Author Topic: LIVE: GSLV Mk-3 1st test launch (X1) December 18, 2014 (0400UTC)  (Read 417285 times)

Offline spaceash2

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #140 on: 01/12/2014 02:26 am »

This is amazing.  I just thought this was going to be over-hyped  dummy test.

If the crew orbit vehicle soft lands, this will be huge moral booster. It is bound to open more doors for ISRO space cooperation.   

I always wondered why ISRO does not approach Japan's JAXA for lunar rover collaboration.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #141 on: 01/12/2014 03:43 am »
Objectives of GSLV Mk3 X1: re-entry analysis of Crew Module and upper cryo stage. Here's an excerpt from ISRO 2013 status reports:
Quote
Re-entry Trajectory Design and Analysis of Two Closely Following Bodies with a Possibility of Break ups:

Re-entry trajectory design is complex as large amount of heat has to be dissipated and structural integrity of the body has to be ensured. Design becomes challenging when two bodies closely follow each other. This typically occurs in one of the missions where crew module and cryostage enters the Earth’s atmosphere and are in close vicinity. The possibility of cryostage breakup during the re-entry is to be analyzed. Number of pieces during the break-up is to be evaluated based upon detailed structural analysis of the cryo stage components. The survivability of these pieces and the effect of impact of these pieces on the ongoing crew module are to be assessed.

The below snippet is a bit old (2011-2012 budget report), but it looks like PSLV stage 4 (PS4) will be modified to be "service module" for Crew Module:
Quote
Mission design and analysis Development of critical technologies for Crew Module, PS4 modified service module and crew escape system. Initiation of setting up of essential facilities.

And, here's the status on pre-project activities of Crew Module: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=28405.msg1146805#msg1146805
« Last Edit: 01/12/2014 05:38 am by vyoma »

Offline sanman

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #142 on: 01/13/2014 01:35 am »
Well, here's a previous posting on the PS4 stage being adapted for crew service module:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=28405.msg1046304#msg1046304

As for soft landing of crew capsule, I assume it's going to be a parachute landing in the Bay of Bengal somewhere.

Actually, since I see that ISRO's trajectory is often influenced by events in other countries, I was sort of hoping that once SpaceX fully demonstrates its pusher-configuration Launch Abort System with powered landing, that it might influence ISRO to design a further iteration with pusher configuration, using knowledge from development of the soft lunar lander for Chandrayaan-2.
« Last Edit: 01/13/2014 01:40 am by sanman »

Offline antriksh

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #143 on: 01/13/2014 03:06 am »




Actually, since I see that ISRO's trajectory is often influenced by events in other countries,

??
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline Star One

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #144 on: 01/13/2014 07:05 am »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?

Offline chota

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #145 on: 01/13/2014 07:21 am »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?

MK3 version for April 2014 test is with a passive cryo stage other wise all the stages were ready in 2013 itself.

Offline cave_dweller

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #146 on: 01/13/2014 07:33 am »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?

MK3 flight is for testing aerodynamic stability of the vehicle.
The real test flight is expected towards end of 2015 or 2016



Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #147 on: 01/13/2014 08:01 am »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?

You really have to look at the Mk II & the Mk III like the difference between the Delta 2 & the Delta IV.

I never figure out why IRSO have that unique vehicle configuration for the Mk II. A solid motor core with less burn time than the four hypergolic strap-on boosters. The Mk III have the more usual hypergolic core with two solid motor strap-on booster. It appears that the Mk II will be retire quite soon after a successful Mk III flight IMO. Of course presuming the new cryogenic upper stage have no developement issues.

Offline AJA

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #148 on: 01/13/2014 09:44 am »
MK3 version for April 2014 test is with a passive cryo stage other wise all the stages were ready in 2013 itself.

Very unlikely. If the CUS is going to remain passive on the sub-orbital test flight, why wait to get it qualified? Moreover, the MkIII is going to use a 20-tonne version, not the 7.5 tonne version that put GSAT-14 into orbit; and this hasn't been tested yet. I'm not even sure that they've run ground acceptance testing on the 20 tonne version.

Bottom line: If they were ready with the rest of the rocket, they'd have tested it. I don't think it is. They're close, but not there yet.

