cable Arm Rope Replacement: The crew performed a scheduled replacement of the ARED cable rope arm today, with no issues.  The new cable arm rope will stretch to its final configuration through several exercise sessions before bar exercises are performed.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #25 on: 12/17/2017 12:27 PM »
ISS config. after  Dragon-13 capture:

(Progress MS-06 is missing!?)
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Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #26 on: 12/17/2017 01:13 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #27 on: 12/18/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/15/2017
 

51 Soyuz (51S) Undock and Landing:  The 51S crew Randolph Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy and Paolo Nespoli undocked from the ISS at 11:13 pm CST on Wednesday evening and landed at 2:37am CST on Thursday.  Ryazanskiy has arrived back in Moscow and Bresnik and Nespoli have arrived back in Houston.  The ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 53S on December 19.

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Launch: SpX-13 launched today from Kennedy Space Center at 9:36 am CST. In addition to supplies and equipment for crewmembers, the vehicle will deliver investigations and instruments for several science experiments that will be conducted on ISS.  Dragon capture is scheduled for December 17th at 5:00 am CST.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: Upon wakeup a 52S crewmember collected a saliva sample and place it into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) before completing a questionnaire. The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Lighting Effects: A 52S subject provided a sleep log entry before conducting a series of three Cognition tests and four urine sample collections throughout the day. The samples were stowed in the MELFI for freezing until their return and analysis. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Space Headaches: A crewmember completed a weekly questionnaire for the Space Headaches investigation.  This experiment collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured daytime images and video footage from Ireland to Moscow. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Inspection and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Installation:  The crew performed an inspection of Lab and Node 1 looking for sources of elevated fungal levels.  No obvious sources were identified.  They installed 6 new HEPA filters in the Lab and installed 4 of the filters removed from the Lab in Node 1, replacing the previously installed charcoal filters.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #28 on: 12/18/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/17/2017
 

53 Soyuz (53S) Launch: 53S launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome this morning with Anton Shkaplerov, Scott Tingle, and Norishige Kanai.  Docking to the Mini Research Module-1 (MRM-1) module is scheduled for 02:42 AM CST on December 19 with hatch opening at ~4:15 AM CST.

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Capture and Berthing: SpX-13 rendezvous and capture were successfully completed today at 11:02 AM CST using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The crew monitored Dragon’s approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation. During capture the Latch End Effector (LEE) snare cable tension went above the expected value, and before resuming nominal operation the Robotics Ground Controllers commanded the LEE mechanism to reduce this tension to the expected range. Dragon was berthed at 7:30 AM CST by ground controllers.  Vestibule outfitting, vehicle ingress and removal of the center stack began following capture.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #29 on: 12/19/2017 09:03 AM »
ISS config. updated

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #30 on: 12/19/2017 11:55 AM »
Press release, 19 December 2017

Smart phone-sized experiments on the ISS - German research on the International Space Station involving immune cells, neurons and cancer cells 


On 15 December at 16:36 CET (10:36 local time), the US Dragon CRS 13 capsule was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) from Cape Canaveral (Florida) by a Falcon 9 rocket. On board were three cell-culture experiments by scientists at the
Otto von Guericke University in Magdeburg and the University of Hohenheim, funded by the Space Administration of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR). The biological samples will be installed in smart-phone-sized
experiment containers in the STaARS 1 research facility in the Destiny module of the ISS. They will remain in microgravity for 30 days and return to Earth in the Dragon capsule in mid January 2018, when they will be examined in the laboratory.

What happens to the immune system in space?

The human immune system is weakened during prolonged stay in space. Preliminary tests on the ISS have shown that immune cell activity is affected by changes in gravity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this are still not
fully known. Macrophages are the immune system’s front line of defence. These scavenger cells, which are a type of white blood cell, are responsible for attacking and destroying bacteria and other pathogens in the human body.

Scientists suspect that the reason behind the immune system's impairment is a disturbance of the cytoskeleton – the flexible inner framework structure of a cell – in the macrophages or a reduction in molecules on the cell surface. Therefore, scientists
at the University of Magdeburg aim to record long-term changes in the macrophages caused by microgravity. "Research under microgravity conditions over a prolonged period is only possible on the International Space Station," explains DLR Project manager
Michael Becker. "In the long term, the acquired knowledge will help develop countermeasures and drugs against immunodeficiency disorders. These will not only be helpful for astronauts on long-term missions in space, but also for patients on Earth."

Cancer research in microgravity

The focus of the second experiment by cell biologists from Magdeburg is on investigating thyroid cancer cells. Previous experiments have shown that in microgravity special cancer cells form a spherical group of tumour cells, called three-dimensional
multi-cellular spheroids. The effect of biochemical substances on spheroid growth, in particular, is best researched in microgravity, as gravitational forces are cancelled out under these conditions. The biochemical substances will be analysed at the
scientists’ laboratory in Magdeburg when the cells return. In addition to gene activation and deactivation, the main focus will be on investigating changes in all cell proteins to discover important signalling pathways. Knowledge of these molecular
processes will help to develop tumour-fighting measures and specific cancer drugs.

How do neurons adapt to microgravity?

For the third experiment, the team of scientists from the University of Hohenheim is exploring the effects of microgravity on neurons. Preliminary investigations have shown that the cytoskeleton of neurons is impaired by changes in gravity. This cytoskeleton
not only plays an important role in shaping the cell, but it also functions as an internal transport system for the exchange of information, such as communication between the neurons themselves.

The cytoskeleton is anchored in the cell membrane using special proteins and is jointly responsible for neuron excitability. This ISS experiment focuses on these anchor proteins. Scientists want to investigate whether these proteins change or deform
under microgravity. Additionally, the experiment is examining the changes in the distribution of so-called channel proteins. These protein molecules are used to transport ions in the cells and are therefore also essential for neuron excitability. Scientists
hope to gain knowledge regarding the development of neurons in microgravity, which is primarily relevant for astronauts on long-term missions in space.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #31 on: 12/19/2017 03:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/18/2017
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 52S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. This entry supports a two week long sleep shift session that began GMT 340 and ends tomorrow. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Zebrafish Muscle 2 Operations: Following the successful arrival of SpaceX-13, the crew performed the first day of Zebrafish activities by retrieving six Zebrafish experiment units (EUs) from the Zebrafish transport bags and dividing them into 3 groups (A, B, and C). Each group contains two Zebrafish EUs. The crew then conducted the fixation for the EUs of Group A and placed them into Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The EUs for Group B were then stowed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) 1G centrifuge and Group C was stowed in the CBEF Micro-G centrifuge. The results from today and next three days of Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

TangoLab-1 and 2 Payload Card Placement: The crew performed several payload card placements into both of the TangoLab-1 & 2 facilities. The crew placed two of the payload cards that arrived on SpaceX-13 into slots 2 and 3 of the TangoLab-1.  The payload in slot 6 of TangoLab-2 will be moved to slot 1 of TangoLab-1. The TangoLab-1 and TangoLab-2 lockers are reconfigurable general research facilities designed for microgravity research and development (R&D) and pilot manufacturing aboard the International Space Station (ISS). TangoLab-2 is similar to TangoLab-1 with the primary difference being an upgraded fan system which allows for a greater heat rejection capability. This upgrade enables payloads with greater power draw and lower temperature requirements to use the facility.

Cell Science Validation Locker (Bioculture System) Installation: The Bioculture System was removed from the SpX-13 vehicle and installed into EXPRESS Rack 7 of the ISS by the crew. The Bioculture System is a space biological science incubator for use on the International Space Station (ISS), with the capability of transporting active and stored experiments to ISS. This incubator supports a wide diversity of tissue, cell, and microbiological cultures and experiment methods to meet any space flight research experiment goals and objectives.  The facility enables variable duration and long-duration cellular and microbiological experiments on ISS to meet the scientific needs of academic and biotechnology interests.

Dragon Cargo Transfers:  The crew continued with cargo transfers from the Dragon Center Stack.  In addition, the Double Coldbags were retrieved and unpacked.  Eight Double Coldbags were unpacked into Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL), MELFI, JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2), General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (Glacier) and ambient locations.  After the science was removed from the Double Coldbags, the Ice Bricks and Double Coldbags were temp stowed to dry out.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #32 on: 12/19/2017 05:49 PM »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #33 on: 12/20/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/19/2017
 

53S Docking:  53 Soyuz launched on Sunday, December 17th, and arrived at the ISS early this morning.  The Soyuz brought Anton Shkaplerov, Scott Tingle, and Norishige Kanai, and docked at 2:39 AM CST with hatch opening at 4:55 AM CST.  This begins the 54-6 stage, and returns the ISS crew to its nominal complement of 6.  Following the docking, the crew conducted an ISS Safety Briefing where they reviewed emergency response for each of the Soyuz crews and then reviewed the emergency equipment locations.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 52S subject completed the two-week long sleep shift session that began on GMT 340, by providing daily sleep log entries to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6): Today the rodent transporters were moved from the SpaceX-13 vehicle to the US Lab to transfer the rodents to the habitats. The crew prepared the habitats by removing the lixit caps and checking the water flow to each side of all four habitats, before installing the rodent huts and food bars.  The animals from both transporters were transferred 10 at a time from the transporter to the habitats, after the crew performed health checks on the rodents.  The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-2 Experiment Container Installation: The crew installed the BioScience-2 experiment containers into the STaARS facility and then powered on the facility in EXPRESS Rack 6. BioScience-2 encompasses two experiments, Experiment Grimm and Experiment Ulrich, which is performed by three investigation teams, all utilizing the same hardware, but processing different biological samples. The principle aim of Experiment Grimm is to investigate how thyroid carcinoma cells react, when they are exposed to real microgravity. The expected information may help to improve in vitro cancer studies such as antitumor drug or trans-endothelial migration tests. Experiment Ulrich will investigate microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, the most important effector cells of the immune system, which are responsible for attacking and killing bacteria and other foreign and pathogenic intruders in the human body. The aim of the experiment is to analyze surface molecules, which are required for recognition of bacteria and cell-cell-communication, and to investigate the cytoskeletal architecture after several days in microgravity.

Space Headaches: Two 53S crewmembers completed the third day of a week-long ESA Space Headache session which started onboard Soyuz prior to docking.  The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #34 on: 12/21/2017 11:46 AM »
https://twitter.com/Tungsten_Flight/status/943545294251352071
Quote
#ISS currently in a no shade period. If you trace the white ground track relative to the nighttime area, you see ISS is never in darkness. Very cool. Has to do with beta (angle of ISS orbital plane to sun) +proximity to winter solstice. Dark returns on Dec 25.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #35 on: 12/21/2017 04:01 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/20/2017
 

Zebrafish Muscle 2: Following the fixation and stowing of experiment units (EUs) from Group A earlier this week, today the crew performed fixation on the EUs from Groups B and C and then stowed them in the refrigerator of the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The results from Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

APEX-05 Operations:  APEX-05 petri plates were installed into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: During today’s scheduled microscope operations for BioCell Habitats A and B, microscope issues inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) prevented ground teams from viewing video footage of the growing bone cells from the BioCells. With the deferment of today’s fixation of BioCell Habitat A, the crew was able to accelerate one of tomorrow’s media exchanges to today. Ground teams will continue to resolve the issue with the microscopy video downlink and are rescheduling tomorrow’s activities.  Synthetic Bone uses BioCell habitats A, B, and C. The BioCell habitats will be used to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: Four Arthrospira experiment containers were retrieved from a Glacier and transferred to the Columbus module where they were assembled and installed into the Biolab Incubator.  The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

JAXA Low Temperature (LT) Protein Crystal Growth (PCG):  PCG samples were retrieved from the Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST) and then the crew initiated the crystallization of the samples before inserting them back into the FROST where crystallization is continuing at a temperature of 4 degrees Celsius. The samples will remain in the FROST until they are returned on SpX-13 for evaluation by ground teams. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to make high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

Dose Distribution Inside the ISS – 3D (DOSIS 3D): Passive radiation detectors were installed in the Columbus module in support of European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) DOSIS 3D investigation. This experiment uses several active and passive detectors to determine the radiation doses inside the ISS and provides documentation of the actual nature and distribution of the radiation fields. A concise three dimensional (3D) dose distribution map of all the segments of the ISS will be developed based on this data and data from JAXA and NASA monitoring devices.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Depress: The crew depressurized the JEM A/L and vented the remaining air in preparation for upcoming NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) activities.

Offline Zakrah

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #36 on: 12/21/2017 04:13 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/20/2017
...
APEX-05 Operations:  APEX-05 petri plates were installed into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis. 
...

Hiya NSF'ers...

A couple movies for you: APEX-05 petri plate insertion yesterday by astronaut Scott Tingle and day 1 photos today. The ISS went over our lab at the University of Wisconsin - Madison while Scott took the photos this morning. For more info about our experiment, you could ask me and/or check gilroylab.wordpress.com/experiment/

Happy holidays :)




Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #37 on: 12/22/2017 06:51 AM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?
« Last Edit: 12/22/2017 08:47 AM by Joachim »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #38 on: 12/22/2017 03:02 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/21/2017
 

Marrow: Upon wakeup a 53S crewmember collected breath and ambient air samples. With operator assistance, the subject collected blood samples to support the Marrow investigation. The blood samples were processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: During yesterday’s scheduled microscope operations for BioCell Habitats A and B, microscope issues inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) prevented ground teams from viewing video footage of the growing bone cells from the BioCells. With the deferment of the fixation of BioCell Habitat A, the crew was able to complete one of today’s media exchanges during yesterday’s operations. Ground teams worked to resolve the issue with the microscopy video downlink and rescheduled today’s activities.  This morning, using the MSG laptop screen as a workaround for the non-functional video monitor, the crew successfully completed the first microscopy of four Synthetic Bone Biocells, two each from Habitats A and B. Additionally, fixation of both Biocells from Habitat A was completed. The two Biocells from Habitat B were re-inserted into SABL for continued incubation and growth. The crew later continued Synthetic Bone operations by performing a media change for Habitat B.  Synthetic Bone uses BioCell habitats A, B, and C. The BioCell habitats will be used to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

MagVector: Today the crew performed setup activities and began the 7-day MagVector #15 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Zebrafish Muscle 2: After completing yesterday’s fixation operations for the experiment units (EUs) from Groups B and C, today the crew transferred the EUs from the refrigerator to the freezer of the MELFI. The EUs will remain in the MELFI freezer until they are returned on SpaceX-13. The results from Zebrafish Muscle 2 operations will help to determine whether atrophy of muscles under microgravity also occurs in zebrafish, and why that muscle atrophy occurs in microgravity. Physical exercise and control of posture are important for maintaining muscle mass and strength. In microgravity conditions, the postural, known as anti-gravity muscles, undergo atrophy because of prominent decrease in their gravity-dependent activity.

APEX-05 Operations:  Following yesterday’s installation of twenty APEX-05 petri plates into the VEGGIE facility to initiate the growth process, today the crew photographed the four spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) transfer to JEM Airlock (JEM A/L):  Overnight, JAXA ground teams removed NREP from JEM External Facility (JEM EF) Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) site 4 to the JEM A/L.  In early January, the crew will remove NREP from the JEM A/L, exchange samples on the platform, and then work with ground controllers to return NREP to EFU #4.

SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE) Survey:  After some anomalous data was observed during last weekend’s Dragon capture, Robotics ground controllers and the crew worked together to inspect the LEE for any potential damage induced.  Later in the day, ground controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to grapple the fixture on the PMM to gather loads data for further analysis.  Results are pending.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #39 on: 12/23/2017 04:48 PM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?

This blog entry with this photo https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/12/21/crew-heads-into-holidays-with-bone-and-muscle-research/ was also removed.
 
It's available only attached file :(
---
SMS ;-).

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 12/23/2017 05:49 PM »
Yesterday Flickr NASA Johnson published a hi res photo of Kanai in Cupola.
Today it is removed. Why?
Has someone saved the hi res version?

This blog entry with this photo https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/12/21/crew-heads-into-holidays-with-bone-and-muscle-research/ was also removed.
 
It's available only attached file :(

Here's a slightly larger version

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 12/23/2017 05:55 PM »
Here's the missing blog article that contained the photo:

Crew Heads into Holidays with Bone and Muscle Research
Mark Garcia - December 21, 2017

Three veteran International Space Station crew members and three first-time astronauts will spend Christmas and New Year’s Eve orbiting Earth. They are continuing to research how living in space affects the human body and maintaining the orbital laboratory.

Veteran cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov is spending his third holiday season in space having served on two previous Expeditions. He recently arrived Dec. 19 with NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and JAXA astronaut Norishige Kanai. Greeting the new crew were Expedition 54 Commander Alexander Misurkin and NASA astronauts Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei. Misurkin and Acaba are in the middle of their second station mission and this is Vande Hei’s first mission.

Today, the station residents explored why bone and muscle atrophy occur in space and ways to prevent that loss to keep astronauts healthy.

Kanai collected and stored his breath and blood samples for the Marrow study to understand what is happening to his bone marrow and blood cells during spaceflight. Kanai later joined Acaba peering at synthetic bone cells through a microscope. The synthetic material is being incubated and then integrated with real bone cells potentially benefitting bone health on Earth and in space.

Vande Hei studied zebrafish today observing how their muscles adapt to the microgravity environment. The experiment seeks to identify chemical, protein and cellular activity taking place during muscle atrophy that may lead to new drugs and treatments.


Cupola image captionExpedition 54-55 Flight Engineer Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is inside the International Space Station’s seven-windowed cupola as the Earth passes 250 miles below.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 12/27/2017 08:19 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/22/2017
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections – Cell-Free Epigenome: With operator assistance, a 53S subject conducted blood sample collections to support the Cell Free Epigenome investigation. The blood samples were processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  In this study, blood samples are collected from astronauts and cellular genes are analyzed.  Blood carries molecular signals released from the cells inside the body. The results tell scientists how human body function during space flight.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the MSG with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container. After the bags were changed out, the cassettes were transferred back to the Bioculture System. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bio culture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Wide-field Camera Power/Data Cable Swap:  Today the crew replaced the damaged power/data cable to the LMM Wide-field Camera with the new cable that was flown on SpaceX-13. Ground controllers will begin checkouts later today.  The LMM wide-field camera is one of two primary science cameras in the new microscope configuration and will be used to support every payload investigation in the FIR. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

JEM Camera Robot:  Today the crew activated the JEM Camera Robot and captured video of it while it performed maneuvers through the module.  This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

APEX-05 Operations:  The crew photographed the four APEX-05 spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Nile Delta and the Iberian Peninsula. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Node 2 Nadir Bolt Inspection:  During recent berthing and unberthing activities, one of the bolts that secures a visiting vehicle to the Node2 Nadir port has shown anomalous loads.  Today, the crew inspected and photographed this bolt for evaluation of a possible R&R.  The CBM bolts can only be accessed from inside the habitable volume when a vehicle is berthed to that particular port, so this task is being performed during the SpaceX-13 berthed period.  When the onboard activity was completed, ground teams evaluated the imagery captured, and made the decision to replace the bolt.  That R&R activity will take place next week.

Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Flow Measurements:  Today the crew took airflow measurements in the IMV inlet for the Oxygen Generator System (OGS) Avionics Air Assembly (AAA) and in other locations in the USOS.  They used an expired Velocicalc measurement tool and a new calibrated Velocicalc for flow validation.

Dragon LiOH Removal:  Today, the crew removed the LiOH filter bag from Dragon.  The LiOH filter bag provided CO2 removal for the live cargo during Dragon free flyer operations.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Operations:  After extensive evaluation yesterday, including imagery and test grapples, engineering teams have cleared the SSRMS for operations.  Operations to remove payloads from the Dragon trunk and install them in their final locations on the outside of ISS will begin next week as planned.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 12/27/2017 08:19 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/25/2017
 

APEX-05 Operations:  Over the weekend, the crew photographed all of the APEX-05 petri plates, which includes twenty petri plates in the Veggie facility and four spares secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo-grid on the maintenance work area. Today the crew took additional images of the four spare petri plates.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Space Headaches: Two 53S crewmembers completed daily questionnaires to support a week-long ESA Space Headache session which started onboard Soyuz prior to docking. The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: Using the MSG laptop screen as a workaround for the non-functional video monitor, the crew completed microscopy and fixation operations of Synthetic Bone Biocells from Habitat B.  The crew also completed a media exchange for Habitat C. Synthetic Bone uses BioCells from Habitats A, B, and C to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

Dragon Cargo Transfer:  Today the crew completed the planned Dragon cargo unloading operations, with the exception of a few locations that contain items that aren’t immediately needed and will be removed at a later time.  In the coming days, the crew will begin packing and loading the cargo that will be returned on Dragon.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 12/27/2017 08:22 AM »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 12/28/2017 09:23 AM »
ISS configuration after Progress MS-06 departure.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 12/28/2017 10:20 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/26/2017
 

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, the crew removed the mice and restocked the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Amyloid Sample Transfer: To prepare for incubation activities tomorrow, today four Amyloid samples were retrieved from the -95 degree Celsius Dewar of the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and installed into the +2 degree Celsius Dewar of the MELFI.  Amyloid fibril is the protein aggregation that is known to be associated with various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. To develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. In this study, aiming to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation, we will prepare the high-quality homogeneous amyloid fibrils using microgravity environment, and bring back the samples to characterize the fibrillation process and intermediate structure by NMR and electron microscopic analyses.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change-Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the MSG with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container. After the bags were changed out, the cassettes were transferred back into the Bioculture System. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Space Test Program – H5 (STP-H5) Innovative Coatings Experiment (ICE): The crew photographed ICE material strips on STP-H5 from the Cupola and Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) windows.  The harsh radiation and extreme temperatures of space can corrode the paint and coatings that protect spacecraft exteriors, potentially damaging a spacecraft’s hull. Optical coatings are also important for robotic and human navigators, who would rely on specialized markings to capture or repair spacecraft. The STP-H5 ICE investigation studies new coatings for use on spacecraft in low Earth orbit, determining their stability after 2 years in space.  Photographs are taken at 60-day intervals.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of Italy and the Nile Delta. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP)-3: The crew pressurized the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) and performed a leak check today in preparation for return of the slide table and the (NREP)-3 into the JEM.  The Cavalier Space Processor, a passive remote sensor with onboard processing capability, will be installed on the NREP-3, which will be attached to the JEM External Facility next week.  NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Node 3 Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Maintenance:  The crew removed and replaced the WHC urine receptacle and insert filter. This was nominally planned periodic maintenance.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: This afternoon, Ground Controllers will translate the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 4 (WS4) to WS6 in preparation for Dragon external cargo activities scheduled for the next few days.  Once the MT is positioned at WS6, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) will be configured for external Dragon cargo operations.  They will unstow Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and setup for Total & Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) extraction from the Dragon trunk. They also will perform a Dragon Trunk Camera checkout and Dragon Trunk cargo survey.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 12/29/2017 06:04 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/27/2017
 

67 Progress (67P) Undock: This evening, 67P is scheduled to undock from the Service Module (SM) aft port at 7:03 PM CST.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: Four Arthrospira experiment containers were removed from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab.  Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) BioScience-2 Experiment Container (EC) Transfers: After being stowed in the STaARS facility for over 170 hours at 25 degrees Celsius, the crew transferred the STaARS BioScience-2 ECs from the facility into a +4 degrees Celsius Glacier.  BioScience-2 encompasses two experiments, Experiment Grimm and Experiment Ulrich, which is performed by three investigation teams, all utilizing the same hardware, but processing different biological samples. The principle aim of Experiment Grimm is to investigate how thyroid carcinoma cells react, when they are exposed to real microgravity. The expected information may help to improve in vitro cancer studies such as antitumor drug or transendothelial migration tests. Experiment Ulrich will investigate microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, the most important effector cells of the immune system, which are responsible for attacking and killing bacteria and other foreign and pathogenic intruders in the human body. The aim of the experiment is to analyze surface molecules, which are required for recognition of bacteria and cell-cell-communication, and to investigate the cytoskeletal architecture after several days in microgravity.

Amyloid Sample Transfer: The Amyloid samples were retrieved from the +2 degree Celsius Dewar of MELFI, installed in the measurement experiment unit and then attached to the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) where they were incubated for 6 hours. After the incubation was complete, the experiment units were detached from the CBEF and the samples were removed and stowed in the MELFI at -95 degrees Celsius. Amyloid fibril is the protein aggregation that is known to be associated with various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. To develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. In this study, aiming to elucidate the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation, we will prepare the high-quality homogeneous amyloid fibrils using microgravity environment, and bring back the samples to characterize the fibrillation process and intermediate structure by NMR and electron microscopic analyses.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 53S subject completed his Flight Day (FD)-15 blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Microbial Tracking-2:  A 52S subject completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

APEX-05 Operations:  The crew photographed the spare petri plates that are secured to the Advanced Biology Research Facility (ABRS) photo-grid on the maintenance work area.  When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from a Russian crewmember, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the RaDI-N experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation will be conducted by measuring neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the New Guinea River Inlets. This investigation creates a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot Activation:  Today the crew relocated the JEM Camera Robot Target Marker. They also activated the JEM Camera Robot and set the position in the JEM before taking video using the camera.

Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM) Gas Trap Manual Valves Reconfiguration: The crew set the Thermal Control Assembly Low Temperature Loop (TCA L) Gas Trap Manual Valves for Gas Trap operations.  They also activated the heater for Gas Trap.

Dragon Cargo Transfer:  Today the crew completed the planned Dragon cargo operations.  In the coming days, the crew will continue packing and loading the cargo that will be returned on Dragon.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 12/29/2017 07:02 AM »
Xmas time aboard the ISS (two pics and video - see attachment).
Source: Roscosmos VK page

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 12/31/2017 11:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/28/2017
 

67 Progress (67P) Undock: 67P undocked from the Service Module (SM) aft port at 7:03 PM CST on Wednesday evening.  The Deorbit burn was completed at 10:10 PM CST.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05):  The crew harvested thale cress from all 20 Petri plates in which the plants have been growing in the Veggie facility for the APEX-05 experiment.  They took close-up photos of each plate and inserted samples from the plants into fixation tubes, which were placed into cold stowage.  The Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants are grown from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS.  They are harvested and frozen samples are returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Amyloid: The crew retrieved the second set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS are returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.  It is expected that this study will provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. 

MagVector: Today the crew set up a cable to transfer data from the 7-day MagVector #15 run #15 that was completed today. This European Space Agency investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor provide insight into ways that the Earth’s magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research may help improve future ISS experiments and offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target Operations: Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the Australian desert today.  This investigation creates a series of videos showcasing Earth from space. These videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Swap and Commercial Resupply Services (CRS)-2 Feasibility Assessment:  The crew will review an overview of the EMU swap plan. EMU 3004 launched to ISS on Dragon in the Short EMU (SEMU) Launch Enclosure (SLE) and EMU 3010 will be returning.  The crew will transfer the SLE with EMU 3004 to Node 1 and remove the EMU.  They will swap the Vent Port and Battery Connector Covers between EMU 3004 and 3010. The SLE will be reinstalled into Dragon using new upper mounting pins and then EMU 3010 will be installed into the SLE in the Dragon cabin.  The hatch for CRS-2 will be too small to allow the SLE to be transferred to Node 1, so EMU rotations will need to occur in the CRS-2 Dragon cabin.  Performing the installation of EMU 3010 into the SLE in the Dragon cabin will build confidence and provide feedback for performing the swaps on CRS-2.

Simplified Aid for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Rescue (SAFER) Swap: SAFER 1016, on orbit has expired and SAFER 1018 was delivered on Dragon.  The crew will unpack SAFER 1018, install the battery, and perform a checkout.   They will pack SAFER 1016 for return on Dragon.

Node 2 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Bolt R&R:  The crew will removed the failed CBM Powered Bolt 1-3 on the Node 2 Nadir Bulkhead and will replace it with a new bolt.  The bolt showed anomalous signature during SpaceX-12 berthing and was masked for the SpaceX-13 berthing.

Offline EgorBotts

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 01/01/2018 11:42 AM »
Could someone explain to me or point to a link describing the main tasks of the next Russian EVA (Russian EVA 44) ?

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 01/01/2018 01:50 PM »
Could someone explain to me or point to a link describing the main tasks of the next Russian EVA (Russian EVA 44) ?

http://tass.ru/opinions/interviews/4757149
In the last part of this interview A. Shkaplerov is speaking about this EVA, but it is only in Russian.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 01/01/2018 02:14 PM »
Google translation:

Quote
You have to accomplish a spacewalk during the flight. What is the planned program?

- The main task of the output is to change the electronic unit at the antenna of the retransmission system "Luch". There is such a satellite antenna in the Russian segment that was delivered to the ISS along with the Zvezda service module during the assembly of the station. Then it was assumed that in the nearest future, satellite retransmitters "Ray" will appear and through them we will have a direct connection with the Earth. But, unfortunately, these were the 2000s and funding was inadequate, satellites were not created.

This antenna idled in space for 17 years, and although it physically works, but the element base there is already outdated. The satellites of the Luch system created today operate on a new element base. Therefore, in order to make the entire retransmission system for the ISS work, it is necessary to change the electronic unit on the antenna - the subscriber relay equipment.

The difficulty lies in the fact that when this service module was launched with the antenna, no one thought that it would have to change this unit in space. Therefore, we are going to have a very difficult and jeweled work: we will have to unscrew tens of bolts in thick gloves of the spacesuit, dismantle the block and put a new one. For this, three types of instruments were invented. We will unscrew one, if it does not go - the second, again not - the third. And earlier, during the previous exits, no one has tried to work in the place where the antenna is. I hope that we will do everything and we will have our onboard-to-Earth connection via the Luch retransmission system (currently the Russian segment uses the NASA retransmission system when the ISS is out of line of sight from Russia - TASS comment).

Probably, let's start some microsatellites

Also there are additional works during this exit. In particular, it will be necessary, if time is enough, to disconnect and dismantle the measuring blocks from the experiment "Furnishings" with subsequent disposal by the method of throwing away from the ISS, to take some samples off the cladding of the station.

Probably, we will start some microsatellites. They are launched in a certain direction with their hands, and it is necessary that they do not rotate. I plan to go to outer space on February 2.

"How do you like the new spacesuit?"

- In the new spacesuit added automatic temperature control - it's like in cars climate control. Earlier it was necessary to manually make it warmer or colder, depending on which side of the station is at the exit: on the sunny or shady. Now this is all done by the automation, which redistributes the water streams inside a special thermoregulating water suit, put on you under a spacesuit.

