Author Topic: Orbital ATK OmegA (NGL) Rocket UPDATES/DISCUSSION - Thread 2  (Read 22600 times)


Offline Lars-J

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

It certainly adds a schedule question as well. ULA is not letting go of SLC-6 until their last Delta IV heavy flies. Which could be later than 2021.

Offline Aurora

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Orbital ATK successfully cast the first inert motor segment for CBS.

Online envy887

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

It certainly adds a schedule question as well. ULA is not letting go of SLC-6 until their last Delta IV heavy flies. Which could be later than 2021.

I thought west coast launches weren't required until 2024?
« Last Edit: 05/02/2018 08:24 PM by envy887 »

Offline Lars-J

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

It certainly adds a schedule question as well. ULA is not letting go of SLC-6 until their last Delta IV heavy flies. Which could be later than 2021.

I thought west coast launches weren't required until 2024?

But without a west coast pad and the capability that gives, they might have to win *ALL* DoD contracts to be viable. Without the capability of polar and high inclination launches they would be limiting the missions they can bid on.

Offline russianhalo117

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

It certainly adds a schedule question as well. ULA is not letting go of SLC-6 until their last Delta IV heavy flies. Which could be later than 2021.
Ed. The FST and main (original) MST were designed for the taller Titan-IIIM. They were shortened and modified for West Coast Shuttle.

Lars-J: A VAFB pad is not needed by 2021. They are pressing East Coast startup first. I wouldnt expect ULA to be ready to hand over SLC-6 until at least 2025.

Online brickmack

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

OmegA has AFTS doesn't it? It might be able to use the same polar corridor from the Cape that was recently announced. Blue seems to have no plans for a west coast New Glenn pad, and SpaceX has shown no indication of upgrading their west pad for FH or building one for BFR. Seems like thats the direction everyone else is going, except maybe ULA

Offline russianhalo117

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All new rockets must have an AFTS system. All existing rockets (including sounding and meteorological rockets) must also eventually implement AFTS.

SpaceX also has taken steps to implement West Coast FH. The reaction frame and launch mount requires substantial standardisation work or replacement to support FH launches.
« Last Edit: 05/02/2018 11:17 PM by russianhalo117 »

Offline russianhalo117

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A 4m fairing makes little sense if their third stage is 5m in diameter.  (BTW, are they building that stage in house or contracting it out?)
If the third stage is 5 meters in diameter; is it essentially a twin-engined version of the Delta IV upper stage?

Pretty much, the artwork makes it look very similar, although that may be artistic vagueness at this point. But it does bring into focus that this rocket will be very large (the DCSS is huge!), and they must be cutting some interesting deals if they can keep the cost down.
Upper Stage Update: US will use 2 RL10C-5-1's per http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_lau/omega.htm

via ARH: http://rocket.com/article/rl10-selected-omega%E2%84%A2-rocket

Quote
RL10 Selected for OmegA™ Rocket
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., April 16, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Orbital ATK has selected the RL10 rocket engine to provide propulsion for the third stage of the company's OmegA rocket which includes a lineup of intermediate- and large-class space launch vehicles.

"The RL10 has provided reliable upper stage propulsion for more than five decades and we look forward to continuing that legacy with Orbital ATK and its OmegA rocket," said Aerojet Rocketdyne CEO and President Eileen Drake. "By selecting the RL10, Orbital ATK is able to leverage investments made by the U.S. Air Force and others to build resilient space launch capabilities for our nation."

"The RL10 has an extensive flight history and provides a low-risk, affordable engine with outstanding performance," said Mike Pinkston, Deputy General Manager of Orbital ATK's Launch Vehicles Division. "OmegA is a robust all-American launch system with its entire design based on flight-proven technologies and common components from Orbital ATK's diversified lineup of rockets and propulsion systems."

The RL10 burns cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants using a highly-efficient expander engine cycle. With nearly 500 engines flown in space, the RL10 has helped place hundreds of satellites into orbit, sent spacecraft to explore every planet in our solar system and propelled the first human-made object, the Voyager I spacecraft, into interstellar space.

The RL10C-5-1 model that will support the OmegA system is derived from the RL10C-1 that made its inaugural flight in December 2014. This new variant of the RL10 will feature an injector assembly that is built using additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing.

"Having our RL10 engine selected to provide upper stage propulsion for a fourth launch vehicle reflects the confidence industry places in our product," said Space Business Unit Senior Vice President Jerry Tarnacki. "It also confirms that the steps Aerojet Rocketdyne has been taking to make our products more competitive—such as incorporating 3-D printing to reduce production costs—are being welcomed in the marketplace."

Aerojet Rocketdyne, a subsidiary of Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:AJRD), is an innovative company delivering solutions that create value for its customers in the aerospace and defense markets. The company is a world-recognized aerospace and defense leader that provides propulsion and energetics to the space, missile defense and strategic systems, tactical systems and armaments areas, in support of domestic and international markets. Additional information about Aerojet Rocketdyne can be obtained by visiting our websites at www.Rocket.com and www.AerojetRocketdyne.com.

