Author Topic: Expedition 53 Thread  (Read 43822 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 09/23/2017 08:52 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/21/2017

Posted on September 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sarcolab-3: After successfully completing three days of the ankle configuration exercises, today USOS and Russian subjects conducted the knee protocol for Sarcolab-3. The subjects ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installed the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes and began the knee exercise protocol, while an operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crewmembers before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Payload On-Orbit Still Shots for Utilization and Maintenance (POSSUM) Payload Photo: The crew took digital photos of all payload racks in the US Lab, JEM Pressurized Module (JPM), and Columbus module to document configuration changes.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A crewmember completed a FMS session which was executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Tropical Cyclone Maria: The crew setup and configured camera settings, before capturing images of Hurricane Maria to support the Tropical Cyclone investigation.  The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember completed breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  Today the crew completed an audit of the Rodent Research -9 hardware and supplies. The RR-9 investigation was successfully completed and returned on SpaceX-12 last week. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

Multi-Omics-Mouse Closeout The crew performed Multi-Omics closeout activities by removing the Mouse Habitat Units from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF), cleaning and taking photos of the glove box, and reconfiguring the video cables between the Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) and the CBEF.

Manufacturing Device (MD) Operations: The crew removed and replaced the MD feedstock canister, extruder, and print tray. The Manufacturing Device – Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) enables the production of components on the ISS for both NASA and commercial objectives. Parts, entire experiments, and tools can be created on demand utilizing the AMF that is installed into an Express Rack locker location. The AMF is capable of producing parts out of a wide variety of thermopolymers including engineered plastics.

N3 Aft Port Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Fan Inlet Cleaning: The crew cleaned this location to remove Foreign Object Debris (FOD) from IMV fan inlets and silencers.

Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) Training: In preparation for the upcoming EVAs in October, two US crewmembers were scheduled to perform virtual reality (VR) training simulating emergency recovery using SAFER. In the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA, SAFER can be used to safely maneuver for recovery.  During the first session, there were some configuration issues, but once the configuration issues were resolved there were still some issues with executing the session.  Both of today’s sessions were deferred until the ground specialists can further review.

Advance Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Upper Rack Cable Kinked: Today, the crew reported a reoccurrence of the ARED Upper Rack cable kinking.  No cable damage was reported.  The crew straightened the cable and took imagery for ground review. This is the second instance of this cable kinking this week.  There are spare cables on-orbit.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 09/28/2017 05:39 PM »
September 28, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-111

South Carolina Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Students at Laing Middle School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, near Charleston, will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11:30 a.m. EDT Monday, Oct. 2. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 53 Commander Col. Randy Bresnik is a member of The Citadel class of 1989. He will answer questions from students at Laing Middle School. The school is hosting the event with the help of Citadel cadets and The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. Cadets will lead the younger students as they pose questions to the Citadel astronaut alumnus.

Bresnik launched to the space station July 28 and is expected to return to Earth in December. A Marine Corps veteran, Bresnik is one of the college’s most visible principled leaders. In May of 2004, Bresnik was selected from among 4,000 applicants to become one of the 11 members of NASA’s Astronaut Class 9 and the first graduate of The Citadel to fly in space. Expedition 52/53 is Bresnik’s second mission to the space station; the first was in 2009.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Kim Keelor at [email protected] Laing Middle School is at 2705 Bulrush Basket Lane in Mt. Pleasant.

The cadets will lead a two-part event for the eighth-grade students, visiting the class first to teach them about Bresnik, the space station, how the live downlink works and conduct an in-class lesson related to the space station. On Oct. 2, they will lead the conversation with Bresnik, guiding the participating students as they ask questions that are expected to revolve around Bresnik’s work with space station experiments and space fitness. Middle school students across the South Carolina Lowcountry and cadets on The Citadel campus are expected to watch the event on NASA TV.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

Learn about videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 09/28/2017 05:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/22/2017

