Author Topic: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates  (Read 55756 times)

Online gongora

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Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« on: 02/21/2021 01:49 pm »
Updates only thread for Perseverance (Mars 2020)

Discussion should go in https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=38208.0
« Last Edit: 02/21/2021 01:51 pm by gongora »

Offline hoku

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« Last Edit: 02/21/2021 10:26 pm by hoku »

Offline Citabria

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #2 on: 02/22/2021 04:29 pm »
Upcoming press conference, 2 pm EST, 1900Z:


« Last Edit: 02/22/2021 04:32 pm by Citabria »

Offline Mammutti

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #3 on: 02/22/2021 06:17 pm »
« Last Edit: 02/22/2021 06:20 pm by Mammutti »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #4 on: 02/22/2021 06:41 pm »

Offline Kaputnik

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #5 on: 02/22/2021 06:42 pm »
They're promising a 'firehose' of images on the website imminently.
"I don't care what anything was DESIGNED to do, I care about what it CAN do"- Gene Kranz

Offline Mammutti

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #6 on: 02/22/2021 06:54 pm »
All videos separately in higher resolution.

Parachute Up-View Camera POV



Parachute Up-View Camera 2 POV



Parachute Deploy Slowed to 30% speed



Rover Descent Camera POV



Descent Stage Down-Look Camera POV



Rover Up-Look Camera POV



Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #7 on: 02/22/2021 07:19 pm »
« Last Edit: 02/22/2021 07:24 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Mammutti

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #8 on: 02/22/2021 08:03 pm »
More images have been uploaded (currently there are 736): https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/

Online AU1.52

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #9 on: 02/23/2021 01:37 am »
From watching the descent video and the two different camera views I determined to a very close degree the location of Perseverance on the surface from one of the closest and clearest views from just as the sky crane started to kick up the Martian dust. I found a distinctive surface feature on both the sky crane image and the from the rover image as it was descending with enabled me to superimpose the rover hanging image on the earlier map. Can you find the feature? Here a clue - its directly below the back left wheel.   
« Last Edit: 02/23/2021 01:38 am by AU1.52 »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #10 on: 02/25/2021 01:02 am »
February 24, 2021
RELEASE 21-023
NASA’s Perseverance Rover Gives High-Definition Panoramic View of Landing Site


NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover got its first high-definition look around its new home in Jezero Crater on Feb. 21, after rotating its mast, or “head,” 360 degrees, allowing the rover’s Mastcam-Z instrument to capture its first panorama after touching down on the Red Planet on Feb 18. It was the rover’s second panorama ever, as the rover’s Navigation Cameras, or Navcams, also located on the mast, captured a 360-degree view on Feb. 20.

Mastcam-Z is a dual-camera system equipped with a zoom function, allowing the cameras to zoom in, focus, and take high-definition video, as well as panoramic color and 3D images of the Martian surface. With this capability, the robotic astrobiologist can provide a detailed examination of both close and distant objects.

The cameras will help scientists assess the geologic history and atmospheric conditions of Jezero Crater and will assist in identifying rocks and sediment worthy of a closer look by the rover’s other instruments. The cameras also will help the mission team determine which rocks the rover should sample and collect for eventual return to Earth in the future.

Stitched together from 142 images, the newly released panorama reveals the crater rim and cliff face of an ancient river delta in the distance. The camera system can reveal details as small as 0.1 to 0.2 inches (3 to 5 millimeters) across near the rover and 6.5 to 10 feet (2 to 3 meters) across in the distant slopes along the horizon.

The detailed composite image shows a Martian surface that appears similar to images captured by previous NASA rover missions.

“We’re nestled right in a sweet spot, where you can see different features similar in many ways to features found by Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity at their landing sites,” said Jim Bell of Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, the instrument’s principal investigator. ASU leads operations of the Mastcam-Z instrument, working in collaboration with Malin Space Science Systems in San Diego.

The camera team will discuss the new panorama during a question and answer session at  4 p.m. EST Thursday, Feb. 25, which will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website, and will livestream on the agency’s Facebook, Twitter, Twitch, Daily Motion, and YouTube channels, as well as the NASA app. Speakers include:

    Jim Bell of Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, the instrument’s principal investigator
    Elsa Jensen of Malin Space Science Systems, who leads the uplink operations team that sends commands to Mastcam-Z
    Kjartan Kinch of the Niels Bohr Institute of the University of Copenhagen, who led the design, construction, and testing of Mastcam-Z’s color calibration targets, which are used to tune the instrument’s settings

Mastcam-Z’s design is an evolution of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover’s Mastcam instrument, which has two cameras of fixed focal length rather than zoomable cameras. The two cameras on Perseverance’s Mastcam-Z dual cameras are mounted on the rover’s mast at eye level for a person 6 feet, 6 inches (2 meters) tall. They sit 9.5 inches (24.1 centimeters) apart to provide stereo vision and can produce color images with a quality similar to that of a consumer digital HD camera.

The Mastcam-Z team includes dozens of scientists, engineers, operations specialists, managers, and students from a variety of institutions. In addition, the team includes deputy principal investigator Justin Maki of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

More About the Mission

A key objective of Perseverance's mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance, go to:

https://www.nasa.gov/perseverance
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline spacexplorer

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #11 on: 02/25/2021 04:09 pm »
Feb. 25, 2021  - 1 p.m. PST / 4 p.m. EST / 21.00 P.M. GMT   
Panoramic View of Landing Site Q&A
https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8873/nasas-perseverance-rover-gives-high-definition-panoramic-view-of-landing-site/


Channels that will carry the live broadcast include:
YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Twitch, Daily Motion, and NASA App
https://www.youtube.com/nasa

Speakers:
- Jim Bell of Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, the instrument’s principal investigator
- Elsa Jensen of Malin Space Science Systems, who leads the uplink operations team that sends commands to Mastcam-Z
- Kjartan Kinch of the Niels Bohr Institute of the University of Copenhagen, who led the design, construction, and testing of Mastcam-Z’s color calibration targets, which are used to tune the instrument’s settings


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #12 on: 03/03/2021 10:48 pm »
March 03, 2021
MEDIA ADVISORY M21-029
NASA to Provide Update on Perseverance ‘Firsts’ Since Mars Landing

Since NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover touched down at Jezero Crater Feb. 18, mission controllers have made substantial progress as they prepare the rover for the unpaved road ahead. Mission team members from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California will discuss mission “firsts” achieved so far and those to come in a media teleconference at 3:30 p.m. EST (12:30 p.m. PST) Friday, March 5.

The teleconference audio and accompanying visuals will stream live on the NASA JPL YouTube channel.

Discussing the rover’s progress will be:

    Robert Hogg, Perseverance deputy mission manager, JPL
    Anais Zarifian, Perseverance mobility test bed engineer, JPL
    Katie Stack Morgan, Perseverance deputy project scientist, JPL

To participate in the teleconference, media must provide their name and affiliation to Rexana Vizza ([email protected]) no later than 1:30 p.m. EST (10:30 a.m. PST) Friday, March 5. Members of the media and public also may ask questions on social media during the teleconference using #CountdownToMars.

