Author Topic: CNES ESA Prometheus / Callisto proposal  (Read 131856 times)

Offline Mamut

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Re: CNES ESA Prometheus / Callisto proposal
« Reply #300 on: 02/14/2024 11:23 am »
This document is from July 2023. It says about Callisto being in development. No timeline specified of course, but at least it shows that project is not dead.
https://elib.dlr.de/197206/1/AECC23_CALLISTO_AERO_klevanski_et_al_v9.pdf

Online TheKutKu

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Re: CNES ESA Prometheus / Callisto proposal
« Reply #301 on: 02/14/2024 10:10 pm »
This document is from July 2023. It says about Callisto being in development. No timeline specified of course, but at least it shows that project is not dead.
https://elib.dlr.de/197206/1/AECC23_CALLISTO_AERO_klevanski_et_al_v9.pdf

https://lachroniquespatiale.com/2024/01/10/callisto-en-vol-des-la-fin-2025/

First flight is scheduled for late 2025.

It is still being worked on, as of early december 2023 and according to Arnaud BIARD, operations architect on the CNES side the integration was planned for late 2024.
« Last Edit: 02/14/2024 10:11 pm by TheKutKu »

Offline Mamut

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Re: CNES ESA Prometheus / Callisto proposal
« Reply #302 on: 02/15/2024 01:10 pm »
Translated article:

https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/aiahmaipelc9cuqxyrbmm/Callisto-in-flight-at-the-end-of-2025-The-Space-Chronicle.pdf?rlkey=8c29db854fivqqt01x6rwl605&e=2&dl=0

Quote
Callisto in flight by the end of 2025
Developed in partnership by CNES and the German DLR and Japanese JAXA agencies, the
reusable demonstrator prototype is expected to make its first take-off by the end of next year.
Formalised as early as June 2016, the CNES Callisto programme has been rather discreet in recent
years. The delay in the programme is due in particular to the two years of COVID’s pandemic, which
put the world to a standstill as early as 2020 and to the DLR’s budget difficulties. Intended for the
smooth return to the ground, the vehicle with a height of thirteen meters, has crossed ...
A new definition review in 2023, the last was in 2019. Divided into three, the programme foresees
that Japan will provide the power plant but also everything to do with oxygen tanks and refuelling
lines. In particular, the German partner must design the hydrogen tank or the design of the landing
feet and ailerons intended to control the roll of the rocket. “For our part, we are doing all the onboard
intelligence, that is to say the flight programme, the guidance and piloting algorithms and we are
going to ensure all the backup,” says Carine Leveau, Director of Space Transport at CNES during the
callisto take-off site will be the old launch pad dedicated to the old Diamond launcher of the Guiana
Space Centre (CSG). In operation between 10 March 1970 and 27 September 1979, it is currently in
the final rehabilitation phase to accommodate mini-launchers by next year. The first three will be
Isar Aerospace, RFA One and Spanish LDP. The challenge for Callisto will be to come back to the
exact starting point. As soon as it becomes operational, the demonstrator will have to make several flights to pass a
return manoeuvre very similar to that performed by Falcon 9. Thus, at least five rounds of tests
comprising two take-offs at each shot are projected for the time being. “We’re going to start modestly
with chip jumps,” Carine Leveau adds. The last flight, on the other hand, will be much more
energetic, since it is planned to peak at an altitude between 30 and 40 km. Once at this height, the
prototype will make a turn-over loop before returning to its starting point. The data to be collected
with Callisto should, in the first place, benefit from the Themis programme of ArianeGroup. “If we
hadn’t done Callisto, we wouldn’t have been able to do Themis so quickly,” the official said. In terms of
ladders, the CNES demonstrator reaches 13 m and its propulsion is provided by a single cryogenic
engine using Lox hydrogen. Themis, on the other hand, is more than double (30 m) and will be
propelled by three Prometheus engines operating with a methane and liquid oxygen mixture. In
addition to mastering reuse technology, one of the other goals of the Callisto programme is to
forge a first experiment on the refurbishment of the launch vehicle and to optimise costs. “One of
the objectives of Callisto is to understand all the rehabilitation operations and their cost because it is a
fundamental element in optimizing re-use ...”. Callisto must therefore provide the first elements to be
confirmed with the flights to be carried out on Themis. “This will allow us to have a consolidated
equation of what we hope to be able to do in the context of a future reusable European launch vehicle.”
Second, the data collection that will be undertaken with Callisto is also expected to benefit from the
programme of the small reusable launcher Maia, currently in development at Maispace, the
Vernon-based subsidiary of ArianeGroup. The calendars of the two programmes coincide since
Maia must be ready to take off as early as 2026.

« Last Edit: 02/16/2024 06:24 am by Mamut »

 

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