Author Topic: Expedition 70 Thread  (Read 128664 times)

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #520 on: 12/05/2023 02:57 pm »
Andreas Mogensen
@Astro_Andreas
I am excited to talk with 2 Nobel laureates on Monday🤩

Maybe I should bring a medal myself 😉

ESA
@esa
📅 Save the date!

🏅@NobelPrize is calling the International @Space_Station!

Join us live as @Astro_Andreas calls with this year's Nobel Prize laureate in physics, Ferenc Krausz and laureate in Chemistry, Moungi Bawendi.

⏰ Monday 11 December at 14:10 GMT/15:10 CET on #ESAWebTV2 👉 http://esawebtv.esa.int

https://twitter.com/Astro_Andreas/status/1731999341072506920

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #521 on: 12/05/2023 04:40 pm »
NASA Space Operations
@NASASpaceOps
.@NASA
 is celebrating the 25th anniversary of @Space_Station
 operations during a live conversation with crew aboard the microgravity laboratory for the benefit of humanity. During a space-to-Earth call at 12:25 p.m. EST Wednesday, Dec. 6, the Expedition 70 crew will speak with NASA Associate Administrator Bob Cabana and Joel Montalbano, space station program manager.

Watch on the NASA+ streaming service at no cost on demand. The discussion also will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, YouTube, and the agency’s website.

Learn more: https://www.nasa.gov/news-release/nasa-leaders-to-highlight-25th-anniversary-of-space-station-with-crew/

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceOps/status/1732091477642109015




Offline dsmillman

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Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #522 on: 12/05/2023 05:16 pm »
From the Dec. 4 ISS status report:

"Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Transition: Ground teams implemented new algorithms to update protection of uplinked Space Station commands.  The new encryption protocol is Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS)-certified and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-approved.  This transition is necessary after previous three-key Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) became outdated.  After the transition, ground teams successfully checked out commanding capabilities."

AES was adopted in 2001. All versions of DES were declared insecure in 2005. 
No further comments are necessary.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #523 on: 12/05/2023 05:19 pm »
Health, Manufacturing Science Day Before Station’s 25th Anniversary

Mark Garcia Posted on December 5, 2023

Research to promote health and advance manufacturing were the top science activities aboard the International Space Station on Tuesday. The Expedition 70 crew will also commemorate 25 years since the first two station modules were connected on orbit.

NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli began her day in the Kibo laboratory module working on the Cerebral Aging study that is exploring neurodegenerative processes. She processed brain cell-like samples inside Kibo’s Life Science Glovebox to understand the effects of microgravity at a molecular and cellular level. Results may advance research techniques, reduce drug development costs, and improve heath on Earth and in space.

Moghbeli later joined astronaut Satoshi Furukawa on Wednesday afternoon transferring cargo in and out of the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft. Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) finalized his day checking the performance of a spherical robot camera that can operate remotely or autonomously inside Kibo.

Commander Andreas Mogensen worked in the Destiny laboratory module on fiber optics research installing experiment hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The advanced physics study may benefit Earth and space-based applications such as laser surgery, remote-sensing, atmospheric monitoring, and optical data communications. Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) wrapped up his day cleaning orbital plumbing hardware.

NASA Flight Engineer Loral O’Hara from NASA began her day inside the Columbus laboratory module removing electronic components from life science hardware. Afterward, she spent the rest of the day inside Kibo supporting more space biology work.

In the orbital outpost’s Roscosmos segment, veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko serviced a carbon dioxide removal device then repositioned eggs in an incubator for a new biology experiment. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub worked on cargo and water transfers from the newly docked Progress 86 cargo craft. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov worked on an oxygen generator, cleaned ventilation systems, then watered and photographed plants growing for a Roscosmos space botany study.

