Author Topic: F1 engine  (Read 19279 times)

Offline xiantii

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F1 engine
« on: 06/20/2010 10:16 PM »
I was bouncing between wiki articles the other day and I came across this picture of the F1 engine. I'm sure people have seen it before but I was simply blown away by how BIG they were! Really puts the saturn V into perspective...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/16/S-IC_engines_and_Von_Braun.jpg

Offline edkyle99

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #1 on: 06/20/2010 11:12 PM »
You don't often see them in photos that provide a good measure of their size.  Here's an image of one in a shop without the nozzle extension, next to a standard doorway. 

 - Ed Kyle

Offline xiantii

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #2 on: 06/20/2010 11:21 PM »
wow  :) That looks like a recent picture, where about's was that taken?

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #3 on: 06/20/2010 11:43 PM »
A posting of the von Braun image with the 5 horizontal F-1s would be a good illustration.
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #4 on: 06/22/2010 01:39 PM »
You don't often see them in photos that provide a good measure of their size.  Here's an image of one in a shop without the nozzle extension, next to a standard doorway. 

 - Ed Kyle

Little Pig Little Pig Let Me In  ::)
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Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #5 on: 06/24/2010 03:55 AM »
Pretty good Kevin. LOL

That opens up a whole slew of one liners.
"Say hello to my little friend" comes to mind first though.

What a great shot you posted there Ed.
I'd really like to see the U.S. pursue a large staged combustion engine like the one in the original post here:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=21817.msg598133#msg598133

Maybe even incorporate it into a LFBB someday?

Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #6 on: 06/24/2010 04:03 AM »
I've read that such a LFBB would be impractical because it is too ass heavy.
Would making the LO2 tank a bit oversized to have some residual counteract this?
Maybe a "normal" amount of residual would be sufficient?
Just wondering.

Offline clongton

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #7 on: 06/24/2010 11:03 AM »
A posting of the von Braun image with the 5 horizontal F-1s would be a good illustration.

How's this?
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I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Online ugordan

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #8 on: 06/24/2010 11:14 AM »
How's this?

Uh, is that not exactly the same image as in the OP?

Offline clongton

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #9 on: 06/24/2010 11:17 AM »
How's this?

Uh, is that not exactly the same image as in the OP?

True, but I thought the image being inline with the text would be nice.
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #10 on: 06/24/2010 11:37 AM »
Some pictures I took while at JSC in 2007. :)
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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #11 on: 06/24/2010 11:40 AM »
Too bad none of them show the thermal blankets covering the engines as the flown Saturns had. I know it's not as "sexy" as seeing the bare F-1s and their piping, but at least it'd be more accurate.

Offline John Duncan

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #12 on: 06/24/2010 12:12 PM »
Up until a few years ago there were no available photos of the insulation.  The best I was able to find at the time was freeze frames from high speed camera footage made during launch.  Then I found two photos:

http://www.apollosaturn.com/tps/tps.htm

There was a document for auction on Ebay which had the layout of the insulation and I tried to win it.  But someone is "writing a book on launch vehicles" and had FAR more money than I did.  The seller would not make me copies of the pages or even share the buyer's name.  So that tome is sitting on someone's shelf, unavailable for research.
-John
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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #13 on: 06/28/2010 02:24 AM »
I took this photo this afternoon at the NASM annex facility out near Dulles.  I don't remember them having an F-1 engine at Udvar-Hazy.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #14 on: 06/28/2010 09:45 AM »
Is that the one with the mirrors to give you the optical illusion of a set of five engines? :)
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Offline clongton

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #15 on: 06/28/2010 11:03 AM »
To give a sense of scale, here's a picture of me standing underneath the Saturn-V at the KSC Visitor Center.
« Last Edit: 06/28/2010 11:04 AM by clongton »
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline Downix