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #149 on: 01/13/2014 11:42 am »
ISRO has completed static hot tests for S200 solid booster and L110 Vikas liquid motor. Here's the snippet from their latest budget outcome:
Quote
Both S200 & L110 stages have been qualified through static hot tests. Critical Design Reviews (CDR) of both S200 and L110 have been completed. Sub-systems for S200 & L110 flight stages have been realized.

Regarding C25 cryo upper stage:
Quote
All engine systems were realized for the integration of engine for development test for C-25 Project. C25 Stage assembled at SDSC-SHAR for Ground Resonance Test (GRT). Stage configuration and fluid circuits & measurement plans are finalized.

C25 integrated engine test is planned during 2013-2014

In a recent interview, ISRO chairman mentioned that it could take 3 years to complete C25:
Quote
Can you tell us about the proposed GSLV-III?

The configuration of this launch vehicle is different from the earlier PSLV or the GSLV. Without waiting for realisation of the cryogenic stage, which could take another three years, we will launch GSLV-III in April, and will make various measurements of this heavy and advanced vehicle during its flight. That will be a major milestone in 2014.

Offline chota

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #150 on: 01/13/2014 12:09 pm »
MK3 version for April 2014 test is with a passive cryo stage other wise all the other stages were ready in 2013 itself.




I think my words were confusing

Offline chota

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #151 on: 01/13/2014 01:08 pm »
The current LVM3 is sized after looking at some design parameters viz. GTO payload (of 4 Tons or more), Max Q (Of Less than 40kpa), Payload mass fraction(> 0.71%), 5 Meter payload faring, lower stage impact at 96.5° E longitude, future growth potential (L110 vs semi cryo to increase GTO), stage compatibility (3.2 meter diameter boosters, 4 Meter diameter L110 stage, 5 Meter payload faring) , flexibility of sun synchronous/geo synchronous missions with single/multi burn cryo stage, development time, resource constraints etc.

Example.

1. S200 to optimize the payload mass fraction and impact
2. L110 altitude ignition was selected to optimize Max Q factor of LVM3 and impact
3. C25 single/multi burn cryo stage to optimize GTO capability to 4T and to ensure adequate propulsion after lower stage jettison before 96.5° E longitude
« Last Edit: 01/13/2014 01:13 pm by chota »

Offline Lars_J

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #152 on: 01/13/2014 08:50 pm »
ISRO really does need to name their launch vehicles projects better. There is very little (or nothing) in common between the GSLV MK-2 and the GLSV MK-3.

Or is there some bureaucratic program funding limitations that make them name their launch vehicles this way, to allow a budget item to be used for both as needed? Surely there are other designations to use than PSLV and GSLV.
« Last Edit: 01/13/2014 08:52 pm by Lars_J »

Offline sanman

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #153 on: 01/13/2014 09:11 pm »
Yeah, they seem to be naming by the launch capability they're targeting, as opposed to a design heritage. Both GSLV-Mk2 and Mk-3 are targeting Geosynchronous Orbit capability, in spite of being different designs.

Offline chota

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #154 on: 01/14/2014 12:53 pm »
After GSLV it will probably be ULV and HLV Mk versions. ISRO internally refers GSLV-Mk3 as LVM3
« Last Edit: 01/14/2014 01:03 pm by chota »

Offline edkyle99

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #155 on: 01/14/2014 01:48 pm »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?
I never figure out why IRSO have that unique vehicle configuration for the Mk II. A solid motor core with less burn time than the four hypergolic strap-on boosters. The Mk III have the more usual hypergolic core with two solid motor strap-on booster. It appears that the Mk II will be retire quite soon after a successful Mk III flight IMO. Of course presuming the new cryogenic upper stage have no developement issues.
GSLV Mk 3 will also be sort of half way between a 2.5 stage and a 3 stage rocket, since the core will not ignite on the pad but will ignite about 30 seconds before the solids burn out.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline baldusi

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #156 on: 01/14/2014 03:24 pm »
Where do you get so much info on the MkIII ed?

Offline antriksh

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #157 on: 01/14/2014 03:43 pm »
This is all very rapid they have only just flown the one successful mission of the MK2 & now they are testing the MK3 version?
I never figure out why IRSO have that unique vehicle configuration for the Mk II. A solid motor core with less burn time than the four hypergolic strap-on boosters. The Mk III have the more usual hypergolic core with two solid motor strap-on booster. It appears that the Mk II will be retire quite soon after a successful Mk III flight IMO. Of course presuming the new cryogenic upper stage have no developement issues.
GSLV Mk 3 will also be sort of half way between a 2.5 stage and a 3 stage rocket, since the core will not ignite on the pad but will ignite about 30 seconds before the solids burn out.