At 12:25 p.m. EST on Wednesday, all seven space station crew members will gather in the Harmony module for a live television conference commemorating 25 years of space station assembly. The orbital septet will receive a call from NASA Associate Administrator Bob Cabana and International Space Station Program Manager Joel Montalbano discussing the station’s evolution and its impact on Earth and space industries. Cabana commanded space shuttle Endeavour during the STS-88 mission on Dec. 6, 1998, when the Zarya and Unity modules were mated. The shuttle’s Canadarm robotic arm grappled Zarya and mated it to Unity stowed in Endeavour’s payload bay.

Watch live on the NASA+ streaming service via the web or the NASA app. Coverage also will air live on NASA Television,  YouTube, and on the agency’s website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/05/health-manufacturing-science-day-before-stations-25th-anniversary/

The space station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during its departure and flyaround on Nov. 8, 2021.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #524 on: 12/05/2023 08:58 pm »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
.@AstroJaws, one of our real @NASA_Astronauts, contributed to the making of our character Callie Rodriguez – the first woman to set foot on the Moon in our "First Woman" graphic novel series. Hear from Jasmin about the new issue and visit http://NASA.gov/CallieFirst to read it!

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1732152508716593412


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #525 on: 12/06/2023 03:40 pm »
Andreas Mogensen
@Astro_Andreas
Here are three images of Columbus, Ohio, Lund, Sweden, and Munich, Germany. These seemingly unconnected cities share a common feature in 2023: They all have a physics Nobel laureate this year. Each of the three winners, Pierre Agostini, Anne L'Huillier, and Ferenc Krausz, used incredibly fast lasers to study of one of the building blocks of our world, the electron. The use cases of their work goes beyond the great fundamental work they have done, as it opens doors into faster electronics and early diagnosis of diseases.

As I see these three different places on our planet, it reminds me of the view from up here on the Space Station, where borders aren't visible and Earth is one big planet. We work on science ever day and hope that every little contribution we make, will one day help people on Earth move to the better future together.

On Monday I will have a call with two of this year's Nobel laureates, Ferenc Krausz and Moungi Bawendi. Who knows, I might bring another medal to the call.

Thanks @AstroJaws and @Astro_Alneyadi for the pictures of Ohio and Munich!

https://twitter.com/Astro_Andreas/status/1732309348624261277


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #526 on: 12/06/2023 04:02 pm »
NASA Laser Communications
@NASALaserComm
ILLUMA-T just achieved "first light!" This means ILLUMA-T and LCRD exchanged data over laser links.

Check out this sped-up video of ILLUMA-T on the @Space_Station during on-orbit testing.

Together, LCRD and ILLUMA-T make NASA's first two-way end-to-end laser relay system!

https://twitter.com/NASALaserComm/status/1732384463290560804


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #527 on: 12/06/2023 09:10 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/05/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on December 5, 2023

Payloads:

Actiwatch-Plus: Twelve Actiwatch Plus devices were removed from the USB Hubs connected to the Human Research Facility (HRF) PC on the HRF Rack. The crew verified that the device displays matched the expected state of the hardware, and returned them to each crewmember for use or had the units stowed in the Actiwatch Plus Kit. The Actiwatch-Plus is a waterproof, non-intrusive, sleep-wake activity monitor worn on the wrist of a crewmember and contains a miniature uniaxial accelerometer that produces a signal as the subject moves. The data is stored in non-volatile memory within the Actiwatch until they are downloaded for analysis.

Cerebral Ageing: Media exchange and termination was performed on designated Bio Cell samples with G preservative. The Impact of Spaceflight on Human Brain Ageing Using Cerebral Organoids (Cerebral Ageing) investigation studies the effect of spaceflight and the durability in space on cerebral organoids, i.e., 3D human-derived structures that closely resemble a developing human brain, at the molecular and cellular level.

Complement of Integrated Protocols for Human Exploration Research on Varying Mission Durations (CIPHER): The Mobil-O-Graph hardware was donned and a 13-hour blood pressure data recording session was initiated in support of the CIPHER study. The CIPHER investigation aims to improve our understanding of physiological and psychological changes in humans on missions that range from weeks to one year in duration. Conducting the same research over missions of different durations allows scientists to extrapolate to multi-year missions, such as a three-year round-trip to Mars. These data could provide deeper knowledge about changes that may occur on such missions and support development of countermeasures to promote astronaut health and well-being.

