Author Topic: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)  (Read 30812 times)

Offline starbase

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 327
  • Liked: 281
  • Likes Given: 82
ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« on: 07/23/2020 01:15 pm »
Interesting bit from this article: https://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/spacewalkers-set-the-stage-for-future-iss-additions/

Quote
H-FIXTURE REMOVAL WORK
Once RiTS was installed and its occupants checked into their quarters, Cassidy and Behnken moved onto the second set of tasks, removing “H-fixtures” on the base of two solar arrays — mast canisters — on the port side of the ISS, according to NASA.

These were originally used for ground processing of the arrays before they were launched and are no longer needed. In their place is expected to be installed a piece of equipment to hold new solar arrays within the next several years.

Called iROSA, or ISS Roll Out Solar Array, these power-generating devices are designed to improve and augment the existing eight arrays, which collectively take up a space larger than an American football field. As they are aging — the oldest pair was launched in 2001 with the other three launched between 2006 and 2009.

Each iROSA is expected to be placed in front of the legacy arrays, according to NASA, and be attached via a modification kit installed onto the same mount the H-fixtures are on.

While each iROSA will shadow about two-thirds of the legacy arrays, the setup is expected to “increase power performance compared to the legacy ISS solar array.”

Ultimately, six iROSA devices will be delivered via three SpaceX Dragon cargo launches starting as early as 2021, according to NASA.

Only two H-fixtures were removed during U.S. EVA-68. A total of six need to be removed for all six iROSA modification kits to be installed.

One H-fixture was originally scheduled to be removed during the July 1 spacewalk. However, complications prevented its removal and required teams on the ground to re-evaluate their procedures and develop a way to pry them away from the canister.

Attached is also a PDF about iROSA from the NASA Technical Reports Server: https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20190032191.pdf

bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Offline robertross

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17935
  • Westphal, Nova Scotia
  • Liked: 648
  • Likes Given: 7342
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #1 on: 07/23/2020 01:26 pm »
As long as deployment doesn't require the good old 'Curbeam manuver'...classic memories from the good old shuttle days.
Those sticking arrays were painful to watch (and the tear), but the solution admirable.

Offline leetdan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 350
  • Space Coast
  • Liked: 294
  • Likes Given: 241
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #2 on: 07/23/2020 02:04 pm »
Those array deployments were indeed epic... Beamer and Suni shakes on STS-116, and of course Scott Parazynski's STS-120 EVA (at the end of the OBSS, itself at the end of the SSRMS).  Remember the OBSS was left at the ISS in case this sort of thing ever happened again.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2006/12/eva-4-required-despite-heroic-shakes/
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2007/11/eva-4-success-with-array-repair-atlantis-rolls-ahead-of-sts-122/

Offline Sesquipedalian

  • Whee!
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 728
  • Liked: 300
  • Likes Given: 941
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #3 on: 07/26/2020 12:11 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

Offline robertross

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17935
  • Westphal, Nova Scotia
  • Liked: 648
  • Likes Given: 7342
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #4 on: 07/26/2020 01:13 am »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.

Offline MATTBLAK

  • Elite Veteran & 'J.A.F.A'
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5361
  • 'Space Cadets' Let us; UNITE!! (crickets chirping)
  • New Zealand
  • Liked: 2222
  • Likes Given: 3864
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #5 on: 07/26/2020 02:02 am »
Imagine 8 of those new arrays powering a Solar Electric Propulsion bus! That would be a good unit to combine with chemical propulsion stages on a big Exploration spacecraft.
"Those who can't, Blog".   'Space Cadets' of the World - Let us UNITE!! (crickets chirping)

Online Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 35666
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 19799
  • Likes Given: 10337
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #6 on: 07/26/2020 04:50 am »
Wow, this is super cool; I had no idea ISS was getting new (additional) wings!