Since landing, NASA’s largest, most sophisticated Mars rover yet has gone through checks on every system and subsystem and sent back thousands of images from Jezero Crater. These checks will continue in the coming days, and the rover will make its first drives. Each system checkout and milestone completed marks a significant step forward as the rover prepares for surface operations. The primary mission is slated for one Martian year, or 687 Earth days.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #13 on: 03/05/2021 07:22 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1367252107561111555

Quote
This week I’ve been doing lots of health checkouts, getting ready to get to work. I’ve checked many tasks off my list, including instrument tests, imaging, and getting my arm moving. Warming up for a marathon of science.

https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1367643559063523329

Quote
A quick test of my steering, and things are looking good as I get ready to roll. My team and I are keen to get moving. One step at a time.

Offline kdhilliard

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #14 on: 03/05/2021 01:51 pm »
Today's (Friday, March 5) 12:30 PST (15:30 EST / 20:30 UTC) JPL telecon:
‘Firsts’ Achieved Since NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover Landing
Quote
Discussing the rover’s progress will be:
* Robert Hogg, Perseverance deputy mission manager, JPL
* Anais Zarifian, Perseverance mobility test bed engineer, JPL
* Katie Stack Morgan, Perseverance deputy project scientist, JPL
Livestream:



Next Thursday's (March 11) 19:00 PST (22:00 EST / 03:00 UTC) JPL public talk:
The von Kármán Lecture Series: Helicopters in Space
Quote
How do you fly a helicopter on Mars? It takes Ingenuity and Perseverance. During this technology demo, Farah Alibay [Systems Engineer, Mars 2020] and Tim Canham [Mars Helicopter Operations Lead] will get into the details of how these craft will manage this incredible task.
Livestream:

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #15 on: 03/05/2021 07:44 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1367936250271858689

Quote
I’m on the move! Just took my first test drive on Mars, covering about 16 feet (5 meters). You’re looking at the very beginning of my wheel tracks. Many more to make.

Offline Kaputnik

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #16 on: 03/08/2021 11:01 pm »
According to the Perseverance Facebook page, odometry now stands at approximately 70m, and they are driving towards an area which they hope will be suitable to place Ingenuity on the ground for its first flight.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=253064426303409&id=101688614774325
"I don't care what anything was DESIGNED to do, I care about what it CAN do"- Gene Kranz

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #17 on: 03/09/2021 06:52 am »
https://twitter.com/_theseaning/status/1369133197754306565

Quote
We aren't talking nearly enough about the freaking zoom lens on @NASAPersevere
« Last Edit: 03/09/2021 06:54 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #18 on: 03/09/2021 10:20 pm »
twitter.com/arkorobotics/status/1369419177522569227

Quote
The LCAM image taken for TRN during EDL are up!
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/

Fun fact: The same camera took all four of these photos!

https://twitter.com/doug_ellison/status/1369420901771603972

Online Truncate

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #19 on: 03/10/2021 01:30 pm »

time: 10 March 2021 17h30 (CET), I think the first 1/2 hour in French, rest in English...

N.B. Supercam has an acoustic microphone
« Last Edit: 03/10/2021 01:33 pm by Truncate »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #20 on: 03/10/2021 04:07 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1369694335168516097

Quote
Things are sounding really good here. Listen to the first sounds of wind captured by my SuperCam microphone. This mic is located at the top of my mast. For this recording, my mast was still down so the sound is a bit muffled.

https://soundcloud.com/nasa/perseverance-mars-supercam-sounds-18-hours-after-landing/s-Da5U96EOyre

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #21 on: 03/25/2021 06:26 pm »
https://twitter.com/tgmetsfan98/status/1375161883972530184

Quote
Perseverance has begun checking its sample collection systems, beginning the challenging task of bringing a piece of Mars back to Earth.

ARTICLE by Justin Davenport (@Bubbinski):

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2021/03/mars-sample-return-underway-perseverance/

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #22 on: 04/07/2021 08:10 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1379883959006363648

Quote
Two bots, one selfie. Greetings from Jezero Crater, where I’ve taken my first selfie of the mission. I’m also watching the #MarsHelicopter Ingenuity as it gets ready for its first flight in a few days. Daring mighty things indeed.

Images: go.nasa.gov/2RaUBKF

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #23 on: 04/17/2021 05:55 am »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #24 on: 04/21/2021 07:44 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1384956021177737223

Quote
Another huge first: converting CO2 into oxygen on Mars. Working off the land with what’s already here, my MOXIE instrument has shown it can be done!

Future explorers will need to generate oxygen for rocket fuel and for breathing on the Red Planet.

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8926/nasas-perseverance-mars-rover-extracts-first-oxygen-from-red-planet/

Quote
April 21, 2021
NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover Extracts First Oxygen From Red Planet

The milestone, which the MOXIE instrument achieved by converting carbon dioxide into oxygen, points the way to future human exploration of the Red Planet.

The growing list of “firsts” for Perseverance, NASA’s newest six-wheeled robot on the Martian surface, includes converting some of the Red Planet’s thin, carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere into oxygen. A toaster-size, experimental instrument aboard Perseverance called the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) accomplished the task. The test took place April 20, the 60th Martian day, or sol, since the mission landed Feb. 18.

While the technology demonstration is just getting started, it could pave the way for science fiction to become science fact – isolating and storing oxygen on Mars to help power rockets that could lift astronauts off the planet’s surface. Such devices also might one day provide breathable air for astronauts themselves. MOXIE is an exploration technology investigation – as is the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) weather station – and is sponsored by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate.

“This is a critical first step at converting carbon dioxide to oxygen on Mars,” said Jim Reuter, associate administrator STMD. “MOXIE has more work to do, but the results from this technology demonstration are full of promise as we move toward our goal of one day seeing humans on Mars. Oxygen isn’t just the stuff we breathe. Rocket propellant depends on oxygen, and future explorers will depend on producing propellant on Mars to make the trip home.”

For rockets or astronauts, oxygen is key, said MOXIE’s principal investigator, Michael Hecht of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Haystack Observatory.

To burn its fuel, a rocket must have more oxygen by weight. To get four astronauts off the Martian surface on a future mission would require approximately 15,000 pounds (7 metric tons) of rocket fuel and 55,000 pounds (25 metric tons) of oxygen. In contrast, astronauts living and working on Mars would require far less oxygen to breathe. “The astronauts who spend a year on the surface will maybe use one metric ton between them,” Hecht said.

Hauling 25 metric tons of oxygen from Earth to Mars would be an arduous task. Transporting a one-ton oxygen converter – a larger, more powerful descendant of MOXIE that could produce those 25 tons – would be far more economical and practical.

Mars’ atmosphere is 96% carbon dioxide. MOXIE works by separating oxygen atoms from carbon dioxide molecules, which are made up of one carbon atom and two oxygen atoms. A waste product, carbon monoxide, is emitted into the Martian atmosphere.

