Author Topic: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates  (Read 45791 times)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21401
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 7843
  • Likes Given: 312
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #40 on: 03/07/2012 03:26 pm »
RELEASE: 12-070

NASA'S TWIN GRAIL SPACECRAFT BEGIN COLLECTING LUNAR SCIENCE DATA

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL)
spacecraft orbiting the moon officially have begun their science
collection phase. During the next 84 days, scientists will obtain a
high-resolution map of the lunar gravitational field to learn about
the moon's internal structure and composition in unprecedented
detail. The data also will provide a better understanding of how
Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed and evolved.


"The initiation of science data collection is a time when the team
lets out a collective sigh of relief because we are finally doing
what we came to do," said Maria Zuber, principal investigator for the
GRAIL mission at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in
Cambridge. "But it is also a time where we have to put the coffee pot
on, roll up our sleeves and get to work."

The GRAIL mission's twin, washing-machine-sized spacecraft, named Ebb
and Flow, entered lunar orbit on New Year's Eve and New Years Day.
GRAIL's science phase began yesterday at 8:15 p.m. EST (5:15 p.m.
PST). During this mission phase, the spacecraft will transmit radio
signals precisely defining the distance between them. As they fly
over areas of greater and lesser gravity caused by visible features
such as mountains, craters and masses hidden beneath the lunar
surface, the distance between the two spacecraft will change
slightly. Science activities are expected to conclude on May 29,
after GRAIL maps the gravity field of the moon three times.

"We are in a near-polar, near-circular orbit with an average altitude
of about 34 miles (55 kilometers) right now," said David Lehman,
GRAIL project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in
Pasadena, Calif. "During the science phase, our spacecraft will orbit
the moon as high as 31 miles (51 kilometers) and as low as 10 miles
(16 kilometers). They will get as close to each other as 40 miles (65
kilometers) and as far apart as 140 miles (225 kilometers)."

Previously named GRAIL A and B, the names Ebb and Flow were the result
of a nation-wide student contest to choose new names for the
spacecraft. The winning entry was submitted by fourth graders from
the Emily Dickinson Elementary School in Bozeman, Mont. Nearly 900
classrooms with more than 11,000 students from 45 states, Puerto Rico
and the District of Columbia, participated in the contest.

JPL manages the GRAIL mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate
in Washington. The GRAIL mission is part of the Discovery Program
managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft.

For more information about GRAIL, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/grail


Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2577
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #41 on: 03/23/2012 06:06 pm »
NASA GRAIL Returns First Student-Selected Moon Images

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-083

Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2577
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #42 on: 03/28/2012 03:11 pm »
Flying Formation - Around the Moon at 3,600 MPH

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-089

Offline racshot65

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2577
  • Aaron Kalair
  • Coventry, England
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #43 on: 05/30/2012 12:10 pm »
NASA Lunar Spacecraft Complete Prime Mission Ahead of Schedule

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-146

Offline grythumn

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 243
  • Liked: 166
  • Likes Given: 242
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #44 on: 08/30/2012 08:28 pm »
Grail is due to start its extended mission today, but no news that I can find. Anyone else have better luck?

-R C

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21401
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 7843
  • Likes Given: 312
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #45 on: 08/31/2012 06:23 pm »
News release: 2012-273                                                                     Aug. 31, 2012

NASA's GRAIL Moon Twins Begin Extended Mission Science

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-273&cid=release_2012-273

PASADENA, Calif. – NASA's twin, lunar-orbiting Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft began data collection for the start of the mission’s extended operations.

At 9:28 a.m. PDT (12:28 p.m. EDT) yesterday, while the two spacecraft were 19 miles (30 kilometers) above the moon’s Ocean of Storms, the Lunar Gravity Ranging System -- the mission's sole science instrument aboard both GRAIL twins -- was energized.

"The data collected during GRAIL's primary mission team are currently being analyzed and hold the promise of producing a gravity field map of extraordinary quality and resolution," said Maria Zuber, principal investigator for GRAIL from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. "Mapping at a substantially lower altitude during the extended mission, and getting an even more intimate glimpse of our nearest celestial neighbor, provides the unique opportunity to globally map the shallow crust of a planetary body beyond Earth."

The science phase of GRAIL's extended mission runs from Aug. 30 to Dec. 3. Its goals are to take an even closer look at the moon's gravity field, deriving the gravitational influence of surface and subsurface features as small as simple craters, mountains and rilles. To achieve this unprecedented resolution, GRAIL mission planners are halving the operating altitude – flying at the lowest altitude that can be safely maintained.

During the prime mission, which stretched from March 1 to May 29, the two GRAIL spacecraft, named Ebb and Flow, orbited at an average altitude of 34 miles (55 kilometers). The average orbital altitude during extended mission will be 14 miles (23 kilometers), which places the GRAIL twins within five miles (eight kilometers) of some of the moon's higher surface features.

