Author Topic: LIVE: Ariane 5 ECA launch - Hot-Bird 9 & Eutelsat W2M - December 20, 2008  (Read 82113 times)

Offline neviden

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Some chest beating about winning 11 of the 15 contracts for medium launch vehicles this year and dominating the upcoming years.

"Thanks to the work of each and every member of the Ariane team, Arianespace remained the preferred launch company in 2008," Le Gall said. "This year is finishing very well, with our six Ariane 5 missions launching half of all the commercial satellites orbited worldwide in 2008; and Arianespace winning 12 of the total 16 contracts competed this year."

http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Ariane_5_Achieves_Another_Successful_Mission_999.html

Offline Analyst

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This may be chest beating, but it is true: Arianespace is the market leader, with margin, and will so for at least the next few years. EELVs are not: In 2008 Ariane flew 3 times as much as both EELVs combined. Proton and Zenit are next, but both only carry one satellite per flight (as do EELVs).

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Offline SIM city

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This may be chest beating, but it is true: Arianespace is the market leader, with margin, and will so for at least the next few years. EELVs are not: In 2008 Ariane flew 3 times as much as both EELVs combined. Proton and Zenit are next, but both only carry one satellite per flight (as do EELVs).

Analyst

Except that Proton is launching its 10th mission this week for the year and with that will have carried 14 satellites.  If you're going to count ESA missions for Ariane, you should count federal missions for Proton...
« Last Edit: 12/22/2008 03:16 pm by SIM city »

Offline Analyst

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Fair point. I didn't realize there were nine Proton missions already. Well, right now they are even :) My post wasn't so much about Ariane, Proton or Zenit, but showing the lack of EELV missions.

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Offline Nicolas PILLET

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If you're going to count ESA missions for Ariane, you should count federal missions for Proton...

Situations are quite different. Inthe case of an ESA payload on Ariane, ESA is an Arianespace customer, like the other.

Roskosmos and Ministry of Defense are not ILS customers...
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline PDJennings

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If you're going to count ESA missions for Ariane, you should count federal missions for Proton...

Situations are quite different. Inthe case of an ESA payload on Ariane, ESA is an Arianespace customer, like the other.

Roskosmos and Ministry of Defense are not ILS customers...

So in your opinion, there is a meaningful chance of the "Customer" ESA ever taking its ATV launch business to another supplier?  I think the chance of that is about the same as for the Russian MoD launching a payload on Ariane 5.

At the very least, ESA should be considered as a captive customer for Arianespace.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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So in your opinion, there is a meaningful chance of the "Customer" ESA ever taking its ATV launch business to another supplier?

No, of course ! :-)

I just wanted to remark that Arianespace is making money whatever the payload is.

ILS doesn't make money with a Glonass launch...
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Online edkyle99

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This may be chest beating, but it is true: Arianespace is the market leader, with margin, and will so for at least the next few years. EELVs are not: In 2008 Ariane flew 3 times as much as both EELVs combined. Proton and Zenit are next, but both only carry one satellite per flight (as do EELVs).

Analyst

I'm not sure what you mean by "market leader".  If you are talking about straight-up number of launches, this year's "leader" will probably end up being China's Chang Zheng (Long March).  Ten have flown year to date, with one more planned. 

If you mean commercial comsat launches, then Ariane 5 does appear to be this year's leader.  Ariane 5 has "hit its stride", having flown 22 times in the past four calendar years.

Kourou is currently tied with Plesetsk as the world's second-busiest orbital launch site this year, with six launches well trailing Baikonur's eighteen (remember when Russia was going to abandon the place?).  Sea Launch Odyssey was the fourth-busiest "site", with five launches.     

As for the U.S., the dearth of EELV flights has been noted (only two in 2008 and only 14 during the past four years).  The Republic of the Marshall Islands Kwajalein Atoll hosted more orbital launch attempts than Cape Canaveral in 2008.  The Cape only ranked fourth among U.S. orbital launch sites during the year!

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/22/2008 10:19 pm by edkyle99 »

Offline William Graham

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« Last Edit: 01/28/2009 08:00 pm by GW_Simulations »

Offline McDew

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Re: Eutelsat W2M failure
« Reply #189 on: 01/28/2009 11:05 pm »
Eutelsat W2M has failed

Evidently hitting the Eutelsat W2M spacecraft with a forklift at the Ariane spacecraft processing facility caused more damage after all.

Offline Nick L.

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Bad luck in GEO huh? DSP 23, Astra 5A, and now this. GOES-12 was acting up a few weeks ago too.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline Bubbinski

You know what they say about bad things happening in threes.....

Is there a common thread between these failures?  Has anything changed in the geostationary orbit environment (more radiation?)  Or is this just "bad luck"?
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Offline JulesVerneATV

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I was reading engineering officials blame Antrix Isro Corp for the fault

Offline GWR64

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very old thread!

Hotbird-9 aka Hotbird-13C (probably renamed again soon) has moved to 12.5 deg W.
At 13 deg E, Hotbird-13G has taken over the transmissions.
Surprising is, that Hotbird-13C the north/south correction may have stopped after the move.
The inclination is increasing, currently 0.18 deg.

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