The conversion process requires high levels of heat to reach a temperature of approximately 1,470 degrees Fahrenheit (800 Celsius). To accommodate this, the MOXIE unit is made with heat-tolerant materials. These include 3D-printed nickel alloy parts, which heat and cool the gases flowing through it, and a lightweight aerogel that helps hold in the heat. A thin gold coating on the outside of MOXIE reflects infrared heat, keeping it from radiating outward and potentially damaging other parts of Perseverance.

In this first operation, MOXIE’s oxygen production was quite modest – about 5 grams, equivalent to about 10 minutes’ worth of breathable oxygen for an astronaut. MOXIE is designed to generate up to 10 grams of oxygen per hour.

This technology demonstration was designed to ensure the instrument survived the launch from Earth, a nearly seven-month journey through deep space, and touchdown with Perseverance on Feb. 18. MOXIE is expected to extract oxygen at least nine more times over the course of a Martian year (nearly two years on Earth).

These oxygen-production runs will come in three phases. The first phase will check out and characterize the instrument’s function, while the second phase will run the instrument in varying atmospheric conditions, such as different times of day and seasons. In the third phase, Hecht said, “we’ll push the envelope” – trying new operating modes, or introducing “new wrinkles, such as a run where we compare operations at three or more different temperatures.”

“MOXIE isn’t just the first instrument to produce oxygen on another world,” said Trudy Kortes, director of technology demonstrations within STMD. It’s the first technology of its kind that will help future missions “live off the land,” using elements of another world’s environment, also known as in-situ resource utilization.

“It’s taking regolith, the substance you find on the ground, and putting it through a processing plant, making it into a large structure, or taking carbon dioxide – the bulk of the atmosphere – and converting it into oxygen,” she said. “This process allows us to convert these abundant materials into useable things: propellant, breathable air, or, combined with hydrogen, water.”

More About Perseverance

A key objective of Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

https://www.nasa.gov/perseverance

First image caption:

Quote
MOXIE Being Installed in Perseverance: Technicians at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory lower the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) instrument into the belly of the Perseverance rover. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Second image caption:

Quote
After a two-hour warmup period, MOXIE began producing oxygen at a rate of 6 grams per hour. The was reduced two times during the run (labeled as “current sweeps”) in order to assess the status of the instrument. After an hour of operation the total oxygen produced was about 5.4 grams, enough to keep an astronaut healthy for about 10 minutes of normal activity.
Credit: MIT Haystack Observatory
« Last Edit: 04/21/2021 07:49 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #25 on: 04/26/2021 03:21 pm »


Quote
This 3D visualization is based on the images taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA's Perseverance rover

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #26 on: 06/01/2021 02:57 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1399740871377973250

Quote
100 days (sols) on Mars, and feeling productive:
 
✅ Tested all cameras & instruments
✅ Returned 75,000+ pics
✅ Deployed #MarsHelicopter & captured its flights
✅ Recorded sounds of Mars
✅ Extracted oxygen from atmosphere
✅ Started south to first exploration zone
 
Onward.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #27 on: 06/10/2021 05:33 pm »



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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #28 on: 06/15/2021 03:53 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1404829016121483268

Quote
Passed this boulder and took a closer look. Some of my team see similarities to volcanic rocks on Earth. Interesting stuff, but I’m on to more sedimentary types, where rock layers could better preserve any potential signs of ancient life. 🔍

More: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/science/landing-site/

Offline spacexplorer

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #29 on: 07/02/2021 06:47 am »
New SPICE kernel with real data of EDL is now available in SPK folder:
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_trajCEDLS-6DOF_ops_od069v1_AL4.bsp

Further updates dated 29/6/2021:
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_atls_ops210303_v1.bsp
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_ls_ops210303_iau2000_v1.bsp

In FK folder (reference frames data):
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/fk/m2020_tp_ops210303_iau2000_v1.tf

You can calculate trajectory here specifying "-168" as target and "IAU_MARS" as observer:
https://wgc.jpl.nasa.gov:8443/webgeocalc/#StateVector

I still can't find any data about Ingenuity in frames kernels.

EDL data not yet implemented in NASA Horizons:

  Trajectory files (from JPL Navigation)       Start                End
  --------------------------------------  -----------------  -----------------
  m2020_traj_ops_od002v1.V0.1             2020-Jul-30 12:53  2020-Jul-31 19:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od018v1.V0.1             2020-Jul-31 19:01  2020-Aug-15 17:00
  m2020_traj_ops_od038v1.V0.1             2020-Aug-15 17:00  2020-Sep-30 22:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od071v1.V0.1             2020-Sep-30 22:01  2020-Dec-18 21:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od089v1.V0.1             2020-Dec-18 21:01  2021-Feb-17 20:37
  edl-landed.v0.1                         2021-Feb-17 20:37  2026-Feb-19 00:00
*******************************************************************************


Once it will be implemented, this page should plot the trajectory automatically, without bothering user with SPICE kernels knowledge:
http://win98.altervista.org/space/exploration/3d/space-explorer-tracker.html?orbiter=-168&[email protected]&start=2021-FEB-18%2020:40&stop=2021-FEB-18%2020:46&step=200&3dzoom=10000&radius=3392

Key points:
2021-02-18 20:38 (40 km altitude, entry interface)
2021-02-18 20:38 - 2021-02-18 20:40 (Horizontal flight at 13 km altitude)
2021-02-18 20:43:20 150m altitude
2021-02-18 20:44 (landed)

------------

Other update: Ingenuity switched from "engineering tasks" to "science tasks": it will explore in advance targets too far for the rover:

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45676.msg2258911#msg2258911
« Last Edit: 07/02/2021 06:48 am by spacexplorer »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #31 on: 07/17/2021 08:15 am »
July 16, 2021
MEDIA ADVISORY M21-084

NASA to Brief Early Science from Perseverance Mars Rover

NASA will hold a virtual media briefing at 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, July 21, to discuss early science results from the agency’s Perseverance Mars rover and its preparations to collect the first-ever Martian samples for planned return to Earth.

The briefing will originate from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, where the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission is managed. It will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website and livestream on multiple agency social media platforms, including JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

Briefing participants include:

Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for science, NASA Headquarters
Jennifer Trosper, Perseverance project manager, JPL
Olivier Toupet, Perseverance enhanced navigation team lead, JPL
Ken Farley, Perseverance project scientist, Caltech
Vivian Sun, Perseverance science campaign co-lead, JPL
To participate in the briefing by telephone, reporters must provide their name and affiliation by 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, July 21, to Rexana Vizza at: [email protected]

Members of the media and the public also may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #AskNASA.

Perseverance landed in Jezero Crater Feb. 18. The rover team recently wrapped up an  initial checkout period, which lasted 90 sols, or Martian days, and which included the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter test flight campaign. Perseverance kicked off the science phase of its mission on June 1.

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith.

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #32 on: 07/21/2021 05:42 pm »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #33 on: 08/17/2021 07:04 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1427707512908763137

Quote
Skirting a boundary between rough rocks and soft dunes. Views from orbit teach us so much about Mars, but there’s nothing like being here and seeing for yourself.