In the new spacesuit the material of the hermetic shell changed - it seems to have become tougher, well, it needs to go out and work, then I can make a conclusion.

« Last Edit: 01/01/2018 02:15 PM by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 01/03/2018 02:53 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/29/2017
 

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: The crew completed microscopy operations for Synthetic Bone and then took a sample from each well on the Synthetic Bone Multiwell BioCell and exchanged the fluids with media in each well.  The samples were placed in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  This experiment uses facilities aboard the ISS to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space.  Sets of bone cell cultures are grown with different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for analysis.

Biological Research In Canisters Light Emitting Diode (BRIC-LED):  The crew performed actuation on the BRIC-LED-001 canisters today.  The BRIC-LED-001 investigation demonstrates the use of light emitting diodes as a lighting source in BRIC hardware and evaluates its use in growing plants in a closed system. Arabidopsis thaliana plants are grown for 10 days onboard the ISS at ambient temperature, with light provided by this new lighting source.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  A crewmember completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation today. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Marrow: Upon waking this morning a crewmember collected breath and ambient air samples. The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew took images of the India-Himalayas-Tibetan Plateau, Europe/Italy in winter conditions and the Nile delta.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches: Two crewmembers completed daily questionnaires today to support a week-long ESA Space Headaches session which started in the Soyuz vehicle prior to docking to the ISS. The Space Headaches investigation requests crewmembers to respond to a questionnaire that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Dragon External Cargo Operations:  Overnight, Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and reconfigured the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM1) to grasp and rotate the SPDM Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP). They then maneuvered the SPDM and Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to use SPDM OTCM1 to grasp and extract the Total & Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) payload from the SpaceX-13 Dragon Trunk and to stow it on the SPDM EOTP. Finally, the SPDM and SSRMS were configured to a park position. Operations were nominal.

Ammonia Measurement Kits (AMK) Chip Changeout:  The Ammonia measurement system chips installed in the AMKs were set to expire at the end of the year. The crew replaced these in both kits with new chips that arrived on Orbital ATK 8 (OA-8).

SpaceX 13 (SpX-13) Dragon Cargo Ops:  The crew continued packing items for return on SpX-13.  As of Thursday, approximately 31 hours of cargo ops have been completed. SpX-13 is scheduled to unberth and return to earth on January 13, 2018.

53 Soyuz (53S) Unpack:  Today the crew completed unpacking and stowage of all United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) hardware that arrived on 53S.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 01/03/2018 02:54 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/02/2018
 

Amyloid: Over the weekend, the crew retrieved the third set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS will be returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. This study is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository):  On Saturday, a 53S subject completed his Flight Day (FD)15 urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Over the weekend, the crew removed two LMM APEX-05 petri plates from the MELFI and installed them into the VEGGIE facility to begin the growth process of the plants. When plants grow in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Cell Science Validation Bioreactor and Sample Bag Removal: Over the weekend, the crew removed the bioreactors and the sample bags from the Cell Science Validation cassettes in the Bioculture System facility and stowed them in the MELFI. Today the crew replaced the used gas supply with a new one to allow the Bioculture System to keep running the Cell Science Payload. This flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. Furthermore, the new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will be demonstrated.  Overall, the validation of the performance of the Bioculture System in the space flight environment is a critical step to insure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Over the weekend and today, a 52S subject completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, today the crew removed the mice and restocked the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot Operations: The crew disconnected the JEM Camera Robot USB power cable from the JEM Camera Robot and connected the USB power/data cable to the JEM Camera Robot to allow the ground team to perform a software update. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

Meteor Hard Drive Replacement: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Airlock Unstow Operations: The crew unstowed hardware from the Airlock which is not needed for the upcoming Extravehicular Activity (EVA)s, and prepared the Airlock to support EVA operations. They also charged ancillary Batteries in the Battery Stowage Assembly (BSA) for the EVAs.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Operations: Today, the crew removed the Short Extravehicular Mobility Unit (SEMU) from the Launch Enclosure (SLE) in order to remove the SEMU Soft Stow Covers and SOP Ancillary hardware. The crew also resized EMUs 3008, 3003, and 3004 in preparation for the upcoming EVAs later this month.

Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Water Sample Collection: The crew collected water samples from the PWD for in-flight analysis. This water sample collection activity will occur multiple times throughout the expedition and the number of water samples collected will vary each time. Analysis of the water samples collected during this activity will occur during separate activities later in the timeline.

Robotic Operations:  Over the weekend, ground robotics operators removed the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) from the SpX-13 Dragon trunk and installed it at Express Logistics Carrier (ELC)3 site 5.  Yesterday, robotics operations continued with the removal of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS) payload from the trunk and its installation on the Columbus External Payload Facility (EPF), at the Starboard Overhead X-Direction (SOX) site.  Last night, the RapidScat payload and its nadir adapter were removed from the Starboard Deck X-Direction (SDX) site of the Columbus EPF.  Later this evening, the two items will be stowed in the Dragon trunk.  This will complete Dragon trunk operations for this mission.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 01/03/2018 04:33 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/02/2018
 

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Operations: Today, the crew removed the Short Extravehicular Mobility Unit (SEMU) from the Launch Enclosure (SLE) in order to remove the SEMU Soft Stow Covers and SOP Ancillary hardware. The crew also resized EMUs 3008, 3003, and 3004 in preparation for the upcoming EVAs later this month.


Hmmm... I specifically heard that 3004 and 3006 are mounted in the airlock and nothing about 3008 or 3003.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 01/04/2018 02:11 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/3/2018
 

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a 53S crewmember instrumented himself with Thermolab Double Sensors and mount the Thermolab Unit to their belt, and began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: The crew removed four Arthrospira-B experiment containers from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab. Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira-B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

Synthetic Bone BioCell Operations: Today, the crew performed microscopy operations for Synthetic Bone and then took a sample from each well on the Synthetic Bone Multiwell BioCell and exchanged the fluids with media in each well.  The samples were placed in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Synthetic Bone uses BioCells from three habitats to test the functionality and effectiveness of new material that can assist in recovery from bone injuries or dental work during long-term space travel. Determining how well Tetranite integrates with bone cell cultures can also inform general strategies for addressing bone loss in space. Synthetic Bone examines the cellular response to a new type of bone adhesive in the microgravity environment of space. This experiment uses facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to grow bone cells in the presence of a commercially available bone adhesive, and a new product called Tetranite. Sets of bone cell cultures grow with the different adhesives for 20 days and are then fixed, frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed analysis in a fully equipped biological laboratory.

MagVector: Today the crew began the 7-day MagVector #16 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval: A USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment, and handed them to a Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning & Inspection: The crew removed the closeout panels at Node 3 to inspect a plastic sleeve coupling the IMV valve to the Node 3 ducting. Results from the inspection are being analyzed, and will be used to determine if any degradation of the coupling has occurred. BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assembly (CPA) Rotation and Closeout:  Today the crew modified the CPAs on Node2 Nadir, the port where the Dragon capsule is currently berthed.  The CPA mod kits were launched on OA-8, but the kits can only be installed on ports where a vehicle is currently attached.  Node1 Nadir was completed during the OA-8 mission, and Node2 Nadir was being completed today.  This modification will allow the CPAs to be rotated into the vestibule rather than requiring that the crew remove them completely after a vehicle arrives.  This will save both crew time and stowage space during a berthed mission.  The CPAs must be installed for proper CBM operation during berthing activities, but they obstruct the pathway into the vehicle once the hatch is opened, so they need to be moved out of the corridor prior to cargo operations.

Robotic Operations:  Last night, robotics ground controllers completed the SpaceX-13 mission’s final external robotic payload operations by installing RapidScat and its nadir adapter in the trunk.    The RapidScat payload had been removed from its mounting location outside of the Columbus module on Monday.  After the SpaceX-13 Dragon capsule departs the ISS, its trunk, with RapidScat in it, will separate from the return capsule and continue toward its destructive re-entry to the atmosphere.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 01/05/2018 09:59 AM »
January 04, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-002

Indiana Students to Speak with Astronauts on International Space Station

Primary school students in Indianapolis will speak live with astronauts living and working on the International Space Station at 12:15 p.m. EST Thursday, Jan. 11. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 54 astronauts Mark Vande Hei of NASA and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will talk to approximately 300 students and 30 teachers gathered at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The students and teachers have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and current research and activities aboard the space station.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Becky Wolfe at 317-334-4618 or [email protected] The Children’s Museum is located at 3000 North Meridian Street.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow NASA astronauts on Twitter at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

Videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station are available at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 01/05/2018 02:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/4/2018
 

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP)-3 Payload Swap:  Today crewmembers extended the JEM A/L slide table into the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM) and exchanged payloads on NREP by removing the External Platform Module 2 (Charge Injector Device), External Platform Module 4 (Dependable Microprocessor) before installing the External Platform Module 5 (Cavalier) on NREP. The slide table was retracted from the JPM side and the inner hatch was closed, and depressurization and ventilation was completed. The Cavalier experiment is a technology demonstration mission with a goal to provide hands on opportunities for working with flight hardware. NREP will remain inside the JEM Airlock until next week when it will be deployed to the JEM External Facility site #4. Cavalier is a 4U active payload that will remain on NREP for approximately six months. NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Cell Science Validation Bag Change-Out Operations: The crew replaced the Bioculture System Cassette media and sump bags in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) with the media and sump bags from an ambient stowage container and then transferred the cassettes back into the Bioculture System. Once the change out activities were completed, the crew removed the Life Science Ancillary Hardware (LSAH) hardware from the MSG to conclude the Cell Science Validation operations. The objective of this flight of the Bioculture System is to validate the hardware by testing and checking out its engineering and operational capability to maintain cell cultures for a long duration in the space flight environment on the ISS. The new enabling capabilities and procedures to manually conduct experiments with the specimens cultured in the Bioculture System will also be demonstrated.  The validation of the Bioculture System performance in the space flight environment is a critical step to ensure the success of future space bioscience experiments that will be conducted on ISS using this facility.

Lighting Effects:  A 53S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

At Home in Space:  A 53S crewmember completed an At Home in Space questionnaire today. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

ZBook Transitions:  Today the crew continued activities to transition the laptops onboard from the T61P model to the newer ZBook model.  Today’s transitions include SSCs 1 (in the Russian segment) and 22 (attached to T2).

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 01/06/2018 12:08 PM »
January 05, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-004

Puerto Rico Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station
 

Several hundred students from 30 schools across Puerto Rico will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:15 a.m. EST Friday, Jan. 12. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will travel to Manatí, Puerto Rico, for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, and will have an opportunity to ask questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Although Acaba is a native Californian, both of his parents were born in Puerto Rico. Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth in February.

Some 30 school districts from 12 cities participate in the Puerto Rico Institute of Robotics’ (PRIOR) network, which was selected through a competitive process to host a downlink with the station. PRIOR is a dynamic collaboration of educators, business leaders and representative from local government and the military, working to introduce and link students, teachers, and the community to the vast array of space, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) resources in their region.

Students from across the participating districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and the current research and activities happening aboard the station. More than 500 attendees are expected to be on-site at Manatí during the downlink event.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Wence Lopez via email at [email protected] or phone at 787-385-1200. Juan Aubin Cruz Coliseum will host the event at Coto Sur, Manatí, Puerto Rico.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 01/09/2018 08:15 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/5/2018

Amyloid: Today the crew retrieved the final set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) where they will remain until they are returned on SpaceX-13. Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS are returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.  It is expected that this study will provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  A 52S crewmember collected surface and air samples to characterize the different types of microbial locations on the ISS. The samples were placed inside a MELFI in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Circadian Rhythms: The 53S subject removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36-hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Wednesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 52S subject conducted his Flight Day (FD) 120 blood sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in MELFI.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

At Home in Space:  A 53S crewmember completed an At Home in Space questionnaire this morning. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Igniter Tip Alignment for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Operations: To properly align the ACME igniter tip with the ACME coflow burner, the crew removed the chamber insert from the CIR combustion chamber and restrained it to the maintenance work area, before aligning the igniter tip to the coflow burner. The crew then reinstalled and connected the chamber insert into the CIR combustion chamber.  The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Transparent Alloys Cartridge Installation: After the installation of the cartridge into the Transparent Alloys hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), there was poor contact between the Transparent Alloys hardware and the cold plate in the MSG that resulted in the inability to properly control the heating of the cartridge. Ground teams are working a plan to resolve this configuration issue.  The experiment run for this investigation will be deferred until after the configuration is corrected next week and then will run for a month. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment is: to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

ZBook Transitions:  Today the crew finished the transition of laptops in the Russian segment from the T61P model to the newer ZBook model.

Cargo operations:  Today, the crew continued working to pack cargo into the SpX-13 Dragon capsule for return to Earth.  Hatch closure is planned for January 12th.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 01/10/2018 07:30 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/8/2018
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Over the weekend, a 52S subject completed his Flight Day (FD) 120 urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Today the crew photographed the APEX-05 petri plates growing in the Veggie facility. Before installing the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) for imaging, the crew checked that the inside of the petri plates were free of condensation and the outside of the plate was dry. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Transparent Alloys Operation: During the installation of the cartridge last week, there was poor contact between the Transparent Alloys hardware and the cold plate in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), which resulted in the inability to properly control the heating of the cartridge. Results from the analysis of the MSG configuration determined that the MSG cold plate still had some M6 plugs installed that prevented good contact and heat transfer between the Transparent Alloys payload and the MSG cold plate. Today the crew removed the plugs, and after activation, the temperature readings are now in the nominal and expected range. This experiment run has started, and will last for a month. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment are: to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Airway Monitoring Overview and Hardware Gather: The crew reviewed reference material and gathered hardware to support the upcoming Airway Monitoring session this week.  With dust particles present in the International Space Station atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.   

Dragon Operations: The crew continued with Dragon cargo loading operations.  They installed a Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) filter into the Dragon vehicle to scrub CO2 after hatch closure and completed a checkout of the Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU) Crew Command Panel (CCP) in preparation for Dragon release operations.  Dragon hatch closure and unberth is scheduled for January 12 with release scheduled on January 13.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew set up a Station Support Computer (SSC) and relocated items out of the airlock.  They completed 1 of 2 training sessions on using the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) and Enhanced Caution and Warning System (ECWS).  The crew also performed a checkout of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU 3004) that was delivered on Dragon SpaceX-13.  The two planned EVA crewmembers also took EMU sizing measurements for the On-Orbit Fitcheck.

Offline Zakrah

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 01/11/2018 01:10 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/8/2018
 
...
Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Today the crew photographed the APEX-05 petri plates growing in the Veggie facility. Before installing the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) for imaging, the crew checked that the inside of the petri plates were free of condensation and the outside of the plate was dry. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.
...

Expedition 54 astronaut Scott Tingle working at the Light Microscopy Module getting ready to remove our APEX-05 petri plate on Tuesday.


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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 01/11/2018 03:00 PM »
"Spheres Zero Robotics" right now, by Joe Acaba and Alexander Misurkin, Kibo lab...

