Author Topic: Vega-C : ClearSpace-1 : NET 2nd half 2026  (Read 5075 times)

Offline Star One

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Vega-C : ClearSpace-1 : NET 2nd half 2026
« on: 12/10/2019 07:29 am »
I couldn’t find an existing thread for this mission.

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ClearSpace-1 will be the first space mission to remove an item of debris from orbit, planned for launch in 2025. The mission is being procured as a service contract with a startup-led commercial consortium, to help establish a new market for in-orbit servicing, as well as debris removal.

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The ClearSpace-1 mission will target the Vespa (Vega Secondary Payload Adapter) upper stage left in an approximately 800 km by 660 km altitude orbit after the second flight of ESA’s Vega launcher back in 2013. With a mass of 100 kg, the Vespa is close in size to a small satellite, while its relatively simple shape and sturdy construction make it a suitable first goal, before progressing to larger, more challenging captures by follow-up missions – eventually including multi-object capture.

The ClearSpace-1 ‘chaser’ will be launched into a lower 500-km orbit for commissioning and critical tests before being raised to the target orbit for rendezvous and capture using a quartet of robotic arms under ESA supervision. The combined chaser plus Vespa will then be deorbited to burn up in the atmosphere.

http://www.esa.int/Safety_Security/Clean_Space/ESA_commissions_world_s_first_space_debris_removal
[December 9, 2019]
« Last Edit: 06/01/2023 11:13 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #1 on: 12/10/2019 09:15 am »
Congratulations to ESA for going on the initiative with this! If we want to make LEO sustainable, we need to start removing the dead satellites, the sooner the better. Hopefully, NASA, Roscosmos, China and other countries will follow in removing their dead satellites.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Star One

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #2 on: 12/10/2019 11:29 am »
Congratulations to ESA for going on the initiative with this! If we want to make LEO sustainable, we need to start removing the dead satellites, the sooner the better. Hopefully, NASA, Roscosmos, China and other countries will follow in removing their dead satellites.

With all these LEO satellite mega-constellations in prospect they shouldn’t be short of business.
« Last Edit: 12/10/2019 11:30 am by Star One »

Offline bolun

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #3 on: 12/10/2019 11:44 am »

Offline Asteroza

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #4 on: 12/11/2019 04:26 am »
Has a bit of an Altius Kraken vibe to it...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #5 on: 11/26/2020 07:44 am »
N° 26–2020:

Call for Media: ESA and ClearSpace SA sign contract for world’s first debris removal mission

26 November 2020

ESA is signing an €86 million contract with an industrial team led by the Swiss start-up ClearSpace SA to purchase a unique service: the first removal of an item of space debris from orbit. As a result, in 2025, ClearSpace SA will launch the first active debris removal mission, ClearSpace-1, which will rendezvous, capture and bring down for reentry a Vespa payload adapter. Journalists are invited to follow an online round table for media on Tuesday, 1 December, at 13:30 CET. Mission experts will give an overview of the project status, explain the ambitious mission design and detail the next steps leading to launch.

A new way to do business for ESA
At ESA’s Space19+ Ministerial Council, ministers granted ESA the funding to place a service contract with a commercial provider for the safe removal of an inactive object from low Earth orbit. Following a competitive process, an industrial team led by ClearSpace SA – a spin-off company of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) – was invited to submit the final proposal. With this contract signature, a critical milestone for establishing a new commercial sector in space will be achieved. Purchasing the mission in an end-to-end service contract, rather than developing an ESA-defined spacecraft for in-house operation, represents a new way for ESA to do business. ESA is purchasing the initial mission and contributing key expertise, as part of the Active Debris Removal/ In-Orbit Servicing project (ADRIOS) within ESA’s Space Safety Programme. ClearSpace SA will raise the remainder of the mission cost through commercial investors.

Vespa target is close in size to a small satellite
The ClearSpace-1 mission will target the Vespa (Vega Secondary Payload Adapter). This object was left in an approximately 801 km by 664 km-altitude gradual disposal orbit, complying with space debris mitigation regulations, following the second flight of Vega back in 2013. With a mass of 112 kg, the Vespa target is close in size to a small satellite.