Latest images: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #34 on: 08/25/2021 10:54 am »
SPICE Kernels updated:
m2020_cruise_od138_v1.bsp                      2021-08-18 09:07  511K
m2020_edl_v01.bsp                              2021-08-18 09:07   10M
m2020_ls_ops210303_iau2000_v1.bsp              2021-06-29 06:12  7.0K 
m2020_struct_v01.bsp                           2021-08-18 09:06   53K 
m2020_surf_rover_loc_0000_0089_v1.bsp          2021-08-18 09:09   57K 
m2020_surf_rover_tlm_0000_0089_v1.bsp          2021-08-18 09:09   52K

Frame kernel updated too, but Ingenuity is still not there!
m2020_tp_ops210303_iau2000_v1.tf 2021-06-29 06:12  3.3K

Webgeocalc can be used to process the kernels, see also developers thread.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #35 on: 09/03/2021 07:06 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1433565831649107971

Quote
#SamplingMars update: first images show a sample in the tube after coring. But pics I took after an arm move are inconclusive due to poor lighting. I’m taking more photos in better light to confirm that we still have an intact core in the tube.

Read more: https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9027/nasas-perseverance-rover-successfully-cores-its-first-rock/

Offline eeergo

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #36 on: 09/03/2021 09:19 am »

Quote
#SamplingMars update: first images show a sample in the tube after coring. But pics I took after an arm move are inconclusive due to poor lighting. I’m taking more photos in better light to confirm that we still have an intact core in the tube.

Read more: https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9027/nasas-perseverance-rover-successfully-cores-its-first-rock/

Good image of the cored rock in the article:
-DaviD-

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #37 on: 09/05/2021 06:00 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1434376252819841026

Quote
I’ve got it! With better lighting down the sample tube, you can see the rock core I collected is still in there. Up next, I’ll process this sample and seal the tube. #SamplingMars

Latest images: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #39 on: 09/07/2021 03:04 pm »
-DaviD-

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #40 on: 09/07/2021 04:41 pm »
Collected:
Next up: return to Earth for analyzation in a lab (assuming it gets selected for return)!
I see a new TV series, Game of Samples, as they vie to be among the lucky chosen.   :)

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #41 on: 09/14/2021 04:09 pm »
https://twitter.com/haygenwarren/status/1437806572101464064

Quote
New rover selfie!

Perseverance took this selfie on Sol 198 (Sept. 10, 2021) while at the Citadelle ridge in Jezero Crater. In the bottom left is Rochette, the rock Percy collected its first two samples from.

Just a reminder that robots take selfies on another planet.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #43 on: 09/24/2021 01:03 pm »
Update on NASA's Perseverance Rover SHERLOC Instrument Sept 23, 2021


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #44 on: 10/18/2021 07:20 pm »
NASA’s Perseverance Rover Captures the Sounds of Mars:


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #45 on: 10/18/2021 11:31 pm »
Doesn't look lie much, if any, change to the scene beyond the obvious change in lighting angle.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #46 on: 10/19/2021 12:24 am »
I mean, they're at the exact same place and it's only been two weeks, right?  (Or am I misunderstanding the situation?)

They can just take an image that almost precisely replicates the lighting angle, no?
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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #47 on: 10/19/2021 03:16 am »
I mean, they're at the exact same place and it's only been two weeks, right?  (Or am I misunderstanding the situation?)

You are right: exactly on the same place. Here's a link - "Hunkering Down for Solar Conjunction".

Between sols 217-235 (September 28 – October 17) nobody could send new instructions to the rover. The Right Navigation Camera (Navcam) which took these photos remained in the same position, with the same settings, so when communications resumed, the first command to NavCam was "take the last picture again".

I checked the settings for each frame - they were exactly the same:

   mastAz: "359.252",
   mastEl: "-47.682",
   scaleFactor: "1",
   xyz: "(181.559,-129.5,-1.72773)",
   subframeRect: "(2593,1793,1296,976)",
   dimension: "(1296,976)"
Azimuth: "49 deg"

They can just take an image that almost precisely replicates the lighting angle, no?

No, the lightning angle can't be repeated exactly. Timestamps are different:
- for September 27, 2021 (Sol 215) the local mean solar time was 10:55:56;
- for October 16, 2021 (Sol 233) the local mean solar time was 17:00:20.
« Last Edit: 10/19/2021 07:49 am by Cherurbino »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #48 on: 10/19/2021 06:57 am »
The images were taken in sets which cycle through similar times of day and similar lighting.  If you pick your images carefully you will be able to find much better image pairs than this one, much easier to compare for change detection.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #49 on: 10/19/2021 08:02 am »
The images were taken in sets which cycle through similar times of day and similar lighting.  If you pick your images carefully you will be able to find much better image pairs than this one, much easier to compare for change detection.
You are right: recently I saw another images acquired for the other conjunction days and now consider my publication premature.

Animation 'Four frames sol 233.gif' is deleted. Sorry.
« Last Edit: 10/28/2021 03:31 pm by Cherurbino »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #50 on: 10/19/2021 12:10 pm »
I mean, they're at the exact same place and it's only been two weeks, right?  (Or am I misunderstanding the situation?)

You are right: exactly on the same place. Here's a link - "Hunkering Down for Solar Conjunction".

Between sols 217-235 (September 28 – October 17) nobody could send new instructions to the rover. The Right Navigation Camera (Navcam) which took these photos remained in the same position, with the same settings, so when communications resumed, the first command to NavCam was "take the last picture again".

I checked the settings for each frame - they were exactly the same:

   mastAz: "359.252",
   mastEl: "-47.682",
   scaleFactor: "1",
   xyz: "(181.559,-129.5,-1.72773)",
   subframeRect: "(2593,1793,1296,976)",
   dimension: "(1296,976)"
Azimuth: "49 deg"

They can just take an image that almost precisely replicates the lighting angle, no?

No, the lightning angle can't be repeated exactly. Timestamps are different:
- for September 27, 2021 (Sol 215) the local mean solar time was 10:55:56;
- for October 16, 2021 (Sol 233) the local mean solar time was 17:00:20.
I didn't say take the photo at the exact same timestamp...

I said take "almost replicate the lighting angle", with "almost" because it has been two weeks and while you can match the solar elevation, the azimuth will be just a bit off.
« Last Edit: 10/19/2021 12:11 pm by meekGee »
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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #51 on: 10/20/2021 07:47 pm »
while you can match the solar elevation, the azimuth will be just a bit off.
You are certainly right!

BTW, just for the extended information: there are two azimuths in the description I quoted - one shows angular position of the rover against Ls, and another - the rotation angle of the mast against the rover body. Phil, please correct me if I was wrong again)))

I could bring here a very nice panorama, recently acquired py Perseverance, but the files are too large to be displayed here. Thus I invite everybody to follow this NASA link https://mars.nasa.gov/resources/26296. This is the first panorama where the degrees in Ls are written.
« Last Edit: 10/20/2021 07:49 pm by Cherurbino »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #52 on: 10/26/2021 09:55 am »
Mrs. Trooper announced it is likely the first sample drop off point at Jezero might be at the edge of the crater. The currently preferred location appears to be at the top of this image:
« Last Edit: 10/26/2021 10:10 am by eeergo »
-DaviD-

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #53 on: 03/15/2022 11:45 am »
Second sample acquired.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #54 on: 03/26/2022 10:58 pm »
Lori Glaze presented this slide detailing the samples collected and the abrasions to date by Perseverance. From this past week's Space Week presentations.

