Author Topic: FAILURE: Astra Rocket 3.3 – STP-27AD1 – Kodiak – August 28, 2021 (22:35 UTC)  (Read 73440 times)

Offline aviators99

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No commentary about the anomalous liftoff on the feed.  Don't understand.

Offline MaxTeranous

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When that tip and power slide started I was sure they were about to lose their GSE to a big kaboom. Pleased to see it make it to MECO in the end.

Better to try and fail than to not try at all.

No commentary about the anomalous liftoff on the feed.  Don't understand.

That's par for the course in launch failure commentary.
Wait, ∆V? This site will accept the ∆ symbol? How many times have I written out the word "delta" for no reason?

Offline RocketLover0119

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Initial thoughts: combing through launch it looks like something relating to either GSE or even an engine blowing happens, which cause the dramatic slide. The vehicle used up so much performance on ascent to counter act, and as a result MECO was significantly lower than it should’ve been, causing aerodynamics to be much greater, which in turn causes the vehicle to tumble.
"The Starship has landed"

Offline RocketLover0119

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The prelaunch chart showed MECO at T+2:50, I think.  So not sure why we had engine cutoff at T+2:30 ish.  But doesn't look like a planned MECO. I wonder if fairing deployment was tagged to 5 seconds after MECO (as opposed to a T+ time) - didn't see it go past the camera before the webcast cutaway.

MECO being lower was a result of the anomalous liftoff. Much more performance used, so therefore MECO happened significantly before it should’ve happened.
« Last Edit: 08/28/2021 10:57 pm by RocketLover0119 »
"The Starship has landed"

Offline russianhalo117

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Quote
🚀 We suffered technical difficulties, but achieved 2.5 minutes of flight data. Every launch, whether successful or not, is an opportunity for us to learn. Our team will study the data and use this information to iterate on our next launch. #AdAstra

Was the post-flight failure press conference also pre-recorded?

No he had different attire yesterday and the time of RSO flight termination would have had to have been dubbed in.

Offline Craftyatom

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nothing seemed normal about that, but on the other hand if it wasnt normal why didnt the FTS fire?  Maybe they just really enjoy dirtying up their launch site
Termination at MECO means that they burnt through most of their propellant during flight, and there's plenty of time for the remaining propellant to burn and debris to spread out on the way down.  Far more environmentally friendly than terminating over land - as Astra learned during one of their early attempts when they had to clean up large amounts of contaminated dirt.  Also saved their GSE.

So long as no humans or infrastructure are under increased risk (which is what the corridor is for), it's better to wait it out.  And if their GNC really did manage to keep it in the corridor with an engine out on liftoff, then huge props to their avionics team.

that they had a failure video all ready to queue up doesnt exactly give confidence
Famously, Nixon had a speech written by William Safire in case Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were stranded on the Moon.  More recently, we got confirmation that SpaceX (as expected) practiced statements to be made on stream in case of failures (something which NASA first learned to do after the Challenger disaster).

The prelaunch chart showed MECO at T+2:50, I think.  So not sure why we had engine cutoff at T+2:30 ish.  But doesn't look like a planned MECO. I wonder if fairing deployment was tagged to 5 seconds after MECO (as opposed to a T+ time) - didn't see it go past the camera before the webcast cutaway.

MECO being lower was a result of the anomalous liftoff. Much more performance used, so therefore MECO happened significantly before it should’ve happened.
  While MECO happened much lower and slower than it should've due to the increased gravity losses, if only 4 of the 5 engines were running then they should've burned for a longer period of time than usual - the opposite of what occurred.  This suggests that there are probably other factors involved, like the state of the non-functioning engine.
« Last Edit: 08/28/2021 11:07 pm by Craftyatom »
All aboard the HSF hype train!  Choo Choo!

Offline TrevorMonty



Tumbling after MECO was probably due to aerodynamic loads as it was to low in atmosphere. Booster spent almost 30s clearing pad, not most efficient launch but definitely coolest ever.

Sent from my SM-T810 using Tapatalk


Offline mrhuggy

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I have made a quick video of the launch frame by frame. It looked like it tipped over then managed to correct itself then took off. It also looks like they was either part of the hold down mechanism attached to it after launch or part of the rocket flipped up. There is also possible explosions, might be a engine failing. Actually it was hovering next to the pad for a while then when the fuel was burnt off it took off, again suggest a engine failed.

Source - NASASpaceflight and Astra Rocket Livestream.


« Last Edit: 08/28/2021 11:13 pm by mrhuggy »

Offline AirmanPika

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Not gonna lie...that was possibly the coolest "failure" ever. That powerslide...

Offline MarcPol

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Initial thoughts: combing through launch it looks like something relating to either GSE or even an engine blowing happens, which cause the dramatic slide. The vehicle used up so much performance on ascent to counter act, and as a result MECO was significantly lower than it should’ve been, causing aerodynamics to be much greater, which in turn causes the vehicle to tumble.

I'm inclined to think an engine blew just after the hold downs released, so it couldn't abort.  Scrubbing through the launch sequence frame by frame, there are a few frames during the power slide where the engine plumes can be seen between the clouds, and it does not look like 5 distinct plumes.  There's also a piece of raceway that slams up towards the camera, possibly from the shock of the engine in that slot blowing, and the rocket leans in that direction.  TVC compensates and keeps it vertical, while the thrust to weight ratio isn't high enough to accelerate upwards, and it hovers until enough propellant burns off for the TWR to be over 1 and it heads upwards. 

Offline Remes

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The channel for cables et al was blown away.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/nextspaceflight/status/1431751673312022528

Quote
Thank you to @Astra for letting the NASASpaceflight team cover the LV0006 test flight and for being willing to fail in front of a live audience. Not all companies have streamed launches before they have reached orbit for the first time.

Offline hartspace

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It reminded me a lot of an old Atlas missile that power slid off the pad.  It flew for a bit before it gave out.  I didn't think that the Astra was going to fly as long as it did after it started tipping and power sliding.  A pretty solid structure, if nothing else. Hopefully, they can fix the problem and fly again.

Offline tgr9898

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The channel for cables et al was blown away.

When the tumble starts you can see part of the rear skirt flapping as well.

Offline RocketLover0119

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GIF of launch zoomed in at the base of the rocket. Something relating to the GSE seems to have given way.
"The Starship has landed"

Offline brussell

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That's too bad. I hope for a quick recovery.

Offline Rocketdog2116

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I bet that the reason that it was slow and meco was early (unless it was from FTS) was cuz it was carrying a big heavy and draggy piece of GSE along for the ride so the engines never had to G-limit throttle down. Not to mention that it dramatically reduced the TWR and added a whole lot of drag possibly.

Offline Skyway

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What a tough design. This thing just insists to fly! Recover from that inclination demonstrate a very good flight computer and also excellent command authority, and of course, a well-projected structure to withstand that.

It gave a new meaning to the term " s*** going sideways".
Everything is fail-proof until it fails.

Offline panjabi

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Giant congrats to the dreamers, the believers, the doers, the workers who keep amazing the rest of us with their ingenuity and hard work.  Today did not end like the Astra team wanted to, but prayers and best wishes to the team for a fantastic success on your next launch.

You still did something today that is in the realm of dreams for most of us. The correction at launch was impressive and the fact that the rocket reached 40+ kms was completely unexpected (after the "electric slide" launch).

Look forward to future success with your amazing team! Keep those chins high and keep them rockets coming!
« Last Edit: 08/29/2021 03:32 am by panjabi »

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