In almost 60 years of space activities, more than 5550 launches have resulted in some 42 000 tracked objects in orbit, of which about 23 000 remain in space and are regularly tracked. With today’s annual launch rates averaging nearly 100, and with break-ups continuing to occur at average historical rates of four to five per year, the number of debris objects in space will steadily increase. ClearSpace-1 will demonstrate the technical ability and commercial capacity to significantly enhance the long-term sustainability of spaceflight. The mission is supported within ESA’s Space Safety Programme based at the agency’s ESOC operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany.

Involvement of European industry in ClearSpace-1
Companies from a wide range of European countries are involved in the ClearSpace-1 mission. While the lead for the industrial team lies with ClearSpace SA, contributions come from enterprises in Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Germany, Sweden, Poland, the United Kingdom, Portugal and Romania.

Programme on Tuesday, 1 December
13:30 CET – 14:30 CET: Online round table for media

Participants

Jan Wörner, ESA Director General
Rolf Densing, ESA Director of Operations
Eric Morel de Westgaver, ESA Director of Industry, Procurement & Legal Services
Holger Krag, Head of ESA’s Space Safety Programme
Luisa Innocenti, Head of ESA’s Clean Space Office
Luc Piguet, CEO of ClearSpace SA
Muriel Richard-Noca, Chief Engineer of ClearSpace SA
Renato Krpoun, Head of the Swiss Space Office
Martin Vetterli, President of EPFL
The participants will each give short statements before journalists get the opportunity to ask questions.

Media registration

Journalists are invited to register at the following link by Monday, 30 November: https://www.esa.int/Contact/mediaregistration

Details to join the online round table will be provided after registration.
The briefing will be in English.

For further questions, please contact [email protected].

Social media
Follow ESA and ESA’s Space Safety Programme at

Twitter: @ESA / @esaoperations
Instagram: Europeanspaceagency
Facebook: EuropeanSpaceAgency
YouTube: ESA

Further information
ClearSpace-1 Media Kit:

https://download.esa.int/esoc/downloads/esa_ADRIOS-CS-1_media_links%26assets.pdf

https://download.esa.int/esoc/downloads/esa_ADRIOS-CS-1_FAQ_25112020_2.pdf

ESA’s clean space activities:
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Safety/Clean_Space

ESA’s space debris activities:
https://www.esa.int/debris

ESA’s space safety activities:
https://www.esa.int/spacesafety

Space debris in numbers:
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Space_Debris/Space_debris_by_the_numbers

More information about ESA:
www.esa.int

ClearSpace SA:
https://clearspace.today/


https://www.esa.int/Newsroom/Press_Releases/Call_for_Media_ESA_and_ClearSpace_SA_sign_contract_for_world_s_first_debris_removal_mission
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

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Jacques :-)

Offline Welsh Dragon

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #7 on: 11/26/2020 03:25 pm »
How heavy is the catcher sat? I tried looking on their website but it's an unusable graphic mess. I don't see how a system where the mass of the (single use) effector is a significant fraction of that of the target is ever going to be feasible for scaling up. 

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #8 on: 11/27/2020 04:43 am »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #9 on: 12/01/2020 01:10 pm »
ESA purchases world-first debris removal mission from start-up

01/12/2020

ESA has signed an €86 million contract with an industrial team led by Swiss start-up ClearSpace SA to purchase a unique service: the first-ever removal of an item of space debris from orbit.

As a result, in 2025, ClearSpace will launch the first active debris removal mission, ClearSpace-1, which will rendezvous, capture and take down for reentry the upper part of a Vespa (Vega Secondary Payload Adapter) used with Europe’s Vega launcher. This object was left in an approximately 801 km by 664 km-altitude gradual disposal orbit, complying with space debris mitigation regulations, following the second flight of Vega back in 2013.

Paying for such a service contract rather than directly procuring and running the entire mission represents a new way for ESA to do business – intended as the first step in establishing a new commercial sector in space.

Along with part-purchasing this initial mission – ClearSpace itself will be raising the remainder of the mission cost through commercial investors – ESA is also contributing key technologies for flight, developed as part of the Agency’s Clean Space initiative through its Active Debris Removal/ In-Orbit Servicing project, ADRIOS.

These include advanced guidance, navigation and control systems and vision-based AI, allowing the chaser satellite to close safely on the target on an autonomous basis, as well as robotic arms to achieve capture.

Challenging achievements ahead

“Think of all of the orbital captures that have occurred up until this point and they have all taken place with cooperative, fully-controlled target objects,” explains ESA Director General Jan Wörner.