Her presentation only had two slides with information; the other one showed current and planned planetary missions. https://www.nationalacademies.org/event/03-21-2022/docs/D7CF2D56483694428ACFDFBF17C42C491C2443BF2E16

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #55 on: 04/07/2022 06:04 am »
Parachute (and backshell, which is the most obvious protrusion in the image) spotted:

https://mobile.twitter.com/mars_stu/status/1511942559224020993
-DaviD-

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #56 on: 04/21/2022 08:21 pm »
Perseverance observes Solar Eclipse on Mars:


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #57 on: 04/21/2022 08:31 pm »
Perseverance observes Solar Eclipse on Mars:



The video doesn't say, but that's in real time.

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #58 on: 06/11/2022 10:29 am »
NASA’s Perseverance Studies the Wild Winds of Jezero Crater

The rover’s weather sensors witnessed daily whirlwinds and more while studying the Red Planet.

During its first couple hundred days in Jezero Crater, NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover saw some of the most intense dust activity ever witnessed by a mission sent to the Red Planet’s surface. Not only did the rover detect hundreds of dust-bearing whirlwinds called dust devils, Perseverance captured the first video ever recorded of wind gusts lifting a massive Martian dust cloud.

A paper recently published in Science Advances chronicles the trove of weather phenomena observed in the first 216 Martian days, or sols. The new findings enable scientists to better understand dust processes on Mars and contribute to a body of knowledge that could one day help them predict the dust storms that Mars is famous for – and that pose a threat to future robotic and human explorers.
Jezero Crater may be in one of the most active sources of dust on the planet.
Manuel de la Torre Juarez
“Every time we land in a new place on Mars, it’s an opportunity to better understand the planet’s weather,” said the paper’s lead author, Claire Newman of Aeolis Research, a research company focused on planetary atmospheres. She added there may be more exciting weather on the way: “We had a regional dust storm right on top of us in January, but we’re still in the middle of dust season, so we’re very likely to see more dust storms.”

Perseverance made these observations primarily with the rover’s cameras and a suite of sensors belonging to the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA), a science instrument led by Spain’s Centro de Astrobiología in collaboration with the Finnish Meteorological Institute and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. MEDA includes wind sensors, light sensors that can detect whirlwinds as they scatter sunlight around the rover, and a sky-facing camera for capturing images of dust and clouds.

“Jezero Crater may be in one of the most active sources of dust on the planet,” said Manuel de la Torre Juarez, MEDA’s deputy principal investigator at JPL. “Everything new we learn about dust will be helpful for future missions.”

Frequent Whirlwinds

The study authors found that at least four whirlwinds pass Perseverance on a typical Martian day and that more than one per hour passes by during a peak hourlong period just after noon.

The rover’s cameras also documented three occasions in which wind gusts lifted large dust clouds, something the scientists call “gust-lifting events.” The biggest of these created a massive cloud covering 1.5 square miles (4 square kilometers). The paper estimated that these wind gusts may collectively lift as much or more dust as the whirlwinds that far outnumber them.

“We think these gust-liftings are infrequent but could be responsible for a large fraction of the background dust that hovers all the time in the Martian atmosphere,” Newman said.

Why Is Jezero Different?

While wind and dust are prevalent all over Mars, what the researchers are finding seems to set Jezero apart. This greater activity may be linked to the crater being near what Newman describes as a “dust storm track” that runs north to south across the planet, often lifting dust during the dust storm season.

Newman added that the greater activity in Jezero could be due to factors such as the roughness of its surface, which can make it easier for the wind to lift dust. That could be one explanation why NASA’s InSight lander – in Elysium Planitia, about 2,145 miles (3,452 kilometers) away from Jezero Crater – is still waiting for a whirlwind to clear its dust-laden solar panels, while Perseverance has already measured nearby surface dust removal by several passing whirlwinds.

“Perseverance is nuclear-powered, but if we had solar panels instead, we probably wouldn’t have to worry about dust buildup,” Newman said. “There’s generally just more dust lifting in Jezero Crater, though average wind speeds are lower there and peak wind speeds and whirlwind activity are comparable to Elysium Planitia.”

In fact, Jezero’s dust lifting has been more intense than the team would have wanted: Sand carried in whirlwinds damaged MEDA’s two wind sensors. The team suspects the sand grains harmed the thin wiring on the wind sensors, which stick out from Perseverance’s mast. These sensors are particularly vulnerable because they must remain exposed to the wind in order to measure it correctly. Sand grains blown in the wind, and likely carried in whirlwinds, also damaged one of the Curiosity rover’s wind sensors (Curiosity’s other wind sensor was damaged by debris churned up during its landing in Gale Crater).

With Curiosity’s damage in mind, the Perseverance team provided an additional protective coating to MEDA’s wires. Yet Jezero’s weather still got the better of them. De la Torre Juarez said the team is testing software changes that should allow the wind sensors to keep working.

“We collected a lot of great science data,” de la Torre Juarez said. “The wind sensors are seriously impacted, ironically, because we got what we wanted to measure.”

More About the Mission

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/
News Media Contact

Andrew Good
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-2433
[email protected]
Karen Fox / Alana Johnson
NASA Headquarters, Washington
301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501
[email protected] / [email protected]

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-perseverance-studies-the-wild-winds-of-jezero-crater

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #59 on: 07/07/2022 10:17 am »
Martian wind pebble damaged the sensor of the Perseverance rover.

16:57 06 July 2022

One of the Perseverance rover's wind sensors was damaged after it was hit by a small rock that was blown into the atmosphere by a very strong gust of wind. Wind observations for the time being will be carried out mainly by the rover's second wind sensor, according to Space.com.

The study of climate dynamics on Mars is important not only for understanding the evolution of the planet in the past, but also for planning future manned expeditions to Mars. Scientists receive these data both with the help of orbiters and rovers and automatic stations. The Perseverance rover, which arrived on the planet last year and operates in the Lake crater, stands out among all the devices, as it delivered to Mars the most advanced system of sensors that are located on the mast of the rover, the outer upper surface of the rover body and inside it. With their help, pressure, temperature, dust content and relative humidity of the atmosphere, wind speed and direction, as well as radiation flux from the planet's surface and soil temperature are monitored.

On July 3, 2022, the rover team reported that one of the two Perseverance wind sensors mounted on the rover's mast was damaged by a small rock blown into the atmosphere by a very strong gust of wind. The sensors were created taking into account the weather conditions on Mars and the redundancy system, but this situation was not foreseen. Currently, the capabilities of the damaged sensor are limited, although it receives data on wind speed and direction. Now specialists will try to restore the full operation of the sensor, and the current wind monitoring will be carried out mainly by the second, undamaged sensor.