Posted on September 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow:  Today a 52S crewmember conducted breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Sarcolab-3: A USOS subject conducted the knee protocol for Sarcolab-3. The subject ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair, installed the knee Electromyography (EMG) electrodes and began the knee exercise protocol, while an operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. The crew deconfigured and stowed MARES, which was originally on the timeline for next Monday. Today’s activity concludes five consecutive days of joint research, where three crewmembers conducted a series of ankle and knee configuration exercises.  The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 52S crewmember collected blood sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. With operator assistance, the subject is collecting blood samples and the samples will be processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Advanced NanoStep: The crew completed setup activities prior to installing the Advanced NanoStep cartridge in the Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF). JAXA’s Advanced NanoStep experiment investigates the relationship between impurity incorporation mechanisms and the quality of obtained protein crystals should be clarified for the progress to an “advanced” stage of the space utilization for structure-based drug design. In this mission, we observe the protein crystal growth surfaces of glucose isomerase crystals in space in the presence of various impurities with the use of a Michelson interferometer. In addition, we also clarify the crystal surface morphology on the molecular step level by using the laser confocal microscope. We evaluate the crystal quality of the returned crystals.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) Chamber Cap Removal and Cartridge Installation:  The crew removed the ELF chamber cap from the chamber hole and installed the sample cartridge. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by container less processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Cable Re-clock: During last week’s LMM control box replacement, two cables were left disconnected due to physical interference of back shells on adjacent power/data cables. Today, the crew re-clocked the connector that mates to the LMM Control Box to remove the interference of the cable connection. LMM is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization (DECLIC) Hose Reseat: The crew removed and reconnected the DECLIC supply and return hoses to troubleshoot the moderate temperature loop flow issues to the DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert (DSI). DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The DSI portion of the DECLIC multi-user facility experiment will study a series of benchmark experiments on transparent alloys that freeze like metals under microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using SCN (succinonitrile-a transparent organic substance in the liquid state that is used to study the phenomena related to solidification processes) based alloys. The DSI insert will be installed for the second run of the three series of DECLIC experiments.

RED Camera Calibration: The crew created calibration files for the RED Dragon Camera in support of the Earth Imagery from ISS investigation. The Earth Imagery from ISS investigation will help create a series of videos, showcasing Earth from space. These videos will be taken with cameras on the International Space Station in 6K hi-resolution, then integrated into videos for screensavers for public enjoyment, exploration, and engagement.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 09/28/2017 05:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/25/2017

Posted on September 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Over the weekend a 52S crewmember completed Flight Day (FD) 15 urine sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. Today another 52S crewmember completed their FD-15 urine samples, and with operator assistance, conducted blood sample collections. The blood samples were processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Lighting Effects:  A 52S crewmember completed a Visual Performance Test by stowing the test hardware in their crew quarters, setting the light to the correct mode, turning all other light sources in the crew quarters off, before performing a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test. The completed tests were photographed and downlinked. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2) Exercise Evaluation:  51S crewmembers exercised using MED-2 with body markers and multiple camcorders for ground evaluation. The ISS’s exercise equipment is large and bulky, while the MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions, reducing the size and weight of exercise equipment for long-duration space missions. The MED-2 investigation is a system to test key technologies needed to develop space based exercise equipment that may provide appropriate countermeasures to the adverse effects of microgravity. This technology is critical for the initial design and development of second and third generation Counter Measure Systems (CMS) hardware that is an order of magnitude lighter and smaller than existing ISS class of CMS hardware and that has significantly greater reliability.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Gas Chromatograph (GC) Installation: The crew installed the GC instrument package to support continued operations of the CIR for the upcoming ACME investigation. During the installation, the crew cleaned and contained a small leak that was noticed from a helium bottle. In an activity unrelated to today’s GC installation package, the crew checked a suspected bad cable connection to see if it was the cause of current Image Processing and Storage Unit (IPSU) data issues. After reporting that the connection appeared to be fully mated, the crew was asked to break and reseat the connector before downlinking photos for ground teams to assess. The CIR is used to perform combustion experiments in microgravity. The CIR can be reconfigured easily on orbit to accommodate a variety of combustion experiments. It consists of an optics bench, a combustion chamber, a fuel and oxidizer management system, environmental management systems, and interfaces for science diagnostics and experiment specific equipment.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A 51S crewmember completed a FD 60 FMS session which is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) Node 2 Setup and Activation: The crew setup the payload components for EarthKAM in Node 2 for a week-long imaging session. Sally Ride EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the International Space Station. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The team at Sally Ride EarthKAM then posts these photographs on the Internet for the public and participating classrooms around the world to view.