“With space debris, by definition no such control is possible: instead the objects are adrift, often tumbling randomly.

“So this first capture and disposal of an uncooperative space object represents an extremely challenging achievement. But with overall satellite numbers set to grow rapidly in the coming decade, regular removals are becoming essential to keep debris levels under control, to prevent a cascade of collisions that threaten to make the debris problem much worse.”

Luc Piguet, founder and CEO of ClearSpace comments: “At orbital velocities, even a screw can hit with explosive force, which cannot be shielded against by mission designers; instead the threat needs to be managed through the active removal of debris items.”

“Our ‘tow truck’ design will be available to clear key orbits of debris that might otherwise make them unusable for future missions, eliminating the growing risks and liabilities for their owners, and benefitting the space industry as a whole. Our goal is to build affordable and sustainable in-orbit services.”

Luisa Innocenti, heading ESA’s Clean Space Office, adds: “The plan is that this pioneering capture forms the foundation of a recurring business case, not just for debris removal by responsible space actors around the globe, but also for in-orbit servicing: these same technologies will also enable in-orbit refuelling and servicing of satellites, extending their working life. Eventually, we envisage this trend extending into in-orbit assembly, manufacturing and recycling.”

European industry leads debris removal

ClearSpace – a spin-off company established by an experienced team of space debris researchers from EPFL, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne – is leading an industrial team that includes companies from several European countries, and contributions will come from enterprises in Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Germany, Sweden, Poland, the United Kingdom, Portugal and Romania.

With a mass of 112 kg, ClearSpace-1’s Vespa target is close in size to a small satellite, while its relatively simple shape and sturdy construction make it a suitable first goal, before progressing to larger, more challenging captures by follow-up missions – eventually including multi-object capture.

The ClearSpace-1 mission will initially be launched into a lower 500-km orbit for commissioning and critical tests, before being raised to the target orbit for rendezvous and capture using a quartet of robotic arms, flying under ESA supervision. The combined ‘space robot’ chaser plus the Vespa target will then be deorbited to burn up in the atmosphere.
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #10 on: 12/01/2020 01:11 pm »
In 2025, the first active debris removal mission, ClearSpace-1, will rendezvous, capture and take down for reentry the upper part of a Vespa (Vega Secondary Payload Adapter) from Europe's Vega launcher. This was left in an approximately 800 km by 660 km altitude gradual disposal orbit, complying with space debris mitigation regulations, following the second Vega flight in 2013. ClearSpace-1 will use ESA-developed robotic arm technology to capture the Vespa, then perform a controlled atmospheric reentry.
Jacques :-)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #11 on: 05/09/2023 10:19 am »
https://twitter.com/clearspacetoday/status/1655862665707679746

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📣 Exciting news for the first active debris removal mission! ClearSpace just signed a contract with @Arianespace for the launch of its servicer spacecraft #ClearSpace1 with the European launcher Vega C.

Watch video: loom.ly/Phq3fpY
Read more: loom.ly/5ieHoNs


Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: ClearSpace-1
« Reply #12 on: 05/09/2023 10:23 am »
https://clearspace.today/clearspace-to-launch-the-first-active-debris-removal-mission-with-arianespace-vega-c/

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ClearSpace To Launch The First Active Debris Removal Mission With Arianespace Vega C

For the benefit of ClearSpace, Arianespace will launch ClearSpace-1, a servicer spacecraft, with the European light launcher Vega C.

ClearSpace-1, developed by ClearSpace, is the first active debris removal mission, which will rendezvous, capture and remove a piece of space debris.

The launch is scheduled from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, starting second half of 2026.


Renens, Switzerland; May 9th 2023. ClearSpace and Arianespace signed a launch contract for ClearSpace-1, the first active debris removal mission that will capture and deorbit a derelict space debris object of more than 100 kg. The launch, scheduled starting as soon as the second-half of 2026, will use the new European light launcher Vega C to release the spacecraft into a sun-synchronous drift orbit for commissioning and critical tests. The servicer spacecraft will then be raised to the client object for rendezvous, capture and subsequent deorbitation through an atmospheric reentry.

The space debris object removed by this mission is the upper part of a Vespa (Vega Secondary Payload Adapter) left in a ‘gradual disposal’ orbit, in compliance with space debris mitigation regulations, during the second flight of a Vega launcher in 2013. Close in mass to a small satellite, the simple shape of this space debris object will allow to demonstrate the technologies of the spacecraft and its quartet of robotic arms, thus opening the way for more challenging missions with multiple captures per flight.

