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General Discussion => Aerospace Education/Colleges/Careers => Topic started by: Oort on 06/14/2016 12:19 PM

Title: Best international schools and can I make it as a mature student?
Post by: Oort on 06/14/2016 12:19 PM
Hello, I have a couple of questions and I'm hoping you guys can help.
At the grand old age of 35 I have decided to make a career change by studying Astronautics or Space Engineering. I have a bachelors in Mechanical Engineering and I'm British.

1) Firstly, do you think it is actually going to be possible to get in to the industry despite my late start and the fact that I do not have much engineering experience since my bachelors?

2) I would love to go to college in the USA but the cost is looking prohibitive (unless anyone knows of something of better value?!). I'm looking at the Masters degrees below and wondered what sort of reputation these courses have? Which is the most renowned?

- International Space Uni, Strasbourg.   Master of Space Studies - E25,000
- Rome Sapienza Uni.   Space and Astronautical Engineering - $minimal cost, just enrolment fees
- TU Berlin. Masters Space Eng ~ E18,500
- The European space masters. Split across several unis. I really like the idea of this one but does the reputation hold up? - $minimal cost, just enrolment fees

Other: Uni Milan, Uni of Pisa, Cranfield UK, Tokyo

I would love to hear your opinions and if there is anywhere else you recommend or people I should talk to, that would be a massive help!

Thank you
Title: Re: Best international schools and can I make it as a mature student?
Post by: Baranquilla on 06/16/2016 08:53 PM
Couple of question:
 What kind of work have you been doing ever since graduating?
Do you want a space engineering master or a space studies master? The difference being that any space engineering master will put less emphasis on the business, management and law behind the space industry.

ISU's reputation is pretty good as far as I know. Furthermore there are Master of Spaces Studies that are not initial master educations, meaning that you already need to have a master to apply. For ISU already having a master is an asset  in the application process not a necessity.
Title: Re: Best international schools and can I make it as a mature student?
Post by: Jim on 06/16/2016 08:57 PM
In the US, aeronautical, astronautical and aerospace engineering is just basically a specialization of mechanical engineering.  You can just take a few astro specific courses and maybe some engineering refresher courses. 
Title: Re: Best international schools and can I make it as a mature student?
Post by: Oort on 06/18/2016 07:42 AM
Thank you for your replies!

Couple of question:
 What kind of work have you been doing ever since graduating?
Do you want a space engineering master or a space studies master? The difference being that any space engineering master will put less emphasis on the business, management and law behind the space industry.

I initially worked for about 4.5 yrs in engineering but it was mostly along the project management side as opposed to technical/design. I then worked in semi-technical sales. So my concern is that I've been out of the technical side for quite some time.

I'm compelled towards Space Engineering instead of Space studies so I'm kind of leaning away from the ISU course I think. I feel like I want to go technical again, at least initially to give myself the know-how.


In the US, aeronautical, astronautical and aerospace engineering is just basically a specialization of mechanical engineering.  You can just take a few astro specific courses and maybe some engineering refresher courses. 


Thanks Jim, that could be a good idea. It would obviously be less time consuming and less expensive. However, given that I've been non technical for quite a while, I felt that perhaps I'd need to re-prove my credentials a bit by studying again. Do you think that is over-kill?


This is all kind of new for me so I'm still learning about the industry and the different roles ...so I'm probably woefully ill-informed! So far though my interest has been in mission planning, habitat design and astronaut training but I appreciate it's not quite this simple!

What sort of roles do you guys work in/want to work in and what other really interesting roles are there in the industry?

P.S. does anyone know which unis have the strongest links to the ESA??

Thanks