Author Topic: PLD Space  (Read 20026 times)

Offline Darkseraph

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Re: PLD Space
« Reply #40 on: 02/01/2018 09:14 PM »
Google Translated from above like: http://danielmarin.naukas.com/2017/06/28/pld-space-dos-anos-de-pruebas-de-motores-cohete-en-espana/

Quote
The company PLD Space continues with its ambitious goal of becoming the first Spanish company to build an orbital launcher. And today we have great news, because the European space agency (ESA) has chosen PLD Space as the main contractor of the LPSR (Liquid Propulsion Stage Recovery) program to develop a reusable first stage. Come on, a kind of SpaceX to the Spanish.

To put ourselves in a position, remember that PLD Space is developing two rockets, the Arion 1 and the Arion 2. The Arion 1 will be a single-stage suborbital launcher, while the Arion 2 will be able to put satellites in low Earth orbit - and even more there- thanks to its three stages. Precisely PLD Space intends to use these launchers as demonstrators of ESA's LPSR program, a program in which other Spanish companies such as COMET Engineering and Tecnalia-CTA Technology Center will also participate. The contract of the LPSR program amounts to 750,000 euros.

The objective of PLD Space is therefore to provide the Arion 2 with a reusable first stage, although previously they will carry out test flights with the Arion 1. So, does this mean that we are going to see a Spanish rocket returning to the launching pad as the Falcon? 9 from SpaceX? Not quite. Precisely the LPSR program must identify which technologies are the most suitable for the recovery and reuse of the first stages of liquid fuel rockets. In the Arion 1 reuse technologies associated with both the supersonic phase of flight and the subsonic will be tested. The techniques of reuse that will be tested in the Arion 1 will be more traditional and will consist of parachutes (both supersonic and subsonic), although the possibility of using controlled paragliders or ballutes, a mixture of parachutes and balloon that was very popular, will also be studied. in the 60s (in fact it was proposed as a braking medium for the MAR manned landing module). In addition, Arion 1 flights will test the benefits of new thermal protection systems (TPS) of the coping - remember that this suborbital launcher will reenter the atmosphere with the nose ahead - and other technologies to reduce the adverse effects of corrosion due to seawater.

The first flight of Arion 1 is scheduled for the end of 2018 and, depending on the success of this vector, the Arion 2 will follow in 2020 (obviously, no one will be shocked if there is finally some delay in these plans). A possible mission of the Arion 1 within the LPSR program could be the following: the rocket takes off from the base of El Arenosillo (Huelva) and 40 seconds later exceeds the speed of sound. About 110 seconds after the launch, the engine shuts off at an altitude of 80 kilometers and two minutes later the rocket reaches its peak at 220 kilometers. 390 seconds after the takeoff, reentry into the atmosphere would begin, which the rocket would carry out with the cap pointing towards the ground, as if it were an arrow. At 420 seconds of the mission the supersonic parachute would be deployed and at 510 seconds it would be the turn of the two larger subsonic parachutes. Finally, the landing in the Atlantic would take place 700 seconds after takeoff. Prior to this mission, a test of Arion 1 will be conducted by launching it from a military cargo plane to test the sequence of events related to the landing.

For its part, the Arion 2 will have a more advanced reuse system that will make use of the vehicle's engines. However, returning the first stage of Arion 2 to almost the launch ramp in a similar way to Falcon 9 is another matter. Why? Because this launcher is already quite small in itself and carry the necessary fuel for reuse would reduce its load capacity to practically zero. For this reason what PLD Space will do within the LPSR program is to recover the first stage of the Arion 2 using rocket engines, yes, but also parachutes, as well as nitrogen propellers and supersonic ailerons similar to those used by SpaceX on top of the first stage of the Falcon 9 (ailerons, by the way, that are used in the emergency escape system, SAS, of the Soyuz). Nitrogen thrusters and supersonic ailerons would allow to maintain control of the vehicle from the supersonic phase to landing. In the final, subsonic phase, the two motors of the first stage would be added to guarantee a vectorial control of the descent and allow to delimit the landing zone with great precision. In order to reduce the technological gap between the Arion 1 and the Arion 2 PLD Space wants to test the Arion 1.5, an improved version of the Arion 1 with two stages, the first of which will be more powerful. Although it will also be a suborbital vector, the Arion 1.5 will have a second stage that will be placed on a trajectory that simulates an orbital launch.