Does anyone know the mass of each iROSA?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Online AstroWare

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 245
  • Arizona
  • Liked: 176
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #7 on: 07/26/2020 01:42 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.
The NTRS presentation referenced includes the following (page 4):

"Upgrading  all  8 power  channels  would  provide  the  most operational  flexibility  for  the program 

6 channels  is  the  minimum  amount required  to  avoid  negatively impacting  ISS operations."

I would imagine that if the (6) upgrades go well, that eventually they decide to do all (8).

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7948
  • Liked: 3771
  • Likes Given: 746
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #8 on: 07/26/2020 05:48 pm »
I'll ask the obvious question... why are there six and not eight ROSAs?

I would venture a guess that higher efficiency cells make it unnecessary to place more.
The NTRS presentation referenced includes the following (page 4):

"Upgrading  all  8 power  channels  would  provide  the  most operational  flexibility  for  the program 

6 channels  is  the  minimum  amount required  to  avoid  negatively impacting  ISS operations."

I would imagine that if the (6) upgrades go well, that eventually they decide to do all (8).
The final 2 depend on further ISS Programme extension as S6 has the youngear pair of arrays.

Offline MATTBLAK

  • Elite Veteran & 'J.A.F.A'
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5361
  • 'Space Cadets' Let us; UNITE!! (crickets chirping)
  • New Zealand
  • Liked: 2222
  • Likes Given: 3864
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #9 on: 07/28/2020 09:45 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?
"Those who can't, Blog".   'Space Cadets' of the World - Let us UNITE!! (crickets chirping)

Offline whitelancer64

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #10 on: 07/28/2020 10:31 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?

Gallium Arsenide. Image is from the PDF in the first link.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline AnalogMan

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3335
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 1406
  • Likes Given: 43
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #11 on: 07/28/2020 10:41 pm »
I've trawled the internets and tried to find out if the iROSA arrays are silicon-based, or gallium-arsenide. I've not been able to find out. does anyone know?

They are triple junction cells made by Spectrolab (so not silicon-based).  This info is in the NTRS presentation attached to the first post (page attached, click to enlarge).
« Last Edit: 07/28/2020 10:42 pm by AnalogMan »

Offline MATTBLAK

  • Elite Veteran & 'J.A.F.A'
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5361
  • 'Space Cadets' Let us; UNITE!! (crickets chirping)
  • New Zealand
  • Liked: 2222
  • Likes Given: 3864
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #12 on: 07/28/2020 10:51 pm »
Ah! Humble thanks, my bad - I did not recognize the acronym of 'GaAs' until you directed me to the appropriate image. Been looking at my too-small phone screen too much. Now that I'm back on my new, 27-inch monitor it's as clear as a bell.
"Those who can't, Blog".   'Space Cadets' of the World - Let us UNITE!! (crickets chirping)

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2234
  • Likes Given: 373
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #13 on: 11/09/2020 01:44 pm »
Wanted to note that iROSA is now nominally rostered for CRS-22, scheduled for May 2021.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=52211.0

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2234
  • Likes Given: 373
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #14 on: 12/21/2020 05:16 pm »
Quote
 IPA project will deliver 6 new external solar array wings in 3 pairs on flights SpX-22, SpX-25, and SpX-26.
 EVA tasks to configure the target wing locations has already begun, with support structure removal tasks during the most recent 3B battery EVAs. EVA tasks to complete configuration will continue throughout the remainder of 2020.
• First delivery of 2 IPA Mod Kits is complete for manifest on NG-14
• Installation to the 2B & 4B Mast Canisters is expected on the IROSA Prep EVA post Crew-1 arrival
 Manufacturing of the first two ISS Roll Out Solar Array (IROSA) wings is in work for SpX-22
◦ The current schedule has limited margin
 Manufacturing of the first composite Deployable Carrier continues to support launch package integration upon arrival of IROSA Wing 1 & 2 in December 2020
 

Source document:
https://www.nationalacademies.org/event/10-14-2020/docs/D0CE42612418D93FC850A8B8383F306148EC43CCAE2D
(Attached as well)
« Last Edit: 12/21/2020 05:22 pm by Jansen »

Offline Raffaele_Di_Palma

  • Member
  • Posts: 9
  • Italy
  • Liked: 18
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #15 on: 01/06/2021 12:49 pm »
On the EVA planned for the 1st feb, Kathleen Rubins and Victor Glover will start the path for the iROSAs.