Fiber Optic Production-2 (FOP-2): The FOP-2 hardware was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox. Calibration of the new unit will begin tomorrow. FOP-2 builds on previous work to manufacture commercial optical fibers in microgravity using a blend of elements called ZBLAN.  Earlier theoretical and experimental studies suggest ZBLAN optical fibers produced in microgravity exhibit qualities superior to those of fibers produced on Earth.  Results from FOP-2 could help further verify these studies and guide manufacture of high value optical fiber aboard the space station for commercial use.

ISS Ham Radio: An ISS Ham contact was initiated with Orangeburg Christian Academy in Orangeburg, SC, USA. Since the earliest space station expeditions, ISS Ham Radio has allowed groups of students in schools, camps, museums, and planetariums to hold a conversation with the people living in space. As the ISS passes overhead, students have about nine minutes to ask crew members 10 to 20 questions.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Internal Ball Camera 2: Off-nominal Checkout #4 was performed on the JEM Internal Ball Robot Camera-2. JEM Internal Ball Camera 2 demonstrates technology for automating video and photos of research activities. Crew time is one of the most valuable resources on the ISS, and many simple, repetitive tasks could be automated. This frees up crew time for more important activities.

Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor-2: The Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor Locker-2 was installed into Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station (ExPRESS) Rack 8 Locker 8 and powered on. The Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor investigation demonstrates the capabilities of a small, reliable, portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer instrument aboard the ISS to conduct major and minor elements of air measurement. The instrument transmits data back to the ground research team every two seconds, providing a continuous analysis to the ground research team.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems, Inc.-1 Experiment Facility (STaARS-1 EF): The remaining two STaARS Experiment Controllers were removed from the STaARS-1 EF. STaARS-1 EF is a temperature controlled (18°C-37°C) experiment facility that provides the environmental control, power and communication required for efficient and effective biotechnology and life science research on the ISS.

Systems:

In-Flight-Maintenance (IFM) UPA Hose Coupler Quick-Disconnect (QD) Cleaning and Purge: UPA hose couplers A and B were prepared for stowage before eventual return on SpX-29.  The crew cleaned the QDs of the couplers using self-wetting swabs and purged the couplers with water and air.

SpX-29 Cargo Transfer Operations: The crew continued transferring science and supplies to and from the SpaceX-29 cargo vehicle in support of science and ISS operations. SpaceX-29 will remain docked with the ISS until December.

Completed Task List Activities:

    Audio Headset Deploy

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    SSRMS Checkout Maneuver

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #528 on: 12/06/2023 09:12 pm »
Station Reaches 25 Years in Orbit, Crew Continues Advanced Space Research

Mark Garcia Posted on December 6, 2023

25 years ago today, the first two modules of the International Space Station – Zarya and Unity – were mated during the STS-88 mission of space shuttle Endeavour. The shuttle’s Canadarm robotic arm reached out and grappled Zarya, which had been on orbit just over two weeks, and attached it to the Unity module stowed inside Endeavour’s payload bay. Endeavour would undock from the young dual-module station one week later beginning the space station assembly era.

The seven-member Expedition 70 crew called down to Earth today and discussed with NASA Associate Administrator Bob Cabana and International Space Station Program Manager Joel Montalbano the orbital outpost’s accomplishments since the assembly era began on Dec. 6, 1998. Cabana was the commander of Endeavour when both modules were robotically mated then outfitted during a series of spacewalks. Montalbano, NASA’s sixth station leader since the program’s inception, remarked today, “We want to celebrate today all the people who designed, built, and operate the International Space Station.”

Meanwhile, a host of space biology work continued aboard the orbital lab on Wednesday to improve human health on Earth and in space. Cargo operations and lab maintenance rounded out the day keeping the four astronauts and three cosmonauts busy during the middle of the week.