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 01/12/2018 06:23 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/10/2018
 

Airway Monitoring Measurement Operations: Using the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PPFS) for guidance, today two crewmembers performed two different measurement protocols; the low Nitric Oxide (NO) protocol which determines how much NO is exhaled with the respiration, and the high NO protocol, which determines how much NO is diffused into the blood. The protocols were initially performed in the Airlock at an ambient pressure and then repeated at a low pressure (10.2 psi). At the low pressure, oxygen concentration in the Airlock is increased to 27.5%. The primary goal of the Airway Monitoring experiment is to determine how gravity and microgravity influences the turnover of Nitric Oxide in the lungs. During future manned missions to the Moon and to Mars, airway inflammation due to toxic dust inhalation is a risk factor. Since dust may cause airway inflammation and since such inflammation can be monitored by exhaled Nitric Oxide analysis, the present study is highly relevant for astronaut health in future space programs. The US Airlock, for this experiment is used as a hypobaric facility for performing science. Utilizing the US Airlock will allow unique opportunities for the study of gravity, ambient pressure interactions, and their effect on the human body.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: The crew removed four Arthrospira experiment containers from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab. Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 53S subject concluded his Flight Day (FD) 30 urine sample collection that began yesterday to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  The crew inserted two APEX-05 RNAlater Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fixation Tubes (KFT)s into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) prior to return on SpaceX-13 (SpX-13). The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6) Transporter Setup: To prepare for the return of two of the four animal transporters on SpaceX-13, the crew reviewed reference material and participated in a conference about live animal return operations. The crew also set up and conducted checkout activities on the live animal transporter. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) Operations:  Ground teams maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module) Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to transfer NREP from the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) slide table to the Exposed Facility Unit (EFU)-4. After transfer operations were complete, the JEMRMS was maneuvered back to a stowed position and NREP was activated via ground command.  NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Dragon Release On Board Training (OBT):  This morning, the crew performed onboard training for this weekend’s upcoming release of the SpaceX-13 Dragon capsule.  The training included the use of the Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT) and a private conference with ground-based trainers.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #65 on: 01/12/2018 02:27 PM »
January 12, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-010

Idaho Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on International Space Station

Students from 10 schools in Idaho will speak with a NASA astronaut living and working aboard the International Space Station at 11:25 a.m. EST Tuesday, Jan. 17. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Approximately 400 students will travel to Boise State University for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba, who arrived at the orbiting laboratory Sept. 12. They will have an opportunity to ask him questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Brady Moore at [email protected] or 208-426-1586. The location of the event is 1910 University Dr.

Boise State University was selected through a competitive process to host a downlink with the space station. Students in the participating districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and current research and activities aboard the space station.

Linking students directly to astronauts in space provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #66 on: 01/12/2018 04:00 PM »
ISS Expedition 54 In-Flight Educational Event with the Puerto Rico Institute of Robotics in San Juan, Puerto Rico and Flight Engineer Joe Acaba.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 01/13/2018 09:43 AM »
ISS configuration updated after Dragon CRS-13 departure at 09.58 UTC

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #68 on: 01/16/2018 08:48 PM »
The evening DPC was conducted by the Flight Director because of reduced manning due to weather.  He joked about an unknown solid substance present outside that had been submitted for analysis :)  Marshall also is impacted cancelling an experiment tomorrow due to ground support unavailability.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #69 on: 01/17/2018 10:30 AM »
January 16, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-012
Massachusetts Students to Speak with Astronauts on Space Station


Students at Framingham State University (FSU) in Massachusetts will speak with astronauts living, working, and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 12:15 p.m. EST Friday, Jan. 19. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will make the call to Expedition 54 astronauts Joe Acaba, Scott Tingle, of NASA, and Norishige Kanai, of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Acaba arrived at the station Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth in February. Tingle and Kanai arrived Dec. 19 and are scheduled to return to Earth in June.

FSU is the alma mater of Christa McAuliffe, a payload specialist on space shuttle Challenger’s STS 51-L, which was lost during launch in 1986. McAuliffe was going to be the world’s first teacher in space, and FSU is the home of the McAuliffe Center, one of Challenger Center’s more than 40 learning centers. The McAuliffe Center received more than 200 questions from 83 students from a wide range of majors at FSU, and chose 25 questions to be asked during the downlink. Some 250 students are expected to attend.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Lisa Vernal via email at [email protected] or phone at 412-337-3880. The event will take place at the McCarthy Center Forum at Framingham State University 93 State Street, Framingham.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.


Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #70 on: 01/17/2018 10:32 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/11/2018

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics (ZR):  Today the crew provided support for a SPHERES ZR Challenge competition between students from High Schools around the world. The SPHERES-Zero-Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the International Space Station (ISS). As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Probiotics Operations: Today a crewmember initiated the first of four sampling phases of the JAXA Probiotic investigation by collecting fecal samples and immediately stowing the samples into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). This sampling phase includes fecal and saliva sample collections and a questionnaire. The saliva sample collection and questionnaire for this phase will be conducted this weekend. Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of probiotics on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts under closed microgravity environment This investigation studies the effects of beneficial bacteria (Probiotics) to improve crew members’ intestinal microbiota as well as their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6) Transporter Setup: To prepare for return on SpaceX-13, the crew activated the lixit water bottles, installed food bars, and transferred the rodents from habitats 1 and 2 to the animal transporter. After the rodents were transferred, the transporter were moved from the US Lab to the SpaceX vehicle. The rodents in habitats 3 and 4 will remain on the International Space Station (ISS).  The RR-6 mission uses mice flown aboard the ISS and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew took images of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest.  The crew also used the Red camera to take images of Fitz Roy, Patagonia. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Made in Space Removal and Stow: To create space for the crew to reach the Made in Space Fiber Optics’ bolts in the back of EXPRESS Rack (ER7), the crew removed Manufacturing Device from ER7 locker 6.  After the Made in Space Fiber Optics was removed and stowed, the crew reinstalled the Manufacturing Device back into ER7.  The Optical Fiber Production in Microgravity (Made in Space Fiber Optics) investigation demonstrates the merits of manufacturing fiber optic filaments in microgravity. The fiber optic material chosen for this demonstration is ZBLAN. Research indicates this material has the potential for better optical qualities than the silica used in most fiber optic cable. This demonstration of the scientific and commercial merits of manufacturing exotic optical fiber in microgravity could set the stage for large scale manufacture of high-quality fiber optic fiber in orbit.

Airway Monitoring US Airlock Reconfiguration: Following yesterday’s successful Airway Monitoring session in the Airlock, today the crew will disconnect and stow the experiment hardware and reconfigure the Airlock back to its nominal configuration. Airway Monitoring is the first experiment to use the US Airlock as a hypobaric facility for performing science. Utilizing the US Airlock will allow unique opportunities for the study of gravity, ambient pressure interactions, and their effect on the human body. This investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Petri Plants Plate Installation: Using the light meter, the crew recorded the light intensity for the Petri Plates and took science photos of the plates before checking that inside of Petri Plate was free of condensation and the outside of the plate was dry to install the LMM for imaging.  The crew subsequently removed the LMM Petri base from the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC) and installed the Petri Plate onto the LMM petri base before installing them into the LMM AFC. Plants cultivated in microgravity look mostly normal, but space-grown plants have a number of distinct features compared to plants grown in comparable habitats on Earth, most notably in the way their roots grow. The Characterizing Arabidopsis Root Attractions-2 (CARA-2) investigation studies the molecular signals that can cause these changes, including the genetic underpinnings of how a plant senses the direction of gravity. Results can improve efforts to grow plants in microgravity on future space missions, enabling crews to use plants for food and oxygen.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator R&R:  After recent incidents of repeated annunciations of the “check separator” warning light on the WHC, the crew changed out the WHC Pump Separator.  This hardware had been approaching end of life.
« Last Edit: 01/17/2018 10:33 AM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #71 on: 01/17/2018 10:33 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/12/2018

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Dragon Unberth:  Today, the crew completed the final packing of critical items into the Dragon Spacecraft. They then egressed the vehicle and removed utility jumpers, followed by the depressurization of the Node 2 to Dragon vestibule.  Ground teams then utilized the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to unberth and maneuver Dragon to an overnight park position.  Dragon release is scheduled for early Saturday morning at ~4:00 AM CST with splashdown occurring at ~9:36 AM CST the same day.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew setup and configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained the Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Petri Plant Plate Removal: The LMM Petri Base with the Petri Plate was removed from the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC).  The crew also removed the plate from the base, and re-installed the base into the LMM AFC. Plants cultivated in microgravity look mostly normal, but space-grown plants have a number of distinct features compared to plants grown in comparable habitats on Earth, most notably in the way their roots grow. The Characterizing Arabidopsis Root Attractions-2 (CARA-2) investigation studies the molecular signals that can cause these changes, including the genetic underpinnings of how a plant senses the direction of gravity. Results can improve efforts to grow plants in microgravity on future space missions, enabling crews to use plants for food and oxygen.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 53S subject completed his Flight Day (FD) 30 blood sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were then placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).

The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
Cell Science Validation Locker (Bioculture System) Transfer for Return: The Bioculture System was removed from EXPRESS Rack 7 of the ISS and installed and powered on SpX-13 Dragon for return. The Bioculture System is space biological science incubator for use on the ISS, with the capability of transporting active and stored experiments. This incubator supports a wide diversity of tissue, cell, and microbiological cultures and experiment methods to meet any space flight research experiment goals and objectives.  The facility enables variable duration and long-duration cellular and microbiological experiments on ISS to meet the scientific needs of academic and biotechnology interests.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Red camera, the crew took images of South Florida to the Bahamas. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #72 on: 01/17/2018 10:34 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/15/2018

Vascular Echo: With ground team assistance, a 53S crewmember performed a Vascular Echo protocol, which included scans of his neck, thigh, portal vein, and heart. Following the scanning activity, the subject completed three consecutive blood pressure measurements using the Cardio-lab Holter Arterial blood pressure unit. Vascular Echo examines changes in blood vessels, and the heart, while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crewmember health, and quality of life for everyone.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S subject began a 24-hour urine sample collection to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).

The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.
Intracranial Pressure & Visual Impairment (IPVI): A 52S crewmember took both front and side view pictures to check for any facial edema, followed by a conference with ground experts.  The IPVI investigation studies changes to crewmembers’ eyes and optic nerves by analyzing arterial blood pressure and blood flow to the brain before and after spaceflight. This investigation uses non-invasive methods to measure intracranial pressure instead of the more common invasive methods.

Meteor Hard Drive Swap-out with Diffraction Grating Configuration: The crew removed and replaced the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) hard drive and changed the diffraction grating in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Red camera, the crew took images of Fitz Roy, Patagonia. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

SpaceX (SpX)-13 Dragon Departure: On Saturday at 4:00am CST, the ISS Crew released Dragon utilizing the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). Following Dragon departure, Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to a park position and provided video support of the Node 2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) petals closure. Dragon splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Saturday at 9:38am CST.  Recovery forces then retrieved cargo, including human and animal science samples, biotechnology studies, and physical science and education investigations.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Operations: The crew performed EMU 3004 suit maintenance, which included scrubbing and iodination of EMU and Airlock cooling water loops. A water sample was taken for subsequent conductivity testing in order to determine the effectiveness of the scrubbing.

Hatch Seal Inspection: The crew performed scheduled maintenance to clean the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) hatch seals in Columbus, Node 2, Airlock, Node 3, Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). They will also inspect the sealing surface and hatch handle mechanism for Foreign Object Debris (FOD) or damage.

Transition to (X2) R16 Software:  As part of the R16 software transition starting today, the crew will install hard drives containing the latest Portable Computer System (PCS) software (R19) onto 5 PCS laptops. Once installed, the ground will load the latest Command and Control software (R16) onto the Command and Control Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM)s. The software transition is expected to be completed on January 18th.

Offline SciNews

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #73 on: 01/17/2018 08:34 PM »
Planned orbit correction on 17 January 2018, 20:15 UTC
https://www.roscosmos.ru/24570/
Google translate:
Quote
the orbital parameters of the ISS after the maneuver were:
• The minimum height above the Earth's surface is 402.8 km,
• the maximum height above the Earth's surface is 422.7 km,
• the circulation period is 92.60 minutes,
• inclination of the orbit - 51.625 degrees.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #74 on: 01/19/2018 09:17 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/16/2018
 
Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, today the crew refilled the rodent habitat water supply using the water refill kit and later remove the mice and restocked the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nano-channel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Gas Chromatograph (GC) Supply Bottle Preparation for Testing: The crew removed the CIR helium burst disk from the CIR optics bench before replacing the CIR GC helium bottle, argon bottle, and the check gas bottle. The CIR is used to perform combustion experiments in microgravity. The CIR can be reconfigured easily on orbit to accommodate a variety of combustion experiments. It consists of an optics bench, a combustion chamber, a fuel and oxidizer management system, environmental management systems, and interfaces for science diagnostics and experiment specific equipment.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S subject concluded his Flight Day (FD) 120 urine sample collection that began yesterday to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew captured images of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and the Gulf of Thailand. The crew also used the Red camera to take images of S. Australia and Tasmania.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations:  In preparation for the US EVAs later this month, the crew utilized the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) Software to review translation paths during the upcoming EVA, followed by a conference with ground specialists to answer any questions. The first of the two EVAs to swap Latching End Effectors (LEEs) and bring a failed LEE inside is scheduled for Tuesday, January 23rd.

Hatch Seal Inspection: Yesterday the crew performed hatch seal inspections on several of the hatch seals on the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS). Today, the crew continued this scheduled maintenance to clean the hatch seals in Node 1, Lab, Node 2, and Node 3. They also inspected the sealing surface and hatch handle mechanism for Foreign Object Debris (FOD) or damage.

Transition to (X2) R16 Software:  As part of the R16 software transition, the crew installed hard drives containing the latest Portable Computer System (PCS) software (R19) onto two remaining PCS laptops. The X2R16 software transition is expected to be completed on January 18th. Ground controllers then updated the software on the Payload Multiplexor-Demultiplexor (PL MDM), along with the last Command & Control (C&C) MDM.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #75 on: 01/19/2018 02:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/17/2018
 

CORRECTIONS TO TODAY’s REPORT:
•Circadian Rhythms activity was deferred due to conflicts with the OFV tomorrow.  It will be performed tomorrow.
•Added ISS Reboost with SM Main Engines

Circadian Rhythms [Deferred]:  Today a 53S crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab Double Sensors, mounted the Thermolab Unit to their belt, and began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: This morning, the crew removed the Arthrospira experiment containers from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab. Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator for processing. The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space, which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Tether Slosh: Today the crew set up the SPHERES Tether Slosh hardware and cameras and began executing the test sessions. SPHERES Tether Slosh combines fluid dynamics equipment with robotic capabilities aboard the International Space Station to investigate automated strategies for steering passive cargo that contain fluids. In space, the fluid fuels used by spacecraft can slosh around in unpredictable ways making space maneuvers difficult. This investigation uses two SPHERES robots tethered to a fluid-filled container covered in sensors to test strategies for safely steering spacecraft such as dead satellites that might still have fuel in the tank.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Petri Plants Plate Installation: Using the light meter in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), the crew took light intensity measurements before transporting the plates to the Lab to photograph the plates with and without lids.  Plants cultivated in microgravity look mostly normal, but space-grown plants have a number of distinct features compared to plants grown in comparable habitats on Earth, most notably in the way their roots grow. The Characterizing Arabidopsis Root Attractions-2 (CARA-2) investigation studies the molecular signals that can cause these changes, including the genetic underpinnings of how a plant senses the direction of gravity. Results can improve efforts to grow plants in microgravity on future space missions, enabling crews to use plants for food and oxygen.

Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) sensor move: Today the crew moved a SAMS sensor drawer from EXPRESS Rack (ER) 4 to ER 5.  Space Acceleration Measurement System-II (SAMS-II) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the International Space Station (ISS) resulting from the operation of hardware, crew activities, dockings and maneuvering. Results generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the ISS.

Lighting Effects:  A crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Transition to (X2) R16 Software:  As part of the R16 software transition, ground controllers configured the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and Thermal Control System (TCS) equipment and then updated the software on the Hub Control Zone (HCZ) Multiplexor-Demultiplexor (MDM). After the HCZ MDM update was completed, the ground controllers returned the ECLSS and TCS equipment to the nominal configuration.  The software transition is expected to be completed on January 18th.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations: The crew performed tool gathering activities in support of the upcoming EVAs.  The crew then performed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3003 and 3008 suit maintenance, including scrubbing and iodination of EMU and Airlock cooling water loops. A water sample was taken for subsequent conductivity testing in order to determine the effectiveness of the scrubbing.  The crew also performed checkout of the hardware powered by the Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly (REBA) batteries.

ISS Reboost:  Today ground teams commanded an ISS reboost using the Service Module (SM) Main Engines. This maneuver, in combination with the next maneuver planned for GMT 30, will set up the proper conditions for the 69P 2-orbit rendezvous test on GMT 42 and 52S landing on GMT 59.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #76 on: 01/19/2018 02:21 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/18/2018
 

Plant Habitat Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Hose Connection: Today the crew removed and replaced the acoustic blanket and growth chamber door before retrieving the GN2 filter and connecting it to the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack nitrogen. The other end was connected to the GN2 hose in order to perform a GN2 leak check. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS Rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a 53S crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab Double Sensors, mounted the Thermolab Unit to their belt, and began 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythm investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Wireless Sensor Network (WiseNet) Hardware Installation:  Today the crew installed the WiseNet Base Station on MagVector rack front panel, inserted the USB Boot Stick, and installed WiseNet sensors at dedicated locations inside the US Lab, Node 2, and Columbus. The goal of the WiseNet technology demonstrator is to establish the functionality of low power Radio Frequency (RF) networks within the ISS environment using low power sensor-nodes. These sensors form a wireless network on board ISS to monitor environmental factors such as temperature, pressure, and humidity.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): The crew took images of Southern California using the Red camera. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos highlighting Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment.

Transition to (X2) R16 Software:  In order to complete the R16 software transition, ground controllers configured the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and Thermal Control System (TCS) equipment and then updated the software on the S0, LSYS, and LA-2 Multiplexor-Demultiplexors (MDMs). After the MDM updates were completed, the ground controllers returned the ECLSS and TCS equipment to the nominal configuration.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations: The crew performed on orbit fit verification (OFV) operations to configure Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) 3003 and 3008 properly for the upcoming EVAs.  The crew also configured EVA tools for use outside the station.  Next Tuesday, two crewmembers will exit the station and perform maintenance on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) by swapping a Latching End Effector (LEE) from the SSRMS with a spare.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #77 on: 01/19/2018 08:44 PM »
Some interesting and spectacular views from SSRMS camera (The arm itself, being controlled by ROBO at MCC-H), a few moments ago....
« Last Edit: 01/19/2018 09:25 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #78 on: 01/19/2018 09:08 PM »
Now SSRMS's LEE-A grapple the PDGF#1 on MBS
« Last Edit: 01/20/2018 11:35 AM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #79 on: 01/23/2018 02:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/19/2018
 

Vascular Echo: After completing the Cardiolab (CDL) blood pressure measurement earlier this week, today the 53S subject performed the Vascular Echo Exercise Portable Doppler (PDOP) measurement with ground team assistance. Using the CDL PDOP, the crewmember donned the PDOP femoral probe and performed a 1-minute exercise followed by a resting period during which data was collected. The 1-minute exercise and data collection was repeated once more before the subject deactivated and stowed the hardware to conclude the activity. The Vascular Echo investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart, while the crew members are in space, and then follows their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Following the rodent habitat water supply refill earlier this week, today the crew checked for obvious signs of water leakage from the rodent habitat water boxes and confirmed that the lights are functioning. The crew stow both habitats for return. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaires for the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and bring improvement to the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Walkoff:  Later today, ground robotics controllers will command the SSRMS to perform three walkoff maneuvers to configure the SSRMS in preparation for the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) planned for this coming Tuesday.  A walkoff maneuver is one in which the SSRMS moves across the ISS like an inchworm, switching end over end.  The upcoming EVA has a primary goal of swapping Latching End Effector (LEE) B, so the SSRMS needs to be based on LEE A, and positioned where the crew can access it.  This set of triple walkoff maneuvers will position it accordingly.

EVA tool configuration and procedure reviews:  Today the crew configured tools and reviewed procedures for the EVA planned for next Tuesday.  They also participated in a conference with ground teams to address any questions and prepare for the EVA operations.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #80 on: 01/23/2018 02:20 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/22/2018
 

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Petri Plants Plate Operations: Over the weekend, the crew used the light meter in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to take light intensity measurements before transporting the plates to the Lab to photograph the plates with and without lids.  Plants cultivated in microgravity look mostly normal, but space-grown plants have a number of distinct features compared to plants grown in comparable habitats on Earth, most notably in the way their roots grow. The Characterizing Arabidopsis Root Attractions-2 (CARA-2) investigation studies the molecular signals that can cause these changes, including the genetic underpinnings of how a plant senses the direction of gravity. Results can improve efforts to grow plants in microgravity on future space missions, enabling crews to use plants for food and oxygen.

Circadian Rhythms: On Saturday, the 53S subject removed and stowed the double sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36-hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Thursday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well.

NeuroMapping: Today a 53S crewmember set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed his Flight Day 30 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  In support of the on-going RR-6 investigation, the crew removed the mice and restocked the two rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interior cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Plant Habitat Science Carrier Installation: The crew installed the science carrier into the Plant Habitat Facility and then powered down the science carrier microcontroller via the EXPRESS Rack 5 laptop computer. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS Rack and two International Sub-rack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Test Target Oil Dispensing: To prepare for upcoming ACE-T6 operations, today the crew placed lint free wipes inside of the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC) and dispensed oil on the LMM Confocal test target. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The LMM enables novel research of microscopic phenomena in microgravity, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images and videos across many levels of magnification. The way that matter is organized and moves on the microscopic level profoundly affects the macroscopic world and an understanding of such processes helps scientists and engineers build more efficient materials and machines both for both the earth and space environments.

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPS) Inspection: The crew completed this regularly scheduled maintenance to inspect Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBAs) and Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs).

EVA tool configuration and procedure reviews:  Today the crew updated cuff checklists, prepared the equipment lock, set up the RWS, audited tools, reviewed procedures, and held a conference with EVA teams on the ground to discuss tomorrow’s EVA.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #81 on: 01/24/2018 02:15 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/23/2018
 

USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #47:  Today, Mark Vande Hei (as EV1) and Scott Tingle (as EV2) successfully completed USOS EVA #47 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 7 hrs 24 min. The primary goal of the EVA was to swap the Latching End Effector (LEE) from the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) B side with the LEE that was stowed as a spare on the External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP-2), while also moving a Worksite Interface Fixture (WIF) adapter and Camera Light Assembly (CLA) between those LEEs.  A state command error was seen during powerup of the new LEE-B on the primary string. The EVA crew demated and remated the connectors, and ground teams were able to power up nominally on the secondary string but still received the state command error on the primary string. Ground teams continue troubleshooting to address the issues with the primary string.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #82 on: 01/26/2018 07:19 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/24/2018
 

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture): Today concluded the incubation of three Arthrospira-B experiment containers (ECs), one that began two weeks ago, and two that began last week. The ECs were removed from the BioLab Incubator and disassembled inside of the BioLab Glovebox, prior to the samples being inserted into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. strain PCC8005 is a candidate for use in spacecraft biological life support systems, for CO2 and nitrate removal, and oxygen and biomass production. However, to ensure the reliability of such a biological life support system it is necessary to characterize the response of Arthrospira sp. PCC8005 to in situ spaceflight conditions.

NeuroMapping: Today a 52S crewmember set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed his Flight Day150 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember conducted a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Color Discrimination Test. After the test was completed, the crewmember setup the Actiwatch hardware to prepare for a two week long sleep study session, where the crewmember will track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The sleep study session will begin tomorrow. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-6 (ACE-T-6) Module Configuration: The crew configured the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) to initiate the ACE-T6 science runs by removing the LMM confocal test target from the inside of the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container and installing the ACE module. The ACE-T-6 investigation studies the microscopic behavior of colloids in gels and creams, to provide new insight into fundamental interactions that can improve product shelf life. Colloids are suspensions of microscopic particles in a liquid, and they are found in products ranging from milk to fabric softener. Consumer products often use colloidal gels to distribute specialized ingredients, for instance droplets that soften fabrics, but the gels must serve two opposite purposes: they have to disperse the active ingredient so it can work, yet maintain an even distribution so the product does not spoil.

Meteor Hard Drive Exchange and Antivirus Update: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive and performed an antivirus update to the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF).  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) and Filter Remove and Replace (R&R): Today, the crew performed an R&R of the Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) SPA and Purge Filter. Data analysis indicated the SPA was not removing all free gas from the purge distillate, which in turn was sent downstream into the primary distillate line. This R&R was performed in order to eliminate free gas returned to the Distillation Assembly (DA) during the UPA drydown/reprocess.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations:  The crew participated in a debrief of yesterday’s EVA with ground specialists and performed a post EVA Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) water recharge.  In preparation for the next USOS EVA planned on January 29, the crew also performed Enhanced Caution and Warning System (ECWS) and SAFER training sessions and an EMU swap.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #83 on: 01/26/2018 08:21 AM »
Right now, Mark and Norishige prepare their EMUs for EVA-48...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #84 on: 01/26/2018 01:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/25/2018
 

FemtoSat Assembly and Deployment: Using onboard components printed from the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF)-Manufacturing Device, today the crew demonstrated FemtoSat deployment trajectories. This experiment consists of a 3D printed deployer, four FemtoSats and a 0.050” L-wrench. The four FemtoSats will be loaded in the deployer and locked in place with the L-wrench.  When the L-wrench is removed the satellites will spring launch out of the deployer. This investigation tests the design of a Femtosat deployment in microgravity prior to a full scale mission where hundreds will be deployed from a satellite. The AMF enables the production of components on the International Space Station (ISS) for both NASA and commercial objectives. The AMF is capable of producing parts out of a wide variety of thermopolymers including engineered plastics.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Setup:  In preparation for the upcoming Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) maintenance, today the crew extended the A/L slide table into the JEM pressurized module (JPM), removed the passive capture mechanism, and installed JEM ORU Transfer Interface (JOTI) on the slide table.  Next week, robotics ground controllers will remove an MBSU from its location outside the station and place it on the JEM A/L slide table for transfer inside.  Once inside, station crew will perform maintenance on the MBSU to recover its functionality and then pass it through the JEM A/L again for reinstallation outside the station.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations:  In preparation for the next USOS EVA planned for January 29, the crew performed tether and bag inspections, tool configuration, battery charging, procedures review, and conferences with the ground teams.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #85 on: 01/29/2018 09:51 AM »
Joe and Norishige....

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #86 on: 01/29/2018 10:14 AM »
And Alexander...

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #87 on: 01/29/2018 10:33 AM »
Joe has now completed the Airlock restow activity, after EVA-48 posponed...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #88 on: 01/29/2018 02:44 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/26/2018
 

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Preparation for Plant Gravity Perception Operations: To prepare the EMCS for the Plant Gravity Perception investigation, the crew replaced the empty EMCS Air Mix Supply Module located on the lower left side of the EMCS holding structure with a full Air Mix Module and then opened the EMCS Gas Valves for ground commanding. Later, the experiment containers (ECs) on the EMCS rotors were replaced with new ECs and the first of three Plant Gravity Perception experiment runs began. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) Hardware Setup and Control Run: The crew set the calibration arm, attached the calibration mass, and then set the software to implement a control run and a payload body mass measurement. The SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crewmember mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass. The device is accurate to 0.5 pounds over a range from 90 pounds to 240 pounds.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Intramodule Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning:  The crew performed cleaning of the IMV Cone Screen located in the Node 1-Node 3 vestibule. This Cone Screen protects debris from entering the IMV Fan located in Node 3. As part of this activity, the crew also cleaned the air duct diffusers.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Operations:  Today the crew continued to prepare for the EVA planned for Monday. They have charged batteries, configured tools, set up cameras, reviewed procedures, and discussed the tasks with ground teams.  The goals of this EVA have changed as a result of the failure of the new Latching End Effector (LEE) that was installed on EVA 47 (executed this past Tuesday).  The new LEE is not operating as expected, so the crew will return the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to its original configuration.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #89 on: 01/29/2018 03:42 PM »
January 29, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-017

Space Exploration Educators to Speak with NASA Astronaut Aboard Space Station


Teachers from across the nation will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 9:35 a.m. EST Thursday, Feb. 1. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The teachers, who are attending the 24th Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference (SEEC) at Space Center Houston, will make the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.                     

Acaba arrived at the space station Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth in February.

SEEC members are leaders in space exploration education throughout the nation. Some 580 teachers are expected to be on-site at Space Center Houston, the official visitor center for NASA’s Johnson Space Center, for the downlink.

 Media interested in attending the event should contact Ed Ellingson via email at [email protected] or phone at 281-244-2157. The event will take place at Space Center Houston, 1601 NASA Parkway.

Linking teachers directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #90 on: 01/30/2018 12:16 PM »
Norishige Did some maintenance work on EMUs...
(we can see, LCVG "Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment" on third, fourth and fifth images...)
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20150003483.pdf
« Last Edit: 01/30/2018 12:39 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #91 on: 01/30/2018 02:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/29/2018
 

USOS ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) 48 status:  Over the weekend, ground teams were able to identify a root cause and a fix for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE) anomaly seen after USOS EVA 47.  Because of this, the EVA to return the LEE to the configuration prior to EVA 47 has been deferred.  EVA 48 is now targeted for mid-February, and the tasks for that EVA are currently being replanned.

SSRMS LEE status:  During USOS EVA 47, LEE serial number 201 was removed from the SSRMS and replaced with the spare LEE, serial number 204.  After the installation, ground teams were unable to bring LEE 204 to an operational state on primary power.  Redundant power operated as expected.  Due to this anomaly, plans were put in place to swap the LEEs back and place LEE 201 on the SSRMS as it was before.  Over the weekend, ground teams were able to install diagnostic software that identified the root cause as a faulty initial force reading.  Ground and on orbit testing confirmed the root cause, and also confirmed the ability to operate the LEE on the prime power string if the LEE was already grappled to a fixture.  A software update is being developed to resolve the issue, and is targeted for uplink in two weeks, at which point it is expected that the LEE currently installed on the SSRMS (LEE 204) will be fully operational.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) sample transfer:  Today the crew moved samples within ELF to prepare for upcoming ground commanded operations.  The Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) is an experimental facility designed to levitate/melt/solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method.  With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.  The ELF is located in the JEM Multipurpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) in Kibo.

