Author Topic: Space-related science and scientific research Q&A  (Read 1589 times)

Offline deltaV

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This thread is for questions and answers about science and scientific research that's related enough to space to be on topic here in NSF forums and doesn't have a better fitting thread. Questions about orbits belong in the thread for that: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=23943.0. Engineering (which includes "rocket science" and the rocket equation) is only on topic if the item being engineered exists primarily to conduct scientific research, e.g. ground telescopes, space telescopes, and Earth science satellites. Questions related to human space flight are most likely a better fit for a human spaceflight thread.

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Here's a question to start this thread: when has space-related scientific research been done in a way where someone other than government(s) took a substantial portion of the risk for a $1M+ project (inflation adjusted to 2023 $) or a major component of such a project? What worked well? What didn't work well?

Cost-plus contracting gives the government most of the risk so it doesn't answer my question. Fixed-price contracts can answer my question, as can contests (like the Ansari X Prize for suborbital spaceflight or the DARPA autonomous car challenge but for science).

I'm aware of the following examples:
* I believe NASA and others usually buy launches for space science assets using fixed-price contracts
* NASA's recent Commercial Lunar Payload Services program is fixed-price
* Ground-based telescopes have sometimes been privately funded recently (e.g. the Keck telescopes) and were usually privately funded 100+ years ago

Any other examples?

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Space-related science and scientific research Q&A
« Reply #1 on: 08/01/2023 01:42 am »
Wouldn't all private / non-government funded in-orbit research fall into this category?

So all of the hundreds of experiments / projects sent to the ISS by CASIS would count, right?
« Last Edit: 08/01/2023 01:53 am by whitelancer64 »
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Offline deltaV

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Re: Space-related science and scientific research Q&A
« Reply #2 on: 08/01/2023 02:31 am »
Wouldn't all private / non-government funded in-orbit research fall into this category?

So all of the hundreds of experiments / projects sent to the ISS by CASIS would count, right?

Yes, privately funded in-orbit research qualifies.

I'm guessing most of the CASIS projects are probably below the $1M+ project size threshold that I specified but some may be barely above the threshold and count.
« Last Edit: 08/01/2023 02:46 am by deltaV »

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