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #16 on: 06/28/2010 11:40 AM »
To give a sense of scale, here's a picture of me standing underneath the Saturn-V at the KSC Visitor Center.
I tried to get a picture like that a few weeks ago, but my son wandered off and I had to go track him down.  To him, the Saturn was not anywhere near as thrilling as the Shuttle.
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #17 on: 06/28/2010 12:01 PM »
Probably because he'll never see one -- or one like it -- ever fly. Soon, a whole new generation wont be able to see a Shuttle fly either :( . Perhaps if you told him that Saturn V used to send men to another World, something Shuttle never could or ever will...
« Last Edit: 06/29/2010 11:21 AM by MATTBLAK »
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Offline Downix

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #18 on: 06/28/2010 12:36 PM »
Probably because he'll never see one -- or one like it -- ever fly. Soon, a whole new generation wont be able to see a Shuttle fly either :( . Perhaps if you told him that Saturn V used to send men to another *World*, something Shuttle never could or ever will...
He knows what it did, but to him it's a video on TV or a clip on the computer.  He's never seen one of that magnitude launch.

I suppose that is rather why I am pushing so hard for DIRECT, to give him that thrill.

Shoot, I never saw the Saturn V liftoff, but I think in terms of math, and the incredibleless of it boggles my mind.
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #19 on: 06/28/2010 01:58 PM »
Is that the one with the mirrors to give you the optical illusion of a set of five engines? :)

No, that's the downtown museum, on the Mall in Washington.  The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Museum is about 23 miles away, in Virginia, near Dulles airport.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #20 on: 06/29/2010 06:21 AM »
Is that the one with the mirrors to give you the optical illusion of a set of five engines? :)

No, that's the downtown museum, on the Mall in Washington.  The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Museum is about 23 miles away, in Virginia, near Dulles airport.

Oh! S'funny -- I don't remember an F-1 at Udvar-Hazy when I was there in 2007. I checked my pictures folder for that trip and I didn't photograph one then. Have they added it since?
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Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #21 on: 06/29/2010 09:33 AM »
Question if I may, what are the cup shaped disks dotted along the nozzle in Ed's picture?

Offline Jim

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #22 on: 06/29/2010 09:40 AM »
Those are protective covers on the insulation attach points, I believe.

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #23 on: 06/29/2010 11:47 AM »
Oh! S'funny -- I don't remember an F-1 at Udvar-Hazy when I was there in 2007. I checked my pictures folder for that trip and I didn't photograph one then. Have they added it since?

I was there sometime in the past year and did not see it, so I think it is relatively new.  That's why I photographed it.  Although it is very easy for me to get to that museum, the parking fee is $15, so I don't go out there that often.

Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #24 on: 06/29/2010 12:59 PM »
$15 parking is a bit of a gouge. However, when the kids get older I've got to get out of MN and see some of this neat stuff. Maybe even see an actual launch someday!

It's only time and money right?

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #25 on: 06/29/2010 01:43 PM »
$15 parking is a bit of a gouge. However, when the kids get older I've got to get out of MN and see some of this neat stuff. Maybe even see an actual launch someday!

It's only time and money right?

It is a bit of a gouge.  But the museum itself is free.  When you figure that at a lot of museums you pay at least $7.50 per person to get in, this is not ridiculous.  (Parking is free after 4 pm, and the museum's summer hours go until 6:30.  They do NOT allow you to drop people off--you pay the parking fee or you don't get in.)  They charge that to cover the cost of that expensive building and also to pay for the additions that they want to build (next up is an aircraft restoration center).  I don't begrudge them charging for parking, but as a local who likes airplanes, it really restricts my attendance.

Washington is an expensive city to be a tourist in.  Food and lodging is pricey.  Taking the family around on the subway can get expensive too.  However, most of the museums are free.  So whereas Disney World will cost you a lot to get in, the attractions in Washington are mostly free.  Only a few private museums (Spy Museum, Crime and Punishment Museum, a few art museums) charge an admission fee.

