Author Topic: Proton-M launch with Sirius FM-6 satellite - October 25, 2013  (Read 61602 times)

Offline Danderman

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We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing.

There *are* 4 FGB-class auxiliary thrusters pointed in the right direction, but these are plumbed to the main prop tank, apparently, these are connected to a smaller "high pressure" prop tank. Since these are fired to provide acceleration for the start of the main engine firing, I suspect that they are required to have higher than normal pressure in the prop tanks (with "normal" being the tank pressure when the thrusters are used at ISS).

I would imagine that if Briz fires multiple times, these auxiliary propulsion prop tanks are pretty much empty by the end of the mission; otherwise, they could be used to provide a little extra delta-V as verniers.


Offline anik

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Exact launch time is 18:08:53.957 UTC.

We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing

Exactly! How do you think what will be this time? Your thoughts are very important!
« Last Edit: 10/25/2013 09:00 pm by anik »

Offline Stan Black

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We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing.

There *are* 4 FGB-class auxiliary thrusters pointed in the right direction, but these are plumbed to the main prop tank, apparently, these are connected to a smaller "high pressure" prop tank. Since these are fired to provide acceleration for the start of the main engine firing, I suspect that they are required to have higher than normal pressure in the prop tanks (with "normal" being the tank pressure when the thrusters are used at ISS).

I would imagine that if Briz fires multiple times, these auxiliary propulsion prop tanks are pretty much empty by the end of the mission; otherwise, they could be used to provide a little extra delta-V as verniers.



There are usually two additional burns for disposal; looking at the numbers half the propellant remains. About 210 seconds total planned duration, of which 115 seconds left for disposal.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing.

There *are* 4 FGB-class auxiliary thrusters pointed in the right direction, but these are plumbed to the main prop tank, apparently, these are connected to a smaller "high pressure" prop tank. Since these are fired to provide acceleration for the start of the main engine firing, I suspect that they are required to have higher than normal pressure in the prop tanks (with "normal" being the tank pressure when the thrusters are used at ISS).

I would imagine that if Briz fires multiple times, these auxiliary propulsion prop tanks are pretty much empty by the end of the mission; otherwise, they could be used to provide a little extra delta-V as verniers.



There is no "auxiliary propulsion prop tank". The 11D458 engines take their propellant in the same tanks as S5.98M main engine.
Nicolas PILLET
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Offline Star One

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2nd Briz-M burn completed: lasted 1039s for 1066s nominal

Why does it often seem to burn under the nominal length, I have noticed this before?
« Last Edit: 10/25/2013 09:55 pm by Star One »

Offline YetAnotherLurker

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2nd Briz-M burn completed: lasted 1039s for 1066s nominal

Why does it often seem to burn under the nominal length, I have noticed this before?

I would assume that over such long burns, slight variations in performance can add up to a total change in delta-V from what is baselined as nominal.
I would also assume that the Briz-M is shooting for a target orbit rather than a target burn time.
Perhaps Briz-M commonly performs slightly better than what is considered nominal?

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Offline Danderman

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We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing.

There *are* 4 FGB-class auxiliary thrusters pointed in the right direction, but these are plumbed to the main prop tank, apparently, these are connected to a smaller "high pressure" prop tank. Since these are fired to provide acceleration for the start of the main engine firing, I suspect that they are required to have higher than normal pressure in the prop tanks (with "normal" being the tank pressure when the thrusters are used at ISS).

I would imagine that if Briz fires multiple times, these auxiliary propulsion prop tanks are pretty much empty by the end of the mission; otherwise, they could be used to provide a little extra delta-V as verniers.



There is no "auxiliary propulsion prop tank". The 11D458 engines take their propellant in the same tanks as S5.98M main engine.

I have a dim memory of there being high pressure prop tanks for the auxiliary thrusters.  Actually, it's more than a dim memory:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/03/ils-proton-m-launch-satmex-8/
Quote

The Briz-M (Breeze-M) upper stage is the Phase III variant, a recent upgrade which utilizes two new high-pressure tanks (80 liters) to replace six smaller tanks


If the auxiliary thrusters and the main engine both share the same prop tank(s), why does failure of the main engine result in end of mission?  Why can't the four 40 kg thrusters simply fulfill at least part of the remaining mission?

« Last Edit: 10/25/2013 10:38 pm by Danderman »

Offline Danderman

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Exact launch time is 18:08:53.957 UTC.

We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing

Exactly! How do you think what will be this time? Your thoughts are very important!

I have no idea, hopefully this will be a successful mission.

fingers crossed.