At Home in Space:  The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire this morning.  This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space.  At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

EPO:  Today the crew recorded several demonstration videos to explain different aspects of life in space to schoolchildren on the ground.  The first video completed today demonstrates the way that crewmembers sleep in space, while the second demonstrates the challenges of and solutions used for exercising the human body while on orbit.

Lighting Effects:  The crew conducted a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Color Discrimination Test.  The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) rack moves:  In order to increase efficiency in the PMM, today the crew moved several stowage racks inside the PMM.  The crew moved a Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR) and Resupply Stowage Platform (RSP), allowing easier accessibility to the stowage in these racks.

Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter R&R:  Today the crew removed and replaced HEPA filters in the JEM.  This is regularly schedule maintenance to keep airflow high and particulate contamination low.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #92 on: 01/30/2018 03:50 PM »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/24623/
Google translation
Quote
In accordance with the program of the International Space Station (ISS) flight, on January 30, 2018, ISS scheduled orbit correction was carried out.

To perform the maneuver at 18:25 Moscow time, the engines of the service module (SM) Zvezda of the International Space Station were switched on. The operating time of the engines was 22.8 seconds. As a result, the station received a speed increment of 0.35 m / s.

According to the data of the ballistic-navigation support service of the Flight Control Center (MCC), the calculated orbit parameters of the ISS after the maneuver were:
the minimum height above the Earth's surface is 403.2 km,
the maximum height above the Earth's surface is 424.3 km,
the circulation period is 92.60 minutes.
the inclination of the orbit is 51.66 degrees.
The purpose of the correction was the formation of ballistic conditions for launching the Progress-MS-08 cargo vehicle, scheduled for February 11, 2018, into orbit.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #93 on: 01/30/2018 11:48 PM »
A good view of Kibo module, by external ISS cam...

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #94 on: 01/31/2018 06:20 PM »
The photo is an old one. Roscosmos uses it for every reboost.
« Last Edit: 01/31/2018 06:32 PM by Joachim »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #95 on: 02/01/2018 11:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/30/2018
 

Personal CO2 Monitor Sensor Calibration: Today the crew will perform a single point calibration of the Personal CO2 monitors using and iPad and readings from a Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) sample port. The Personal CO2 Monitor demonstrates a system capable of unobtrusively collecting and downlinking individual crew members’ CO2 exposure for weeks to months. This investigation evaluates wear ability principles in microgravity and also demonstrates Modular Wearable Architecture Base Board, allowing rapid certification of future wearable devices.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  The crew will remove the mice and restock both of the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats in support of the on-going RR-6 investigation The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Condensate Water Separator Assembly (CWSA) Desiccant Module (DM) Inspection/R&R:  This morning, the crew will inspect the CWSA DM and determine if the salt is saturated.  If so, the DM will be replaced.

ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) Operations:  Today the crew is performing activities to deconfigure the airlock and Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs).  Yesterday’s EVA was deferred, but much of the preparation had already been completed already.  The activities today include EMU water loop scrubs and Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) battery R&Rs.

Russian EVA support:  Today the USOS crew assisted with preparations for the Russian EVA planned for Friday.  They gathered USOS tools and inspected tethers and bags that will be used by the Russian crew.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #96 on: 02/01/2018 03:46 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/31/2018
 

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) SmoothNav: The crew set up the SPHERES work area to activate and check out the hardware and EXPRESS laptop computer (ELC) before conducting the SmoothNav experiment run. SmoothNav develops an estimation algorithm aggregating relative state measurements between multiple, small, and potentially differently instrumented spacecraft. The algorithm obtains the most probable estimate of the relative positions and velocities between all spacecraft using all available sensor information, including past measurements. The algorithm remains portable between different satellite platforms with different onboard sensors, adaptable in the case that one or more satellites become inoperable, and tolerant to delayed measurements or measurements received at different frequencies.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Change: The crew changed the configuration of the CBEF and cleaned the inside of the incubator unit to prepare the facility for the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Tropical Cyclone: The crew configured the camera settings in the Cupola to take untended images of the Category 4 Typhoon Cebile in the Southern Indian Ocean. The Tropical Cyclone investigation captures images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Water Sampling:  Today the crew sampled fluid from the ITCS for return and analysis on the ground.  This is regularly scheduled preventive maintenance to verify health of the ITCS.

Eye exams:  The crew completed routine OCT and Fundoscope eye exams today.  Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crewmembers eye health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #97 on: 02/01/2018 09:27 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/18/2018
 

Plant Habitat Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Hose Connection: Today the crew removed and replaced the acoustic blanket and growth chamber door before retrieving the GN2 filter and connecting it to the EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack nitrogen. The other end was connected to the GN2 hose in order to perform a GN2 leak check. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS Rack and two International Subrack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

Something must be wrong here.
AFAIK Plant Habitat is located inside EX-5. The 17th SAMS-II was moved from EX-4 to EX-5. SAMS-II is a ISIS drawer (4 PU) payload. A EX-rack only has two ISIS drawer locations. So I think Plant Habitat only has One ISIS drawer and it uses the SAMS-II

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #98 on: 02/01/2018 09:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/29/2018

Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) rack moves:  In order to increase efficiency in the PMM, today the crew moved several stowage racks inside the PMM.  The crew moved a Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR) and Resupply Stowage Platform (RSP), allowing easier accessibility to the stowage in these racks.

AFAIK this is the current layout of the PMM. I used the ISS Google Streetview & some L2 info generously shared with me.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #99 on: 02/04/2018 01:13 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/01/2018
 

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG):  The crew used hot water from the PWD to dissolve sugar crystals in two pouches and later transfer sugar water into the pouches with seeded dowels. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew removed and replaced CIR manifold #2 bottle on the front of the optics bench. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity. This is for the ACME investigation which is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) loop scrub and conductivity test:  As part of the deconfiguration from the EVA activities over the past two weeks, the crew performed EMU water loop scrubs and then acquired and tested water samples for conductivity.  These activities are required for long term health monitoring and maintenance of the EMUs.

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Water Sampling:  Today the crew continued to sample fluid from the ITCS for return and analysis on the ground.  Today’s samples were taken from the US Lab module.  This is regularly scheduled preventive maintenance to verify health of the ITCS.

Eye Exams:  The crew completed routine Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Fundoscope eye exams today.  Eye exams are performed regularly onboard in order to monitor crewmembers eye health.  Eyesight is one of the many aspects of the human body that is affected by long-duration stays in a microgravity environment.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #100 on: 02/06/2018 03:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/02/2018
 

Russian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #44: Alexander Misurkin (as EV1) and Anton Shkaplerov (as EV2) performed RS EVA #44 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 8 hrs 13 min. During the EVA, the cosmonauts removed and replaced the [OHA] antenna high frequency receiver on Service Module (SM) aft.

Microbial Tracking-2:  A 53S crewmember completed body and saliva sample collections in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. The Microbial Tracking series-2 continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the International Space Station (ISS). It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms aboard the ISS. Crew samples from pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight times in addition to environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations will be collected to analyze any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated yesterday, today the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crewmember videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Operations: The crew continued to conduct CBEF configuration activities that began earlier this week by installing the mouse habitat unit interface to prepare the facility for the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Preparation for Plant Gravity Perception Operations: The experiment containers (ECs) on the EMCS rotors were replaced with new ECs to begin the 2nd of three Plant Gravity Perception experiment runs. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-6 (ACE-T-6) Operations: After dispensing oil on the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Confocal test target last week to initiate the ACE-T6 science runs, this week the crew cleaned the oil inside of the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container. The ACE-T-6 investigation studies the microscopic behavior of colloids in gels and creams, to provide new insight into fundamental interactions that can improve product shelf life. Colloids are suspensions of microscopic particles in a liquid, and they are found in products ranging from milk to fabric softener. Consumer products often use colloidal gels to distribute specialized ingredients, for instance droplets that soften fabrics, but the gels must serve two opposite purposes: they have to disperse the active ingredient so it can work, yet maintain an even distribution so the product does not spoil

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Pressurized Module (JPM) Rack Relocations:  Today the crew swapped the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station (ExPRESS) Rack-4 from JPM1F5 location and Zero-G Soft Rack (ZSR) from JPM1F6 location in preparation for Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) installation into the ZSR.  LSG will be delivered on H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) 7.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Quarterly Maintenance:  Today the crew performed ARED Quarterly maintenance. They inspected X-Rotation dashpots, cycled the main arm through the full range of motion, and greased the ARED Vibration Isolation System (VIS) rails and rollers and upper stop.  This is nominal periodic maintenance performed to keep the system operating nominally.

Television Camera Interface Converter (TVCIC): The crew attempted to remove and replace the attachment bolts on the TVCIC #002 in preparation for installation on a future EVA.  An inspection performed on the TVCIC in October 2017 identified noticeable wear on the bolt threads’ dry film lube indicating they are near their end of life.  During the activity today, the new bolts could not be located and the original bolts were re-installed.  Forward plan is under evaluation

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Repress: Ground controllers initiated a nitrogen repress from the NORS system. The crew terminated the repress by closing the nitrogen isolation valve and then removed and prepared the N2 recharge tank for return to the ground. A leak check of the N2 System confirmed the repress was successful.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew performed a checkout on the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER). During the activity, they measured the SAFER regulator pressure under flow and no-flow conditions, performed a leak check, and measured the relief valve opening and reseating pressure of the SAFER.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #101 on: 02/06/2018 03:59 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/05/2018
 

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Over the weekend, a 53S subject completed saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated last week, over the weekend and today the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Lighting Effects: A 52S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by stowing the hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performing a Color Discrimination Test.  The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)–1 Electronics Unit (EU) Operations: The crew installed the repaired EU into the MELFI-1 spare stowage location.  The MELFI-1 EU failed in August of 2017 and returned on SpaceX-12. The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures throughout a mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Over the weekend, the crew took images of Japan using the Nikon camera, and images of the Iberian Peninsula and Nile Delta using the RED camera. Today the RED camera was used to take images of the Himalayas and the snowfields of Asia and Kamchatka.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  To prepare for this week’s RR-6 operations, the crew participated in a crew conference, gathered equipment and cleaned the animal access unit. The crew also removed the mice and restocked both of the rodent habitats with new food bars in addition to cleaning the lids and interiors cages of the habitats. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Education Payloads Operations (EPO): To show children how astronauts conduct hygiene activities on the International Space Station (ISS), today the crew will demonstrate how astronauts clean themselves and wash their hair, highlighting the differences between doing these activities in zero-gravity on the ISS and in gravity on Earth. The video will also feature the European Space Agency’s mascot for young kids.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEM A/L) Valve Box Remote Controller (VB-RC) Installation:  Today the crew attempted to install the JEM A/L VB-RC.  Due to mechanical interference and alignment issues, they had to stand down on installation until ground teams are able to recommend a solution.  Once installed, this new system will enable additional capability for ground controllers to perform JEM A/L operations without crew intervention.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) R2 Upgrade:  Today ground controllers began the upgrade of the C2V2 system to version R2.  The C2V2 system is used to communicate with and control vehicles as they arrive and depart from the ISS.  This upgrade package is needed to interface with upcoming missions.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #102 on: 02/06/2018 05:47 PM »
Sorry for this stupid comment; but could you make a link to the NASA ISS On-Orbit Status Report Blog, in the future.
like this:
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/05/2018
From Februari 1th onward they have a dedicated link for each blog. Before it changed.
Thanks in advanced. And again sorry for this stupid comment.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #103 on: 02/06/2018 07:07 PM »
February 06, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-024
Idaho Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students from Boise State University and Timberline High School in Boise, Idaho, will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at noon EST Thursday, Feb. 8. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Students will travel to Timberline High School for the call to Expedition 54 astronauts Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei, and Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Acaba and Vande Hei arrived at the space station Sept.12 and will return to Earth this month. Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in April.

Boise State University and Timberline High School were selected through a competitive process to host a call with the space station. Students have been preparing for the event by studying the station, astronaut biographies, and the current research and activities happening aboard the orbiting laboratory. About 300 high school and college students are expected to be at Timberline High School during the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Dan Hollar via email at [email protected] or phone at (208) 890-8309. Boise State University will host the event at Timberline High, 701 E. Boise Ave. in Boise. 

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #104 on: 02/07/2018 12:47 AM »
Космический бадминтон (Space badminton)


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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #105 on: 02/08/2018 12:41 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/06/2018
 

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) R2 Upgrade:  Due to issues experienced yesterday while loading the C2V2 R2 upgrade, ground controllers were unable to complete the first day of R2 load operations.  The attempt to load the software today was again unsuccessful.  It was determined that a file mismatch was causing errors in the software load.  In order to correct this, a new general configuration file will need to be re-delivered.  The C2V2 system is used to communicate with and control vehicles as they arrive and depart from the ISS.  This upgrade package is needed to interface with upcoming missions.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the first of four consecutive days of RR-6 operations by setting up the refrigerated centrifuge and processing a series of blood samples from the rodents.  The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for frozen storage until they can be returned to the ground for testing.  The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions.  RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions. 

Veg-03 Initiation: The crew installed the root mat and plant pillows into the Veggie facility to initiate the fifth Veg-03 experiment run.  Veg-03 contains a total of six experiment runs with the fourth, 5th, and 6th sessions being the first of their kind because they contain a mixed harvest of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna, which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows.  Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space.  Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests.  Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Manifold #2 & #4 Bottle and Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Controller Replacements:  To control the airflow over the flame, today the crew removed and replaced one ACME controller while the ACME chamber insert was fully installed inside of the CIR combustion chamber.  After the ACME controller was replaced, the crew replaced the CIR manifold #2 and #4 bottles on the front of the optics bench.  CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.  This is for the ACME investigation, which is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR.  ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Two crewmembers performed MT-2 sample collection activities.  The 52S crewmember collected surface and air samples to characterize the different types of microbial locations on the ISS and the 53S crewmember collected saliva samples.  The samples will be placed inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew will capture images of Hawaii at night and using the RED camera, they will capture images of the Iberian Peninsula.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space.  The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

On Board Training (OBT), Emergency Simulation:  Today the crew will review procedures and prepare for tomorrow’s OBT, in which they will rehearse their responses to onboard emergencies.

68 Progress (68P) Leak Check:  Today ground controllers worked with the onboard crew to perform a leak check on 68P.  The onboard crew isolated the vehicle by closing hatches and the ground teams performed the leak check.  Progress leak checks were nominal and the hatches are now open with clamps installed.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #106 on: 02/10/2018 01:03 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/08/2018
 

Communications Issues:  This morning, communication with the ISS on Space to Ground (S/G) became intermittent.  A failed controller card at White Sands prevented the acquisition of the correct Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS).  Nominal communications were restored after the card was replaced.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the third day of RR-6 operations by conducting fixative swaps and processing a series of blood samples from the rodents. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for containment. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nano-channel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Plant Gravity Perception Operations European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS): The crew configured the EMCS Maintenance Work Area (MWA) then removed and stowed the EMCS seed cassettes from the experiment containers (ECs) of the previous experiment run. The crew then replaced the ECs on the EMCS rotors with new ECs and began the next Plant Gravity Perception experiment run. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Plant Habitat Water Refill: In support of the on-going Plant Habitat investigation, today the crew injected water into the distribution system. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility used to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Station (ISS). It occupies the lower half of the EXPRESS Rack and two International Sub-rack Interface Standard (ISIS) drawers, providing a large, enclosed, environmentally controlled chamber.