MagVector: Because the generically used MagVector USB stick was reported broken, the crew retrieved a new USB stick to support the 14th MagVector experiment run that begins later this week.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

EVA preparations:  Today the crew inspected tethers and modified the Ballscrew Lubrication Tool (BLT) depth gauge.  These tasks are required to prepare for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include R&R of one SSRMS LEE, lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 09/28/2017 05:52 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/26/2017

Posted on September 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember completed their Flight Day (FD) 60 breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

BioLab Glovebox Health Check: Today the crew exchanged the BioLab Glovebox gloves with new ones, and performed periodic health check of the BioLab Glovebox seals and gloves including sensors for the fan status, delta pressure, temperature and relative humidity. This procedure can also be used to perform individual ground-only checks of the Biolab Glovebox pressure, temperature, relative humidity and fan status. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the Columbus laboratory. It is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates.  BioLab allows scientists to study the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

Circadian Rhythms:  Today a crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab Double Sensors and mount the Thermolab Unit to their belt, which will begin 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythms investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 52S crewmember completed their Flight Day (FD) 15 urine sample collections in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. A 52S crewmember completed their FD-60 urine samples, and with operator assistance, conduct blood sample collections. The blood samples will be processed for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge prior to being placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Lighting Effects Meter Readings: The crew setup and configured the Light Meter hardware and obtained the Light Meter readings before downloading the data, and stowing the hardware. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Gas Valve Open: The crew manually opened the EMCS Gas Valves, which is conducted within 24 hours prior to the start of the EMCS Experiment. The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) is an ESA experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions (e.g. temperature, atmospheric composition, water supply, illumination, observation, and gravity). The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms. Experiments with insects, amphibia, and invertebrates as well as studies with cell and tissue cultures are also foreseen in EMCS.

VEG-03: The crew completed on-board training and installed the Root Mat and Plant Pillows. They powered up and set intervals, before filling Root Mats in support of the VEG-03 experiment. Veg-03 is a direct follow-on to the Veg-01 hardware validation test, which demonstrated plant growth in the Veggie facility. Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. But future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew reviewed EVA tasks, configured tools, performed EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) fit verifications, and performed Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) checkouts in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 09/28/2017 05:52 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/27/2017

Posted on September 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from the Russian crewmembers, a USOS crewmember deployed eight Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the Radi-N experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation will be conducted by measuring neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

At Home in Space Questionnaire and Photo:  The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire and took photos to document ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: The Crew setup and activated the JEM Camera Robot before assisting ground teams with the 4th flight checkout activity. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

Veggie-01 Installation: The crew assembled the veggie hardware before installing it into the EXPRESS Rack, and conducting checkout activities. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation. The Veggie facility provides lighting and nutrient delivery, but utilizes the cabin environment for temperature control and as a source of carbon dioxide to promote growth.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 51S crewmember completed the Flight Day (FD) 60 urine sample collection that began yesterday in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples are obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Marrow:  Today a 51S crewmember conducted breath and ambient air sample collections for the Marrow investigation, which looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew reviewed EVA procedures, conducted a conference with EVA specialists on the ground to review procedures, prepared the Contingency Water Container (CWC) and configured EVA tools in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

ISS Reboost – Today ground teams commanded an ISS reboost using the Aft Progress (67P) thrusters. This reboost set up the proper conditions for a 2-Orbit rendezvous profile for the 68 Progress arrival on 10/12/17. This maneuver was the first of three burns to set up the proper conditions for the 51S landing (12/14/17) and the 53S launch and docking (12/17/17). The second burn is expected to occur on 11/02/17 and the third is expected to occur on 11/22/17.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 10/01/2017 07:46 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/28/2017
Posted on September 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

MagVector: The crew completed setup activities and began the 7-day MagVector #14 experiment run. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

At Home in Space Questionnaire and Photo:  The crew took photos to document ISS culture in support of the At Home in Space investigation. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Circadian Rhythms: The 51S crewmember removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36 hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Tuesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Two Phase Flow:  The crew setup the Two Phase Flow laptop in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).  The Two Phase Flow investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot: Following yesterday’s checkout activities, today the crew conducted a cable swap to allow the ground team to perform a software update. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras. 

Meteor Hard Disk Drive and Antivirus Update: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) and transfered an updated Antivirus file to the laptop.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) DECLIC Hose Relocation: The DECLIC supply and return hoses from the Upper Control Panel (UCP) to the Lower Control Panel (LCP) were relocated to continue troubleshooting the moderate temperature loop (MTL) flow issues to the DECLIC directional solidification insert (DSL). DECLIC is a multi-user facility utilized to study transparent media and their phase transitions in microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The DSI portion of the DECLIC multi-user facility experiment will study a series of benchmark experiments on transparent alloys that freeze like metals under microgravity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using SCN (succinonitrile-a transparent organic substance in the liquid state that is used to study the phenomena related to solidification processes) based alloys. The DSI insert will be installed for the second run of the three series of DECLIC experiments.

Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) Hardware Setup and Control Run:
The crew performed a SLAMMD control run by setting up the calibration arm and attaching the calibration mass, prior to setting the software to implement a control run and payload body mass measurement. SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crewmember mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass. The device is accurate to 0.5 pounds over a range from 90 pounds to 240 pounds.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew configured EVA tools, inspected the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) Sublimators, performed an EMU loop scrub, filled the Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG), recharged the EMU water, and performed a conductivity test on that water in preparation for the upcoming trio of EVAs in October.  The goals of the EVAs include Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 10/03/2017 07:07 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 9/29/2017

Posted on September 29, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
VEG-03: Following the installation of the Root Mat and Plant Pillows earlier this week, the crew opened the wicks of each Veg-03 Plant Pillow. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate types of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna for on-orbit harvesting and return to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans; future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food and understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal.

Space Headaches:  The weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation was completed by 51S crewmembers.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information which may help in the development of new methods to alleviate the symptoms associated with headaches in space and improve the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers and negatively influence performance during a space mission.

Mobile Procedure Viewer (MobiPV):  Today the crew completed checkout activities for the MobiPV investigation. MobiPV allows users to view procedures hands-free and aims to improve the efficiency of activity execution by giving crewmembers a wireless set of wearable, portable devices that utilize voice navigation and provide a direct audio/video links to ground experts.  A smartphone is the primary device used by crew to interface with procedures and capability exists to display pictures provided in procedure steps on a Google Glass display.   

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC) Configuration: To prepare for upcoming ACE-T6 operations, the crew configured the LMM for confocal operations. The LMM observation camera, objective lenses, control base, and the confocal test target will be installed inside the LMM AFC. The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a modified commercial, highly flexible, state-of-the-art light imaging microscope facility that provides researchers with powerful diagnostic hardware and software onboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 65 FMS session by performing a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet. The FMS investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) On-Orbit Fitcheck Verification:  Today the crew completed pressurized fitchecks on EMU 3003 and 3008 in order to assess fit and feel of the suits prior to the upcoming series of Octobers EVAs. After the initial fitchecks were completed, the resizing of necessary components was successfully accomplished to ensure proper range of motion during the EVAs. The goals of the upcoming EVAs include: Remove and Replace (R&R) of a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE), lubrication of the two LEEs, and R&R of two external cameras.

PMM Hygiene Cover Installation:  The crew installed a series of hygiene covers and privacy curtains into the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) in order to protect hardware from free water and provide the crew increased privacy during personal hygiene activities. 

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 10/04/2017 06:43 AM »
The report of Oct 2 is a carbon copy of Sep 29.
Somebody at NASA apparently was not fully awake after the weekend...  ;D


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 10/05/2017 06:37 AM »
October 04, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-118

Michigan Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station


Students at St. Mary Cathedral School in Gaylord, Michigan, will speak with NASA astronauts living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 11 a.m. EDT Friday, Oct. 6. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Twenty northern Michigan students, grades preschool through high school, will be invited to ask the astronauts questions about living in space aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, or any other topic that interests the students.

For Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik, this is his second mission to the International Space Station. Bresnik launched to the space station on July 28 and is expected to return to Earth in December. Joe Acaba arrived at the space station Sept. 12 for his third mission to space. Bresnik and Acaba will participate in three spacewalks this month to service the space station’s robotic arm and install new external cameras.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Christie Perdue at 231-409-1214. St. Mary Cathedral School is at 606 N. Ohio Ave. in Gaylord.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 10/05/2017 06:38 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/03/2017

Posted on October 3, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
VEG-03 Operations: Today the crew continued to conduct Veg-03 operations that began last week by thinning out the plants to one plant per pillow, in order to promote growth of the larger plants. The crew then watered the plant pillows. The crew will now begin the autonomous space gardening phase of the experiment.  The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce, and mizuna. The first crew consumption harvest should be in about 3-4 weeks.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Configuration Change: Following the completion of last month’s Multi-Omics Mouse investigation, today the crew continued to perform closeout activities by changing the configuration of the CBEF from the Multi-Omics configuration, back to its nominal configuration. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Clean Bench (CB) Valve Checkout: The crew conducted standard maintenance on the CB relief valves and the microscope stage clips, located inside the Saibo Rack. This maintenance activity is performed every 6 months to prevent the valves from sticking. The CB is a glovebox with a High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter and a high-performance optical microscope.