Offline shuttlefan

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #26 on: 06/29/2010 02:33 PM »
With regards to the F1 nozzle extensions, where they always installed in the vertical in the VAB and was an F1 ever replaced in the vertical as has been done numerous times on Shuttle?

Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #27 on: 06/29/2010 02:56 PM »
Good info Blackstar, thanks. If the museum is free that is a heck of a deal. The spy museum would also be really interesting to check out. Years ago I saw a show on Keith Meltons collection that would be absolutely facinating to see not to mention learning more about tradecraft and various operations.

In regards to aircraft restoration, great idea. There was a show (Discovery channel?) on the near recovery of B29 Kee Bird. Made me sick to my stomach after all that sacrifice & hard work but really piqued my interest in restoration.

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #28 on: 06/29/2010 03:00 PM »
I was going to say, what are the parking rates at Dulles Airport again, then looked them up ( http://www.visitingdc.com/airport/dulles-airport-parking.htm ). Your right, it is a bit of a gouge...
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Offline clongton

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #29 on: 06/29/2010 03:14 PM »
I was going to say, what are the parking rates at Dulles Airport again, then looked them up ( http://www.visitingdc.com/airport/dulles-airport-parking.htm ). Your right, it is a bit of a gouge...

Back on topic please
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline Lee Jay

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #30 on: 06/29/2010 03:17 PM »
I took this photo this afternoon at the NASM annex facility out near Dulles.  I don't remember them having an F-1 engine at Udvar-Hazy.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13269.0

Offline JosephB

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #31 on: 06/29/2010 03:46 PM »
I took this photo this afternoon at the NASM annex facility out near Dulles.  I don't remember them having an F-1 engine at Udvar-Hazy.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13269.0

Good thread there.

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #32 on: 06/29/2010 08:39 PM »
That thread indicates that the F-1 showed up at Udvar-Hazy around May 2008, although it did not have the aft skirt.  I've been to U-H a bunch of times, but don't remember seeing it before my trip a few days ago.  But they don't really have any other place to hide it, so it must have been there and it just didn't register.

There are a few other new things in the space wing, such as a Soviet Venus balloon.  Never saw that before, and it's definitely new (there was a piece of paper describing it, and somebody had drawn an arrow pointing up).

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #33 on: 06/30/2010 06:28 AM »
I remember John Duncan e-mailing me years back when I was researching an article about unflown Apollo hardware (Thank you, Sir!): he said that there were 19 or 20 full-fledged production unflown F-1 engines and quite a few unflown J-2 engines. Has there been any new info turned up since about the leftover engines? And how credible does it seem to anyone the concept of 'using up' the unflown F-1s on a new launcher project? A smaller quantity that that of leftover SSMEs have recently been touted as engines for a Heavy-Lift demonstrator.
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Offline John Duncan

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #34 on: 06/30/2010 11:31 AM »
I remember John Duncan e-mailing me years back when I was researching an article about unflown Apollo hardware (Thank you, Sir!): he said that there were 19 or 20 full-fledged production unflown F-1 engines and quite a few unflown J-2 engines. Has there been any new info turned up since about the leftover engines? And how credible does it seem to anyone the concept of 'using up' the unflown F-1s on a new launcher project? A smaller quantity that that of leftover SSMEs have recently been touted as engines for a Heavy-Lift demonstrator.

:D



I'm not sure we know how to use F-1's anymore.  Or at least they would require requalifying....

-John
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Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #35 on: 06/30/2010 11:47 AM »
No Bucks, No Buck Rogers, eh? Sad really. I remember an interview with Max Faget in Popular Mechanics in the early 1990s, about using pairs of F-1s for Flyback Shuttle Boosters to replace the SRBs. But perhaps a pristine F-1 could eventually be stripped for research when/if a new Hydrocarbon engine project gets underway? In a manner similar to when one or more J-2s were looked at for J-2X.
« Last Edit: 06/30/2010 11:49 AM by MATTBLAK »
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Offline max isp

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #36 on: 06/30/2010 07:41 PM »
The August and September issues of Spaceflight will have articles that reveal where all the F-1 engines are that still exist.