"Ebb and Flow, and our mission operations team, are both doing great, which is certainly notable considering all the milestones and challenges they have experienced," said David Lehman, GRAIL project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "The twins have endured the lunar eclipse of June 4, 2012, and 26 rocket burns since arriving in lunar orbit at the beginning of the year. Down here in our control room, with all the planning and mission operations we have been doing, it feels as though we've been riding right along with them. Of course, they have the better view."

Science data are collected when the Lunar Gravity Ranging System transmit radio signals between the two spacecraft, precisely defining the rate of change of distance between Ebb and Flow. The distance between the twins change slightly as they fly over areas of greater and lesser gravity caused by visible features, such as mountains and craters, and by masses hidden beneath the lunar surface.

Mission scientists calculated that even as the last data were downlinked, four of the mission's six principal science measurement goals had already been achieved. The objective of the GRAIL mission is to generate the most accurate gravity map of the moon and from that derive the internal structure and evolution of Earth's natural satellite.

JPL manages the GRAIL mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The GRAIL mission is part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft.

For more information about GRAIL, visit: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/grail/

Offline Silmfeanor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1248
  • Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 392
  • Likes Given: 698
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #46 on: 08/31/2012 08:38 pm »

During the prime mission, which stretched from March 1 to May 29, the two GRAIL spacecraft, named Ebb and Flow, orbited at an average altitude of 34 miles (55 kilometers). The average orbital altitude during extended mission will be 14 miles (23 kilometers), which places the GRAIL twins within five miles (eight kilometers) of some of the moon's higher surface features.


clipping mountains!
I wonder how much delta-V is used per orbit to keep control at such a low altitude with all the changing gravity fields.

Offline spectre9

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2403
  • Australia
  • Liked: 42
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #47 on: 10/21/2012 07:54 am »
Quote
"The data collected during GRAIL's primary mission team are currently being analyzed and hold the promise of producing a gravity field map of extraordinary quality and resolution," said Maria Zuber, principal investigator for GRAIL from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

This has me excited.

With much focus on EML1/2 it's going to be good to have new data on exactly how the gravity of the moon behaves.

There's much unknown about LLO. Just "It's unstable" seems to generalised to me and I'm keen to learn more.

Offline Proponent

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7101
  • Liked: 2627
  • Likes Given: 1357
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #48 on: 10/21/2012 02:44 pm »
The further you get from the moon, the better is the approximation that the moon is a spherically-symmetric mass.  Lunar L1 and L2 being about 60,000 km from the moon, I don't think the new information about details of the lunar gravitational field will have much impact on use of the Lagrange points.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21401
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 7843
  • Likes Given: 312
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #49 on: 12/05/2012 05:09 pm »
RELEASE: 12-417

NASA TWIN SPACECRAFT CREATE MOST ACCURATE GRAVITY MAP OF MOON

WASHINGTON -- Twin NASA probes orbiting the moon have generated the
highest resolution gravity field map of any celestial body.

The new map, created by the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory
(GRAIL) mission, is allowing scientists to learn about the moon's
internal structure and composition in unprecedented detail. Data from
the two washing machine-sized spacecraft also will provide a better
understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar
system formed and evolved.

The gravity field map reveals an abundance of features never before
seen in detail, such as tectonic structures, volcanic landforms,
basin rings, crater central peaks, and numerous simple, bowl-shaped
craters. Data also show the moon's gravity field is unlike that of
any terrestrial planet in our solar system.

These are the first scientific results from the prime phase of the
mission, and they are published in three papers in the journal
Science.

"What this map tells us is that more than any other celestial body we
know of, the moon wears its gravity field on its sleeve," said GRAIL
principal investigator Maria Zuber of the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology in Cambridge. "When we see a notable change in the gravity
field, we can sync up this change with surface topography features
such as craters, rilles or mountains."

According to Zuber, the moon's gravity field preserves the record of
impact bombardment that characterized all terrestrial planetary
bodies and reveals evidence for fracturing of the interior extending
to the deep crust and possibly the mantle. This impact record is
preserved, and now precisely measured, on the moon.

The probes revealed the bulk density of the moon's highland crust is
substantially lower than generally assumed. This low bulk crustal
density agrees well with data obtained during the final Apollo lunar
missions in early 1970s, indicating that local samples returned by
astronauts are indicative of global processes.

"With our new crustal bulk density determination, we find that the
average thickness of the moon's crust is between 21 and 27 miles (34
and 43 kilometers), which is about 6 to 12 miles (10 to 20
kilometers) thinner than previously thought." said GRAIL
co-investigator Mark Wieczorek of the Institut de Physique du Globe
de Paris. "With this crustal thickness, the bulk composition of the
moon is similar to that of Earth. This supports models where the moon
is derived from Earth materials that were ejected during a giant
impact event early in solar system history."