Aging studies are taking place on the orbital lab helping researchers understand space-caused accelerated aging symptoms at the molecular and cellular level. NASA Flight Engineers Loral O’Hara and Jasmin Moghbeli took turns processing liver stem samples for the Space AGE study taking place in the Kibo laboratory module. Kibo’s Life Science Glovebox is hosting the research operation that is exploring aging-like properties of immune cells and the regenerative capacity of liver cells.

Mental health and cognition are key concerns for NASA and its international partners as the space agencies plan longer human missions farther away from Earth. Commander Andreas Mogensen wore virtual reality goggles for the VR Mental Care experiment today and watched a 360-degree movie to understand its stabilizing effect on the nervous system. Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa took a computerized robotics test for a CIPHER investigation studying how in microgravity affects brain structure, sleep quality, stress, and immune function.

Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) and Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) also partnered with O’Hara and Moghbeli transferring payloads in and out of the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft throughout the day. The foursome then spent the rest of Wednesday supporting a variety of other ongoing space research and life support activities.

Veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko tended to eggs being incubated for a Roscosmos space biology study, deployed carbon dioxide monitors, and practiced using emergency masks. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub worked on an immunity study and continued unpacking cargo from the Progress 86 resupply ship. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov started his morning replacing electrical plumbing gear then worked in the afternoon checking smoke detectors and charging a science laptop computer.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2023/12/06/station-reaches-25-years-in-orbit-crew-continues-advanced-space-research/

Space shuttle Endeavour’s Canadarm robotic arm was used to grapple the Zarya module and connect it to the Unity module stowed in the shuttle’s payload bay on Dec. 6, 1998.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #529 on: 12/07/2023 01:28 am »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
25 years ago, @NASA joined with space agencies from around the world to begin on-orbit operations for the space station. Since then, hundreds of people have lived and worked safely above Earth to make discoveries and devise new tech for humanity’s push to deep space exploration!

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1732478925266145584


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #530 on: 12/07/2023 01:39 am »
International Space Station
@Space_Station
25 years of remarkable achievements.

On Dec. 6, 1998, the six-member STS-88 crew mated Unity, the first U.S. element of the International Space Station, with the already-orbiting Zarya module, beginning the historic assembly of the orbiting laboratory.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1732515308928172040

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #531 on: 12/07/2023 01:42 am »
NASA Space Operations
@NASASpaceOps
Media accreditation is open for the next launch to deliver @NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to @Space_Station. This launch is the 20th @NorthropGrumman commercial resupply services mission to the orbital laboratory for the agency.

NASA, Northrop Grumman, and SpaceX are targeting no earlier than Monday, Jan. 29, for a Falcon 9 rocket to launch the Cygnus spacecraft from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

Learn more: https://www.nasa.gov/news-release/nasa-invites-media-to-northrop-grumman-spacex-space-station-launch/

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceOps/status/1732516675075879392



Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #532 on: 12/07/2023 01:46 am »
Pamela Melroy
@Astro_Pam
The International @Space_Station is a testament to international cooperation! Zarya and Unity's union in space 25 years ago laid the foundation. I had the privilege to be part of three space station assembly missions, and today, the ISS is a symbol of what humanity can achieve when we work together.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Pam/status/1732514761655357850


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #533 on: 12/07/2023 01:52 am »
Astronauts Talk with NASA Leadership for Space Station’s 25th Anniversary - Dec. 6, 2023



Offline Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #534 on: 12/07/2023 02:57 am »
We got some interesting views from cameras on the SSRMS today, as they took "close-out" photos of the Robotic Refueling Mission 3 equipment (which was relocated from ELC-3 to Cygnus NG-19 for disposal). First we got some views of the service module end of the Cygnus (including the grapple fixture they'll use for unberthing), before starting on this face of the RRM3...

Offline Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #535 on: 12/07/2023 03:01 am »
... with closeups, particularly of the various tools that Dextre was able to grapple and use during the tests.

Offline Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #536 on: 12/07/2023 03:13 am »
Next up was a review of various fittings / receptacles on the top face of RRM3.