Offline catdlr

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #37 on: 07/10/2015 04:48 AM »
"The Saturn Propulsion System" Project Apollo Rocket Engines 1962 NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

Published on Sep 18, 2012
more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/project_apollo.html

Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved sound and video.

"The theory of reaction engines and the application to the Saturn propulsion system." Includes film of the first Saturn I launch in 1961 (SA-1).

NASA f HQ-a77

I couldn't do much to improve the color on this one, but the sound cleaned up nicely.

Public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and 1-pass exposure & color correction applied (cannot be ideal in all scenes).
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

Rocket engine development history: V-2 engine led to Navaho engine led to Atlas engine led to Saturn H-1 engine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM-64_Navaho

...Development of the first stage rocket engine for the Navaho began with two refurbished V-2 engines in 1947. That same year, the phase II engine was designed, the XLR-41-NA-1, a simplified version of the V-2 engine made from American parts. The phase III engine, XLR-43-NA-1 (also called 75K), adopted a cylindrical combustion chamber with the experimental German impinging-stream injector plate. Engineers at North American were able to solve the combustion stability problem, which had prevented it being used in the V-2, and the engine was successfully tested at full power in 1951. The Phase IV engine, XLR-43-NA-3 (120K), replaced the poorly cooled heavy German engine wall with a brazed tubular ("spaghetti") construction, which was becoming the new standard method for regenerative cooling in American engines. A dual-engine version of this, XLR-71-NA-1 (240K), was used in the G-26 Navaho. With improved cooling, a more powerful kerosene-burning version was developed for the triple-engine XLR-83-NA-1 (405K), used in the G-38 Navaho. With all the elements of a modern engine (except a bell-shaped nozzle), this led to designs for the Atlas, Thor and Titan engines...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketdyne_H-1

Rocketdyne's H-1 is a 205,000 lbf (910 kN) thrust liquid-propellant rocket engine burning LOX and RP-1. The H-1 was developed for use in the S-IB first stage of the Saturn I and Saturn IB rockets, where it was used in clusters of eight engines. After the Apollo program, surplus H-1 engines were rebranded and reworked as the Rocketdyne RS-27 engine with first usage on the Delta 2000 series in 1974...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-1_(rocket_engine)

The F-1 is a rocket engine developed by Rocketdyne and used in the Saturn V. Five F-1 engines were used in the S-IC first stage of each Saturn V, which served as the main launch vehicle in the Apollo program. The F-1 is still the most powerful single-chamber liquid-fueled rocket engine ever developed. The RD-170 has slightly more thrust, using a cluster of four smaller combustion chambers and nozzles...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-2_(rocket_engine)

The J-2 was a liquid-fuel cryogenic rocket engine used on NASA's Saturn IB and Saturn V launch vehicles. Built in the United States of America by Rocketdyne, the J-2 burned cryogenic liquid hydrogen & liquid oxygen propellants, with each engine producing 1,033.1 kN (232,250 lbf) of thrust in vacuum. Development of the engine began in the 1960s, with the first flight, AS-201, occurring on 26 February 1966. The J-2 underwent several minor upgrades over its operational history to improve the engine's performance, with two major upgrade programs, the de Laval nozzle-type J-2S and aerospike-type J-2T, being cancelled after the conclusion of the Apollo program.

Five J-2 engines were used on the Saturn V's S-II second stage, and one J-2 was used on the S-IVB upper stage used on both the Saturn IB and Saturn V. Proposals also existed to use various numbers of J-2 engines in the upper stages of an even larger rocket, the planned Nova. The J-2 was America's largest production liquid hydrogen fuelled rocket engine before the RS-25 Space Shuttle Main Engine, and a modernised version of the engine, the J-2X, is intended for use on the Earth Departure Stage of NASA's Space Shuttle replacement, the Space Launch System.