Although there are currently several initiatives within the ESA to create reusable launch systems, this is the first time that the European agency - and not the various space agencies of the EU countries - decides to bet on the development of technologies for recovering complete stages of liquid fuel launchers, techniques that at the moment only dominate the North American companies SpaceX and Blue Origin. And the good news is that these technologies will be tested on Spanish rockets. PLD Space now has a huge challenge ahead: to prove that not only are they capable of launching rockets, but they can also recover them. Whether they succeed or not, they will undoubtedly make history. From here we wish you all the luck of the world. I bear witness that they deserve it.]The company PLD Space continues with its ambitious goal of becoming the first Spanish company to build an orbital launcher. And today we have great news, because the European space agency (ESA) has chosen PLD Space as the main contractor of the LPSR (Liquid Propulsion Stage Recovery) program to develop a reusable first stage. Come on, a kind of SpaceX to the Spanish.

To put ourselves in a position, remember that PLD Space is developing two rockets, the Arion 1 and the Arion 2. The Arion 1 will be a single-stage suborbital launcher, while the Arion 2 will be able to put satellites in low Earth orbit - and even more there- thanks to its three stages. Precisely PLD Space intends to use these launchers as demonstrators of ESA's LPSR program, a program in which other Spanish companies such as COMET Engineering and Tecnalia-CTA Technology Center will also participate. The contract of the LPSR program amounts to 750,000 euros.

The objective of PLD Space is therefore to provide the Arion 2 with a reusable first stage, although previously they will carry out test flights with the Arion 1. So, does this mean that we are going to see a Spanish rocket returning to the launching pad as the Falcon? 9 from SpaceX? Not quite. Precisely the LPSR program must identify which technologies are the most suitable for the recovery and reuse of the first stages of liquid fuel rockets. In the Arion 1 reuse technologies associated with both the supersonic phase of flight and the subsonic will be tested. The techniques of reuse that will be tested in the Arion 1 will be more traditional and will consist of parachutes (both supersonic and subsonic), although the possibility of using controlled paragliders or ballutes, a mixture of parachutes and balloon that was very popular, will also be studied. in the 60s (in fact it was proposed as a braking medium for the MAR manned landing module). In addition, Arion 1 flights will test the benefits of new thermal protection systems (TPS) of the coping - remember that this suborbital launcher will reenter the atmosphere with the nose ahead - and other technologies to reduce the adverse effects of corrosion due to seawater.

The first flight of Arion 1 is scheduled for the end of 2018 and, depending on the success of this vector, the Arion 2 will follow in 2020 (obviously, no one will be shocked if there is finally some delay in these plans). A possible mission of the Arion 1 within the LPSR program could be the following: the rocket takes off from the base of El Arenosillo (Huelva) and 40 seconds later exceeds the speed of sound. About 110 seconds after the launch, the engine shuts off at an altitude of 80 kilometers and two minutes later the rocket reaches its peak at 220 kilometers. 390 seconds after the takeoff, reentry into the atmosphere would begin, which the rocket would carry out with the cap pointing towards the ground, as if it were an arrow. At 420 seconds of the mission the supersonic parachute would be deployed and at 510 seconds it would be the turn of the two larger subsonic parachutes. Finally, the landing in the Atlantic would take place 700 seconds after takeoff. Prior to this mission, a test of Arion 1 will be conducted by launching it from a military cargo plane to test the sequence of events related to the landing.

For its part, the Arion 2 will have a more advanced reuse system that will make use of the vehicle's engines. However, returning the first stage of Arion 2 to almost the launch ramp in a similar way to Falcon 9 is another matter. Why? Because this launcher is already quite small in itself and carry the necessary fuel for reuse would reduce its load capacity to practically zero. For this reason what PLD Space will do within the LPSR program is to recover the first stage of the Arion 2 using rocket engines, yes, but also parachutes, as well as nitrogen propellers and supersonic ailerons similar to those used by SpaceX on top of the first stage of the Falcon 9 (ailerons, by the way, that are used in the emergency escape system, SAS, of the Soyuz). Nitrogen thrusters and supersonic ailerons would allow to maintain control of the vehicle from the supersonic phase to landing. In the final, subsonic phase, the two motors of the first stage would be added to guarantee a vectorial control of the descent and allow to delimit the landing zone with great precision. In order to reduce the technological gap between the Arion 1 and the Arion 2 PLD Space wants to test the Arion 1.5, an improved version of the Arion 1 with two stages, the first of which will be more powerful. Although it will also be a suborbital vector, the Arion 1.5 will have a second stage that will be placed on a trajectory that simulates an orbital launch.

Although there are currently several initiatives within the ESA to create reusable launch systems, this is the first time that the European agency - and not the various space agencies of the EU countries - decides to bet on the development of technologies for recovering complete stages of liquid fuel launchers, techniques that at the moment only dominate the North American companies SpaceX and Blue Origin. And the good news is that these technologies will be tested on Spanish rockets. PLD Space now has a huge challenge ahead: to prove that not only are they capable of launching rockets, but they can also recover them. Whether they succeed or not, they will undoubtedly make history. From here we wish you all the luck of the world. I bear witness that they deserve it.
« Last Edit: 02/01/2018 09:16 PM by Darkseraph »
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