Story Time from Space: Two crewmembers participated in the Story Time from Space activity by reading “Max Goes to Mars” and “Sunset” on camera. The video recordings will be downlinked and used for educational purposes. Story Time from Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations:  EVA preparations continued today with setup of Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) and camera configuration and battery charging.  A trio of EVAs will begin with the Latching End Effector (LEE) R&R EVA on Thursday.

Eye Exams:  Two crewmembers underwent eye exams using the onboard ultrasound device.  Periodic eye exams are critical for monitoring crew health.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 10/05/2017 02:28 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/04/2017

Posted on October 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval:  Today a USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week for the RaDI-N experiment, and transferred them to the Russian crewmember for processing in the Bubble Reader. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS.  Bubble detectors are used as neutron monitors designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) preparations:  Today the crew performed EVA tether inspections, tool configurations, cuff checklist printing, scheduled health checkups, and procedure reviews in preparation for the tomorrow’s EVA.  The primary goal of tomorrow’s EVAs is to Remove and Replace (R&R) a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latching End Effector (LEE) which had been exhibiting some anomalies in its operation.

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Blower Speed Test – Today, ground controllers began a 7 day test of the Lab CDRA using higher blower speeds. The CDRA blower speed will be gradually increased to determine the ability of the CDRA blower to operate at increased speeds without triggering software responses to excessive speed and to evaluate impacts of elevated speed to the blower.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 10/06/2017 10:12 AM »
https://twitter.com/edbirchnall/status/916020433014706176
Quote
And tomorrow the ground will put #Canadarm2 back to work using the new LEE to walk to a new base and get ready for the next space walk.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 10/09/2017 03:09 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/05/2017

Posted on October 5, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #44: Today Randy Bresnik (as EV1) and Mark Vande Hei (as EV2) exited the airlock and successfully performed US EVA #44 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6:55. The primary goal of today’s EVA was to remove the degraded Latching End Effector (LEE) A from the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS), replace it with the LEE that is currently located on the Payload/ORU Accommodation (POA), and install the degraded LEE onto the POA.  LEE-A had exhibited significantly increased resistance to latch deployment during recent robotics activities prompting today’s replacement. Today’s EVA brought the SSRMS back to full capability.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): This morning, a 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 70 FMS session, which is executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performs a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trend/vary over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trend/vary before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

MagVector:  The crew completed the 14th experiment run of the MagVector investigation that began last week. The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general, the backbone of our technology.

Biological Experiment Laboratory in Columbus (BioLab) Temperature Control Unit Cleaning and Silica Bag Exchange: The crew cleaned the Biolab TCUs and exchanged the silica gel bags for TCUs 1 and 2. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the European Columbus laboratory. The facility is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates. BioLab allows scientists to gain a better understanding of the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 10/10/2017 02:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/09/2017

Posted on October 9, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember collected fecal samples for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew photodocumented the status of the plants in the Veggie facility, and evaluated the plant pillows to determine if additional watering is required. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) 45 Preparation: Today the crew reconfigured necessary EVA tools, reviewed procedures, and participated in a conference with ground EVA planners in support of next week’s EVA.  The goals of this EVA include: Removal and Replacement of the degraded CP9 camera and lubrication of the Latching End Effector (LEE) B.

External Robotics Operations:  Over the weekend, robotics ground controllers walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) onto Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 3 (PDGF3).  They then maneuvered SSRMS as required to perform a video and imagery survey of the Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) snare cables using an External High Definition Camera (EHDC).  Once the survey was completed, the SSRMS was walked off onto MBS PDGF4 in preparation of US EVA 45 scheduled tomorrow (GMT 283).

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 10/11/2017 03:27 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/10/2017

Posted on October 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
USOS Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) #45: Today Randy Bresnik (as EV1) and Mark Vande Hei (as EV2) successfully performed US EVA #45 with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6:26. The primary goal of today’s EVA was to Remove and Replace (R&R) the External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) located at Camera Port 9 (CP9) and to lubricate the newly installed Latching End Effector (LEE) A on the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS). The LEE A was installed onto the SSRMS last week during USOS EVA #44.  Additional tasks accomplished include: Airlock High Pressure Gas Tank (HPGT) handle tie back, rotation of the Pump/Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS), R&R of the Mobile Base System (MBS) mast Camera/Light/PTU Assembly (CLPA) lens cover, removal of a handrail from Node 3, and BDCU MLI Removal.

