Author Topic: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?  (Read 22674 times)

Offline FishInferno

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #20 on: 03/19/2022 02:58 am »
FWIW - check out NASA OSTEM internships. There's TONS of opportunities in the Summer.

Today was the last day to apply I believe. I was submitting applications all day :P.
Comparing SpaceX and SLS is like comparing paying people to plant fruit trees with merely digging holes and filling them.  - Robotbeat

Online Orbiter

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #21 on: 03/19/2022 02:06 pm »
FWIW - check out NASA OSTEM internships. There's TONS of opportunities in the Summer.

Today was the last day to apply I believe. I was submitting applications all day :P.

As was I!
KSC Engineer, astronomer, rocket photographer.

Online Phil Stooke

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #22 on: 03/25/2022 07:50 pm »
I seet he thread "Relativity Space - Orbital Rockets with zero human labor"  has been changed to "Relativity Space: updates and discussion".  Does that count as good news?

Offline StormtrooperJoe

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #23 on: 06/19/2023 09:34 am »
I recommend keeping your ear to the ground in terms of space industry news to help you find jobs in the industry. For example, if you see a company getting a huge contract, that's a good sign that they're about to need a bunch more people and that you should try and apply to them. For example, given that they just won that big HLS contract, Blue Origin is probably a good bet although without any experience at all, it will still be difficult.

Offline Jim

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #24 on: 06/19/2023 11:57 am »
It seems like you're struggling to find entry-level jobs in the space industry after completing your aerospace engineering degree. Don't worry, you can still improve your chances. Consider gaining certifications like STK level 1 and 2, and learning SQL and Python to enhance your skills. Applying for satellite operations engineer positions is a good start. Keep an eye out for other attainable opportunities too. Grad school may be an option in the future, but for now, focus on building your experience and skills.

Space Forcxe is an option.

Online catdlr

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #25 on: 12/05/2023 07:38 pm »
Rocket Lab hiring video?  It seems likely that they wouldn't create this video unless they are actively seeking to hire new employees. Stay open-minded and willing to take on any tasks they assign you.
 
« Last Edit: 12/05/2023 07:43 pm by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #26 on: 12/06/2023 12:46 pm »
 I looked for rats nest situations that looked like the hell sinful engineers went to, and dove in with nobody telling me to. I hold several PITA certifications, worked a lot of unpaid overtime and went through many, many positions, but eventually got turned out to do what I wanted and paid to match what I did.
 Point being, get in where you can and earn your way. Certifications might fool HR, but performance is what people who matter will notice.

 Look at Jim. There's no job description that matches what he knows. Knowing nothing about his history, I'd bet my last dime he got where he is by figuring out how things work and delivering without whining about stuff not being his job.

 *Late night Cambodian bar post*
« Last Edit: 12/08/2023 09:29 am by Nomadd »
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.

