Author Topic: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system  (Read 7327 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« on: 02/22/2010 04:36 pm »
Since the launch of the first Meteosat in 1977, 33 years of imagery combined with increasing computer power have given meteorologists the tools to improve weather forecasting, with direct benefits for us.
In order to have follow-up geostationary missions, ESA and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) plan the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) satellite system.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/MSG/SEMT4I3KV5G_0.html
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #1 on: 03/19/2010 01:51 pm »
The tendering process that will result in the supply of Europe's next series of meteorological satellites, Meteosat Third Generation, has reached an advanced stage as ESA invites Thales Alenia Space to enter formal contract negotiations.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXKUCKP6G_index_0.html
Jacques :-)

Offline Simonpro

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #2 on: 03/20/2010 06:23 am »
Out of interest, are you aware where the MSG-3 and -4 satellites will be placed? I imagine one of them will take over the 0 degree slot, but will both of them be placed there? EUMETSAT seems somewhat disinclined to tell anyone :)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #3 on: 11/18/2010 08:52 pm »
18 November 2010

Marking a significant milestone for Europe's next fleet of meteorological satellites, ESA has given the go-ahead to Thales Alenia Space in France to start work on developing the Meteosat Third Generation.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMBYG56JGG_index_0.html


Jacques :-)

Offline bolun

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #4 on: 02/26/2011 07:14 am »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12583115

Quote
The all clear has been given for Europe to press ahead with the 3.4bn-euro (£2.9bn) project to build a next-generation weather satellite system.

Eumetsat, the international agency charged with looking after Europe's Meteosats, said on Friday that all participating nations had now agreed to the programme and its financing.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #5 on: 09/30/2022 01:34 pm »
The first of Europe’s #Meteosat Third Generation satellites is now safely aboard a ship and making its way across the Atlantic to French Guiana where it will be readied for liftoff in December..

https://twitter.com/esa/status/1575824368890187778

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #6 on: 10/04/2022 03:05 pm »
https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Meteorological_missions/meteosat_third_generation/Introducing_MTG?fbclid=IwAR1sLCNVI1VGN_ptOzbuF3Y-Ybr4bk2tvEKnKReG8Wi63EP8oWwl7ZZ1WLs

Introducing MTG
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ESA / Applications / Observing the Earth / Meteorological missions / meteosat third generation

Weather – and particularly extreme weather – affects everything we do. Being able to view the whole disc of Earth allows forecasters to monitor developing weather systems. So in 1977 when the first Meteosat took its place in geostationary orbit, maintaining its position at 0 degrees longitude as Earth rotated below, this new weather satellite laid the foundations for the European and world cooperation in meteorology that continues today.

Building on the long-standing partnership between ESA and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (Eumetsat), and the success of both the first generation of Meteosat missions and the subsequent Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) series, which are operational today, it will soon be time for Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) to take over the reins.

This third generation of weather satellites will not only guarantee the continuity of data for weather forecasting from geostationary orbit for the next two decades, but also offers significant enhancement of the current imager capabilities, an all-new infrared sounding capability and realtime lightning imaging for early detection  of severe storms as they develop.

The combination of MTG’s increased resolution and sensitivity of the imaging data and state of the art sounding products will take weather forecasting capabilities to the next level, particularly in the challenging task of ‘nowcasting’.

Nowcasting relates to the monitoring and prediction, in quasi real time, of rapidly evolving, and potentially damaging, weather phenomena such as severe thunderstorms. Earlier detection of such phenomena will increase the available reaction time for issuing severe weather warnings and implementing the necessary measures to avoid potentially catastrophic impacts. Improving warnings by a few hours can in the more extreme cases be the difference between safe evacuation of the public and significant loss of life.
Earth from MSG-4
Earth from MSG-4

To do this, the satellite design is based on a significantly different approach compared to the first two generations. Rather than implementing a spinning satellite design adopted for the earlier Meteosats, the MTG satellites accommodate their state of the art instruments on a three-axis stabilised satellite platform, meaning that the orientation of the satellites remains fixed with respect to Earth, with the payloads looking continually at the Earth’s disc. By comparison, the instruments on the previous generation spinning satellites spent less than 5% looking towards the Earth.