Offline Yellowstone10

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #537 on: 12/07/2023 03:28 am »
And wrapping up with some views of the RRM3 tools from a different angle, with a neat view of the logo of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Satellite Servicing Projects Division.

Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #538 on: 12/07/2023 08:52 pm »
古川聡 Satoshi Furukawa
@Astro_Satoshi

GT:  This is near Islamabad, Pakistan, and you can also see Tarbela Dam Lake.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Satoshi/status/1732705205723263476


Offline ddspaceman

Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Reply #539 on: 12/07/2023 09:35 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/06/2023

Bill Keeter Posted on December 6, 2023

25th Anniversary of the ISS: Today marks the 25th anniversary of the USOS Unity node (Node 1) mating with the Russian Zarya module (FGB) marking the start of the ISS in orbit.  Designed and built by engineers thousands of miles apart and never joined together on Earth, the first two modules of the orbiting laboratory fit perfectly together when they met in space.  All seven members of the ISS crew commemorated the event during an interview with The ISS program Manager and the NASA associate administrator.

Payloads:

Bio-Monitor: Bio-Monitor Wearable hardware was removed and Data was downlinked completing a 48-hour data collection session. Bio-Monitor is a Canadian onboard instrument that serves as a platform for scientific experiments on the ISS. The instrument performs on-orbit monitoring of crew member physiological parameters, with wearable sensors that only minimally interfere with crewmember daily activities.

Complement of Integrated Protocols for Human Exploration Research on Varying Mission Durations (CIPHER): The Blood Pressure Vascular Echo Mobil-O-Graph Cuff was doffed and the data was transferred to the ground completing a 13-hour session. The CIPHER investigation aims to improve our understanding of physiological and psychological changes in humans on missions that range from weeks to one year in duration. Conducting the same research over missions of different durations allows scientists to extrapolate to multi-year missions, such as a three-year round-trip to Mars. These data could provide deeper knowledge about changes that may occur on such missions and support development of countermeasures to promote astronaut health and well-being.

Fiber Optic Production-2 (FOP-2): The calibration probe was reseated by the crew and the ground initiated the calibration sequence. FOP-2 builds on previous work to manufacture commercial optical fibers in microgravity using a blend of elements called ZBLAN.  Earlier theoretical and experimental studies suggest ZBLAN optical fibers produced in microgravity exhibit qualities superior to those of fibers produced on Earth.  Results from FOP-2 could help further verify these studies and guide manufacture of high value optical fiber aboard the space station for commercial use.

Four Bed Carbon Dioxide (4BCO2) Scrubber: CO2 effluent was sampled from the 4BCO2 Scrubber and stowed for return. 4BCO2 Scrubber demonstrates a technology for removing CO2 from the atmosphere on a spacecraft. The technology is based on the current system in use on the ISS with mechanical upgrades in absorption beds, heater elements, and valves and use of an improved zeolite absorbent to reduce erosion and dust formation. A goal for next-generation systems is continuous operation for 20,000 hours without a failure, and this technology is a step toward that goal.

Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL): The CO2 Incubator Controller was swapped out for a fresh unit. The SABL unit supports a wide variety of investigations in the life, physical, and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has over 23 liters of temperature-controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and investigations. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 (or any required concentration of CO2) for cell cultures or other types of investigations and has two USB 2.0 ports and two Ethernet LAN connections. The SABL unit also has switchable 28VDC and 5VDC power supplies for investigation use.

Sleep in Orbit: Overnight data recording with earpiece EEG (electroencephalogram) hardware. The Long-term Sleep Monitoring Before, During and After Extended Spaceflight (Sleep In Orbit) investigation studies the physiological differences between sleep on Earth and in space using ear-EEG based sleep monitoring.