Offline Jim

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #27 on: 12/06/2023 03:13 pm »
5 year degree in Aerospace Engineering.  (extended due to intern program.  Worked fall and spring and went to school summer and winter)
Aerospace jobs were tight in early 1980's, some companies were not even coming to the school to interview
Started looking at the Air Force during my senior year. Tried getting into CSEP (College Senior Engineering Program).  Basically, you enlist and get paid while finishing your degree and then go to officer training school (90 day wonder).
I took until May to complete my paperwork.  Graduated and started application for masters program. 
Got notified that I was accepted in mid July and my report date was the end of July.  Less than 14 days notice.  I had friends with several months of notice.
Went and got my commission in October and was assigned to Los Angeles AFB in what could be called the AF Shuttle Program office. Worked on a report on the shuttle's ability to meet DOD requirements.  Had a short period of in-between jobs since the report was competed.  One task as I was assigned to the source selection board for the STAS (Space Transportation Architecture Study) contract.  Notable because this let to the ALS (Advanced Launch Systems) studies followed by NLS (National Launch System) and finally EELV.
After the source board in late summer, I was assigned to the office that dealt with all the spacecraft program offices and NASA on payload manifesting.  Was fairly benign until January 1986.  Spent the next two years on various studies on space launch recovery.  These eventually led to Delta II, Titan IV production increase (10 to 41) and Atlas II.  Worked out a transfer to the Cape  (using contacts acquired in doing the studies) for the return to flight.  Supported all the DOD space shuttle missions and early Titan IV and Atlas II missions.  Supported TIV Centaur trailblazers.  Early on, led DOD secondary and middeck ops on the shuttle and moved on to a Titan IV payload of nation importance.   After 4 years, it was time for a move and with the post Desert Storm draw down, I decide to take a buy out and leave the Air Force.  Didn't have a job when I left but got one within two weeks.  Again, contacts led me to an opening at MDC supporting the Spacehab program, based on my knowledge of shuttle mid deck experiment operations.  Worked there through the 90's.  Towards the latter of the 90's, started looking for other jobs.  Didn't like that my job was directly dependent on the shuttle.  Was at Grill's in the Port and ran into an old friend (Godparent of one my sons), she was with the Chief Engineer of what became the NASA Launch Services Program. They suggested that I look into a job with LSP.  Boeing at the time was providing support to the program (I was now Boeing after the merger with MDC).  Starting looking for postings and saw one, but it was at Vandenberg.  I applied but not to get the job but to open a dialogue.  So I go to the interview, it is a group one and it is led by my former USAF boss with my neighbor and the other Godparent of my son.  I told them that I wasn't really interested in moving but I am interested in the organization and its purpose.  We had a long talk and they revealed that NASA would be hiring and converting many of the contractor jobs.  They said I should be on the look out for postings.  Later one round of posting came and I applied but I didn't make it through HR to get an interview.  Another round came and in the process of applying, I realized I made an error in my previous application and overlooked a section.  I got the job (LV Integration Engineer) and started in Jan 2001.   After talking with my new supervisor, I found out that I would not have made the cut for the first round (many of the contractor incumbents made the badge change).  I changed jobs in 2008 to get back into launch site ops but been happy.  So happy in that this Jan will be making a transition to retiree.

Online catdlr

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #28 on: 12/06/2023 08:13 pm »
I changed jobs in 2008 to get back into launch site ops but been happy.  So happy in that this Jan will be making a transition to retiree.

Jim,

Thank you for sharing your detailed work history and illustrious biography. Your journey reminds us that what we initially set out to do may not always align with what ultimately brings us happiness. It's crucial to find a position that we thoroughly enjoy and are content with. Your departure will be felt by many in the aerospace community, and we anticipate a wonderful retirement party from your colleagues. We hope that you will remain a member of NSF and continue to guide us in the future with your knowledge. We wish you a happy retirement and hope that you find new interests to keep yourself occupied. You will always be a valued member of the NSF family.  Enjoy your Christmas, with your family and friends.

Your Happy future ahead, You'll be missed.
Best wishes
Tony De La Rosa

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Offline laszlo

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Re: Where are all the entry level jobs!?!?
« Reply #29 on: 12/06/2023 09:46 pm »
I looked for rats nest situations that looked like the hell sinful engineers went to, and dove in with nobody telling me to. I hold several PITA records, worked a lot of unpaid overtime and went through many, many positions, but eventually got turned out to do what I wanted and paid to match what I did.
 Point being, get in where you can and earn your way. Certifications might fool HR, but performance is what people who matter will notice.

 Look at Jim. There's no job description that matches what he knows. Knowing nothing about his history, I'd bet my last dime he got where he is by figuring out how things work and delivering without whining about stuff not being his job.

 *Late night Cambodian bar post*

I want to emphatically second Nomadd's approach. I've used it myself at several companies with great success. Another variation is to learn as much about a project as possible and see if you can spot something they missed (there's always something they missed) and do that. Also, never point out a problem without bringing a solution. Don't get pigeon-holed (except as a go-getter troubleshooter); always cast your net wide and be on the lookout for the next thing. Don't hoard your knowledge. Share it and always be training your replacement. Paradoxically, this makes you more valuable than the experts who are hoarding to make themselves irreplaceable. Finally, as you get older, don't stay in your age cohort. Actively seek out working with the newbies. You'll be training them up and they'll be keeping you in touch with the new developments in the field and thinking young. Some of the most rewarding professional relationships I've had with with new hires that could have been my grandkids.

And when you do get hired, look for that friendly granddad (or grandmom).

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