Here's a video that show the assembling sequence of bracket mountings.

Hope you like it :)

« Last Edit: 01/06/2021 12:58 pm by Raffaele_Di_Palma »

Online Josh_from_Canada

Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #16 on: 01/11/2021 07:44 pm »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1348732046865272834
Quote
Making power moves.

A new set of Boeing-built solar arrays will help power
@Space_Station
 to keep cutting-edge orbital research capabilities and commercial opportunities going for years to come.

Release: https://boeing.mediaroom.com/news-releases-statements?item=130801

Article:
Quote
HOUSTON, Jan. 11, 2021 – Boeing [NYSE: BA] will support the International Space Station’s (ISS) growing research capabilities and commercial opportunities with new solar arrays to increase the orbiting laboratory’s power supply. The modification to Boeing’s ISS sustainment contract with NASA calls for Boeing to deliver six additional solar arrays to NASA for installation beginning in 2021.

The new 63-foot-by-20-foot (19-meter-by-6-meter) arrays will together produce more than 120 kilowatts of electricity from the sun’s energy, enough to power more than 40 average U.S. homes. Combined with the eight original, larger arrays, this advanced hardware will provide a 20 to 30 percent increase in power, helping to maximize the station’s capabilities for years to come. The arrays will provide ISS with electricity to sustain its systems and equipment, plus augment the electricity available to continue a wide variety of public and private experiments and research in the station’s unique microgravity environment.

“When it comes to game-changing research and technological development, the space station is currently hitting its full stride,” said John Mulholland, ISS vice president and program manager for Boeing. “These arrays, along with other recent upgrades to the station’s power system and data-transfer speed, will ensure that ISS remains an incubator and business model in the commercial space ecosystem for the coming decades. Access to this unique lab will continue to pay off as researchers study the challenges of future deep-space exploration and make discoveries that improve life on Earth.”

Most of the ISS systems, including its communications systems, batteries and scientific equipment racks, have been upgraded since humans began a continuous presence on the orbiting laboratory in November 2000. Two International Docking Adapters, manufactured by Boeing, have been attached to the ISS to allow commercial spacecraft to dock autonomously to the station. Boeing is the prime contractor for ISS sustainment; the company’s studies have determined that the ISS could safely operate beyond 2030 if NASA and its international partners choose to do so.

Deployable Space Systems of Santa Barbara, California, will produce the structure of the new arrays, including the canister and frame that will unfurl to hold the solar-array blankets in place. Deployable Space Systems also built the canister, frame and solar array blanket for a prototype of the new arrays that was successfully tested aboard the ISS in June 2017.

Spectrolab, a Boeing company based in Sylmar, California, produces the arrays’ XTJ Prime solar cells, which will be some of the most powerful ever launched into space. They are the same solar cells that power Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft in flight and while docked to the ISS. Spectrolab also produced the station’s original solar cells, as well as the solar cells tested on the prototype.

“The XTJ Prime space solar cells are much more efficient than any of their predecessors and are fit to support the cutting-edge research being done aboard the International Space Station,” said Tony Mueller, president of Spectrolab.

For more information on Spectrolab, visit www.spectrolab.com. For more information on Boeing Defense, Space & Security, visit www.boeing.com. Follow us on Twitter at @BoeingSpace.

Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company and leading provider of commercial airplanes, defense, space and security systems, and global services. As the top U.S. exporter, the company supports commercial and government customers in more than 150 countries and leverages the talents of a global supplier base. Building on a legacy of aerospace leadership, Boeing continues to lead in technology and innovation, deliver for its customers and invest in its people and future growth.
« Last Edit: 01/11/2021 07:45 pm by Josh_from_Canada »
Launches Seen: Atlas-V OA-7,

Offline SMS

  • Regular
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3099
    • Astronauts & their spaceflights
  • Liked: 1985
  • Likes Given: 245
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #17 on: 01/11/2021 08:04 pm »
https://twitter.com/Free_Space/status/1348730703731695616


Jan. 11, 2021
New Solar Arrays to Power NASA’s International Space Station Research

As the International Space Station orbits Earth, its four pairs of solar arrays soak up the sun’s energy to provide electrical power for the numerous research and science investigations conducted every day, as well as the continued operations of the orbiting platform. The space station is the springboard to NASA's Artemis missions to the Moon, a platform to test advanced technologies for human exploration of deep space and future mission to Mars. NASA also has opened the space station for business and commercial activities, including private astronauts missions.

Designed for a 15-year service life, the solar arrays have been operating continuously since the first pair was deployed in December 2000, with additional array pairs delivered in September 2006, June 2007, and March 2009. The first pair of solar arrays has now provided continuous electrical power to the station for more than 20 years as more modules were added and dozens of crews tackled thousands of scientific experiments and continued operations through hundreds of spacewalks, cargo missions, and more.

Though they are functioning well, the current solar arrays are showing signs of degradation, as expected. To ensure a sufficient power supply is maintained for NASA’s exploration technology demonstrations for Artemis and beyond as well as utilization and commercialization, NASA will be augmenting six of the eight existing power channels of the space station with new solar arrays. Boeing, NASA’s prime contractor for space station operations, its subsidiary Spectrolab, and major supplier Deployable Space Systems (DSS) will provide the new arrays. The combination of the eight original, larger arrays, and the smaller, more efficient new arrays will restore the power generation of each augmented array to approximately the amount generated when the original arrays were first installed, providing a 20% to 30% increase in power for space station research and operations.

The new solar arrays will be a larger version of the Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) technology that successfully demonstrated the mechanical capabilities of solar array deployment during its test on the space station in June 2017.

The new solar arrays will be positioned in front of six of the current arrays, and will use the existing sun tracking, power distribution, and channelization. This approach is similar to the one used to upgrade the station’s external television cameras to high definition, using the existing power and control mechanisms.

The new arrays will shade slightly over half of the length of the existing arrays and will be connected to the same power system to augment the existing supply. The eight current arrays are currently capable of generating up to 160 kilowatts of power during orbital daytime, about half of which is stored in the station’s batteries for use while the station is not in sunlight. Each new solar array will produce more than 20 kilowatts of electricity, eventually totaling 120 kilowatts (120,000 watts) of augmented power during orbital daytime. In addition, the remaining uncovered solar array pair and partially uncovered original arrays will continue to generate approximately 95 kilowatts of power for a total of up to 215 kilowatts (215,000 watts) of power available to support station operations at completion. For comparison, an active computer and monitor may use up to 270 watts, and a small refrigerator uses about 725 watts.

The solar arrays will be delivered to the International Space Station in pairs in the unpressurized trunk of the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft during three resupply missions starting in 2021, when the second pair of current arrays reaches the 15th year of its design life. The installation of each solar array will require two spacewalks: one to prepare the worksite with a modification kit and another to install the new solar array.

NASA signed a modification to the ISS Vehicle Sustaining Engineering contract with Boeing to provide the six new solar arrays. Doing so provides the International Space Station with enough power to maintain normal operations and ensure adequate power for future opportunities in low-Earth orbit, whether for NASA and its international partners or commercial companies.

Deployable Space Systems ROSA solar array
Credits: Deployable Space Systems
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Lars-J

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6711
  • California
  • Liked: 8138
  • Likes Given: 5181
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #18 on: 01/11/2021 08:16 pm »
Will the new solar panels be in addition to the existing ones? (if so where will they be located)
Or replace some of them? (if so, how will the existing ones be disposed of)

Offline Lars-J

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6711
  • California
  • Liked: 8138
  • Likes Given: 5181
Re: ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)
« Reply #19 on: 01/11/2021 08:22 pm »

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1