Unlike most liquid-fuelled rocket engines in service at the time, the J-2 was designed to be re-started once after shutdown when flown on the Saturn V. The first burn, lasting about two minutes, placed the Apollo spacecraft into a low Earth parking orbit. After the crew verified that the spacecraft was operating nominally, the J-2 was re-ignited for translunar injection, a 6.5 minute burn which accelerated the vehicle to a course for the Moon...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_IB

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_V

« Last Edit: 07/10/2015 02:34 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #38 on: 01/07/2016 02:50 AM »
The August and September issues of Spaceflight will have articles that reveal where all the F-1 engines are that still exist.

I'm dredging up an old post to ask if anybody has those issues electronically and can share them with me.

I'm working on an article for Spaceflight about the remaining Saturn rockets and I would like to include a note on the serial numbers for all of the engines on the display stages. I don't know where to find the J-2 information, but the F-1 info should be in these issues.

Offline Antilope7724

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #39 on: 01/07/2016 05:35 AM »
The F-1 is big, but there were proposed follow on engines that
dwarfed the F-1. Illustrated are 24-million lb thrust engines.

These illustrations come from the 1964 NASA budget authorization
hearings booklet.

Text that accompanies the illustrations:

"...On your left is the F-1 engine with 1 1/2 million pounds of thrust.
This is an example of the current state of the art and is the largest
engine in development in the free world...."

"...Five of these engines will be used in the first stage of the Saturn V.
Engine technology has progressed such that the next larger engine
size could have a thrust on the order of 20 to 30 million pounds.

The second engine shown which is compared with a man's height
indicates the size of engine which would result if the F-1 technology
were employed to develop 24 million pounds of thrust.

It should be noted that such an engine would be roughly equivalent
in size to a four-story building.

By increasing the chamber pressure through new advances in re-
search, the same thrust could be delivered by the third engine shown.

An even more interesting engine concept is shown on the far right
where high chamber pressure in one of the new nozzle design concepts
are combined to develop an equivalent level of thrust.

Figure 87 (bottom) illustrates a model employing one of the advanced nozzle
concepts that we have been working on which has a cluster of indi-
vidual combustion chambers. It has a single large pump in the center
supplying fuel and oxygen into the individual combustion chambers
along the periphery which, in turn, discharge into a common nozzle.
Now, we realize that we must go to higher chamber pressures, but
this has introduced a number of problems which must be explored
through further research..."


http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=umn.31951d03496983x;view=1up;seq=447

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=umn.31951d03496983x;view=1up;seq=448
« Last Edit: 01/07/2016 11:13 AM by Antilope7724 »

Offline Archibald

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #40 on: 01/07/2016 11:03 AM »
Sweet Jesus... 12 million pounds of thrust ? since the basic F-1 was 1.5 million pounds, that's 8 times more. So 675 tons of thrust become 5400 tons of thrust... for a single engine. Take that, Musk Raptor and BFR !
... that ackward moment when you realize that Jeff Bezos personal fortune is far above NASA annual budget... 115 billion to 18 billion...

Offline Antilope7724

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #41 on: 01/07/2016 11:08 AM »
Sweet Jesus... 12 million pounds of thrust ? since the basic F-1 was 1.5 million pounds, that's 8 times more. So 675 tons of thrust become 5400 tons of thrust... for a single engine. Take that, Musk Raptor and BFR !

How about a single engine Saturn V? Yikes!