The map was created by the spacecraft transmitting radio signals to
define precisely the distance between them as they orbit the moon in
formation. As they fly over areas of greater and lesser gravity
caused by both visible features, such as mountains and craters, and
masses hidden beneath the lunar surface, the distance between the two
spacecraft will change slightly.

"We used gradients of the gravity field in order to highlight smaller
and narrower structures than could be seen in previous datasets,"
said Jeff Andrews-Hanna, a GRAIL guest scientist with the Colorado
School of Mines in Golden. "This data revealed a population of long,
linear, gravity anomalies, with lengths of hundreds of kilometers,
crisscrossing the surface. These linear gravity anomalies indicate
the presence of dikes, or long, thin, vertical bodies of solidified
magma in the subsurface. The dikes are among the oldest features on
the moon, and understanding them will tell us about its early
history."

While results from the primary science mission are just beginning to
be released, the collection of gravity science by the lunar twins
continues. GRAIL's extended mission science phase began Aug. 30 and
will conclude Dec. 17. As the end of mission nears, the spacecraft
will operate at lower orbital altitudes above the moon.

When launched in September 2011, the probes were named GRAIL A and B.
They were renamed Ebb and Flow in January by elementary students in
Bozeman, Mont., in a nationwide contest. Ebb and Flow were placed in
a near-polar, near-circular orbit at an altitude of approximately 34
miles (55 kilometers) on Dec. 31, 2011, and Jan. 1, 2012.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., manages the
mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. GRAIL
is part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space
Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems of
Denver built the spacecraft.

To view the lunar gravity map, visit:

http://bit.ly/grailtour

For more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/grail


Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6851
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 3475
  • Likes Given: 2743
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #50 on: 12/11/2012 01:32 am »
Grail project coming to it's planned end:

MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-238
 
 
NASA to Host Dec.13 Teleconference on Twin Probes Mission Ending Moon Impact

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-391&cid=release_2012-391 
 
PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10:30 a.m. PST (1:30 p.m. EST) Thursday, Dec. 13, to provide an overview of events leading up to twin spacecraft being commanded to impact the moon's surface on Dec. 17 at approximately 2:28 p.m.

NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, whose two washing machine-sized probes were named Ebb and Flow by elementary school students in Bozeman, Montana, via a nationwide contest, have successfully completed their prime missions and have only days to go on their extended mission science collection. As planned, the duo is running low on fuel. They have been orbiting the moon since New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, respectively, giving scientists unprecedented detail about the moon's internal structure and composition.

For teleconference dial-in information, reporters must send their name, media affiliation and telephone number to Elena Mejia at [email protected] or call NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Media Relations Office at 818-354-5011.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio


and


www.ustream.tv/nasajpl


For more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/grail 

 
- end -
« Last Edit: 12/11/2012 01:34 am by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21401
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 7843
  • Likes Given: 312
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #51 on: 12/13/2012 07:53 pm »
RELEASE: 12-434

TWIN NASA PROBES PREPARE FOR DEC. 17 MISSION-ENDING MOON IMPACT

PASADENA, Calif. -- Twin lunar-orbiting NASA spacecraft that have
allowed scientists to learn more about the internal structure and
composition of the moon are being prepared for their controlled
descent and impact on a mountain near the moon's north pole at about
2:28 p.m. PST (5:28 p.m. EST) Monday, Dec. 17.

Ebb and Flow, the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL)
mission probes, are being sent purposely into the lunar surface
because their low orbit and low fuel levels preclude further
scientific operations. The duo's successful prime and extended
science missions generated the highest resolution gravity field map
of any celestial body. The map will provide a better understanding of
how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed and
evolved.

"It is going to be difficult to say goodbye," said GRAIL principal
investigator Maria Zuber of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
in Cambridge. "Our little robotic twins have been exemplary members
of the GRAIL family, and planetary science has advanced in a major
way because of their contributions."

The mountain where the two spacecraft will make contact is located
near a crater named Goldschmidt. Both spacecraft have been flying in
formation around the moon since Jan. 1, 2012. They were named by
elementary school students in Bozeman, Mont., who won a contest. The
first probe to reach the moon, Ebb, also will be the first to go
down, at 2:28:40 p.m. Flow will follow Ebb about 20 seconds later.

Both spacecraft will hit the surface at 3,760 mph (1.7 kilometers per
second). No imagery of the impact is expected because the region will
be in shadow at the time.

Ebb and Flow will conduct one final experiment before their mission
ends. They will fire their main engines until their propellant tanks
are empty to determine precisely the amount of fuel remaining in
their tanks. This will help NASA engineers validate fuel consumption
computer models to improve predictions of fuel needs for future
missions.