Offline Rebel44

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Since Firefly has been "given" SLC 2W, it seems likely that Omega, if developed, would default to SLC 6.  Makes sense since SLC 6 was created to handle SRB-diameter motor segments.  I'm guessing, though, that the "Omega Heavy" variant would be too tall to fit inside the SLC 6 mobile structure.  Does anyone have any thoughts about that question?

 - Ed Kyle

It certainly adds a schedule question as well. ULA is not letting go of SLC-6 until their last Delta IV heavy flies. Which could be later than 2021.

The last scheduled Delta IV Heavy:
Year: 2023   
Payload: NROL-91
Launchpad: Vandenberg SLC-6

source: http://spacenews.com/u-s-air-force-plans-to-buy-2-delta-4-heavy-rockets-for-nro-missions/

So I don't expect anyone else to be able to use SLC-6 until at least 2025

Online soltasto

They have also 2 other possibilities:

1) Upgrade one of the pads that were used for Minotaur/Taurus launches
2) Build a new pad from scratch on unused land or on unused pads (SLC-1/SLC-5/SLC-10)

Either way the work would be extensive and require a big investment.

Offline russianhalo117

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They have also 2 other possibilities:

1) Upgrade one of the pads that were used for Minotaur/Taurus launches
2) Build a new pad from scratch on unused land or on unused pads (SLC-1/SLC-5/SLC-10)

Either way the work would be extensive and require a big investment.
SLC-10's pads are not available as it is a National Historic Site and cannot be modified.

Offline rayleighscatter

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They have also 2 other possibilities:

1) Upgrade one of the pads that were used for Minotaur/Taurus launches
2) Build a new pad from scratch on unused land or on unused pads (SLC-1/SLC-5/SLC-10)

Either way the work would be extensive and require a big investment.
SLC-10's pads are not available as it is a National Historic Site and cannot be modified.
LC-39 is as well. Historic designations only carry so much weight.

Offline russianhalo117

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They have also 2 other possibilities:

1) Upgrade one of the pads that were used for Minotaur/Taurus launches
2) Build a new pad from scratch on unused land or on unused pads (SLC-1/SLC-5/SLC-10)

Either way the work would be extensive and require a big investment.
SLC-10's pads are not available as it is a National Historic Site and cannot be modified.
LC-39 is as well. Historic designations only carry so much weight.
It is explained a while back in L2. SLC-10 (LE-6, LE-7, and LE-8) is home to VAFB's Space and Missile Heritage Center (http://www.vandenberg.af.mil/About-Us/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/338395/space-and-missile-heritage-center/) also https://www.nps.gov/articles/space-launch-complex-10.htm


Online gongora

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Tweets from Jeff Foust:
Quote
Michael Laidley, Orbital ATK: we have about 500 people working on our OmegA rocket right now; expect that to ramp up to about 1,000. Ground testing of first stage to begin next year. #SpaceTechExpo

Laidley: on schedule for first flight of intermediate version of OmegA in 2021, with USAF certification in 2022. Heavy version first launch 2024. #SpaceTechExpo

Laidley: if we don’t win Launch Services Award from USAF for OmegA, we would not proceed with the vehicle as currently defined. It would be some other design that doesn’t address all EELV requirements. #SpaceTechExpo
« Last Edit: 05/22/2018 08:17 PM by gongora »

Offline catdlr

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OmegA: Northrop Grumman’s New Large-Class Rocket

Northrop Grumman
Published on Jun 13, 2018
Modified on June 18, 2018

Northrop Grumman has announced the name of the company's new large-class rocket: OmegA. This all-American rocket, designed for the U.S. Air Force’s Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program, will have a capacity of up to 10,100 kg to Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) and up to 7,800 kg to Geostationary Equatorial Orbit (GEO). Aerojet Rocketdyne's RL10C engine will be the vehicle’s upper stage propulsion system.

Learn more: bit.ly/OmegaRocket

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZc8SktOz7E?t=001




Updated: Jue 18, 2018  Tony De La Rosa
« Last Edit: 06/18/2018 09:38 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline TrevorMonty

Good article on OmegA.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3539/1

They've proposed it as backup to Antares for Cygnus ISS launches. Don't how costs compare to Antares but a couple extra flights a year for OmegA could make the difference to its financial viability.


Offline russianhalo117

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Good article on OmegA.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3539/1

They've proposed it as backup to Antares for Cygnus ISS launches. Don't how costs compare to Antares but a couple extra flights a year for OmegA could make the difference to its financial viability.
So going internal and I guessing they will be shedding Atlas V/Vulcan launch options as a result of that decision.

Online gongora

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and I guessing they will be shedding Atlas V/Vulcan launch options as a result of that decision.

... if Omega actually goes into service, which may not really be decided for a couple more years.

Offline Kabloona

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Good article on OmegA.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3539/1

They've proposed it as backup to Antares for Cygnus ISS launches. Don't how costs compare to Antares but a couple extra flights a year for OmegA could make the difference to its financial viability.

Thanks for the link. That's an uncommonly excellent article, both in terms of technical depth and clarity for the layperson. Written by an engineer, no less! Someone should hire that guy to do technical writing for a living.

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