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Spacecraft has just separated. All nominal.  :)
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http://www.ilslaunch.com/newsroom/news-releases/ils-proton-successfully-launches-sirius-fm-6-satellite-sirius-xm-radio

ILS Proton Successfully Launches the Sirius FM-6 Satellite for Sirius XM Radio

BAIKONUR COSMODROME, Kazakhstan, October 26, 2013 – International Launch Services (ILS), a leader in providing mission integration and launch services to the global commercial satellite industry, successfully carried the Sirius FM-6 satellite, built by SSL, into orbit today on an ILS Proton for Sirius XM Radio Inc.
The ILS Proton Breeze M vehicle launched from Pad 39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 00:09 today local time (18:09 GMT and 14:09 EDT on October 25).  The first three stages of the Proton used a standard ascent profile to place the orbital unit (Breeze M upper stage and the Sirius FM-6 satellite) into a sub-orbital trajectory. From this point in the mission, the Breeze M performed planned mission maneuvers to advance the orbital unit first to a circular parking orbit, then to an intermediate orbit, followed by a transfer orbit, and finally to a geostationary transfer orbit. Separation of the Sirius FM-6 satellite occurred approximately 9 hours and 11 minutes after liftoff. The satellite, weighing over 6 metric tons, was built on the flight-proven SSL 1300 platform. This was the 6th satellite launched by ILS Proton for SiriusXM and the 27th SSL 1300 satellite launched.
Sirius FM-6 has an X-band uplink transponder and an S-band downlink transponder to deliver digital audio radio service. With approximately 20 Kw end-of-life power and an anticipated service life of 15 years, the Sirius FM-6 satellite is one of the most powerful satellites built today.  The final orbital location for the satellite will be 116.15 degrees west longitude.
This was the 390th launch for Proton since its maiden flight in 1965 and the 83rd ILS Proton Launch overall. The Proton Breeze M vehicle is developed and built by Khrunichev Research and Production Space Center of Moscow, Russia’s premier space industry manufacturer and majority shareholder in ILS.
Phil Slack, president of ILS commented, “For over a decade, SiriusXM has entrusted ILS Proton to deliver their satellites into orbit. It is a tremendous honor for ILS to have been a part of the satellite radio industry since 2000, with the launch of SiriusXM’s first generation fleet on ILS Proton within a 5 month period. Thank you to all of the teams that made this successful launch possible, including SiriusXM, SSL, Khrunichev, and ILS.”
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Offline input~2

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Achieved sequence of events

Offline input~2

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A first object has been catalogued, 39362/2013-058C, presumably the APT in
327 x 15140 km x 49.60°
« Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:19 am by input~2 »

Offline Stan Black

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We are getting near the point where the Briz-M has failed in the past, sometimes due to the main engine plumbing failing.

There *are* 4 FGB-class auxiliary thrusters pointed in the right direction, but these are plumbed to the main prop tank, apparently, these are connected to a smaller "high pressure" prop tank. Since these are fired to provide acceleration for the start of the main engine firing, I suspect that they are required to have higher than normal pressure in the prop tanks (with "normal" being the tank pressure when the thrusters are used at ISS).

I would imagine that if Briz fires multiple times, these auxiliary propulsion prop tanks are pretty much empty by the end of the mission; otherwise, they could be used to provide a little extra delta-V as verniers.



There is no "auxiliary propulsion prop tank". The 11D458 engines take their propellant in the same tanks as S5.98M main engine.

I have a dim memory of there being high pressure prop tanks for the auxiliary thrusters.  Actually, it's more than a dim memory:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/03/ils-proton-m-launch-satmex-8/
Quote

The Briz-M (Breeze-M) upper stage is the Phase III variant, a recent upgrade which utilizes two new high-pressure tanks (80 liters) to replace six smaller tanks

If the auxiliary thrusters and the main engine both share the same prop tank(s), why does failure of the main engine result in end of mission?  Why can't the four 40 kg thrusters simply fulfill at least part of the remaining mission?

Quote
The Breeze M is then delivered to Building 44 in Area 31, the propellant
fueling hall, where MMH and N2O4 are loaded in the high pressure tanks of the low-thrust settling/attitude
control system thrusters.
Proton Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide, LKEB-9812-1990
Revision 7, July 2009

Offline Stan Black

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As always, let's all try and get a really nice launch image for the article (which will go on at launch).

You should have quite a bit to write for this one.

Originally FM6 was to replace FM1 and FM2, but could not work out a method of end of life disposal.
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-08-1156A1.pdf

Original campaign saw satellite returned to manufacturer.
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27515.msg863855#msg863855

This launch featured a rocket previously delivered for Satmex-8, but found to have come loose during transportation. The rocket was returned to the manufacturer for repairs.
http://www.vz.ru/news/2012/11/26/608864.html

And then the extended stay outdoors waiting for ground station.

Offline input~2

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Injection orbit (prior to S/C separation) according to telemetry is : 4097.24 x 35790.69 km x 23.15°
quite close to the expected orbit of: 4126.59 x 35785.86 km x 23.18°
« Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:39 am by input~2 »

Offline input~2

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Briz-M after final post S/C injection burn was catalogued as 39361/2013-058B in
3388 x 34231 km x 23.66° (epoch Oct 26, 0900UTC)
« Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:17 am by input~2 »

Offline input~2

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and the S/C as 39360/2013-058A in
4075 x 35812 km x 23.17° (epoch Oct 26, 0900UTC)

Offline Artyom.

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Offline Artyom.

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