Earlier, we talked about how dust whirlwinds and rising winds were responsible for the dust haze on Mars.

Alexander Voytyuk

https://nplus1.ru/news/2022/07/06/rover-and-mars-wind

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #61 on: 07/13/2022 02:44 pm »
What would you take from #Mars? As @NASAPersevere fills its 10th tube with martian soil, European scientists discuss what the best samples for a return to #Earth would be. The first Mars Sample Return Science Group meeting took place last month in the 🇺🇸.

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/1547186041660096512

Offline eeergo

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #62 on: 07/13/2022 03:53 pm »
Perseverance really made a mess upon landing didn't it. And that's without checking out the surroundings of the skycrane's stage crash-landing site!

https://twitter.com/landru79/status/1547245219074244610
-DaviD-

Offline bolun

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #63 on: 08/24/2022 05:00 pm »
From ESA - Mars Express updates

Related article: New water map of Mars will prove invaluable for future exploration

Water-rich minerals at Jezero Crater

Jezero crater and its surroundings on Mars display a rich array of minerals that have been altered by water in the planet’s past. These minerals are predominately clays and carbonate salts. Of the minerals identified in this particular region, carbonate is a salt, Fe/Mg phyllosilicates are iron- and magnesium-rich clays, and hydrated silica is a form of silicon dioxide that forms the gemstone opal on Earth. The close-up data were obtained from a global map of minerals produced by ESA’s Mars Express and NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

NASA’s Perseverance rover, which landed on Mars in 2020, is currently exploring Jezero crater and its surroundings.

https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2022/08/Water-rich_minerals_at_Jezero_Crater

Image credit: ESA/Mars Express (OMEGA and HRSC) and NASA/Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (CRISM and HiRISE)

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #64 on: 09/02/2022 05:49 am »
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/status/401/a-day-full-of-moxie/

Quote
BLOG | August 31, 2022
A Day Full of MOXIE
Written by Michael Hecht, Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) Principal Investigator at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Today, we published our first peer-reviewed, post-landing paper on MOXIE, detailing the seven oxygen generation runs we completed during Perseverance’s first year on Mars. We’ve made considerable progress since those first seven runs, completing run #11 this past weekend – and it turned out to be the most productive MOXIE run to date!

This is the peak of the Martian winter, when cold nights and relatively high atmospheric pressures conspire to produce the highest air density of the year. The denser the air, the more CO2 MOXIE has to work with, and the more oxygen it can make. We’re always extremely cautious about designing runs for the irreplaceable flight model on Mars, but we pushed the envelope a little this time to briefly produce oxygen at a rate of nearly 10.5 grams per hour. If you were to double that, a human being could survive on it – it’s not a lot, but a record for us.

We have a long way to go before being able to make the 2 to 3 kilograms per hour that will be needed to make the tens of tons of propellant to lift a human crew of four to six astronauts off the surface of Mars and into orbit – the main goal of future oxygen generation technology to succeed MOXIE. But that will require 25 kilowatts of power, and Perseverance only gives us 100 watts, so we’re doing fine. And we’re learning how to make the next MOXIE a lot more power efficient. Right now, we only use about 10% of our power to generate oxygen. The rest goes to running the compressor that collects the air, to our electronics, and to making up for heat loss from our 800 degrees Celsius electrolysis unit through the wires and tubes.

In a full-scale version, we expect to use more like 90% of the power through a few simple changes, like running the compressor at lower pressure and designing a more efficient oven. I’d love to help build that unit, but one step at a time…

Image caption:

Quote
MOXIE Lowered into Rover: Technicians in the clean room are carefully lowering the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) instrument into the belly of the Perseverance rover. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #65 on: 09/05/2022 04:05 am »
From ESA - Mars Express updates

Related article: New water map of Mars will prove invaluable for future exploration

Water-rich minerals at Jezero Crater

Jezero crater and its surroundings on Mars display a rich array of minerals that have been altered by water in the planet’s past. These minerals are predominately clays and carbonate salts. Of the minerals identified in this particular region, carbonate is a salt, Fe/Mg phyllosilicates are iron- and magnesium-rich clays, and hydrated silica is a form of silicon dioxide that forms the gemstone opal on Earth. The close-up data were obtained from a global map of minerals produced by ESA’s Mars Express and NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

NASA’s Perseverance rover, which landed on Mars in 2020, is currently exploring Jezero crater and its surroundings.

https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2022/08/Water-rich_minerals_at_Jezero_Crater

Image credit: ESA/Mars Express (OMEGA and HRSC) and NASA/Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (CRISM and HiRISE)

Looks like the rover has scrupulously avoided areas of carbonate and opal....
Apologies in advance for any lack of civility - it's unintended

Online Phil Stooke

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #66 on: 09/05/2022 06:53 am »
Yes indeed, but the carbonates near the crater rim are a later goal of the mission.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #67 on: 09/06/2022 02:11 am »
Yes indeed, but the carbonates near the crater rim are a later goal of the mission.

Still, the lake floor carbonates would have been at least worth examination, even if not sampled.  Are they deuteric alteration, or from percolating groundwater? Residual lake sediments or spring discharges?
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Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #68 on: 09/06/2022 02:13 am »
Perseverance seems to be driving in circles.  No explanation I can find on the NASA web site or even the Unmanned spaceflight forum, which is sometimes more helpful

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #69 on: 09/06/2022 03:17 am »
The rover did a quick survey at Enchanted Lake and the 'bacon strip' areas, then chose sites to sample.  They sampled two places on the 'bacon strip' and are now heading back to Enchanted Lake to get that.  Every tube is precious so they didn't sample at Enchanted lake initially until they were sure from their survey that it was important. 

Here is a mission blog about the return to Enchanted Lake and the bit of debris they were studying for a while.

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/status/397/perseverance-soon-heads-to-enchanted-lake/


Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #70 on: 09/07/2022 05:38 am »
The rover did a quick survey at Enchanted Lake and the 'bacon strip' areas, then chose sites to sample.  They sampled two places on the 'bacon strip' and are now heading back to Enchanted Lake to get that.  Every tube is precious so they didn't sample at Enchanted lake initially until they were sure from their survey that it was important. 

Here is a mission blog about the return to Enchanted Lake and the bit of debris they were studying for a while.

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/status/397/perseverance-soon-heads-to-enchanted-lake/

Thanks.  It certainly could have been better explained by the mission. 
« Last Edit: 09/07/2022 05:39 am by Dalhousie »
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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #71 on: 09/13/2022 05:05 pm »
Webcast for briefing on Thursday




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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #72 on: 09/14/2022 09:23 pm »


Quote
NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover has arrived at an ancient delta in Jezero Crater, one of the best places on the Red Planet to search for potential  signs of ancient life. The delta is an area where scientists surmise that a river once flowed billions of years ago into a lake and deposited sediments in a fan shape.

Rachel Kronyak, a member of the Perseverance science operations team, guides the viewer through this Martian panorama and its intriguing sedimentary rocks. It’s the most detailed view ever returned from the Martian surface, consisting of 2.5 billion pixels and generated from 1,118 individual Mastcam-Z images. Those images were acquired on June 12, 13, 16, 17, and 20, 2022 (the 466th, 467th, 470th, 471st, and 474th Martian day, or sol, of Perseverance’s mission).

