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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by nzguy on Today at 03:07 am »
Green tag is for items that need to installed before flight.  Standard practice is an enable plug vs a wire pin.  The issue is their implementation.  Items like this would be known years before flying as part of safety review process.  NASA usually hand holds payloads through this process and most of the payloads know to do things like this.  My take on this is a new company going through the process and SpaceX doing the minimum to host/facilitate (their facility, their rocket) the process and they don't know what is flying next month much less next year so their review process is just in time.  Things are done much later in the mission cycle and certainly much later in the design and development process (spacecraft in manufacture vs in design reviews).

Thanks for your insight! An enable plug sounds like a good idea as its easy to verify during inspections.
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Rocket Lab / Re: Rocket Lab General Discussion Thread
« Last post by TrevorMonty on Today at 02:55 am »
https://x.com/breadfrom/status/1762982418670047287?s=46&t=eQrUtTJk6IAt4GyTzH7J2w

Techcrunch article with the details:

https://techcrunch.com/2024/02/28/rocket-lab-has-misrepresented-neutron-launch-readiness-congressional-memo-says/

Nothing surprising here.
Don't know what all fuss is about, LV development programs always slip, typically by years eg SLS, Vulcan, NG, Spaceship, Alpha, Terran 1. Even if Neutron maiden launch slips to late 2025 it will be considerably quicker than most programs with surprising little slippage compared to original development launch schedule.
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Northrop Grumman Completes First BOLE Solid Rocket Motor Segment for NASA’s Space Launch System:
https://news.northropgrumman.com/news/releases/northrop-grumman-completes-first-bole-solid-rocket-motor-segment-for-nasas-space-launch-system

Quote from: NG Feb. 26 Press Release
PROMONTORY, Utah – Feb. 26, 2024 – (PHOTO RELEASE) Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) completed the first Booster Obsolescence and Life Extension (BOLE) motor segment for the next-generation Space Launch System (SLS) solid rocket booster. BOLE adds nearly five metric tons of payload capacity for SLS Block 2 Moon and Mars missions above the enhancements already in work for the SLS Block 1B configuration slated to fly on Artemis IV. The new solid rocket boosters will be used on Block 2 beginning with Artemis IX when all the recovered and refurbished shuttle-era steel cases have been expended.

Building on the foundation of the largest and most powerful solid rocket boosters ever flown, Northrop Grumman’s BOLE booster incorporates cutting-edge carbon fiber technology and a weight-saving composite case. Combined with other upgrades, it generates 11% more total impulse than the current five-segment solid rocket boosters. The first BOLE demonstration test is scheduled for this year, featuring a full-scale static test with all five segments integrated and horizontally fired in a test bay.
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I believe that there is a future possibility that they go back to landing legs for domestic use.
I agree. The landing legs are needed for the moon and mars. Might as well test them on earth first. Much faster and cheaper.
This was stated in regard to the booster, not the ship.  I don't see any reason why the booster would go back to using landing legs, unless catching turns out to be infeasible.
I was going to reply about that but it's getting off topic now.
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At least we are safe from Earthquakes, hurricanes and forest fires!
Not quite. As those events will affect the viability of emergency landing zones and availability of emergency services near those zones. It depends on the scale of those groundside events.

You are assuming that all rotating space stations will be in an orbit that allows for evacuation vehicles to return to Earth. That is far from certain since I think LEO is one of the least likely places to place a rotating space station (LEO is too close to Earth to require a rotating space station for people that want or need to live in space).

You are also assuming that there can't be a evacuation destination close by in space, which would eliminate the need for vehicles with wings - and evacuation vehicles with wings will need constant maintenance and recertification, since no one wants to leave one place of danger, and end up in another  ;).

So the cheaper, less complicated, and safer option for evacuating from a rotating space station is to evacuate to a nearby destination.

Hrm, that does bring up an interesting idea, requiring everyone to bring a standard escape pod/suitcraft with them. At a minimum they become available laborers.
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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by theinternetftw on Today at 02:30 am »
Quick note that in my notes above I had that the NASA payloads had sent back "over 15 MB" of data.

I misheard.  The correct quote is a much more sensible "over 50 MB."
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I think that Eric Berger is right. When asked about the launch of Viper, Jim Free at 33-34 minutes of the video below made some comments about assessing CLPS to see if adjustments to the launch date of Viper will be necessary. Free said that they would soon have more news on this:

https://twitter.com/i/broadcasts/1YqJDgDOgaLGV

https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1762862736545849631
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At least we are safe from Earthquakes, hurricanes and forest fires!
Not quite. As those events will affect the viability of emergency landing zones and availability of emergency services near those zones. It depends on the scale of those groundside events.

You are assuming that all rotating space stations will be in an orbit that allows for evacuation vehicles to return to Earth. That is far from certain since I think LEO is one of the least likely places to place a rotating space station (LEO is too close to Earth to require a rotating space station for people that want or need to live in space).

You are also assuming that there can't be a evacuation destination close by in space, which would eliminate the need for vehicles with wings - and evacuation vehicles with wings will need constant maintenance and recertification, since no one wants to leave one place of danger, and end up in another  ;).

So the cheaper, less complicated, and safer option for evacuating from a rotating space station is to evacuate to a nearby destination.
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At least we are safe from Earthquakes, hurricanes and forest fires!
Not quite. As those events will affect the viability of emergency landing zones and availability of emergency services near those zones. It depends on the scale of those groundside events.
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