For the overall MTG mission two types of satellite are being developed; the Imaging satellite (MTG-I) and the Sounding Satellite (MTG-S). Both use a common three-axis stabilised platform, but with very different payload complements:

    The MTG-I satellite accommodates the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) instrument and Lightning Imager (LI)
    The MTG-S accommodates the Infrared Sounder (IRS) instrument and Copernicus Sentinel-4

To meet more than the 20-year operational life of the mission, the full MTG system comprises six satellites, four MTG-I and two MTG-S. At any point in time during the full mission deployment two MTG-I and one MTG-S satellite will be in orbit. The two MTG-I satellites will operate in tandem – one scanning the full Earth disc (including Europe and Africa) every 10 minutes, while the other will provide a local area coverage, for example covering only Europe, with a faster repeat cycle. The single MTG-S satellite will also provide local-area coverage over selected parts of Earth, with a repeat cycle of typically 15 minutes.

The first MTG-I satellite is scheduled to be launched at the end of 2022, followed by an MTG-S in 2024 and then the next MTG-I in 2025. The next three satellites will be launched around 10 years later to replace the first set, which have a nominal life of 8.5 years but sufficient fuel for more than 10.7 years.

Thales Alenia Space leads the industrial consortium that is building the MTG family, with a major partner being OHB.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #7 on: 10/04/2022 04:28 pm »
The first Meteosat Third Generation imager satellite left @Thales_Alenia_S Cannes site en route⛴️ to its launch pad
@EuropeSpacePort. It will soon be making its long journey to the skies..

https://twitter.com/Thales_Alenia_S/status/1577203802461327361

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #8 on: 12/13/2022 09:54 am »
https://twitter.com/airbusspace/status/1602601574743904258

Quote
We've delivered the first #Sentinel-4 air-monitoring instrument to @ESA!
Its data will improve knowledge about the air above Europe & North Africa from 2024, with the launch of @EUMETSAT #MTG-S1 which will carry this instrument.
🔗 Read more:

https://www.airbus.com/en/newsroom/stories/2022-12-airbus-delivers-first-sentinel-4-air-monitoring-instrument-to-esa

Quote
Airbus delivers first Sentinel-4 air-monitoring instrument to ESA
Its data will improve knowledge about the air that European citizens breathe
 
Airbus Defence and Space has successfully delivered the first Sentinel-4/UVN (Ultraviolet, Visible and Near Infra-Red) multispectral instrument flight model to the European Space Agency (ESA). It will be integrated onto the Meteosat Third Generation Sounder (MTG-S1) satellite next year.

The instrument will continuously monitor key air quality trace gases and aerosols from geostationary orbit with Europe and North Africa in the field of view. Trace gases it will monitor include: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulphur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde, glyoxal, and aerosols which are vital for assessing air quality. The development and manufacture of the Sentinel-4 spectrometer for the Copernicus programme was led by Airbus in Ottobrunn/Munich. Understanding the atmospheric composition will help to reduce the risks of phenomena such as desert dust plumes, long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants including pollen, as well as ash plumes from volcanic eruptions.

Sentinel 4 test preparation

"The information gathered by the Sentinel-4 instrument will help decision makers shape European policies on public health and air-traffic safety to protect European citizens," said Philippe Pham, Head of Earth Observation and Science at Airbus. "The combination of a geostationary satellite and an instrument such as Sentinel-4 means that measurements of trace gases in the Earth's atmosphere can be performed above Europe in record time of about 1 hour.”

The Sentinel-4 instrument is a high resolution spectrometer with a fast revisit time operating in three bands covering the ultraviolet (305-400 nm), the visible (400-500 nm) and the near infrared (750-775 nm) wavelength ranges.

The first model of the instrument will be embarked on the MTG-S1 spacecraft which is scheduled for launch in 2024 and the second yet to be built will fly on board MTG-S2 to be launched in 2034. The purpose is to ensure data availability to the scientific community over a period of two decades.

Both the spacecraft and the instrument will be operated by EUMETSAT, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites. The Sentinel-4 instrument builds on the experience of previous proven ESA instruments like Sciamachy and Tropomi (on-board Sentinel-5P) also built by Airbus.