In this panorama, an area called Hogwallow Flats is visible, as is Skinner Ridge, where two rock core samples were taken.

The color enhancement in this image improves the visual contrast and accentuates color differences. This makes it easier for the science team to use their everyday experience to interpret the landscape.


For more information on the Perseverance rover, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/perseverance.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #73 on: 09/15/2022 02:49 am »

Quote

In this panorama, an area called Hogwallow Flats is visible, as is Skinner Ridge, where two rock core samples were taken.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

I keep reading this as "Hogwarts Flats"
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Offline ChrisC

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #74 on: 09/15/2022 05:41 pm »
Webcast for briefing on Thursday

FYI this Youtube capture somehow ate 2-3 minutes of Ken Farley's opening comments.  I was (am) watching it live, and I went back over that glitch multiple times.  Then I switched my watching to the regular NASA TV feed (12 hour buffer on Youtube) and saw that there was indeed another 2-3 minutes from him.  My guess is that something in the encoding / transmission path was severely buffered and then burped itself back to "live".
PSA #1: EST does NOT mean "Eastern Time".  Use "Eastern" or "ET" instead, all year round, and avoid this common error.  Google "EST vs EDT".
PSA #2: It's and its: know the difference and quietly impress grammar pedants.  Google "angry flower its" .

Offline Star One

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #75 on: 09/15/2022 06:17 pm »
New Perseverance Mars rock samples ‘most important’ of mission:


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #76 on: 09/15/2022 06:49 pm »
Press release for today's briefing.

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9261/nasas-perseverance-rover-investigates-geologically-rich-mars-terrain/

I listened to the briefing.  Highlights:

1) Delta materials contain organics and sulfates (the latter indicating salty water when deposits were made)
2) After collecting two more pairs of samples and preparing one additional witness tube, Perseverance will deposit a sample cache of the one each of the paired samples plus witness tube(s)
3) Perseverance will then continue exploring up the delta toward the crater rim for about a year. Hope to continue exploring beyond the rim.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #77 on: 09/16/2022 01:53 am »
Press release for today's briefing.

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9261/nasas-perseverance-rover-investigates-geologically-rich-mars-terrain/

I listened to the briefing.  Highlights:

1) Delta materials contain organics and sulfates (the latter indicating salty water when deposits were made)
2) After collecting two more pairs of samples and preparing one additional witness tube, Perseverance will deposit a sample cache of the one each of the paired samples plus witness tube(s)
3) Perseverance will then continue exploring up the delta toward the crater rim for about a year. Hope to continue exploring beyond the rim.

Further details...

Two locations described, Wildcat ridge and Skinner ridge, the first being stratigraphically below the second.

Wildcat ridge is a fine-grained sediment containing sulphates, clays, and organics.

Organics have been found in every sample to date (detection limit is 10 ppm BTW) but is highest in the Wildcat ridge area where they include aromatic compounds.

Skinner ridge is a heterolithic, well-rounded sandstone, with grains from potentially hundreds of km beyond the crater rim.


Apologies in advance for any lack of civility - it's unintended

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #78 on: 09/16/2022 02:15 pm »
2) After collecting two more pairs of samples and preparing one additional witness tube, Perseverance will deposit a sample cache of the one each of the paired samples plus witness tube(s)

I know I saw an explanation of this a year or so ago, but I've forgotten. Can somebody explain what a witness tube is and what it is for?

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #79 on: 09/16/2022 02:17 pm »
2) After collecting two more pairs of samples and preparing one additional witness tube, Perseverance will deposit a sample cache of the one each of the paired samples plus witness tube(s)

I know I saw an explanation of this a year or so ago, but I've forgotten. Can somebody explain what a witness tube is and what it is for?
Almost certainly this is to function as a kind of experimental control, to check for contamination. Basically go through all the motions of a sample tube, but don't put anything in it.

EDIT: Yeah, confirmed:
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/pia24751-witness-tube-in-perseverance-sample-caching-system
Quote
Witness tubes are similar to the sample tubes that will hold Martian rock and sediment, except they have been preloaded with a variety of materials that can capture molecular and particulate contaminants. They are opened on the Martian surface to "witness" the ambient environment near sample collection sites. With samples returned to Earth in the future, the witness tubes would show whether Earth contaminants were present during sample collection. Such information would help scientists tell which materials in the Martian samples may be of Earth origin.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2022 02:18 pm by Robotbeat »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #80 on: 10/05/2022 11:59 pm »
Perseverance Mars rover picks up 'lucky' 13th rock sample for return to Earth

https://www.space.com/perseverance-rover-13th-rock-core-sample
Apologies in advance for any lack of civility - it's unintended

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #81 on: 10/12/2022 07:30 am »
There's some error as montdenier and montagnac samples seals has same seal no., that is, SN170. Could I know the correct seal no. Please!!

One the other hand, Malay sample seal has seal no. SN53 but I will be be pleased to know if 53 is just 053 or 153 or 253. Please correct that too.
https://pds-geosciences.wustl.edu/missions/mars2020/returned_sample_science.htm
« Last Edit: 10/12/2022 07:31 am by Chinakpradhan »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #82 on: 12/07/2022 08:26 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1600600785363955713

Quote
A kaleidoscope of grains to study🔬
Unlike the 15 rock cores collected to date, 2 samples taken by @NASAPersevere are filled with broken rock & dust. Studying these could help teams design safer missions & equipment, especially for future Mars astronauts. go.nasa.gov/3YgdutY

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-perseverance-rover-gets-the-dirt-on-mars

Quote
NASA’s Perseverance Rover Gets the Dirt on Mars
Dec. 7, 2022

The mission’s first two samples of regolith – broken rock and dust – could help scientists better understand the Red Planet and engineers prepare for future missions there.

NASA’s Perseverance rover snagged two new samples from the Martian surface on Dec. 2 and 6. But unlike the 15 rock cores collected to date, these newest samples came from a pile of wind-blown sand and dust similar to but smaller than a dune. Now contained in special metal collection tubes, one of these two samples will be considered for deposit on the Martian surface sometime this month as part of the Mars Sample Return campaign.

Scientists want to study Martian samples with powerful lab equipment on Earth to search for signs of ancient microbial life and to better understand the processes that have shaped the surface of Mars. Most of the samples will be rock; however, researchers also want to examine regolith – broken rock and dust – not only because of what it can teach us about geological processes and the environment on Mars, but also to mitigate some of the challenges astronauts will face on the Red Planet. Regolith can affect everything from spacesuits to solar panels, so it’s just as interesting to engineers as it is to scientists.
Optimism, a full-scale replica of NASA's Perseverance Mars rover, tests a model of Perseverance's regolith bit in a pile of simulated regolith — broken rock and dust — at JPL.

As with rock cores, these latest samples were collected using a drill on the end of the rover’s robotic arm. But for the regolith samples, Perseverance used a drill bit that looks like a spike with small holes on one end to gather loose material.

