Author Topic: Relativity Terran 1 first flight : CCSFS SLC-16 : February 2023  (Read 42946 times)

Offline edzieba

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Does it really count as getting to orbit if you didn't even try to include a payload or a fairing that could actually separate from the vehicle?
Yes.

Otherwise, you must declare STS-1 never achieved orbit, since it never separated a fairing or deployed a payload.

Offline edkyle99

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Does it really count as getting to orbit if you didn't even try to include a payload or a fairing that could actually separate from the vehicle?
Yes.

Otherwise, you must declare STS-1 never achieved orbit, since it never separated a fairing or deployed a payload.
Also AC-2, SA-5, SA-203, and the first Falcon 9, among others.

Good luck to these guys.  Love seeing SLC 16 active again.  Being first isn't as important as being best.

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Offline ParabolicSnark

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Otherwise, you must declare STS-1 never achieved orbit, since it never separated a fairing or deployed a payload.
Also AC-2, SA-5, SA-203, and the first Falcon 9, among others.

Fair points - I'll concede they'll have made orbit. My caveat would be that it would be a demonstrated negative payload to orbit (0 kg payload plus mass penalty from no fairing mechanisms or payload deployer).

Offline Robotbeat

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Does it really count as getting to orbit if you didn't even try to include a payload or a fairing that could actually separate from the vehicle?

Obviously yes.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Offline edkyle99

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Fair points - I'll concede they'll have made orbit. My caveat would be that it would be a demonstrated negative payload to orbit (0 kg payload plus mass penalty from no fairing mechanisms or payload deployer).
They might have a simulated payload mass.  I would expect something like that on a proof flight.

ZQ-2 was first to attempt Methane to orbit.  Someone will be first to make orbit.  Someone else might be first to deploy a satellite to orbit, and so on. 

Terran-1 is roughly speaking a ZQ-2 divided by three.  About one-third the liftoff thrust and presumably liftoff weight.  Maybe one-fourth of the payload capability though that remains to be seen.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/15/2022 01:47 am by edkyle99 »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/1603457630688739333

Quote
Relativity’s Terran 1 rocket at LC-16 in Cape Canaveral, Florida, during this morning’s beautiful sunrise. The fully 3D-printed launch vehicle now has a shot at becoming the first methane-fueled vehicle to reach orbit, with its debut flight likely in early 2023

Offline trimeta

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Fair points - I'll concede they'll have made orbit. My caveat would be that it would be a demonstrated negative payload to orbit (0 kg payload plus mass penalty from no fairing mechanisms or payload deployer).
They might have a simulated payload mass.  I would expect something like that on a proof flight.

ZQ-2 was first to attempt Methane to orbit.  Someone will be first to make orbit.  Someone else might be first to deploy a satellite to orbit, and so on. 

Terran-1 is roughly speaking a ZQ-2 divided by three.  About one-third the liftoff thrust and presumably liftoff weight.  Maybe one-fourth of the payload capability though that remains to be seen.

 - Ed Kyle
To be honest, I wouldn't expect a simulated payload mass, because this is their first launch and they probably want to leave as much margin as possible in case there's underperformance anywhere else. IIRC, the first Astra Rocket 3 to reach orbit just had a lightbulb which turned on to simulate payload deploy, without bothering with a weight to simulate the payload. (Although admittedly, a single lightbulb might constitute a considerable fraction of Rocket 3's payload capacity.)
« Last Edit: 12/15/2022 10:33 pm by trimeta »

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We got a look at Relativity's Terran 1 rocket on the pad from both the air and the ground, spotted evidence that a New Glenn first stage might be in testing, plus we try to figure out what on Earth SpaceX is doing at its Cidco Road facility.

Use code "Flyover18" to get 10% off in the Merch store: https://shop.nasaspaceflight.com

Previous Flyover:   

 • How Will SpaceX S... 

Video and Pictures from Stephen (@spacecoast_stve), Julia (@julia_bergeron), Thomas (@TGMetsFan98), Nic (@NicAnsuini), Starbase LIve and Space Coast Live. Additional video from CNSA and Relativity.

Narrated by Sawyer (@thenasaman). Script by Adrian (@BCCarCounters), Harry (@Harry__Stranger), Jack (@theJackBeyer), and Sawyer. Edited by Sawyer.

All content copyright to NSF. Not to be used elsewhere without explicit permission from NSF.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/relativityspace/status/1605996828851179520

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Terran 1’s testing campaign is filled with firsts – Starting with a look back at Stage 2’s test milestones. A thread 👇

twitter.com/relativityspace/status/1605997350408683520

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Printed at the Portal in Long Beach, CA and tested at our @NASAStennis facilities, our integrated Stage 2 completed a successful Mission Duty Cycle (MDC) test on first attempt. 🔥 Making it the first time a 3D printed stage successfully completed acceptance testing.

https://twitter.com/relativityspace/status/1605999504330608640

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Like its structure, all Relativity Aeon engines are 3D printed and use liquid oxygen (LOX) + liquid natural gas (LNG). Better for rocket propulsion, reusability ♻️ & also the easiest to eventually make on Mars. 

Next time Stage 2’s Aeon Vac engine lights will be in space. 🚀

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/alexphysics13/status/1610294744109780993

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Something caught my eye on today's SpaceX stream after the landing of the booster... Where is Terran 1? 🤔

Offline Daniels30

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Chamath Palihapitiya (Investor) says Relativity will launch in the third week of January. Timestamp: 00:23:00
« Last Edit: 01/06/2023 12:33 pm by Daniels30 »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Any new news?  It's days from the 3rd week of January.
« Last Edit: 01/13/2023 05:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Foximus

Have not seen anything publicly shareable.  Are they still awaiting a 450 license?

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Any new news?  It's days from the 3rd week of January.
The rocket is not yet on the pad, so the launch will not take place this month.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Cross-post:
Ben Cooper's Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated January 20:
Quote
The first flight of Relativity Space's Terran 1 rocket is set for January-February TBD.

And, NextSpaceFlight, updated January 20:
Launch NET February
« Last Edit: 01/20/2023 05:57 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline PM3

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And, NextSpaceFlight, updated January 20:
Launch NET February

Just kicking the can down the road.

Since September 2022, Terran 1 always launches next month (see e. g. post #47).
« Last Edit: 01/20/2023 08:26 pm by PM3 »
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Offline brussell

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And, NextSpaceFlight, updated January 20:
Launch NET February

Just kicking the can down the road.

Since September 2022, Terran 1 always launches next month (see e. g. post #47).

That's pretty typical for a first flight. I'd give them a pass. Though it's true that all the talk gets annoying. Tim Ellis sure falls in the "talk a lot, make lots of promises" type of CEO. It gets them the investment money I guess...

Offline edzieba

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And, NextSpaceFlight, updated January 20:
Launch NET February

Just kicking the can down the road.

Since September 2022, Terran 1 always launches next month (see e. g. post #47).

That's pretty typical for a first flight. I'd give them a pass. Though it's true that all the talk gets annoying. Tim Ellis sure falls in the "talk a lot, make lots of promises" type of CEO. It gets them the investment money I guess...
They also have sat a flight vehicle on the pad and fired it, which is the sort of 3d-printed-metal fire-breathing talk that many other launch companies yet aspire to.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Ben Cooper's Launch Photography Viewing Guide, updated February 1:
Quote
The first flight of Relativity Space's Terran 1 rocket is set for February TBD, likely in the early afternoon EST.
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https://twitter.com/thetimellis/status/1621476862772789249

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Back to the Cape! Closer every day, final prep for upcoming static fire then launch closely after.

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