Space AGE: Media was exchanged for all sample collections of the Space AGE Bio Cells. Many changes to the human body seen in microgravity resemble those associated with aging on Earth. Aging-like changes to human immune cells are reversed after return to Earth. Tissue Engineered Liver Immune Chips in Microgravity as a Novel Platform to Study the Effect of Aged Immune Cells on Behavior and Regenerative Capacity of Liver Stem Cells (Space AGE) studies how microgravity-induced aging-like changes in immune cells affect the regenerative capabilities of liver cells and their postflight recovery. Results could improve understanding of the biology of aging and its effects on disease mechanisms

Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor: The initial protective MCA (Major Constituent Analyzer) Plug was removed from the Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor-2 MCA inlet in preparation for Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor-2 first operations. The MCA inlet will allow atmospheric gasses to pass into the monitor facility. The Spacecraft Atmosphere Monitor investigation demonstrates the capabilities of a small, reliable, portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer instrument aboard the ISS to conduct major and minor elements of air measurement. The instrument transmits data back to the ground research team every two seconds, providing a continuous analysis to the ground research team.

Virtual Reality (VR) Mental Care: The VR Mental Care session was completed and the hardware (VR controller, VR Anchor and ESA Power Bank) was charged up. The VR Mental Care investigation demonstrates the application of VR for mental relaxation, using 360° high quality (HQ) VR video and sound scenarios delivered via a VR headset. The overall aim is to use VR technology to provide a positive impact on the general mental health of astronauts during a space mission. Investigation activities consist of in-flight testing sessions comprised of VR video viewing and questionnaires (via the ESA EveryWear app).

Systems:

SpX-29 Cargo Transfer Operations: The crew continued transferring science and supplies to and from the SpaceX-29 cargo vehicle in support of science and ISS operations. SpaceX-29 will remain docked with the ISS until December.

Station Support Computer (SSC) Field Strip and Solid State Drive (SSD) removal: A field strip was performed on SSC 15 as part of troubleshooting efforts. The crew disconnected and reconnected all external connections to the laptop before removing the battery and SSD.  After SSD removal, the battery was replaced and the SSC booted up without issue.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Monthly Inspection: The crew completed a regular maintenance inspection to ensure the T2 exercise device is in good operational condition. The crew inspected all four Snubber Arms for any sign of free play, as well as make any necessary adjustments to reduce the free play. The crew also performed additional inspections for Sorbothane residue on Snubber Pins, the Snubber Pin position within the Snubber Cup, and all tape and witness markings on the T2 Thumbwheels, Snubber Jam Nuts, and Snubber Cup Housing.

Surface Sampler Kit (SSK) and Microbial Air Sampler (MAS) Analysis T+5: Previously taken air and surface samples were visually analyzed.  Last week, the crew took samples onboard ISS of the air and surfaces using media slides, swab tubes, and the MAS.  After the samples had incubated for 5 days, they were ready for inspection.  Future cleaning activities will be scheduled after ground teams assess analysis results.

Handheld Mic (HHM) Replacement and Stowage: The crew replaced three HHMs in the JEM, Node 2, and Node 3 modules onboard the ISS. The three previous HHMs from those locations were stowed and staged for return on SpX-29.  The HHM in the JEM failed a checkout and will be replaced with one of the working old mics on a future date.

Emergency Mask Review On-Board Training (OBT): The crew reviewed on-board procedures and practiced don/purge techniques for Emergency Mask usage.  Practice was done using ‘Training only’ masks.  This OBT was performed in preparation for installing new retaining rings to mitigate a defect found in some on-board Emergency Masks.

Node 3 O2 Trending Sensor Troubleshooting: Troubleshooting was performed on the Node 3 O2 Trending Sensor after it recently stopped sending data.  The ground team supported this activity while the crew traced and verified cable connections and health.  The crew found that one of the wires connecting to the O2 sensor was damaged, and will be removed and replaced at a later date.

Completed Task List Activities:

    None.

Today’s Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

    SSRMS Survey of Robotic Refueling Mission Phase 3.
    4BCO2 Scrubber Sample Support Operations
    SpX-29 Prop Checkout
    COTS Air Sensors N3 O2 Trending Sensor Troubleshooting Support Operations

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