Each of the 3 engines to the right of the F-1, in the first graphic, are 24-million lbs of thrust.
The 2nd (engine from the left) is just a scaled up F-1 to achieve 24-million lbs of thrust.
The 3rd (engine from the left) achieves 24-million lbs of thrust with scaled up chamber pressure.
The 4th (engine from the left) , also 24-million lbs of thrust, has scaled up chamber pressure, a different nozzle design and multiple combustion chambers. The 4th engine is also shown in the second graphic.
« Last Edit: 01/07/2016 11:51 AM by Antilope7724 »

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #42 on: 01/07/2016 02:08 PM »
Recall, too, that the original Nova design also postulated a new engine -- the M-1, a hydrolox engine (IIRC) which would develop, in a single engine, one million pounds of thrust.  A Nova second stage with from three to five of these M-1 engines was proposed, with a third stage consisting of a single M-1 engine and a fourth stage (a recognizable S-IVB) with a single J-2.

Sometimes I think that the von Braun team pushed to achieve the Apollo landings with the Saturn C-4 or above, in preference to the Nova, because they despaired of developing both a 1.5-million-lb-thrust kerolox engine and a 1-million-lb-thrust hydrolox engine at the same time...
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline Hog

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #43 on: 01/07/2016 05:05 PM »
Over the Christmas holidays I was able to enjoy the company of one of my Uncles that I don't see very often.  He is P. Engineer and we ended up talking "shop" over the holiday.  He was telling me that within the last few years that he received a request for any and all engineering data related to the F-1 rocket engine. 

It was related to the proposed use by  Pratt&Whitney, Dynetics and Rocketdyne to use four F1-B engines per pair of new design advanced liquid boosters (Pyrios?) for SLS.

It was an interesting conversation to say the least. He was just beginning his career as Shuttle was being decided upon in the late 60's early 70's.  Lots of great stories.

4 F1-'s along with 4 RS-25's up and burning at the same time?  That would be quite the orchestra to hear, and sight to see.
Paul

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #44 on: 01/24/2016 04:07 AM »
I'm trying to find a list of the serial numbers of the remaining F-1 and J-2 engines on display. Alan Lawrie had some of this information, but I have been unable to contact him.

In particular, I want to get the numbers for the engines on the Saturn V displays at JSC, Huntsville, KSC and Michoud. Anybody have that info or know how I can get it?

Offline Proponent

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #45 on: 01/24/2016 12:25 PM »
I'm trying to find a list of the serial numbers of the remaining F-1 and J-2 engines on display. Alan Lawrie had some of this information, but I have been unable to contact him.

In particular, I want to get the numbers for the engines on the Saturn V displays at JSC, Huntsville, KSC and Michoud. Anybody have that info or know how I can get it?

This is probably a stupid thought that you've already checked out, but I'd have thought that kind of thing would be in Lawrie's books.  In particular, the Amazon blurb for his Saturn I/IB says: "Rarely published photographs of how the rockets were built and tested are included with statistical data—such as details of the engines attached to each stage and the transportation records of each stage—as well as information on the many manufacturing and test facilities used and the current status of each one."

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #46 on: 01/24/2016 01:37 PM »
The information is there (some of it), but his Spaceflight article indicated that he had more reliable information that he acquired after the publication of the books. So I'm trying to check on that.

Offline catdlr

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Re: F1 engine
« Reply #47 on: 04/26/2018 04:03 AM »
bump for Historic Film...

F-1 The Mightiest Rocket Engine

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center
Published on Apr 25, 2018

Capable of generating 1.5 million pounds of thrust, the F-1 engine for the Saturn V launch vehicle first stage remains the most powerful single-nozzle, liquid fueled rocket engine ever developed. Each Saturn V launch vehicle included five F-1 engines which burned a mixture of kerosene (RP-1) and liquid oxygen at a combined rate of 15 metric tons per second for the entirety of its two and a half minutes of operation. The Rocketdyne developed engine pre-dated NASA itself, starting life as an Air Force project in 1955. Over the course of the Apollo program and Skylab mission, the F-1 engine represented a major success for the program with its consistent performance throughout.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ml0Ax9sxsEc?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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