At Home in Space:  The crew took photographs today to document the current on-orbit ISS culture. This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 10/12/2017 01:34 PM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/918286374096183296
Quote
Ops complete for tonight. #Canadarm2 is in position for tomorrows ops - picking up #Dextre and getting ready for Friday's RPCM R&R...

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 10/14/2017 07:36 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/11/2017

Posted on October 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

NeuroMapping: Today two 52S crewmembers set up the NeuroMapping hardware and performed their Flight Day 30 tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crewmembers executed three Behavioral Assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): To support the ACME payload investigation, the crew disconnected water umbilicals at the CIR Z-Panel to remove water pressure from the rack and then removed the Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) from the CIR combustion chamber for the final time. The ACME chamber insert for the first set of test points was configured and connected into the CIR Combustion Chamber.  After the water umbilicals were reconnected to the Z-Panel, the crew performed a leak check. Due to the amount of hardware requiring installation, activities will be conducted over the next two days. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Post Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Tasks: Today crewmembers participated in an EVA debrief conference with ground specialists, preformed battery maintenance, and serviced the water system on the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) used during yesterday’s EVA. During US EVA #45 the crew successfully Removed and Replaced (R&R) the External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) located at Camera Port 9 (CP9) and lubricated the newly installed Latching End Effector (LEE) A on the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS). 

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 10/14/2017 07:36 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/12/2017

Posted on October 12, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

68P Launch and Dock Delay:  68P was planned for launch at 04:30 AM Central time, but the launch was aborted during final countdown.  Russian teams are looking into the cause of the abort.  The next launch opportunity is Saturday morning at 03:47 AM Central, with docking two days later on Monday morning.

Multi-Omics Sample Collections: A 52S crewmember collected saliva samples and completed a questionnaire for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment. The samples were placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Maintenance: The crew performed maintenance activities in the CIR by replacing a window and the CIR Interface Resource Ring (IRR) vent filter inside the combustion chamber due to fuel and combustion by-product buildup. The CIR is used to perform combustion experiments in microgravity. The CIR can be reconfigured easily on orbit to accommodate a variety of combustion experiments. It consists of an optics bench, a combustion chamber, a fuel and oxidizer management system, environmental management systems, and interfaces for science diagnostics and experiment specific equipment.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Configuration for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): The crew continued to conduct ACME insertion configurations that began yesterday, by disconnecting water umbilicals at CIR Z-Panel to remove water pressure from the rack and then remove the Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) from the CIR combustion chamber for the final time. The ACME chamber insert for the first set of test points was configured and connected into the CIR combustion chamber.  After the water umbilicals were reconnected to Z-Panel, the crew checked for leaks. The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A 51S crewmember conducted a Flight Day 75 FMS session executed on a touchscreen tablet, where the subject performed a series of interactive tasks. The investigation studies how fine motor skills are affected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of FMS is to answer how fine motor performance in microgravity trends/varies over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trends/varies before and after gravitational transitions, including the periods of early flight adaptation, and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Veg-03 Operations: The crew checked and photo documented the status of the plants in the Veggie facility, and evaluated the plant pillows to determine if additional watering was required. The Veg-03 investigation uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.  Organisms grow differently in space, from single-celled bacteria to plants and humans. Future long-duration space missions will require crew members to grow their own food, so understanding how plants respond to microgravity is an important step toward that goal. Veg-03 uses the Veggie plant growth facility to cultivate a type of cabbage, lettuce and mizuna which are harvested on-orbit with samples returned to Earth for testing.

USOS Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) #46 Preparations:  Today the crew reconfigured necessary EVA tools and resized an EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) in support of next week’s EVA.  The goals of this EVA include Removal and Replacement (R&R) of the degraded CP13 camera and lubrication of the Latching End Effector (LEE) B.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 53 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 10/15/2017 08:43 AM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/918286374096183296
Quote
Ops complete for tonight. #Canadarm2 is in position for tomorrows ops - picking up #Dextre and getting ready for Friday's RPCM R&R...
It seems, that this task was also delayed to next week.

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