The Sentinel-4 mission is an initiative of the European Union and the European Space Agency which provides continuous monitoring of the atmosphere above Europe. Together with the American mission TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) and the South Korean mission GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer), Sentinel-4 will provide scientists with crucial knowledge about air quality of large parts of the northern hemisphere.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Meteosat Third Generation satellite system
« Reply #9 on: 08/17/2023 06:15 am »
https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Meteorological_missions/meteosat_third_generation/Putting_the_S_in_the_first_Meteosat_Third_Generation_Sounder?fbclid=IwAR3Z9Y1n07TI654N9a2pSsFAn54xDjxK2cbk4nrAxgRN-Eunv7n3i-qZXpw

Putting the S in the first Meteosat Third Generation Sounder
14/08/2023 1265 views 65 likes
ESA / Applications / Observing the Earth / Meteorological missions / meteosat third generation

Following on from the launch of the first Meteosat Third Generation weather satellite, MTG-I1, last December, the focus is now on getting its partner satellite, MTG-S1, ready for liftoff next year – and a significant milestone has been reached. The satellite has been equipped with its main instrument, the Infrared Sounder, hence the satellite’s name, and also the Copernicus Sentinel-4 instrument, an ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared light spectrometer, or UVN for short.

Working alongside its MTG-I1 partner satellite, which carries an advanced imager (the Flexible Combined Imager), the MTG-S1 satellite will not only be used to further improve atmospheric observations for weather forecasting, but thanks to the Sentinel-4 UVN instrument, it will also deliver information every hour to monitor air quality and pollution over Europe.

Having spent a lot of time preparing for the delicate task of mounting the two huge instruments onto the satellite platform, engineers at OHB in Germany needed to work with extreme precision since the infrared sounder instrument and the Sentinel-4 spectrometer have to sit just 50 mm apart.

The infrared sounder instrument alone measures 1.7 x 1.9 x 2.0 m and weighs over 450 kg, while Sentinel-4 is 1.1 x 1.4 x 1.6 m and weighs around 200 kg.

To safeguard these huge but sensitive instruments and the satellite platform, the engineers first carried out a complete rehearsal of the integration using structural models of the respective instruments.

This allowed the teams to do a dry run, iterate and improve the procedures, which resulted in a very smooth integration with the real instruments.

ESA’s Christoph Goetz, who oversees the assembly, integration and testing for MTG-S, said, “Whilst this is a major step towards the completion of the satellite, the MTG-S1 satellite is not yet fully assembled as we still need to mount the solar array wings and several other smaller units.

“That said, it is the first time we can enjoy the full dimensions of this impressive satellite, standing more than five meters tall and weighing nearly two tonnes.  When the satellite is fuelled for its life in geostationary orbit, it will weigh more than 3.8 tonnes.

“Both the industrial consortium and the ESA MTG and Sentinel-4 teams are very proud of what has been achieved.”

ESA’s MTG Engineering, Assembly, Integration and Testing Manager, James Champion, added, “The integration of these two instruments marks an important milestone as we now move on to focus on the satellite as a whole. We look forward to working with the various teams over the coming year to ready MTG-S1 for launch.”

Over the next 12 months, the full satellite will be put through a complete set of functional and environmental tests to ensure that following liftoff and its journey geostationary orbit, 36 000 km above the equator, MTG-S1 will perform as faultlessly as is the case today for MTG-I1.

“It is very pleasing to see this significant milestone accomplished and I congratulate all teams involved. This is not only important for the MTG and Sentinel-4 teams, but it also marks a significant step towards the completion of the MTG constellation and releasing its revolutionary capabilities to significantly enhance future weather forecasting and, in particular, early predictions of severe weather events,” highlighted Paul Blythe, ESA’s Meteosat Programme Manager.

“Once in orbit, this MTG-S1 satellite will bring a radically new ability to provide three dimensional images of Earth’s atmosphere, with the potential to pick up localised atmospheric instabilities that could indicate the development of major storms much earlier than the current MSG system can provide.”

Giorgio Bagnasco, ESA’s Project Manager for the Sentinel-4 mission, added, “We are thrilled to see the Sentinel-4’s UVN spectrometer now safely fitted to the MTG-S1 satellite.

“In conjunction with the MTG Infrared Sounder, it will provide measurements of pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and formaldehyde, affecting the atmosphere over Europe.

“Remarkably, these measurements will be of unprecedented accuracy, and they will be delivered hourly – serving the needs of the European Union’s Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service.”

The MTG mission is a cooperation between Eumetsat and ESA. ESA is responsible developing and procuring the MTG satellites. The full MTG system is based on a series of two types of satellite: four MTG-Imagers and two MTG-Sounders. Eumetsat defines the system requirements, develops the ground systems, procures the launch services, operates the satellites and makes the data available to users.

The MTG-Sounder satellites carry the Copernicus Sentinel-4 mission's UVN instrument.
« Last Edit: 08/17/2023 06:16 am by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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