NeuroMapping: Two 52S crewmembers set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed their Flight Day150 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): A 53S subject performed saliva sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew set up and configured the Light Meter hardware to obtain Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Protein Crystallization Research Facility (PCRF) Cable Replacement and Checkout: The crew conducted standard maintenance operations by relocating and conducting checkout activities for two PCRF maintenance units. The PCRF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility that investigates protein crystal growth in microgravity. The PCRF can accommodate six cell cartridges. Each cell cartridge can accommodate a motor drive and Peltier elements, from which activation and termination timing, as well as temperature profiles, can be freely designed by the investigator.

Try Zero-Gravity Preparation: To prepare for next week’s Try Zero-Gravity experiment, today the crew reviewed reference videos and prepared items for the experiment. Try Zero-Gravity (Try Zero-G) allows the public, especially kids, to vote for and suggest physical tasks for JAXA Astronauts to demonstrate the difference between 0-G and 1-G for educational purposes. Some of tasks include putting in eye drops, performing push-ups on the ceiling, arm wrestling, and flying a magic carpet.   

Education Payloads Operations (EPO) – Recycling Air and Water: Today the crew recorded a video to explain to children why and how water and air are recycled onboard the ISS. It is very expensive to launch mass to space and because there is not enough space onboard to store new water and air, they must be constantly recycled. The video also featured the European Space Agency’s mascot for young kids.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew captured images of Japan and with the RED camera, they captured images of the Namib Desert. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Helmet Light Inspection and Installation:  Today the USOS crew inspected and reinstalled EMU helmet lights that were removed and loaned to the Russian crew for their Extravehicular Activity (EVA), which was performed last Friday.  The lights were installed on EMUs 3004 and 3003 for use on a future USOS EVA.  EMU 3003 will be used for USOS EVA 48, currently planned for February 15th.

Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) Commissioning: Yesterday evening, Robotic Ground Controllers performed new Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) commissioning steps.  This consisted of performing LEE B checkouts, maneuvering the Space Station Remote Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to capture the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) with LEE-B, verifying SPDM power up on LEE-B on both the SSRMS Prime and Redundant Payload Power Strings.  They also switched the SSRMS base from LEE-A to LEE-B and back to LEE-A.  At the completion of these steps, the Robotic Ground Controllers released LEE-B from MBS PDGF4 and maneuvered to a park position in preparation for USOS EVA 48.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #107 on: 02/10/2018 08:02 AM »
Preparation for the docking of the Progress MS-08 cargo spacecraft.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #108 on: 02/10/2018 04:00 PM »
February 09, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-027

Texas Educators to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Pre-service teachers from Houston, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:35 a.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 13. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The teachers-in-training will travel to the University of Houston-Downtown, for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbiting laboratory, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth later this month.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station (YES), which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

The STEM on Station team has been working with pre-service teachers at the University of Houston-Downtown as part of YES. In a science methods course, students have been designing simple experiments that could be performed by astronauts on the space station. Some 150 teachers and students are expected to be on-site at UH- Downtown for the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Mike Emery via email at [email protected] or phone at 713-226-5806. The University of Houston-Downtown will host the event at One Main Street, Houston.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

Offline jcm

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #109 on: 02/11/2018 03:45 PM »
There's a new debris orbit being tracked, 1998-067NN  43206.  This is in ADDITION to the electronics box that
got jettisoned in the Russian EVA, which is 1998-067NM 43203.

My calculations suggest it separated from ISS late on Feb 5, but I don't entirely trust that, and it's possible
it's associated with the EVA.  Anyone got any ideas?
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #110 on: 02/12/2018 11:40 AM »
There's a new debris orbit being tracked, 1998-067NN  43206.  This is in ADDITION to the electronics box that
got jettisoned in the Russian EVA, which is 1998-067NM 43203.

My calculations suggest it separated from ISS late on Feb 5, but I don't entirely trust that, and it's possible
it's associated with the EVA.  Anyone got any ideas?

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=44785.msg1781851#msg1781851 

If you follow to the Youtube link in that post by flyright, there's definitely something that flies off.  Could be it.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2018 11:40 AM by deruch »
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #111 on: 02/14/2018 08:46 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/09/2018
 

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew performed the fourth day of RR-6 operations where they conducted fixative swaps and processed a series of blood samples from the rodents. The samples from today’s activities were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for containment. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks Vuze (One Strange Rock) Camera Mounted Operations: The crew setup the NanoRack Vuze camera and recorded 3-Dementional 360 degree videos of the Cupola inside of the ISS. The mounted camera captured a “day in a life” style footage as the crew went about their nominal tasks throughout the ISS. National Geographic Channel–Virtual Reality Educational Video for Television Series–“One Strange Rock” (One Strange Rock Virtual Reality) is a 10-part series that transports a virtual reality camera to the ISS for recording of a National Geographic special on the Earth as a natural life-support system. Crew aboard the ISS record a series of virtual reality pieces for incorporation into a larger documentary about natural history and the solar system. Each episode features a different crew member and addresses different topics using next generation virtual reality technology to raise awareness about the Earth system and the space program.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th Veg-03 experiment run earlier this week, today the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 plant pillow, and initiated the 6th experiment run to ultimately conduct two Veg-03 grow outs at the same time. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Lighting Effects Visual Performance Test at a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) Setting: A 52S and 53S subject conducted a Visual Performance Test by turning all non-GLA light sources off and performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated last week, the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Robonaut: The crew prepared and stowed Robonaut in preparation for return on SpaceX-14. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.

Space Automated Bio-product Lab (SABL) CO2 Sensor Calibration: Today the crew setup the CO2 Meter in the SABL for a CO2 sensor calibration. SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has a temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images from Ireland to Moscow in the daytime. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #112 on: 02/14/2018 08:46 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/12/2018
 

69 Progress (69P) Launch Abort:  Over the weekend, the planned launch of 69P did not occur.  The vehicle issued an abort command shortly before launch and successfully shut down the launch sequence.  The root cause is under investigation, and the forward plan is in work.  The next available launch opportunity is tomorrow morning, Tuesday, February 13th at 2:13am CST.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Following four consecutive days of RR-6 operations last week, over the weekend the crew completed the final set of fixative swaps and cleaned the access units. The RR-6 hardware was removed from Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) this morning, and MSG is now ready for re-installation of Transparent Alloys so that payload can continue its science runs begun prior to RR-6 operations.  The RR-6 mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): To track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated two weeks ago, the crew took photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth over the weekend. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Over the weekend, the crew took images of the Caribbean and the Iberian Peninsula. Today the RED camera was used to take images of Central America to the Caribbean, New Zealand, the Amazon, and the southern tip of Baja. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th and 6th Veg-03 experiment runs last week, today the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 plant pillow. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations:  This morning, the crew completed a review of the robotics procedures for the upcoming USOS EVA and then completed a training session using the Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT).  They also performed a review of the EVA activities using the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software.  This afternoon, they performed tool configuration, camera battery charging, GoPro camera charging, and a conference with the EVA ground controllers.  EVA #48 is currently scheduled for February 15th.

Soyuz 52S Packing:  The crew started packing USOS cargo for return on 52 Soyuz (52S).  Some of the USOS cargo will be retrieved at the landing site for immediate return to the US.  This cargo is packed with special labelling for ease of retrieval.  There will be additional packing as items become available.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #113 on: 02/14/2018 08:49 AM »
February 12, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-002

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students from Highland Village, Texas, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 14. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The students will travel to Briarhill Middle School for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.
         
Acaba arrived at the space station on Sept. 12 on his third space mission, and is scheduled to return to Earth later this month.

Students have been preparing for this downlink by studying the solar system, universe, gravitational effects on plants and animals, plotting space station coordinates, calculating distances to various planets, planning what to pack for a journey to Mars using surface and volume formulas, and using ratios/proportions to paint a life size version of the International Space Station on their football field. About 1,000 students and teachers are expected to be at Briarhill for the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Liz Haas via email at [email protected] or phone at 469-948-8041. Briarhill Middle School will host the event at 2100 Briarhill Blvd in Highland Village.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #114 on: 02/14/2018 03:43 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/13/2018
 

69 Progress (69P) Launch:  69P launched from the Baikonur, Kazakhstan this morning at 2:13am CST and achieved nominal insertion with all antennas and solar arrays deployed.  Due to orbital phasing, this will be a 34-orbit rendezvous profile.  69P docking is scheduled for Thursday morning at 4:43am CST.

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject began a two-week long sleep session by providing daily sleep log entries to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Transparent Alloy: The crew set up the Transparent Alloy hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume and installed the Transparent Alloy cartridges to begin the payload investigation. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment are to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Veg-03 Initiation: Following the initiation of the 5th and 6th Veg-03 experiment runs last week, today the crew thinned the plants as needed to one plant per pillow and added water to the small plant pillows. This is first time the Veg investigation has conducted two plant grow outs at the same time. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Education Payloads Operations (EPO) – Try Zero-Gravity: The crew participated in a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) EPO event by demonstrating Try Zero-Gravity experiments proposed by Asian countries. Try Zero-Gravity (Try Zero-G) allows the public, especially kids, to vote for and suggest physical tasks for JAXA Astronauts to demonstrate the difference between 0-G and 1-G for educational purposes. Some of tasks include putting in eye drops, performing push-ups on the ceiling, arm wrestling, and flying a magic carpet.   

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Controller Replacement:  To control the airflow over the flame, the crew removed and replaced an ACME controller. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.  The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Operations: The crew continued CBEF configuration activities that began two weeks ago by reconfiguring the video cables to support the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the Nikon camera, the crew captured images of Thailand boats and with the RED camera, they captured images of the east coast of the Unites States, the Iberian Peninsula, and the Galapagos to Caribbean. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Soyuz (52S) Return Cargo Packing: Today, the crew started packing the cargo that will be returning on 47S. The remaining packing will be completed prior to undocking.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Hardware Replacement: The crew replaced the CEVIS Ergometer, Inertial Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (IVIS) Boxes, and CEVIS Display Cable due to the end of Braking Band life within the Ergometer. After the replacement of the hardware, the crew performed a successful checkout of CEVIS.

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Tank Installation and Repressurization:  Today the crew attached a new oxygen tank to NORS and initiated a repressurization of the ISS with gas from that tank.  NORS is a system to attach nitrogen or oxygen tanks to the station through the joint airlock plumbing system for resupply of station.  Tanks are launched on cargo vehicle flights and installed by the crew as needed.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #115 on: 02/15/2018 10:24 AM »
Feb. 15, 2018: International Space Station Configuration. Four spaceships are parked at the space station including the Progress MS-07 and 08 resupply ships and the Soyuz MS-06 and MS-07 crew ships.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/visiting-vehicle-launches-arrivals-and-departures

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #116 on: 02/15/2018 03:59 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/14/2018
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Plant Gravity Perception Operations European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS): The crew replaced the EMCS Thermal Control System (TCS) cold spot sponge before replacing the Experiment Containers (ECs) on the EMCS rotors with new ECs to begin the next Plant Gravity Perception experiment run. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Manifold #2 Bottle Replacement: The crew removed and replaced a CIR manifold #2 bottle on the front of the optics bench. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity. This is for the ACME investigation which is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): The crew continued to track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated two weeks ago, by taking photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Tropical Cyclone: The crew configured the camera settings in the Cupola to take untended images of the Category 3 Typhoon Gita, near the South Pacific island nation of Tonga. The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Amazon River, the Gulf of Thailand, and the Baja Peninsula. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Columbus Mass Memory Unit (MMU) Memory Card Replacement: Today, the crew replaced one of the Memory Cards to restore internal redundancy in MMU2. To gain access to MMU2, the crew rotated the Human Research Facility 1 (HRF-1) rack and performed the memory card replacement.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #117 on: 02/16/2018 03:03 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/15/2018
 
69 Progress (69P) Docking:  This morning the 69P vehicle docked to the SM aft port of the ISS.  Rendezvous and docking both completed successfully in the automated mode with a preliminary docking capture time of 4:38:43 AM CST. 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Caribbean and the Baja Peninsula. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparation:  Today the USOS Crew completed final Equipment Lock configuration and tool checks in preparation for Friday’s EVA.  Detailed reviews of Cuff Checklists, the EVA Briefing Package, Detailed Timeline, Tool Configuration Summary, Sharp Edge Briefing, and SSU Systems Briefing Package completed EVA preparation.  Scheduled egress from the Joint Airlock is tomorrow morning at 6:10 AM CST.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #118 on: 02/17/2018 07:35 AM »
February 16, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-033

Minnesota Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students in central Minnesota will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:35 p.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 20. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

The event is being hosted by the College of Saint Benedict (CSB), in St. Joseph, Minnesota, and Saint John’s University (SJU), located in nearby Collegeville, Minnesota. Students from five area middle and high schools will travel to SJU for the call to Expedition 54 astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbital outpost, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Vande Hei, an SJU alumnus, arrived at the space station on Sept.12 and will return to Earth later this month. Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in June.

Students across the participating school districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and incorporating rockets and space station-focused physics lessons into the curriculum, as well as hosting an Engineering Design Competition. About 200 people are expected to be on-site at the university during the downlink.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Michael Hemmesch via email at             [email protected] or phone at 320-363-2595. CSB & SJU will host the event at 2850 Abbey Plaza in Collegeville.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #119 on: 02/17/2018 07:36 AM »
February 16, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-034

New Mexico Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station


Students from six schools in Alamogordo, New Mexico, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11 a.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 21. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Middle and high school students will travel to Alamogordo High School for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Scott Tingle aboard the space station, posing questions about life aboard the orbital outpost, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Tingle arrived Dec.19 and is scheduled to return to Earth in June.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History (NMMSH) has collaborated with the Alamogordo Public School and the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for this event. NMMSH is a state museum chartered to educate the people of New Mexico and visitors in the history, science and technology of space.

Students have been preparing for the event by forming teams to design and build simple apparatuses or experiments involving fluid management, combustion, or crystal growth to compare performance in a 1g vs simulated microgravity environment. Some 1,500 students and teachers are expected to be on-site at Alamogordo High School during the downlink with 4,000 more watching virtually in school auditoriums throughout Alamogordo Public Schools.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Cathy Harper via email at [email protected] or phone at (575) 437-2840. NMMSH will host the event at Alamogordo High School, 103 Cuba Avenue in Alamogordo.   

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network's Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts/

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation/

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 02/19/2018 02:50 PM »
A relatively rare view of the Russian segment...
« Last Edit: 02/20/2018 05:27 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 02/21/2018 07:10 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/16/2018
 

USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #48: Today, Mark Vande Hei (as EV1) and Norishige Kanai (as EV2) performed USOS EVA #48 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 5:57. The primary goal of today’s EVA was to remove and replace the Payload ORU Accommodation (POA) Latching End Effector (LEE). The LEE formerly occupying the POA was brought inside ISS via the Joint Airlock while the LEE previously on the External Stowage Platform (ESP)-2 Flight Support Equipment (FSE) was relocated to the POA. The crew also performed the following get-ahead tasks: LEE Lube, Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT) Deploy, Force Movement Sensor (FMS) Grounding Strap Install, and Flex Hose Rotary Coupler (FHRC) Strut Correction. 