 - Ed Kyle


ASLV had similar design with core stage ignited only after two boosters burnt out.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline johnxx9

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #158 on: 01/14/2014 04:40 pm »

Offline vyoma

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Re: GSLV Mk-3 first test launch (X1) April 2014
« Reply #159 on: 01/22/2014 03:05 pm »
Here's some info about GSLV Mk3 X1 and CE20 engine, from two interviews:
http://www.frontline.in/cover-story/will-be-able-to-repeat-the-success/article5590227.ece
http://www.frontline.in/cover-story/gslv-mkiii-the-next-milestone/article5596588.ece

On gas generator cycle CE20 engine (CS25 stage):
Quote
But in the gas generator cycle, you have the ability to test the individual elements. So if you look at the reliability aspects—establishing a reliable system and the time required for that—we can work in parallel. The issue is relevant in the context of GSLV MkIII, for which we were working on the engine and stage elements in parallel. The turbo pump, which has something like 5 megawatt of power, has already been tested and it has logged about 1,400 seconds on the ground. We have tested the thrust chamber along with the injector, igniter and the nozzle. We did two tests, and the third test is being done today [January 10]. [This test, which lasted for 50 seconds, was as predicted and was successful.] Now, when we have sufficient knowledge about the ignition characteristics, the combustion instability aspects and performance in different regimes of [LOX+liquid hydrogen, or LH2] mixture ratio, then we can start with engine test and then the stage test. So the time required from now to qualifying the stage becomes less. This is the main advantage. The flexibility that is available in a gas generator cycle is much more because individual systems can be tested from the input/output point of view and they can be qualified in parallel.

Steering and thrust vectoring in CE20:
Quote
The second aspect of the GSLV MkIII engine is that we are gimballing the nozzle for thrust vector control [and not the two using vernier (steering) engines as in the Russian engine and the cryogenic upper stage (CUS) of the indigenised MkII]. So we are only concerned about two ignitions, that is, the main engine and the gas generator. In the case of GSLV MKII’s CUS, the two steering engines have to ignite before the main engine ignites and that feed has to come from the main line.

On GSLV Mk3 X1 (officially known as LVM3-X) mission:
Quote
What is the next important milestone for the GSLV?

The immediate thing is GSLV MkIII, the experimental mission with the passive cryo stage.

What do you mean by passive cryo?

No engine will be burnt in the third stage. Actually, if you look at the GSLV, 50 per cent of the velocity is given by the non-cryo portion. So we will get about 5 km/s velocity, and it will be a suborbital flight. But what we want to test here is the atmospheric phase of the flight. While it is coming down, we will use it to characterise the crew module. We can measure the thermal stress when it is coming down. As far as the vehicle is concerned, its exterior will be ditto. Internally, the cryo will be passive.

Quote
You plan to do a suborbital flight of GSLV-Mk III in March this year without firing the cryogenic engine. What is a suborbital flight? What is its purpose? Is this flight going to carry a model of the crew module required for ISRO’s human space flight programme?

The suborbital flight test of GSLV Mk III, named LVM3-X mission, is primarily to characterise the new 600-tonne heavy-lift vehicle with two large solid strap-on boosters during its flight through the atmosphere.

The vehicle configuration will be in full and final form. However, the cryogenic stage, C25, will not be functional and will not develop any thrust. With this constraint, the vehicle can reach only about 5 km per second velocity, which falls short of the orbital velocity required. Hence the mission is suborbital, with the upper stage and payload re-entering atmosphere and falling back to the earth.

The whole objective of the LVM3-X mission is to validate a host of important parameters and characteristics of this totally new vehicle of relatively larger dimensions and large strap-ons. In effect, with this flight experience, when we attempt the first developmental launch, LVM3-D1, with a functional cryo stage, C25, we will have greater confidence that C25 will get an opportunity to ignite and perform in flight, which is indeed essential considering the enormous effort we put into realising the cryogenic engine and stage.
« Last Edit: 01/22/2014 03:24 pm by vyoma »

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