"Our lunar twins may be in the twilight of their operational lives,
but one thing is for sure, they are going down swinging," said GRAIL
project manager David Lehman of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in
Pasadena, Calif. "Even during the last half of their last orbit, we
are going to do an engineering experiment that could help future
missions operate more efficiently."

Because the exact amount of fuel remaining aboard each spacecraft is
unknown, mission navigators and engineers designed the depletion burn
to allow the probes to descend gradually for several hours and skim
the surface of the moon until the elevated terrain of the target
mountain gets in their way.

The burn that will change the spacecrafts' orbit and ensure the impact
is scheduled to take place Friday morning.

"Such a unique end-of-mission scenario requires extensive and detailed
mission planning and navigation," said Lehman. "We've had our share
of challenges during this mission and always come through in flying
colors, but nobody I know around here has ever flown into a moon
mountain before. It'll be a first for us, that's for sure."

During their prime mission, from March through May, Ebb and Flow
collected data while orbiting at an average altitude of 34 miles (55
kilometers). Their altitude was lowered to 14 miles (23 kilometers)
for their extended mission, which began Aug. 30 and sometimes placed
them within a few miles of the moon's tallest surface features.

JPL manages the GRAIL mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate
in Washington. The mission is part of the Discovery Program managed
at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed
Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft.

For more information about GRAIL, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/grail

Offline clongton

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11614
  • Connecticut
    • Direct Launcher
  • Liked: 6133
  • Likes Given: 3008
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #52 on: 12/13/2012 11:11 pm »
I wonder what another extended mission might have uncovered, or was the retrieved data about all that could be uniquely identified? Alas - no propellant remains. Adu Ebb and Flow.
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline Robert Thompson

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1177
  • Liked: 101
  • Likes Given: 658
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #53 on: 12/14/2012 04:57 am »
http://target.lroc.asu.edu/da/qmap.html
Sweet toy. The image said 26.63 E but it's west. I'd wish it was impacting further north so we get a northern version of LCROSS.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21401
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 7843
  • Likes Given: 312
Re: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #54 on: 12/14/2012 07:25 pm »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-240

NASA TO PROVIDE DEC. 17 COMMENTARY AS TWIN PROBES END LUNAR MISSION



PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will provide live commentary of the scheduled
lunar surface impacts of its twin Gravity Recovery and Interior
Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft beginning at 2 p.m. PST (5 p.m. EST)
Monday, Dec. 17. The event will be broadcast on NASA Television and
streamed on the agency's website.

The two probes will hit a mountain near the lunar north pole at
approximately 2:28 p.m. Monday, bringing their successful prime and
extended science missions to an end.

Commentary will originate from the control room at NASA's Jet
Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. Coverage will last
about 35 minutes and include live interviews with GRAIL team members.
GRAIL's final resting place on the moon will be in shadow at the time
of impact, so no video documentation of the impacts is expected.

Data from the GRAIL twins are allowing scientists to learn about the
moon's internal structure and composition in unprecedented detail.
The two probes are being sent purposely into the moon because they do
not have enough altitude or fuel to continue science operations.
Media wishing to cover the end of the GRAIL mission at JPL, where they
will have the opportunity to conduct interviews and watch a live feed
from mission control, must contact the JPL Media Relations Office at
818-354-5011 by 11 a.m. Dec. 17. Valid media credentials are
required. Non-U.S. citizens also must present valid passports.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

The coverage will also be streamed live on Ustream at:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

Join the conversation on Twitter by following the hashtag #GRAIL. To
learn more about all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/connect

For the mission's press kit and other information about GRAIL, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/grail


Offline Chris Bergin

Re: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #55 on: 12/17/2012 07:00 pm »
I think we'll convert this into a live thread for the EOM. I'll convert it back later.
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline robertross

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17934
  • Westphal, Nova Scotia
  • Liked: 648
  • Likes Given: 7354
Re: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #56 on: 12/17/2012 08:36 pm »
I think we'll convert this into a live thread for the EOM. I'll convert it back later.

Thanks, I almost forgot!

Time to rush home  :)

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #57 on: 12/17/2012 08:37 pm »
Lockheed Martin ‏@LockheedMartin
Final engine burns on @NASA’s #GRAIL moon orbiters start soon.
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline Prober

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10348
  • Save the spin....I'm keeping you honest!
  • Nevada
  • Liked: 721
  • Likes Given: 729
Re: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #58 on: 12/17/2012 08:50 pm »
kinda a sad ending ......
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Robert Thompson

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1177
  • Liked: 101
  • Likes Given: 658
Re: LIVE: NASA - GRAIL Updates
« Reply #59 on: 12/17/2012 08:54 pm »
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/12110923-grail-results.html
Isostasy, gravity, and the Moon: an explainer of the first results of the GRAIL mission, Lakdawalla, 12/11/12

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0