Veg-03 Initiation: The crew continued to perform Veg-03 operations by thinning the plants to one plant per pillow and adding water to the small plant pillows. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 02/22/2018 01:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/20/2018
 

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) 52 Soyuz (52S) Survey:  Today, ground operators walked the SSRMS off to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) and conducted a video survey of the exterior 52S prior to return.  52S will return CDR Alexander Misurkin, FE-3 Joe Acaba, FE-2 Mark Vande Hei to Earth early next week.

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Testing:  Ground teams are continuing testing of CDRA blower speed capabilities in order to maximize carbon dioxide removal from the ISS atmosphere.

ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) Battery Charging:  Today the crew configured a lithium-ion battery charger and initiated an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Long Life Battery (LLB) charge cycle. Data logging is required to extend the expiration date of the LLBs.

Veg-03: Over the weekend, the crew continued to perform Veg-03 operations by thinning out the plants to one plant per pillow and added water to the small plant pillows. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of-concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Marrow, and Repository): Over the weekend, a 52S crewmember completed his breath and ambient air sample collections to support the Marrow experiment, and today he completed his return minus 14 day (R-14) blood, and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile, and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Setup and Activation: Yesterday, the crew setup and activated the payload components for EarthKAM in Node 2 for a week-long imaging session. Sally Ride EarthKam allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): A 52S subject completed saliva and body sample collections in support of the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Igniter Replacement:  The crew removed and replaced the damaged ACME igniter tip.  CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.  The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR.  ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Plant Gravity Perception Operations European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS): Today the crew removed the EMCS Maintenance Work Area (MWA) Rotor A and Rotor B cassettes. The cassettes were promptly placed in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The crew also replaced the EMCS Thermal Control System (TCS) cold spot sponge. The Plant Gravity Perception investigation germinates normal and mutated forms of thale cress, a model research plant, to study the plants’ gravity and light perception. Results provide new information about plants’ ability to detect gravity and how they adapt to an environment without it, which benefits efforts to grow plants for food on future missions. The EMCS is an experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions. The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the Iberian Peninsula and Italy along with the Nile River and Red Sea. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6):  Today the crew prepared the habitats for stowing. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

Vascular Echo Ultrasound Using Echo: Today, the crew attached the ECG Electrodes and Cable and performed two scanning activities with remote guidance from ground team. Near the end of the activity, the crew donned the Leg Cuffs and performed an ultrasound scan prior to disconnecting and temp stowing the EGC Cable. The crew left the Echo connected to allow ground team to remotely transfer data from the Echo unit to its External Hard Disk. Vascular Echo investigation examines changes in blood vessels, and the heart, while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.

Robotic Operations: Yesterday and overnight Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and maneuvered the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to unstow the Spare SSRMS Yaw Joint from SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) and stow it on External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP-2) site 5. Next they configured the SPDM for stow and stowed it on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2). Finally the SSRMS was walked off Node2 and onto the Lab in preparation for the 52S survey.

Offline eeergo

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 02/22/2018 01:35 PM »

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) 52 Soyuz (52S) Survey:  Today, ground operators walked the SSRMS off to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) and conducted a video survey of the exterior 52S prior to return.  52S will return CDR Alexander Misurkin, FE-3 Joe Acaba, FE-2 Mark Vande Hei to Earth early next week.


Nice to see the Zarya PDGF is getting its use after so many delays in installing it!
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 02/22/2018 01:50 PM »
Right now, on the audio Stream, Soyuz Descent OBT for Soyuz MS-06 crew
« Last Edit: 02/22/2018 01:51 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 02/22/2018 02:17 PM »

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) 52 Soyuz (52S) Survey:  Today, ground operators walked the SSRMS off to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) and conducted a video survey of the exterior 52S prior to return.  52S will return CDR Alexander Misurkin, FE-3 Joe Acaba, FE-2 Mark Vande Hei to Earth early next week.


Nice to see the Zarya PDGF is getting its use after so many delays in installing it!

installed the 05/25/2011 by Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke.

http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/home/spacenews/files/5d4239e94f79b15e4e23decbbc736aac-262.html
« Last Edit: 02/22/2018 02:46 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 02/22/2018 02:28 PM »
Soyuz MS-06 Survey
« Last Edit: 02/22/2018 02:28 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 02/22/2018 02:30 PM »
installed 05/25/2011 by Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke.

Are these pictures from the recent survey or from previous walkoffs? Do you have any shots of the MS-06 survey?

Didn't realize it was installed so long ago - I suppose then the SSRMS Soyuz surveys have been performed for quite a while now? Have there been any other major uses for it so far? I know it is a major requirement for when Nauka arrives and the airlock now in Poisk is due to be installed.
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 02/22/2018 02:37 PM »
Are these pictures from the recent survey or from previous walkoffs? Do you have any shots of the MS-06 survey?
Screenshots from Tuesday and last Wednesday on Ustream

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-iss-stream
« Last Edit: 02/22/2018 02:52 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 02/23/2018 02:20 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/21/2018
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile and Repository): A 53S crewmember completed his Flight Day 60 (FD 60) blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Mouse Stress Defense Checkout Operations: To prepare the CBEF facility for the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14, today the crew conducted checkout activities on the mouse habitat unit. This investigation will send genetically modified loss-of-Nrf2-function and gain-of-Nrf2-function mice to space and examine how Nrf2 contributes to effective prevention against the space-originated stresses. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Cerebral Autoregulation Equipment Setup: To test the configuration and connection of the experiment equipment, today the crew performed checkout activities for the Cerebral Autoregulation investigation. The Cerebral Autoregulation investigation tests whether this self-regulation improves in the microgravity environment of space. Non-invasive tests measure blood flow in the brain before, during, and after a long-duration spaceflight, and provide new insights into how the brain safeguards its blood supply in a challenging environment.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the snow over Kazakhstan, the Philippine islands, and the southern tip of India. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Lens Change: The crew performed a lens change out for the Sally Ride EarthKam equipment in Node 2, and reactivated the equipment. EarthKam allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

Crew Quarters Cleaning and Fastener R&R:  Today the crew cleaned the starboard crew quarters location, and replaced the access panel fasteners with Velcro for ease of access during future activities.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) loop scrub and conductivity test:  As part of the deconfiguration from last week’s Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the crew performed EMU cooling loop maintenance, including loop scrubs, sampling, and iodinization.  These activities are required for long term health monitoring and maintenance of the EMUs.

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Testing:  Ground teams continued their testing of CDRA blower speed capabilities in order to maximize carbon dioxide removal from the ISS atmosphere.

52 Soyuz (52S) Survey: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF. The SSRMS was then maneuvered into position to perform a survey of the 52S Soyuz. Additionally, some external Russian payload hardware was surveyed. The SSRMS was then walked back onto the Lab and maneuvered to park.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 02/26/2018 10:23 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/22/2018
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, a 53S subject provided a daily sleep log entry to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile and Repository): A 53S crewmember completed his Flight Day 60 (FD 60) blood and urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Mouse Stress Defense Checkout Operations: To prepare the CBEF facility for the Mouse Stress Defense investigation arriving on SpaceX-14, today the crew conducted checkout activities on the mouse habitat unit. This investigation will send genetically modified loss-of-Nrf2-function and gain-of-Nrf2-function mice to space and examine how Nrf2 contributes to effective prevention against the space-originated stresses. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Cerebral Autoregulation Equipment Setup: To test the configuration and connection of the experiment equipment, today the crew performed checkout activities for the Cerebral Autoregulation investigation. The Cerebral Autoregulation investigation tests whether this self-regulation improves in the microgravity environment of space. Non-invasive tests measure blood flow in the brain before, during, and after a long-duration spaceflight, and provide new insights into how the brain safeguards its blood supply in a challenging environment.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED camera, the crew captured images of the snow over Kazakhstan, the Philippine islands, and the southern tip of India. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Lens Change: The crew performed a lens change out for the Sally Ride EarthKam equipment in Node 2, and reactivated the equipment. EarthKam allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

Crew Quarters Cleaning and Fastener R&R:  Today the crew cleaned the starboard crew quarters location, and replaced the access panel fasteners with Velcro for ease of access during future activities.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) loop scrub and conductivity test:  As part of the deconfiguration from last week’s Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the crew performed EMU cooling loop maintenance, including loop scrubs, sampling, and iodinization.  These activities are required for long term health monitoring and maintenance of the EMUs.

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Testing:  Ground teams continued their testing of CDRA blower speed capabilities in order to maximize carbon dioxide removal from the ISS atmosphere.

52 Soyuz (52S) Survey: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF. The SSRMS was then maneuvered into position to perform a survey of the 52S Soyuz. Additionally, some external Russian payload hardware was surveyed. The SSRMS was then walked back onto the Lab and maneuvered to park.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 02/26/2018 02:40 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/23/2018
 

Lighting Effects: Upon wakeup, the 53S subject provided a sleep log entry and conducted a series of three Cognition tests and provided urine samples over a 24-hour period. The samples will be stowed in the MELFI for freezing until their return and analysis. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Marrow, Biochemical Profile, and Repository): A 53S crewmember completed breath and ambient air sample collections to support the Marrow experiment and provided blood and urine sample collections to support his Flight Day (FD 60) Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Functional Immune: Today two 52S crewmembers began a five day Functional Immune session by collecting saliva samples. These samples support the return minus zero day (R-0) compliment for the 52S crewmembers. The Functional Immune investigation analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

NanoRacks DreamUp Xtronaut Crystal Growth (DreamXCG): The crew continued to track the progression of the DreamXCG formation that was initiated three weeks ago, by taking photo and video images of each pouch to show any visible sugar crystal growth. This investigation teaches students about the effects of microgravity on crystal formations using near-identical flight kits flown and operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). With access to crew member videos and data on the same experiment, students are able compare crystal formations in space to those in their classrooms. The investigation aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields to the next generation of students.

Mobile Procedure Viewer (mobiPV):  The crew changed the credential settings for the mobiPV investigation to enable mobiPV free use anywhere on the ISS.  MobiPV allows users to view procedures hands-free and aims to improve the efficiency of activity execution by giving crewmembers a wireless set of wearable, portable devices that utilize voice navigation and a direct audio/video link to ground experts.  A smartphone is the primary device to interface with procedures.  Images provided in procedure steps can be displayed on a Google Glass display

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Using the RED and Nikon camera, the crew captured images of the Australia Desert, and a swath of the Earth from Ireland to Moscow. EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

EVA Deconfiguration:  Today the crew continued operations to reconfigure from last week’s EVA by continuing to charge batteries, auditing tools and Retractable Equipment Tethers (RETs), and conducting water conductivity.

COTS UHF Communications Unit (CUCU) Deactivation:  Today the crew deactivated the CUCU system after the completion of the GPS Ancillary Data Version 3 (GAD-V3) testing.

IFM CQ Port Cleaning:  This morning, the crew cleaned the port crew quarters.

WHC Piping R&R:  Today the crew replaced the Waste Hygiene Compartment (WHC) piping between the Pump Separator and the Dose Pump.

Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Testing:  Ground teams are continuing testing of CDRA blower speed capabilities in order to maximize carbon dioxide removal from the ISS atmosphere.  The blower speed has been increased to 149,500 rpm.

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 02/26/2018 05:58 PM »
Quote
Support teams deploy to Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan to prepare for the landing of @AstroAcaba @Astro_Sabot and Alexander Misurkin from @Space_Station

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto/sets/72157693123365554/
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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 02/26/2018 10:28 PM »
Change of command ceremony, during which Misurkin will hand over station command to Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos.
« Last Edit: 02/26/2018 10:38 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 02/27/2018 03:20 AM »
ISS Expedition 54/55 Change of Command Ceremony

Space Videos
Published on Feb 26, 2018

As Expedition 54 crew members prepare to leave the International Space Station tomorrow, February 27th, they hand over control of the station to Expedition 55.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2RG68ys5qQ?t=001


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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 02/27/2018 06:32 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/22/2018
 


The Feb 22 report is a carbon copy of Feb 21. Somebody at NASA seems to have been sleeping  :P

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 02/27/2018 01:07 PM »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 02/27/2018 01:07 PM »

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #138 on: 02/27/2018 02:49 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/26/2018
 

52Soyuz Landing Preparations:  Crew and ground teams continued to prepare for tomorrow’s planned 52S Undock and landing.  52S is scheduled to undock tomorrow at 5:09 PM CST with landing at 8:31 PM CST.  Today’s activities included packing 52S with return cargo, Emergency Roles and Responsibilities Review, and Change of Command Ceremony.

Lighting Effects: Upon wake up the 53S subject completed the two week sleep session study by providing daily sleep log entries to track his sleep patterns and wakefulness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2): Over the weekend and today a 52S subject provided saliva samples to support the MT-2 investigation. The MT-2 series continues the monitoring of the types of microbes that are present on the ISS. It seeks to catalog and characterize potential disease-causing microorganisms onboard the ISS. Crew pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight samples and environmental samples from ISS surface and air locations are collected to identify any associations between the microbial content of the samples, as well as potential health effects.

Functional Immune: Over the weekend and today two 52S crewmembers continued to support a five-day Functional Immune session that began Friday by collecting saliva samples. The samples support the return minus zero day (R-0) compliment for the 52S crewmembers. The crew will also perform a dry saliva collection using the Saliva Collection Dry Book. The Functional Immune investigation analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew performed Veg-03 operations by watering each plant pillows and photo documenting the progression of the plant grow outs. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, finally culminating on Mars, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and International Space Station made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space.

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization (DECLIC): The crew removed the Directional Solidification Insert (DSI) from the DECLIC Experiment Locker (EXL), before installing and activating the ALICE-LIKE Insert (ALI) in the EXL. The crew also removed and replace the removable hard disk drive inside the EXL. DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

At Home in Space:  The crew took photographs to document ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Earth Imagery from ISS Target (EIISS): Over the weekend, the crew used the Nikon camera to capture images of South Australia and Tasmania. Today, the crew captured Australia at night using the light from the moon and took images of the Australia Desert, the Southern tip of India, the USA East Coast and Ireland during the day.  EIISS is used to support creation of a series of videos showcasing Earth views taken from space. The videos are taken with cameras on the ISS in 6K hi-resolution and are integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) Removal and Replace (R&R) – Today, the crew successfully R&Red RPCM N13B_A using the Hot Mate/Demate technique.  This is the second Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) RPCM Hot Mate/Demate replacement performed on-orbit, made possible by the updated firmware load which increases the boot delay time to 3 minutes.  Following the crew activity, ground teams recovered power to the External Stowage Platform -1 (ESP-1) Primary Heaters.  Power to these heaters was lost due to a trip in October 2017.

LAB1P1 Rack Flow Control Assembly (RFCA) Reconfiguration – Today, the crew relocated the LAB1P1 Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) rack Bypass Jumper from the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) to the Low Temperature Loop (LTL). This reconfiguration places the MTL ITCS lines on the RFCA to allow MTL rack flow control, which is required to support the Life Support Rack arriving on HTV-7 later this year.  The Lab ITCS was transitioned to Dual Loop Mode during the activity to mitigate impacts in the event of a water leak.

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