“Above us, there currently are over 34,000 pieces of space debris of more than 10 centimeters each as well as about 6,500 operational satellites in orbit, a number expected to rise to more than 27,000 by the end of the decade. These figures demonstrate the need to find innovative solutions for preserving the benefits of Space for humanity and life on Earth. At Arianespace, we are honored to deliver this mission with Vega C, thus supporting a sustainable use of Space,” said Stéphane Israël, CEO of Arianespace.

“We are very enthusiastic about this deal with Arianespace. This secures ClearSpace’s access to space for our trailblazing space debris removal mission. The ClearSpace-1 mission demonstrates a turning point in the space industry as we urgently need to bring solutions to a fundamental problem: we are putting objects into space quicker than they are being removed”, said Luc Piguet, CEO and Co-founder of ClearSpace. “We look forward to this European collaboration and the potential for more missions in the future.”

In 2019, ESA selected ClearSpace from a field of more than a dozen candidates to lead the first mission to remove an ESA-owned item from orbit. Supported by ESA’s new Space Safety Programme, the mission is being procured as a service contract with a startup-led commercial consortium, to help establish a new market for in-orbit servicing, as well as debris removal.

Image captions:

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The Arianespace VEGA C ready to launch the ClearSpace-1 mission due in 2026, artistic rendering © ClearSpace, Arianespace

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Luc Piguet, ClearSpace CEO and co-founder, and Stéphane Israël, Arianespace CEO, signing a contract for the launch of the ClearSpace-1 mission, due in 2026. © Arianespace, ClearSpace

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Vega-C : ClearSpace-1 : NET 2nd half 2026
« Reply #13 on: 08/22/2023 01:33 pm »
https://twitter.com/esaoperations/status/1693979113973829791

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New space debris objects have been detected in the vicinity of the target object of the future Clearspace-1 debris removal mission.
Analysis is ongoing: https://www.esa.int/Space_Safety/Objects_detected_in_the_vicinity_of_Clearspace-1_debris_removal_mission_target
📷ClearSpace SA

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Objects detected in the vicinity of Clearspace-1 debris removal mission target

22/08/2023
ESA / Space Safety

On 10 August 2023, ESA’s Space Debris Office was informed by the United States 18th Space Defense Squadron that new objects have been detected in the vicinity of a payload adapter.

This adapter, named VESPA, was left in orbit following the 2013 launch of a Vega rocket from ESA’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The object is a 113 kg, two-metre-diameter, conical upper portion of a payload adapter associated with the VV02 Vega launch that delivered the Proba-V, VNREDSat-1 and ESTCube-1 satellites into Earth orbit.

The new debris is believed to originate from the VESPA adapter, which is in an orbit with perigee at 660 km altitude, apogee at 790 km and an inclination of 98.72 degrees.

This payload adapter is the subject of the upcoming Clearspace-1 active space debris removal (ADR) mission. It is being developed as the first-ever mission to remove an existing derelict object from orbit through highly precise and complex, close-proximity and capture operations.

ESA procured the Clearspace-1 mission as a service from the Swiss start-up ‘Clearspace’ in order to demonstrate the technologies needed for debris removal and as a first step to establishing a new, sustainable and striving commercial space ecosystem.

The information currently available indicates that the most likely cause of the event was the hypervelocity impact of a small, untracked object that resulted in a low-energy release of new fragments. A preliminary assessment indicates that the increased collision risk to other missions posed by these fragments is negligible.

The US 18th Space Defense Squadron has conducted further tracking, and the TIRA system of the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques in Germany and the Polish “European Optical Network” members (under ESA contract) have also conducted independent observations. These observations indicate that the main object remains intact and has experienced no significant alteration to its orbit.

The development of the Clearspace-1 mission will continue as planned while additional data on the event is collected. ESA and industrial partners are carefully evaluating the event’s impact on the mission. A full analysis will last for several weeks.

This fragmentation event underlines the relevance of the Clearspace-1 mission. The most significant threat posed by larger objects of space debris is that they fragment into clouds of smaller objects that can each cause significant damage to active satellites. To minimise the number of fragmentation events, we must urgently reduce the creation of new space debris and begin actively mitigating the impact of existing objects.
« Last Edit: 08/22/2023 01:33 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

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