Engineers designed the special drill bit after extensive testing with simulated regolith developed by JPL. Called Mojave Mars Simulant, it’s made of volcanic rock crushed into a variety of particle sizes, from fine dust to coarse pebbles, based on images of regolith and data collected by previous Mars missions.

“Everything we learn about the size, shape, and chemistry of regolith grains helps us design and test better tools for future missions,” said Iona Tirona of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, which leads the Perseverance mission. Tirona was the activity lead for operations to collect the recent regolith sample. “The more data we have, the more realistic our simulants can be.”

The Challenge of Dust

Studying regolith up close could help engineers design future Mars missions – as well as the equipment used by future Martian astronauts. Dust and regolith can damage spacecraft and science instruments alike. Regolith can jam sensitive parts and slow down rovers on the surface. The grains could also pose unique challenges to astronauts: Lunar regolith was discovered to be sharp enough to tear microscopic holes in spacesuits during the Apollo missions to the Moon.

Regolith could be helpful if packed against a habitat to shield astronauts from radiation, but it also contains risks: The Martian surface contains perchlorate, a toxic chemical that could threaten the health of astronauts if large amounts were accidentally inhaled or ingested.

“If we have a more permanent presence on Mars, we need to know how the dust and regolith will interact with our spacecraft and habitats,” said Perseverance team member Erin Gibbons, a McGill University doctoral candidate who uses Mars regolith simulants as part of her work with the rover’s rock-vaporizing laser, called SuperCam.

“Some of those dust grains could be as fine as cigarette smoke, and could get into an astronaut’s breathing apparatus,” added Gibbons, who was previously part of a NASA program studying human-robot exploration of Mars. “We want a fuller picture of which materials would be harmful to our explorers, whether they’re human or robotic.”

Besides answering questions about health and safety hazards, a tube of Martian regolith could inspire scientific wonder. Looking at it under a microscope would reveal a kaleidoscope of grains in different shapes and colors. Each one would be like a jigsaw puzzle piece, all of them joined together by wind and water over billions of years.

“There are so many different materials mixed into Martian regolith,” said Libby Hausrath of University of Nevada, Las Vegas, one of Perseverance’s sample return scientists. “Each sample represents an integrated history of the planet’s surface.”

As an expert on Earth’s soils, Hausrath is most interested in finding signs of interaction between water and rock. On Earth, life is found practically everywhere there’s water. The same could have been true for Mars billions of years ago, when the planet’s climate was much more like Earth’s.

More About the Mission

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

Image captions:

Quote
Two holes are left in the Martian surface after NASA's Perseverance rover used a specialized drill bit to collect the mission's first samples of regolith on Dec. 2 and 6, 2022. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover took this image of regolith — broken rock and dust — on Dec. 2, 2022. This regolith will be considered for deposit on the Martian surface as part of the Mars Sample Return campaign.

Quote
Optimism, a full-scale replica of NASA's Perseverance Mars rover, tests a model of Perseverance's regolith bit in a pile of simulated regolith – broken rock and dust – at JPL. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Quote
The drill bits used by NASA's Perseverance rover are seen before being installed prior to launch. From left, the regolith bit, six bits used for drilling rock cores, and two abrasion bits. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #83 on: 12/08/2022 08:26 pm »
It was a challenge, but we persevered. Thankful for my team back at @NASAJPL, who helped me troubleshoot and successfully seal my sample tube for rock core #14. Three cheers for interplanetary teamwork!

https://twitter.com/NASAPersevere/status/1595502507358576641

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #84 on: 12/08/2022 08:26 pm »
My collection is growing! 🪨 I’ve now got my 15th rock core: a nice piece of sandstone.

Up next, I’m heading back to a nearby dune to break out a new tool – my regolith collection bit – for gathering loose, sandy material.

https://twitter.com/NASAPersevere/status/1598085678042329088

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #85 on: 12/08/2022 08:27 pm »
New achievement unlocked! After taking 15 rock cores and one atmospheric sample, I now have my third sample type: “regolith” (loose, sandy material). This specialized, hollow drill bit is another great tool for #SamplingMars.

https://twitter.com/NASAPersevere/status/1599884877448740864

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #86 on: 12/21/2022 08:21 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1605674209522249728

Quote
Not one to brag, but this is pretty momentous. By dropping this one tube to the ground, I’ve officially started setting aside samples that Mars Sample Return could bring back to Earth someday.

Learn more:

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9323/nasas-perseverance-rover-deposits-first-sample-on-mars-surface/

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #87 on: 12/22/2022 11:26 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1605674209522249728

Quote
Not one to brag, but this is pretty momentous. By dropping this one tube to the ground, I’ve officially started setting aside samples that Mars Sample Return could bring back to Earth someday.

Learn more:

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9323/nasas-perseverance-rover-deposits-first-sample-on-mars-surface/
some details
https://twitter.com/dejasu/status/1605844654792052737?s=20&t=-lpvO_Q3cRry1LOtH12pqA
images of cachearm below
and lastly the list of samples to be dropped at three forks sample depot
https://twitter.com/SpaceRockDoc/status/1605567977104953344?s=20&t=X_ImEarQqBCZm2i4yc-5Qw

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #88 on: 01/04/2023 06:07 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1610710508973477890

Quote
🔴🔴🔴🔴⚪⚪⚪⚪⚪⚪
Sample Depot: 40% complete!

Another successful tube drop adds to my growing collection here at the “Three Forks” location. Four of the 10 tubes I’m leaving here as a backup set are down. More on my samples: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars-rock-samples/




Offline eeergo

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #92 on: 01/26/2023 08:32 am »
Nice sleuthing showing where all the sample tubes dropped so far are relative to the rover's recent position and ground trek:

https://twitter.com/marsologbey/status/1618374060798513154
-DaviD-

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #93 on: 01/26/2023 03:13 pm »
Nice sleuthing showing where all the sample tubes dropped so far are relative to the rover's recent position and ground trek:

https://twitter.com/marsologbey/status/1618374060798513154
better one!!!! https://twitter.com/dejasu/status/1617998813209448449?s=20

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #94 on: 01/30/2023 04:31 pm »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #95 on: 02/02/2023 06:19 pm »
Forthcoming talk on February 17th:


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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #96 on: 02/15/2023 05:30 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1625587281984901120

Quote
The full set, in one view! Check out my new panorama, featuring all 🔟 of the sample tubes I recently set down as a backup for #MarsSampleReturn.

Trouble spotting them all? Improve your odds with this interactive viewer, and zoom in on the full image:

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9348/nasas-perseverance-rover-shows-off-collection-of-mars-samples/
« Last Edit: 02/15/2023 05:31 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #97 on: 02/15/2023 07:45 pm »

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #98 on: 02/28/2023 03:33 am »
Nat Geo East  https://www.nationalgeographic.com/tv/watch-live/natgeo-east

Built for Mars: The Perseverance Rover: Special Payload
The building of the Mars rover Perseverance.

TV-PG | 02.27.23 | 120m

Airing now. DVR is running...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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